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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

AIR QUALITY: MERCURY, TRACE ELEMENTS, AND PARTICULATE MATTER CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the planning/preparation, facilitation, and outcome of the conference entitled ''Air Quality: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate Matter'' that was held December 1-4, 1998, in McLean, Virginia (on the outskirts of Washington, DC). The goal of the conference was to bring together industry, government, and the research community to discuss the critical issue of how air quality can impact human health and the ecosystem, specifically hazardous air pollutants and fine airborne particles; available and developing control technologies; strategies and research needs; and an update on federal and state policy and regulations, related implementation issues, and the framework of the future.

John H. Pavlish; Steven A. Benson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Atmospheric Deposition of Mercury, Trace Elements, and Major Ions Around a Coal-fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a multiyear study to measure mercury (Hg), trace elements, and major ions in precipitation around Plant Crist, a four-unit coal-fired power plant in Pensacola, Florida. The main purpose of the study was to see if Hg emissions from Plant Crist could be detected and quantified in local wet deposition. Specifically, the study evaluated whether the significant reduction in Hg emissions that accompanied the installation of a wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber ...

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

5

Mercury and Other Trace Metals in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the trace metal analyses of more than 150 as-received bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coal samples from full-scale power plants. Analyses for mercury, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead offer a benchmark for utilities to compare and contrast their own estimates and measurements of trace element content in coal.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface, and Photo-induced reaction pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Air Quality III: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate34, 2711. 7. Sloss, L.L. Mercury Emissions and Control.1996 , Jan. , 60 pp. 2. Mercury Study Report to Congress;

Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Trace element speciation under coal fired power station conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion from power stations is one of the largest contributors of potentially toxic trace elements to the environment. Some trace elements may be released in range of valencies, often with varying toxicity and bioavailability. Hence, determination ... Keywords: arsenic, chromium, coal combustion, mercury, selenium, speciation, trace elements

Pushan Shah; Vladimir Strezov; Peter F. Nelson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Multimedia Trace Elements Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current and future trace element regulations on flue gas emissions, water discharges, and solid waste disposal will result in increasingly stringent limits and substantially increased costs for energy companies. As a result, there is a critical need to address environmental pollutant releases in a holistic, multimedia manner so that a pollutant removed by a control technology in one medium (for example, flue gas) is properly managed in regard to discharges in the other media (water and solid waste). This...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous sampling has shown that air pollution control devices can have a significant impact on mercury and other trace elements. For example, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can substantially increase the percentage of oxidized mercury that can then be removed by a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) also readily captures most of the trace elements of interest. The emission of these trace elements is then directly related to the overall particulate collect...

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Laboratory Evaluation of Novel Trace Element Removal Technologies for Wet FGD Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems can remove a wide range of trace elements, such as mercury, selenium, arsenic, and others from the flue gas. Some trace elements leave the FGD system with solid byproduct streams, but a portion generally leaves as dissolved species in the FGD chloride purge stream. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) effluent limitation guidelines and state or local regulations generally limit the quantities of these trace species in wastewater discharges from ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

13

Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

15

Biological trace element measurements using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing x-ray fluorescence trace element determinations at concentrations substantially below the ppM level for biological materials is demonstrated. Conditions for achieving optimum sensitivity were ascertained. Results achieved for five standard reference materials were, in most cases, in excellent agreement with listed values. Minimum detectable limits of 20 ppM were measured for most elements.

Giauque, R.D.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Thompson, A.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury 23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the reasonable alternatives for managing and storing elemental mercury at seven candidate locations (i.e., Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and the Mesa County Board of Commissioners (Mesa County, Colorado) are cooperating agencies in the preparation of this EIS. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 5, 2012 EIS-0423-S1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

17

ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS  

SciTech Connect

Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and hydrogen selenide sorbents. The noncarbon sorbent was able to reduce the concentration to 0 ppb from a starting concentration of 120 ppb. This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (~17?g/m3). The EERC-prepared metal-based pellet and coprecipitate sorbents exhibited arsine reductions of 90% or greater, being below 10 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited brief periods (<1 hour) of attaining 90% arsine reduction but were able to achieve greater than 80% reduction for several hours. With respect to hydrogen selenide, all Group IB and IIB metal-based sorbents tested exhibited 100% reduction from an inlet concentration of approximately 400 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited an 82% reduction when two monoliths were tested simultaneously in series.

Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

Frey, Frederick August

19

Theoretical investigation of selected trace elements in coal gasification plants. Final report Mar 78-Nov 79  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of a theoretical investigation of the disposition of five volatile trace elements (arsenic, boron, lead, selenium, and mercury) in SNG-producing coal gasification plants. Three coal gasification processes (dry-bottom Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, and HYGAS) were investigated to examine the possible effects of gasifier operation conditions on the speciation of the volatile trace elements. Results of this investigation suggest that none of the trace elements considered in this study will be present in the product SNG from a coal gasification plant, but will be removed from the fuel gas by various unit operations. Results also suggest that speciation of these volatile trace elements is not significantly affected by gasifier conditions.

Hill, A.H.; Anderson, G.L.; Fleming, D.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface, and Photo-induced reaction pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Elemental Mercury by Chlorine: Gas Phase, Surface, andthe oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics wasoxidation of Hg 0 by chlorine (Cl 2 ). The three concurrent

Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sulfur polymer cement stabilization of elemental mercury mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, is a problem throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report describes the development and testing of a process to immobilize elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, in a form that is non-dispersible, will meet EPA leaching criteria, and has low mercury vapor pressure. In this stabilization and solidification process (patent pending) elemental mercury is mixed with an excess of powdered sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and additives in a vessel and heated to {approximately}35 C, for several hours, until all of the mercury is converted into mercuric sulfide (HgS). Additional SPC is then added and the mixture raised to 135 C, resulting in a homogeneous molten liquid which is poured into a suitable mold where is cools and solidifies. The final stabilized and solidified waste forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, as well as tested for leaching behavior and mercury vapor pressure. During this study the authors have processed the entire inventory of mixed mercury waste stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

Melamed, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Patel, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized ...  

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized with Coal Fly Ash Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Professor, Geo Engineering Program Dept. of ...

23

Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal 2009 Keywords: Corbicula fluminea Coal-fired power plant Selenium Mercury Glutathione Condition index Bioaccumulation a b s t r a c t Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have

Hopkins, William A.

24

Effect of Trace Elements on Anaerobic Digestion of Coking Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pretreatment of coking wastewater using ASBR was conducted at 35? in this paper. The addition of trace elements to the anaerobic reactor has positive effect on the anaerobic treatment of coking wastewater, but too much or too little of it will ... Keywords: trace elements, anaerobic digestion, coking wastewater

Yu-ying Li; Bing Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Downers Grove, IL); Huang, Hann-Sheng (Darien, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the reasonable alternatives for managing and storing elemental mercury at seven candidate locations (i.e., Colorado, Idaho, Missouri, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, and the Mesa County Board of Commissioners (Mesa County, Colorado) are cooperating agencies in the preparation of this EIS.

29

Factors influencing trace element composition in human teeth  

SciTech Connect

The authors recently compiled and reviewed the literature published in or after 1978 for 45 major, minor, and trace elements in human teeth as a part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various factors that influence the concentration levels of certain trace elements in human teeth. The sampling practices and analytical techniques that are applicable for trace element analysis are also discussed. It is also our intention to identify reference range of values, where data permit such conclusions. The scrutiny was designed to identify only the healthy permanent teeth, and values from teeth with fillings, caries, or periodontal diseases were eliminated.

Tandon, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Iyengar, G.V. [Biomineral Sciences International, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NETL: News Release - DOE Licenses Mercury Control Patent to Help...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2007 DOE Licenses Mercury Control Patent to Help Meet Clean Air Regulations Research Aims at Trace Element Reduction from Power Generation Facilities by 2010 Washington, DC - A...

31

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Title Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Brostoff, Lynn B., Jhanis J. Gonzalez, Paul Jett, and Richard E. Russo Journal Journal of Archeological Science Volume 36 Start Page 461 Issue 2 Pagination 461-466 Date Published 02/2009 Keywords Ancient gold, femtosecond, la-icp-ms, Trace element Abstract In this collaborative investigation, femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the study of a remarkable group of ancient Chinese gold objects in the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Taking advantage of the superior ablation characteristics and high precision of a femtosecond 266 nm Ti:sapphire laser at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, major, minor and trace element concentrations in the gold fragments were quantified. Results validate use of femtosecond LA-ICP-MS for revealing ''fingerprints'' in minute gold samples. These fingerprints allow us to establish patterns based on the association of silver, palladium and platinum that support historical, technical and stylistic relationships, and shed new light on these ancient objects.

32

NETL: IEP - Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization The goal of the proposed effort is to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements on the management of CCBs. Supporting objectives are to 1) determine the release potential of selected air toxic elements, including mercury and arsenic, from CCBs under specific environmental conditions; 2) increase the database of information on mercury and other air toxic element releases for CCBs; 3) develop comparative laboratory and field data; and 4) develop appropriate laboratory and field protocols. The specific mechanisms of air toxic element releases to be evaluated will be leaching releases, vapor releases to the atmosphere, and biologically induced leaching and vapor releases.

33

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1976--1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements (As, B, F, Mo, Se) by shale oil production and use. Some of the particularly significant results are: The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. This implies that the number of analytical determinations required of processed shales is not large. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, And Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements ae not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Upon oxidation a drastic lowering in pH is observed. Preliminary data indicates that this oxidation is catalyzed by bacteria. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. These amounts depend upon the process and various site specific characteristics. In general, the amounts taken up decrease with increasing soil cover. On the other hand, we have not observed significant uptake of As, Se, and F into plants. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. In particular, most of the Cd, Se, and Cr in shale oil is associated with the organic fraction containing most of the nitrogen-containing compounds.

Chappell, W.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Summary Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Statement Final LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY DOE/EIS-0423-S1 September 2013 SUMMARY AND GUIDE FOR STAKEHOLDERS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT For additional information on this Mercury Storage SEIS, contact: David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-11) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Printed with soy ink on recycled paper FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND

38

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­3109. (28) Niksa, S.; Fujiwara, N. Predicting extents of mercury oxidation in coal-derived flue gases. J, 1365­1371. (6) Presto, A. A.; Granite, E. J. Survey of catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas mercury (Hg0) from simulated coal-combustion flue gas. Experiments were carried out in fixed-bed reactors

Laughlin, Robert B.

39

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mercury (Hg) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg). ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Strong Lines of Mercury ( Hg )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mercury (Hg) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Strong Lines of Mercury ( Hg ). ...

42

DOE Mercury Control Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Research Mercury Control Research Air Quality III: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate Matter September 9-12, 2002 Rita A. Bajura, Director National Energy Technology Laboratory www.netl.doe.gov 169330 RAB 09/09/02 2 Potential Mercury Regulations MACT Standards * Likely high levels of Hg reduction * Compliance: 2007 Clean Power Act of 2001 * 4-contaminant control * 90% Hg reduction by 2007 Clear Skies Act of 2002 * 3-contaminant control * 46% Hg reduction by 2010 * 70% Hg reduction by 2018 * Hg emission trading President Bush Announcing Clear Skies Initiative February 14, 2002 169330 RAB 09/09/02 3 Uncertainties Mercury Control Technologies * Balance-of-plant impacts * By-product use and disposal * Capture effectiveness with low-rank coals * Confidence of performance 169330 RAB 09/09/02 4

43

Trace Element Remediation by Free-Living and Plant-Associated Microbes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants can accumulate, detoxify, and transform trace elements present in contaminated soil and water, leading to the phytoremediation of contaminated sites. This study considers the role of plant-associated microbes in the phytoremediation of trace elements, particularly selenium (Se), in the root zone (rhizosphere) as well as the isolation and characterization of free-living microbes for Se bioremediation.

2003-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

Hopkins, William A.

45

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

46

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

47

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Comparative assessment of the trace-element composition of coals, crude oils, and oil shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of the amounts of 42 trace elements in coals, crude oils, and oil and black shales was performed. The degree of concentration of trace elements by caustobioliths and their ashes relative to their abundance in argillaceous rocks and the Earth's crust was calculated. Typomorphic trace elements were distinguished, of which many turned out to be common for the different kinds of caustobioliths in question. The trace elements were classified according to their concentration factors in different caustobioliths. The ash of crude oils is enriched in trace elements (Cs, V, Mo, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Hg, Se, Cr, Co, Ni, U) to the greatest extent (concentration factor above 3.5) and that of oil shales is enriched to the least extent (Re, Cs, Hg, Se). The ratios between typomorphic trace elements in general strongly differ from those in the Earth's crust and argillaceous rocks and are not identical in different caustobioliths. Quantitative parameters that make it possible to calculate a change in these ratios on passing from one caustobiolith type to another were proposed and the relative trace-element affinity of different caustobioliths was estimated.

M.Y. Shpirt; S.A. Punanova [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULATIONS Although incinerator flue gas emission limits for acid gases have been imposed by the federal, such as sodium chlorite (NaCI02), is added to oxidize flue gas NO to N02, which can be removed by a sodium of saturated flue gas to approximately 60°C ( 140°F), the total (par ticulate and gaseous) mercury emissions

Zevenhoven, Ron

50

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical interaction of thermal fluids with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah, has resulted in the development of characteristic trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional perspective of chemical redistribution within this structurally-controlled hot-water geothermal system. Five distinctive elemental suites of chemical enrichment are

51

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to determine which of the faults in these regions were active and open to hydrothermal fluid circulation, we have employed selective ion geochemistry that is a new geochemical method capable of detecting anomalous concentrations for up to 47 elements transported to soils by geochemical cells or low pressure vapors. Enzyme leach and Terrasol leach are two such techniques. This method has to datae been mostly applied to

52

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas, Environ.mercury oxidation when the chlorine concentration in flue gas

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

55

Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

Zhang Lei, E-mail: wxzyfx@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Jahng, Deokjin, E-mail: djahng@mju.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, San 38-2, Namdong, Cheoin-Gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

57

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

58

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

59

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

60

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shi, J.B. ; Feng, X.B. Mercury Pollution in China. Environ.J T. DOE/NETLs Phase II Mercury Control Technology Fieldoxidants for the oxidation of mercury gas. Ind. vEng. Chem.

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa

63

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Evaluation of BOC'S Lotox Process for the Oxidation of Elemental Mercury in Flue Gas from a Coal-Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Linde's Low Temperature Oxidation (LoTOx{trademark}) process has been demonstrated successfully to remove more than 90% of the NOx emitted from coal-fired boilers. Preliminary findings have shown that the LoTOx{trademark} process can be as effective for mercury emissions control as well. In the LoTOx{trademark} system, ozone is injected into a reaction duct, where NO and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas are selectively oxidized at relatively low temperatures and converted to higher nitrogen oxides, which are highly water soluble. Elemental mercury in the flue gas also reacts with ozone to form oxidized mercury, which unlike elemental mercury is water-soluble. Nitrogen oxides and oxidized mercury in the reaction duct and residual ozone, if any, are effectively removed in a wet scrubber. Thus, LoTOx{trademark} appears to be a viable technology for multi-pollutant emission control. To prove the feasibility of mercury oxidation with ozone in support of marketing LoTOx{trademark} for multi-pollutant emission control, Linde has performed a series of bench-scale tests with simulated flue gas streams. However, in order to enable Linde to evaluate the performance of the process with a flue gas stream that is more representative of a coal-fired boiler; one of Linde's bench-scale LoTOx{trademark} units was installed at WRI's combustion test facility (CTF), where a slipstream of flue gas from the CTF was treated. The degree of mercury and NOx oxidation taking place in the LoTOx{trademark} unit was quantified as a function of ozone injection rates, reactor temperatures, residence time, and ranks of coals. The overall conclusions from these tests are: (1) over 80% reduction in elemental mercury and over 90% reduction of NOx can be achieved with an O{sub 3}/NO{sub X} molar ratio of less than two, (2) in most of the cases, a lower reactor temperature is preferred over a higher temperature due to ozone dissociation, however, the combination of both low residence time and high temperature proved to be effective in the oxidation of both NOx and elemental mercury, and (3) higher residence time, lower temperature, and higher molar ratio of O{sub 3}/NOx contributed to the highest elemental mercury and NOx reductions.

Khalid Omar

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Christensen, Et Al., Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three of the recognized trace-element suites are characteristic of the surface and near-surface environment. These are: (1) concentrations of As, Sb, Be and Hg associated with siliceous material at the location of liquid discharge, fluid mixing, or at boiling interfaces; (2) deposits of Mn and Fe oxides containing concentrations of Ba, W, Be, Co, Cu, As, Sb and Hg formed by the oxidation of cooled brines; and (3) high concentrations of Hg

66

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

67

Estimation Methodology for Total and Elemental Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a tool for estimating total and speciated mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The mercury emissions methodology is based on EPRI's analyses of the results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mercury Information Collection Request (ICR). The Mercury ICR required owner/operators of coal-fired electric utility steam generating units to report for calendar year 1999 the quantity of fuel consumed and the mercury content of that fuel. In addition, 84 power plant...

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on the Wet Deposition of Mercury in Southern Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sourcereceptor relationships for mercury (Hg) and other trace elements wet deposited in southeastern Florida were investigated using daily event precipitation samples collected over a 1-yr period in 199596. Data collected in Davie, Florida, ...

J. Timothy Dvonch; Gerald J. Keeler; Frank J. Marsik

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It will analyze the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

70

Distribution and speciation of trace elements in iron and manganese oxide cave deposits  

SciTech Connect

Fe and Mn oxide minerals control the distribution and speciation of heavy metals and trace elements in soils and aquatic systems through chemical mechanisms involving adsorption, incorporation, and electron transfer. The Pautler Cave System in Southwest Illinois, an analog to other temperate carbonate-hosted karst systems, contains Fe and Mn oxide minerals that form in multiple depositional environments and have high concentrations of associated trace elements. Synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) shows unique spatial distributions of Fe, Mn, and trace elements in mineral samples. Profile maps of Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings show Fe- and As-rich laminations, indicating dynamic redox conditions in the cave stream. {mu}-SXRF maps demonstrate that Ni, Cu, and Zn correlate primarily with Mn whereas As correlates with both Mn and Fe; As is more enriched in the Fe phase. Zn is concentrated in the periphery of Mn oxide stream pebble coatings, and may be an indication of recent anthropogenic surface activity. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements reveal that As(V) occurs as surface complexes on Mn and Fe oxides whereas Zn(II) associated with Mn oxides is adsorbed to the basal planes of phyllomanganates in a tetrahedral coordination. Co(III) and Se(IV) are also observed to be associated with Mn oxides. The observation of Fe, Mn, and trace element banding in Mn oxide cave stream pebble coatings suggests that these materials are sensitive to and document aqueous redox conditions, similar to ferromanganese nodules in soils and in marine and freshwater sediments. Furthermore, speciation and distribution measurements indicate that these minerals scavenge trace elements and limit the transport of micronutrients and contaminants in karst aquifer systems while also potentially recording changes in anthropogenic surface activity and land-use.

Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Trace metal transformation in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to 1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, 2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and 3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Allen, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Holcombe, N.T. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Trace metal transformations in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An in situ approach to study trace element partitioning in the laser heated diamond anvil cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on partitioning behavior of elements between different phases at in situ conditions are crucial for the understanding of element mobility especially for geochemical studies. Here, we present results of in situ partitioning of trace elements (Zr, Pd, and Ru) between silicate and iron melts, up to 50 GPa and 4200 K, using a modified laser heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). This new experimental set up allows simultaneous collection of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) data as a function of time using the high pressure beamline ID27 (ESRF, France). The technique enables the simultaneous detection of sample melting based to the appearance of diffuse scattering in the XRD pattern, characteristic of the structure factor of liquids, and measurements of elemental partitioning of the sample using XRF, before, during and after laser heating in the DAC. We were able to detect elements concentrations as low as a few ppm level (2-5 ppm) on standard solutions. In situ measurements are complimented by mapping of the chemical partitions of the trace elements after laser heating on the quenched samples to constrain the partitioning data. Our first results indicate a strong partitioning of Pd and Ru into the metallic phase, while Zr remains clearly incompatible with iron. This novel approach extends the pressure and temperature range of partitioning experiments derived from quenched samples from the large volume presses and could bring new insight to the early history of Earth.

Petitgirard, S.; Mezouar, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Borchert, M.; Appel, K.; Liermann, H.-P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Andrault, D. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire des Magmas and Volcans, 5 rue Kessler 63038, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klusman & Landress, Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This study involved the field collection and laboratory analysis of Al-horizon soil samples in the vicinity of a known geothermal source at Long Valley, California. The samples were analyzed for several constituents known to have influence on Hg retention by soils, including pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, as well as Hg. The data compiled for these secondary parameters and the field-determined parameters of geology, soil

75

Isotopic and trace element characteristics of rhyolites from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of work supported by DOE grant No. DE-FGO5-87ER13795 that was completed or is still in progress. The stated purpose of this grant was to collect geochemical information (trace element, radiogenic isotope and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope) on samples from core holes VC-I and VC-2a in the Valles caldera in order to establish a consistent detailed intracaldera stratigraphy and relate this to extracaldera volcanic rock units of the Jemez Mountains. Careful stratigraphic control of the intracaldera units is necessary to evaluate models of caldera formation, ignimbrite deposition, and resurgence. Combined stable and radiogenic isotope and trace element data will also provide major insights to petrogenesis of the Bandelier magma system. The composition of non-hydrothermally altered samples from outflow units of the Bandelier Tuff and related volcanics must be known to assess isotopic variations of intracaldera ignimbrite samples. On detailed examination of the VC-2a core samples, it became apparent that hydrothermal alteration is so extensive that no geochemical information useful for stratigraphic fingerprinting or petrogenesis could be obtained, and that correlation with other intracaldera units and extracaldera units must be made on the basis of stratigraphic position and gross lithologic characteristics. Accordingly, we emphasize geochemical data from the extracaldera Bandelier Tuffs and related units which will be useful for comparison with proposed drill hole VC-4 and for any future studies of the region. The stable isotope, radiogenic isotope and trace element data obtained from this project, combined with existing major and trace element data for volcanic rocks from this area, provide an extensive data base essential to future Continental Scientific Drilling Program projects in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.

Self, S.; Sykes, M.L. [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Wolff, J.A. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology; Skuba, C.E. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Demonstration Test of Iron Addition to a Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Absorber to Enhance Mercury Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings from a full-scale demonstration test of the effects on trace elements of adding iron to a forced oxidation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Three specific effects were evaluated: lowering mercury emissions to the atmosphere; lowering the concentration of soluble or sub-micron-sized mercury particles in FGD purge water, which could improve removal of mercury in FGD purge water treatment; and lowering the concentration of selenate in FGD purge water, which could i...

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Trace Elemental Variation in Dosidicus Gigas Statoliths Using LA-ICP-MS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range expansion events of the Humboldt squid reveal our inadequate understanding of populations of this species. Despite recent hatching, reproductive, tagging, genetic and dietary studies of Dosidicus gigas, much speculation remains concerning geographic migration, stock assessment and habitat preferences. This study provides evidence that statolith trace elemental variations can be useful in distinguishing among geographic populations. Specimens were collected from the Galapagos Islands, southern California, and Washington State. A dissection method was recorded and published. By using laser ablation methods, discrete measurements of 10 elements were collected at 6 to 7 ablation sites covering embryonic, paralarval, juvenile and adult stages. Analysis of Variance revealed important ontogenic elemental variations among ablation locations. Multivariate Analysis of Variance, ordination techniques and discriminant function analysis with permutation testing were all utilized to compare and characterize the variations found in elemental concentrations. Significant ontogenic variations were found for 8 out of the 10 focus elements; this is the first report for 5 of these elements for this species. The geographic populations were effectively classified as distinct group for the first time using these methods. Elemental fingerprint signatures were found to be significantly different at multiple ontogenic growth regions of the statolith. Seattle and California paralarvae exhibited similar elemental signatures despite significant differences in those found in the embryonic core and juvenile regions of the statolith. These methods are a useful tool in providing stock assessment and can be improved for use in future population dynamics models.

Arbuckle, Nancy 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilh, Toledo District, Belize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powell 1972 Strontium Isotope Geology. Minerals, Rocks, andisotope ratios in an ecosystem are a factor of the local geology andisotope and trace element values in human bone vary depending on the geology

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Allegheny Power Service Constructed Wetland at Springdale: The Role of Plants in the Removal of Trace Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are proving an effective technology for the removal of many aqueous contaminants. The ability of wetlands to remove contaminants such as trace elements appears to be a function of both the physical trapping of suspended materials and the biological and chemical processes occurring within the wetlands. Thus, wetlands are commonly described as "biogeochemical reactors." This report details a study of trace element removal and sequestration within a highly engineered wetland designed to...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Source characterization studies at the Paraho semiworks oil shale retort. [Redistribution of trace and major elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to determine the redistribution of trace and major elements and species during aboveground oil shale retorting, a comprehensive program was carried out for the sampling and analysis of feedstock, products, effluents, and ambient particulates from the Paraho Semiworks Retort. Samples were obtained during two periods in 1977 when the retort was operating in the direct mode. The data were used to construct mass balances for 31 trace and major elements in various effluents, including the offgas. The computed mass balances indicated that approx. 1% or greater fractions of the As, Co, Hg, N, Ni, S, and Se were released during retorting and redistributed to the product oil, retort water, or product offgas. The fraction released for these seven elements ranged from approx. 1% for Co and Ni to 50 to 60% for Hg and N. Approximately 20% of the S and 5% each of the As and Se were released. Ambient aerosols were found to be elevated near the retorting facility and associated crushing and retorted shale disposal sites. Approximately 50% of these particles were in the respirable range (< 5 ..mu..m). The elevated dust loadings are presented very local, as indicated by relatively low aerosol loadings at background sites 100 to 200 m away. State-of-the-art dust control measures were not employed. 15 figures, 19 tables.

Fruchter, J.S.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sanders, R.W.; Abel, K.W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Environ. Sci. &Technologies for Coal-Fired Power Plants, DOE/NETL Mercurynumber of coal-fired generating plants (1-3). The mercury is

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Concentration of major and trace elements in the Miocene lignite from the Canakkale-Can coalfield  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on major and trace element concentrations of three lignite samples, of which two are from the working lignite seam and one from a feed coal to an thermal power plant. The Canakkale-Can lignite deposit is currently being mined by open-cast mining methods despite its high sulfur content. The production lignites are mainly consumed by a fluidized-bed thermal power plant with 2 160 MW capacity and less domestic heating and industrial factories around Can. Major oxide compositions of the coal ash samples imply that the more abundant oxides are SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and less CaO and Fe2O{sub 3}. Trace element concentrations in the samples on whole-coal basis show that three samples analyzed were enriched in V, and also concentrations of B, Sc, Sn, Th, Tl, and U in one sample that exceed the range values of most world coals.

Inaner, H.; Karayigit, A. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Geological Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mass balance of major and trace elements in a coal-fired power plant  

SciTech Connect

A total of 48 samples, feed coals (FCs), fly ashes (FAs) and bottom ashes (BAs), which were systematically collected once a week over an eight-week period from boiler units, B1-4 with 660 MW and B5-6 with 330 MW capacity from Soma power plant, have been evaluated for major and trace elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ti, S, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Cs, Ga, Ge, Hf, Hg, Li, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn, Sr, Ta, Th, Tl, U, V, Y, Zn, Zr, and REEs) to get information on behavior during coal combustion. This study indicates that some elements such as Hg, Bi, Cd, As, Pb, Ge, Tl, Sn, Zn, Sb, B show enrichments in FAs relative to the BAs in both group boiler units. In addition to these, Cs, Lu, Tm, and Ga in Units B1-4 and S in Units B5-6 also have enrichments in FAs. Elements showing enrichments in BAs in both group boiler units are Ta, Mn, Nb. In addition to these, Se, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe in Units B1-4 and Cu in Units B5-6 also have enrichments in BAs. The remaining elements investigated in this study have no clear segregation between FAs and BAs. Mass balance calculations with the two methods show that some elements, S, Ta, Hg, Se, Zn, Na, Ca in Units B1-4, and Hg, S, Ta, Se, P in Units B5-6, have volatile behavior during coal combustion in the Soma power plant. This study also implies that some elements, Sb and Tb in Units B1-4 and Sb in Units B5-6, have relatively high retention effects in the combustion residues from the Soma power plant.

Karayigit, A.I.; Bulut, Y.; Karayigit, G.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Vassilev, S.; Vassileva, C. [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p}. Allowing R{sub b} to vary as R{sub p}{sup 1/2}, consistent with available precipitation rate studies, produces a better fit to some trace element and isotopic data than a model where R{sub b} is constant. This model can account for most of the experimental data in the literature on the dependence of {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca and metal/Ca fractionation in calcite as a function of precipitation rate and temperature, and also accounts for {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O variations with some assumptions. The apparent temperature dependence of Ca isotope fractionation in calcite may stem from the dependence of R{sub b} on temperature; there should be analogous pH dependence at pH < 6. The proposed model may be valuable for predicting the behavior of isotopic and trace element fractionation for a range of elements of interest in low-temperature aqueous geochemistry. The theory presented is based on measureable thermo-kinetic parameters in contrast to models that equire hyper-fast diffusivity in near-surface layers of the solid.

DePaolo, D.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US DOE is developing a series for models of environmental systems. Both zero-order and detailed models are being developed. Detailed models are based on fundamental engineering principles and the use of detailed physical and chemical property data; reliance on empirical relationships and correlations is minimized. The key advantage of detailed models is their predictive capabilities and utility in performing valid comparative analyses. An important prerequisite to the development of detailed models in the availability of representative, long-term process and environmental data. These data are needed both to develop the models as well as to validate them. Zero-order models are less rigorous and have less predictive capability than detailed models since they are based on empirical estimates and simple correlations. However, they can be developed relatively quickly and are significantly less expensive to develop and use compared to detailed models. Zero-order models are useful in identifying potential environmental or control technology problems. As such, they can help direct future research and development efforts. They can provide useful information when comprehensive data are unavailable for detailed modeling, and can be used as a screening tool to identify process alternatives which appear to warrant more detailed modeling. This report describes a zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant located near Beulah, North Dakota. The model estimates how trace elements entering the plant in the feed coal are distributed to the plant's process and waste streams. Elements that may be introduced to the plant's waste streams from sorbents and/or catalysts (e.g., Vanadium in makeup Stretford solution) are not considered in the model. 13 refs.

Thomas, W.C.; Page, G.C.; Magee, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The application of a synchrotron radiation microprobe to trace element analysis  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron radiation is light emitted by electrons when accelerated in a circular orbit. Properties of synchrotron radiation important to trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence analysis include a broad, continuous and tunable energy spectrum for K- and L-shell excitation of all elements; a linearly polarized source reducing the scattered radiation backgrounds; low energy deposition in the target; and an appreciable flux in narrow energy bandwidths for chemical speciation. Experiments to date have generally used ''white'' continuous spectra with a low energy absorber and no focussing, but future runs will use focussing mirrors which increase intensities by a factor of more than 1000. Monochromators will be used to select the energy and bandwidths appropriate to the experiment. Detection limits for thin biomedical samples using a solid-state detector, a 0.5 mm beam and a 5 min counting interval were in the range of 30 ppB for calcium to 50 ppB for zinc. A prototype wet cell was designed, constructed and tested using cat cardiac myocytes with the result that major trace elements such as iron could be quantitated in single myocytes. The x-ray microprobe was used to localize gallium in fetal rat bone explants after being cultured in BGJ media containing 25 ..mu..M Ga(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The high brightness of x rays from a synchrotron source makes possible the development of computerized tomography on a micrometer scale. A tomogram of a freeze-dried caterpillar head was produced in a 50 min scan. The pixel size was 30 ..mu..m using a 20-..mu..m beam. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

High precision trace element and organic constituent analysis of oil shale and solvent-refined coal materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a number of sensitive and precise methods for the determination of trace elements, heavy element species and organic compounds in materials from an oil shale research retort process and from a solvent-refined coal pilot plant operation are discussed. The methods were chosen both for their sensitivity, and also for their relative freedom from interference effects. Coal liquids contain much higher concentrations of aromatic compounds, including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's). A larger relative fraction of the pna's in shale oil are alkyl substituted. Coal liquids are also considerably higher in phenols (28 percent) than is shale oil (2 percent). N-heterocyclics are present in higher concentration (greater than 8 percent) in shale oil due to the high nitrogen content of the raw shale. Hydroaromatics are common in coal liquids but negligible in shale oil. Inorganic elements and speciation measurements indicate significant amounts of the toxic heavy elements Hg, As, Zn, and Se in effluent oil water and gas streams. In addition, the process water contains significant Co, Br, Sb, and U. Raw oil shale is highly enriched in Se, As and Sb and somewhat enriched in U, Pb, Cs, Hg and Zn. Solvent-refined coal liquids were found to be relatively low in most trace elements. The majority of trace elements are concentrated by the process into the mineral residue. Only Br and Hg are not depleted in solvent-refined coal. Other trace elements still remaining in significant amounts are U, Ta, Cr, and Zn.

Fruchter, J.S.; Petersen, M.R.; Laul, J.C.; Ryan, P.W.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Characterization of soils from an industrial complex contaminated with elemental mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historic use of liquid elemental mercury (Hg(0)l) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN, USA resulted in large deposits of Hg(0)l in the soils. An evaluation of analytical tools for characterizing the speciation of Hg in the soils at the Y-12 facility was conducted and these tequniques were used to examine the speciation of Hg in two soil cores collect at the site. These include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), soil Hg(0) headspace analysis, and total Hg determination by acid digestion coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption. Hg concentrations determined using XRF, a tool that has been suggestions for quick onsite characterization of soils, were lower than concentrations determined by HgT analysis and as a result this technique is not suitable for the evaluation of Hg concentrations in heterogeneous soils containing Hg(0)l. Hg(0)g headspace analysis can be used to examine the presence of Hg(0)l in soils and when coupled with HgT analysis an understanding of the speciation of Hg in soils can be obtained. Two soil cores collected within the Y-12 complex highlight the heterogeneity in the depth and extent of Hg contamination, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 8400 mg/kg. At one location Hg(0)l was distributed throughout 3.2 meters of core whereas the core from a location only 12 meters away only contained Hg(0)l in 0.3 m zone of the core. Sequential extractions, used to examine the forms of Hg in the soils, indicated that at depths within the core that have low Hg concentrations organically associated Hg is dominant. Soil from the zone of groundwater inundation showed reduced characteristics and the Hg is likely present as Hg-sulfide species. At this location it appears that Hg transported within the groundwater is a source of Hg to the soil. Overall the characterization of Hg in soils containing Hg(0) l is difficult due to the heterogeneous distribution within the soils and this challenge is enhanced in industrial facilities in which fill material comprise most of the soils and historical and continuing reworking of the subsurface has remobilized the Hg.

Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Lester, Brian P [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Problems of trace-element ratios and geothermometry in a gravel geothermal-aquifer system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system studied is a Tertiary-age, block-faulted basin in which a Pleistocene gravel bed acts as a confined aquifer and permits the lateral dispersion of the geothermal fluids. Vertical movement of the hot water is currently believed to be controlled by faults on the east side of the valley. An aerial magnetic anomaly and a Bouguer gravity anomaly appear to correspond with thoese eastern faults. Basic data on the geology and trace element halos has been presented previously. Evaluation of the mixing phenomena in this system was attempted using a dissolved silica-enthalpy graph. A chalcedony curve is also plotted. An enthalpy versus chloride plot, suggests that either conductive cooling occurs before mixing or that higher chloride content background waters are available for mixing. (MHR)

Sonderegger, J.L.; Donovan, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Conversion of the trace elements Zn, Cd, and Pb in the combustion of near-Moscow coals  

SciTech Connect

A model for the conversion of trace elements in the combustion of near-Moscow coals based on a complex approach combining the capabilities of geochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, phase analysis, and chemical kinetics is proposed. The conversion of the trace elements Zn, Cd, and Pb as the constituents of near-Moscow coal in the flow of coal combustion products along the line of the P-59 boiler at the Ryazanskaya Thermal Power Plant was calculated. Experimental data were used in the development of the model and in calculations.

E.V. Samuilov; L.N. Lebedeva; L.S. Pokrovskaya; M.V. Faminskaya [OAO Power Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russia)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Speciation of Trace Elements in Biological and Environmental Samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Role of Plants and Microbes in Remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants can accumulate, detoxify, and transform trace elements present in contaminated soil and water, leading to the phytoremediation of contaminated sites. An important factor for consideration is the chemical form of trace elements accumulated in tissues of different plant species used for phytoremediation. This report describes the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for successfully determining the speciation of trace elements in biological and environmental samples.

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mercury's Protoplanetary Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Recently, by expressing ratios relative to Fe, I discovered a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Here, on the basis of that relationship, I derive expressions, as a function of the mass of planet Mercury and the mass of its core, to estimate the mass of Mercury's lost elements, the mass of Mercury's alloy and rock protoplanetary core, and the mass of Mercury's gaseous protoplanet. Although Mercury's mass is well known, its core mass is not, being widely believed to be in the range of 70-80 percent of the planet mass. For a core mass of 75 percent, the mass of Mercury's lost elements is about 1.32 times the mass of Mercury, the mass of the alloy and rock protoplanetary core is about 2.32 times the mass of Mercury, and the mass of the gaseous protoplanet of Mercury is about 700 times the mass of Mercury. Circumstantial evidence is presented in support of the supposition that Mercury's lost elements is identical to the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation.

J. Marvin Herndon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using an online thermal-desorption electron-ionization high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the detection of particulate trace elements was investigated analyzing data from Mexico City obtained during the MILAGRO 2006 field campaign, where relatively high concentrations of trace elements have been reported. This potential application is of interest due to the real-time data provided by the AMS, its high sensitivity and time resolution, and the widespread availability and use of this instrument. High resolution mass spectral analysis, isotopic ratios, and ratios of different ions containing the same elements are used to constrain the chemical identity of the measured ions. The detection of Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sn, and Sb is reported. There was no convincing evidence for the detection of other trace elements commonly reported in PM. The elements detected tend to be those with lower melting and boiling points, as expected given the use of a vaporizer at 600oC in this instrument. Operation of the AMS vaporizer at higher temperatures is likely to improve trace element detection. The detection limit is estimated at approximately 0.3 ng m-3 for 5-min of data averaging. Concentration time series obtained from the AMS data were compared to concentration records determined from offline analysis of particle samples from the same times and locations by ICP (PM2.5) and PIXE (PM1.1 and PM0.3). The degree of correlation and agreement between the three instruments (AMS, ICP, and PIXE) varied depending on the element. The AMS shows promise for real-time detection of some trace elements, although additional work including laboratory calibrations with different chemical forms of these elements are needed to further develop this technique and to understand the differences with the ambient data from the other techniques. The trace elements peaked in the morning as expected for primary sources, and the many detected plumes suggest the presence of multiple point sources, probably industrial, in Mexico City which are variable in time and space, in agreement with previous studies.

Salcedo, D.; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Jimenez, Jose L.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

www.elsevier.com/locate/fuel Trace elements in coal derived liquids: analysis by ICP-MS and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrations of trace elements in coal derived liquids have been investigated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and by Mssbauer spectroscopy. Liquefaction extracts prepared from the Argonne Premium Coals and a coal tar pitch have been examined. Microwave digestion in concentrated nitric acid has been shown as a suitable method for determining trace element concentrations in coal derived liquids by ICP-MSfor sample sizes as small as 320 mg. High concentrations of Fe were found for all extract samples (?2651474 ppm). Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ga, Sb, Cs and Ba were measurable. Concentration distributions of trace elements found in the extracts bore little relation to the corresponding distributions in the original coals. The proportions of individual trace elements present in the original coals and found in the extracts, varied widely. Mssbauer spectroscopy of the extracts indicated that the high Fe-concentrations corresponded to the presence of organometallic-Fe compoundsand not to pyritic iron. There is evidence suggesting the presence of material derived from iron-storage proteins such as ferritin, but final proof is lacking. Our data suggest that other metallic ions detected in these coal derived liquids may be present in association with the organic material. Concentrations of paramagnetic metal species were found to be of the same order of magnitude as ESR spin-densities already found in coal liquids. Both types of paramagnetic species are suspected of causing loss of signal in

Mssbauer Spectroscopy; R. Richaud A; H. Lachas A; M. -j. Lazaro A; L. J. Clarke B; K. E. Jarvis B; A. A. Herod A; T. C. Gibb C; R. Kandiyoti A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mercury-selenium interactions in the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to consider the need to control emissions of trace elements and compounds emitted from coal combustion, including coal-fired power plants. Concern has been expressed about emissions of mercury and arsenic, for example, since health effects may be associated with exposure to some of these compounds. By and large, effects of trace element emissions have been considered individually, without regard for possible interactions. To the extent that the relevant environmental pathways and health endpoints differ, this mode of analysis is appropriate. For example, arsenic is considered a carcinogen and mercury affects the brain. However, there may be compelling reasons to consider emissions of mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) together: (1) Both Se and Hg are emitted from power plants primarily as vapors. (2) Hg and Se are both found in fish, which is the primary pathway for Hg health effects. (3) Se has been shown to suppress Hg methylation in aqueous systems, which is a necessary step for Hg health effects at current environmental concentrations. (4) Se is a trace element that is essential for health but that can also be toxic at high concentrations; it can thus have both beneficial and adverse health effects, depending on the dosage. This paper reviews some of the salient characteristics and interactions of the Hg-Se system, to consider the hypothesis that the effects of emissions of these compounds should be considered jointly.

Saroff, L. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lipfert, W.; Moskowitz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A substantial number of samples of water, stream sediment, soils, plants, oil shale, spent shale, shale oil and other materials were collected for analyses. A considerable amount of effort was also involved in the development and validation of methods for preparing and analyzing these samples for trace element content. Among the results are: Cu, Li, and Zn exhibit well-defined trends in soils over the Piceance Basin, with values increasing from north to south; As, Mo, B, and Se are all elevated in the soils of the Piceance Basin; Mo and B are more soluble in TOSCO spent shale than in unprocessed shale and are also elevated in plants growing on spent shale; F is less soluble in spent (TOSCO) shale than in unprocessed oil shale, but although the levels in leachates are quite significant (25 mg/l). F is not readily leached out; and As and Se are not very soluble in spent shale (TOSCO) and are not taken up to a significant extent by plants.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Discovery of Fundamental Mass Ratio Relationships of Whole-Rock Chondritic Major Elements: Implications on Ordinary Chondrite Formation and on Planet Mercury's Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high occurrence on Earth of ordinary chondrite meteorites and the making of models based upon arbitrary assumptions has led to some confusion about the origin of ordinary chondrites. Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Expressing ratios relative to Fe leads to a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components: one is a relatively undifferentiated, primitive component, oxidized like the CI or C1 chondrites; the other is a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the reduced enstatite chondrites. Such a picture would seem to explain for the ordinary chondrites, their major element compositions, their intermediate states of oxidation, and their ubiquitous defiencies of refractory siderophile elements. I suggest that the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation consists of planet Mercury's missing complement of elements, presumably separated from protoplanetary Mercury during its formation.

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mercury Calibration System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. During the second quarter, froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) tests on 34 project samples were completed at {minus}100, {minus}200, and {minus}400 mesh particle sizes. Products from the FF/RA tests were analyzed for ash, moisture, and some for total S and heating value (BTU), and the resulting data are being used to construct a series of washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected. Composite samples, each having 80% of the total BTU (or combustibles), were prepared for the {minus}100 and {minus}200 mesh FF/RA tests and submitted for trace element analysis. The composite samples for the {minus}400 mesh FF/RA tests will be submitted soon, and the analytical results are expected to be available in 3--4 months. The trace element data on the composite samples will indicate the potential for the removal of each element from the coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particle sizes.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mercury emission behavior during isolated coal particle combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of all the trace elements emitted during coal combustion, mercury is most problematic. Mercury from the atmosphere enters into oceanic and terrestrial waters. Part of the inorganic Hg in water is converted into organic Hg (CH3Hg), which is toxic and bioaccumulates in human and animal tissue. The largest source of human-caused mercury air emissions in the U.S is from combustion coal, a dominant fuel used for power generation. The Hg emitted from plants primarily occurs in two forms: elemental Hg and oxidized Hg (Hg2+). The coal chlorine content and ash composition, gas temperature, residence time and presence of different gases will decide the speciation of Hg into Hg0 and Hg2+. For Wyoming coal the concentrations of mercury and chlorine in coal are 120ppb and 140ppb. In order to understand the basic process of formulation of HgCl2 and Hg0 a numerical model is developed in the current work to simulate in the detail i) heating ii) transient pyrolysis of coal and evolution of mercury and chlorine, iii) gas phase oxidation iv) reaction chemistry of Hg and v) heterogeneous oxidation of carbon during isolated coal particle combustion. The model assumes that mercury and chlorine are released as a part of volatiles in the form of elemental mercury and HCl. Homogenous reaction are implemented for the oxidation of mercury. Heterogeneous Hg reactions are ignored. The model investigates the effect of different parameters on the extent of mercury oxidation; particle size, ambient temperature, volatile matter, blending coal with high chlorine coal and feedlot biomass etc,. Mercury oxidation is increased when the coal is blended with feedlot biomass and high chlorine coal and Hg % conversion to HgCl2 increased from 10% to 90% when 20% FB is blended with coal. The ambient temperature has a negative effect on mercury oxidation, an increase in ambient temperature resulted in a decrease in the mercury oxidation. The percentage of oxidized mercury increases from 9% to 50% when the chlorine concentration is increased from 100ppm to 1000ppm. When the temperature is decreased from 1950 K to 950 K, the percentage of mercury oxidized increased from 3% to 27%.

Puchakayala, Madhu Babu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

High precision trace element and organic constituent analysis of oil shale and solvent-refined coal materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Broad spectrum inorganic and organic analytical techniques provide the best approach for the initial characterization of the complex samples encountered in working with new energy technologies such as oil shale retorting and solvent refining of coal. In complex samples, analyses are facilitated by techniques, such as neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence, that are relatively insensitive to matrix effects. A comparative organic constituent analysis of the crude shale oil and coal liquid samples analyzed in this study showed that the coal liquids contained higher concentrations of aromatic compounds including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The coal liquids were considerably richer in phenols than was the shale oil. N-heterocyclics were present in higher concentration in shale oil due to the high nitrogen content of the raw shale. Hydroaromatics were found to be common in coal liquids but negligible in this shale oil. Measurable amounts of the heavy elements Hg, As, Zn, and Se were found in effluent streams from oil shale retorting. The process water also contained significant Co, Br, Sb, and U. The raw oil shale was enriched in Se, As and Sb and somewhat enriched in U, Pb, Cs, Hg, and Zn. Solvent-refined coal liquids were found to be relatively low in most trace elements. Most were concentrated in the mineral residue. Only Br was not depleted in solvent-refined coal. Other trace elements remaining in significant amounts were U, Ta, Cr and Zn. We have not yet measured the trace elements and gaseous and particulate samples from the solvent-refined coal plant. 10 tables.

Fruchter, J.S.; Laul, J.C.; Petersen, M.R.; Ryan, P.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Real-Time Measurements of Engine-Out Trace Elements: Application of a Novel Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer for Emissions Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lubricant-derived trace element emissions are the largest contributors to the accumulation of incombustible ash in diesel particulate filters (DPF), eventually leading to filter plugging and an increase in engine fuel ...

Cross, Eben Spencer

108

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Non-destructive determination of trace-element concentrations. Annual progress report, August 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development and testing of the neutron-capture prompt ..gamma..-ray activation analysis method continued. A wide range of NBS Standard Reference Materials, USGS Standard Rocks, and other materials have been analyzed in order to identify elements whose lines can be observed, to determine interferences and detection limits for each important ..gamma.. ray of observable elements and to measure concentrations of observable elements for comparison with certified or other previous results. In most crustal samples, concentrations of 16 to 20 elements can be determined.

Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Baseline Concentrations of Radionuclides and Trace Elements in Soils and Vegetation around the DARHT Facility: Construction Phase (1998)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory mandates the establishment of baseline concentrations for potential environmental contaminants. To this end, concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup tot}U and Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl were determined in surface and subsurface soils, sediments, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1998 (this is the third of a four year baseline study). Also, volatile (VOC) and semivolatile (SVOC) organic compounds were measured in soils and sediments. Most radionuclides and trace metals in soil, sediment, and vegetation were similar to past years at DARHT and were within regional background concentrations. Exceptions were concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, Be, Ba, and total U in some samples--these elements exceeded upper limit regional background concentrations (e.g., >mean plus two std dev). No VOCs and very few SVOCs were detected in soils and sediments at DARHT. Mean ({+-} std dev) radionuclide and trace element concentrations measured in soil, sediment, and vegetation summarized over a three-year period (construction phase) are summarized.

P. R. Fresquez; M. H. Ebinger; H. T. Haagenstad; L. Naranjo, Jr.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Non-destructive determination of trace-element concentrations. Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A beam port has been installed at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reactor by the University of Maryland group in cooperation with the NBS staff in order to initiate studies of a new analytical technique: neutron-capture prompt ..gamma..-ray activation analysis (PGAA). A detection system based on a large, high resolution Ge(Li) detector surrounded by NaI crystal has been developed for measurement of prompt ..gamma.. rays from 80 keV to 11 MeV. With a temporary external beam tube in place, neutron and ..gamma..-ray backgrounds were investigated prior to design and construction of a well-shielded beam tube and massive shielding for the detection system. With the backgrounds suitably low, it has been possible to investigate ..gamma..-ray spectra of a wide range of samples. These spectra are being carefully analyzed to identify species contributing the observed lines. Whenever an element's presence is suspected. Standards of the pure element or simple compounds are irradiated to determine its complete spectrum. This is necessary in order to determine which lines are useful for analytical purposes and which have interferences from other elements. From the results to date, it appears that PGAA will be able to measure the following elements in many types of samples: H, B, C, N, Na, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cd, Sm, and Gd. Many other elements will be measurable in certain classes of samples. Furthermore, the list of elements is incomplete, as not all lines have yet been identified in the spectra. The quantitative application of the method is being tested using a wide range of NBS Standard Reference Materials whose elemental compositions are well characterized. Measurements are reported for about fourteen elements in several standards. In general, the agreement with previous measurements is quite good.

Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mobilization of trace elements in aquifers by biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants. Master Thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study had two objectives: (1) to determine the extent of metal mobility within petroleum-contaminated aquifers, (2) to determine if biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons can explain metal mobility. The approach reviewed analytical results from 2305 groundwater sampling events, taken from 958 wells, located at 136 sites found at 53 Air Force installations. The study showed that high levels of metals are present at petroleum hydrocarbon sites where metals would not generally be expected. Of the metals with drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), mercury and silver were detected the least frequently. Barium and copper were detected at the sites, but fewer than 2.5 percent of the samples exceeded their MCLs. All other metals exceeded their MCLs in at least 2.5 percent of the samples, with antimony and lead exceeding their MCLs in 19 percent and 10 percent of samples, respectively. Higher concentrations of barium and manganese were most strongly correlated with petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, and relatively strong correlations also existed for aluminum, arsenic, iron, and lead. Major cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium were least affected by petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations.

Kearney, S.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biological processes for concentrating trace elements from uranium mine waters. Technical completion report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste water from uranium mines in the Ambrosia Lake district near Grants, New Mexico, USA, contains uranium, selenium, radium and molybdenum. The Kerr-McGee Corporation has a novel treatment process for waters from two mines to reduce the concentrations of the trace contaminants. Particulates are settled by ponding, and the waters are passed through an ion exchange resin to remove uranium; barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and radium from the mine waters. The mine waters are subsequently passed through three consecutive algae ponds prior to discharge. Water, sediment and biological samples were collected over a 4-year period and analyzed to assess the role of biological agents in removal of inorganic trace contaminants from the mine waters. Some of the conclusions derived from this study are: (1) The concentrations of soluble uranium, selenium and molybdenum were not diminished in the mine waters by passage through the series of impoundments which constituted the mine water treatment facility. Uranium concentrations were reduced but this was due to passage of the water through an ion exchange column. (2) The particulate concentrations of the mine water were reduced at least ten-fold by passage of the waters through the impoundments. (3) The sediments were anoxic and enriched in uranium, molybdenum and selenium. The deposition of particulates and the formation of insoluble compounds were proposed as mechanisms for sediment enrichment. (4) The predominant algae of the treatment ponds were the filamentous Spirogyra and Oscillatoria, and the benthic alga, Chara. (5) Adsorptive processes resulted in the accumulation of metals in the algae cells. (6) Stimulation of sulfate reduction by the bacteria resulted in retention of molybdenum, selenium, and uranium in sediments. 1 figure, 16 tables.

Brierley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. ? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

119

Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Modifications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Jointly funded by DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), this project's purpose is to investigate novel approaches of capturing elemental and...

122

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produce oil, in various gas, bitumen, and C quantities andquantity of each element distributed among the products and Elements in the oilOil shales contain organic material in a mineral matrix which includes significant environmentally As, quantities

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

MERCURY CONTROL FOR MWCs USING THE SODIUM TETRASULFIDE PROCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for mercury control for flue gases of Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) not only ecological hydrochloric acid (HCl) and elemental mercury (Hg") under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream to the decreasing gas temperature, the elemental mercury is able to react with other flue gas components. The main

Columbia University

124

Publications | Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Afsahi, and R. Ross, Mercury: Enabling Remote Procedure Call for High-Performance Computing, IEEE International Conference on Cluster Computing, Sep 2013. DOIslides...

125

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Pilot Testing of Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts Project Summary Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts Project Summary URS Group, Inc., Austin, TX, will demonstrate at the pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project's pilot tests, conducted at electric generating plants using wet flue gas desulfurization systems and particulate collection systems, will be conducted for periods up to 14 months to provide data for future, full-scale designs. Mercury-oxidation potential will be measured periodically to provide long-term catalyst life data. The project is applicable to about 90,000 megawatts of generation capacity. Project partners are the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, which will co-manage and co-fund the pilot tests, and five utilities.

126

Mercury emission control for coal fired power plants using coal and biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a leading concern among the air toxic metals addressed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) because of its volatility, persistence, and bioaccumulation as methylmercury in the environment and its neurological health impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports for 2001 shows that total mercury emissions from all sources in USA is about 145 tons per annum, of which coal fired power plants contribute around 33% of it, about 48 tons per annum. Unlike other trace metals that are emitted in particulate form, mercury is released in vapor phase in elemental (Hg0) or oxidized (Hg2+, mainly HgCl2) form. To date, there is no post combustion treatment which can effectively capture elemental mercury vapor, but the oxidized form of mercury can be captured in traditional emission control devices such as wet flue gas defulrization (WFGD) units, since oxidized mercury (HgCl2) is soluble in water. The chlorine concentration present during coal combustion plays a major role in mercury oxidation, which is evident from the fact that plants burning coal having high chlorine content have less elemental mercury emissions. A novel method of co-firing blends of low chlorine content coal with high chlorine content cattle manure/biomass was used in order to study its effect on mercury oxidation. For Texas Lignite and Wyoming coal the concentrations of chlorine are 139 ppm and 309 ppm on dry ash free basis, while for Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass it is 2,691 ppm. Co-firing experiments were performed in a 100,000 BTU/hr (29.3 kWt) Boiler Burner facility located in the Coal and Biomass Energy laboratory (CBEL); coal and biomass blends in proportions of 80:20, 90:10, 95:5 and 100:0 were investigated as fuels. The percentage reduction of Hg with 95:5, 90:10 and 80:20 blends were measured to be 28- 50%, 42-62% and 71-75% respectively. Though cattle biomass serves as an additive to coal, to increase the chlorine concentration, it leads to higher ash loading. Low Ash and High Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass have 164% and 962% more ash than Wyoming coal respectively. As the fraction of cattle biomass in blend increases in proportion, ash loading problems increase simultaneously. An optimum blend ratio is arrived and suggested as 90:10 blend with good reduction in mercury emissions without any compromise on ash loading.

Arcot Vijayasarathy, Udayasarathy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Investigation of modified speciation for enhanced control of mercury  

SciTech Connect

The control of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions was addressed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which provided an initial list of 189 elements and compounds of concern. The combustion of coal has the potential to produce a number of those species, either directly as a result of the trace elements found in coal, or as products of chemical reactions occurring in combustion. However, field studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and others have shown that the actual emissions are very low and that effective particulate-matter capture can control most of the inorganic species. The most significant exception is mercury, which has also been singled out for particular regulatory attention because of its behavior in the environment (bioaccumulation) and the potential for deleterious health effects. In anticipation of possible regulations regarding mercury emissions, research efforts sponsored by DOE, EPRI, and others are investigating the risks posed by mercury emissions, improved techniques for measuring those emissions, and possible control measures. The focus in the control research is on techniques that can be used in conjunction with existing flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) systems in order to minimize additional capital costs and operational complexity. The very small amount of mercury (on the order of a few micrograms per cubic meter) in flue gas, its occurrence in several chemical forms that vary from system to system, the very low solubility of the elemental form, and the fact that it is usually in the vapor phase combine to make the achievement of cost-effective control a challenging task.

Livengood, C.D.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fate of soluble uranium in the I{sub 2}/KI leaching process for mercury removal  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of {approximately} 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake.

Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials and Chemistry Lab.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mercury and platinum abundances in mercury-manganese stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report new results for the elemental and isotopic abundances of the normally rare elements mercury and platinum in HgMn stars. Typical overabundances can be 4 dex or more. The isotopic patterns do not follow the fractionation model of White et al (1976).

C. M. Jomaron; M. M. Dworetsky; D. A. Bohlender

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements. Over 25% of the raw shale gas five groups productsthe oil, in the raw oil shale gas, consequence of retortinggood product raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mercury Vapor Pressure Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparent difference between the historical mercury vapor concentration equations used by the mercury atmospheric measurement community ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg  

SciTech Connect

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower concentrations can also be measured in the CRDS mode when a compact laser source is available to be integrated into the spectrometer in the future. This exploratory study demonstrates a new instrument platform using an OES-CRDS dual-mode technique for potential field applications.

Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi 39759 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mercury and Dioxin Control for Municipal Waste Combustors Anthony Licata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and elemental mercury (Hg«» under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream of the refuse incinerator), sulfur dioxide (S02)' nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), PCDDs/PCDFs, cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg emission regulations. Mercury Control in MWCs The capture of Hg in flue gas cleaning devices depends on the

Columbia University

134

National Waste Processing Conference Proceedings ASME 1994 ACID GASES, MERCURY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and elemental mercury (Hg«» under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream of the refuse incinerator), sulfur dioxide (S02)' nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), PCDDs/PCDFs, cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg emission regulations. Mercury Control in MWCs The capture of Hg in flue gas cleaning devices depends on the

Columbia University

135

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations. Based on these factors, DOE identified the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas, as the preferred alternative for long-term management and storage of mercury. DOE will consider the environmental impact information presented in this

136

Mercury Oxidation and Capture over SCR Catalysts in Simulated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SCR catalysts were tested for oxidation and capture of elemental mercury ... EBSD Analysis of Complex Microstructures of CSP? Processed Low Carbon...

137

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), ...

138

Fate of Mercury in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a bench-scale, laboratory investigation of the fate of flue gas mercury species in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers that are used for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in coal-fired power plants. Data collected in the EPA mercury Information Collection Request (ICR), and in research projects sponsored by EPRI show that most wet scrubbers used for SO2 control achieve high removals of oxidized mercury and little or no elemental mercury removal. However, some scru...

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of Mercury Oxidation Catalyst for Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on a mercury control technology development program co-funded by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), and several EPRI-member companies. The mercury control process under development uses catalysts installed downstream of the air heater and particulate control device to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

Klunder; ,Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

FY09 assessment of mercury reduction at SNL/NM.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment takes the result of the FY08 performance target baseline of mercury at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, and records the steps taken in FY09 to collect additional data, encourage the voluntary reduction of mercury, and measure success. Elemental (metallic) mercury and all of its compounds are toxic, and exposure to excessive levels can permanently damage or fatally injure the brain and kidneys. Elemental mercury can also be absorbed through the skin and cause allergic reactions. Ingestion of inorganic mercury compounds can cause severe renal and gastrointestinal damage. Organic compounds of mercury such as methyl mercury, created when elemental mercury enters the environment, are considered the most toxic forms of the element. Exposures to very small amounts of these compounds can result in devastating neurological damage and death.1 SNL/NM is required to report annually on the site wide inventory of mercury for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, as the site's inventory is excess of the ten pound reportable threshold quantity. In the fiscal year 2008 (FY08) Pollution Prevention Program Plan, Section 5.3 Reduction of Environmental Releases, a performance target stated was to establish a baseline of mercury, its principle uses, and annual quantity or inventory. This was accomplished on July 29, 2008 by recording the current status of mercury in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

McCord, Samuel Adam

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt`s report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman`s recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO{sub 3} were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman.

Livingston, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

AN EXPERIMENT ON DEHASIDDHI WITH MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The author experimented with the dehasiddhi using mercury. The interesting experiment is narrated in this article. The land of Bharath is the only place which developed the science dealing with the metal remedies for holistic health during the Vedic period when people in other parts of the world continued to use potions and witchcraft to cure diseases of the body. This science in Vedic language is termed rasa sastra. It uses metals such as iron, copper, silver, gold mercury, elements such as iron, copper, silver, gold mercury, elements such as sulphur, mica and other materials such as shells, pearls corals jewels, salts, etc in a purified and processed form for internal

M. P Alexander

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

It's Elemental - The Element Gold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Platinum Platinum Previous Element (Platinum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mercury) Mercury The Element Gold [Click for Isotope Data] 79 Au Gold 196.966569 Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight: 196.966569 Melting Point: 1337.33 K (1064.18°C or 1947.52°F) Boiling Point: 3129 K (2856°C or 5173°F) Density: 19.282 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word Jval and the Anglo-Saxon word gold. Gold's chemical symbol comes from the the latin word for gold, aurum. Say what? Gold is pronounced as GOLD. History and Uses: An attractive and highly valued metal, gold has been known for at least 5500 years. Gold is sometimes found free in nature but it is usually found

146

Removal of mercury from coal via a microbial pretreatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the removal of mercury from coal prior to combustion is disclosed. The process is based on use of microorganisms to oxidize iron, sulfur and other species binding mercury within the coal, followed by volatilization of mercury by the microorganisms. The microorganisms are from a class of iron and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The process involves contacting coal with the bacteria in a batch or continuous manner. The mercury is first solubilized from the coal, followed by microbial reduction to elemental mercury, which is stripped off by sparging gas and captured by a mercury recovery unit, giving mercury-free coal. The mercury can be recovered in pure form from the sorbents via additional processing.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN); Hamilton, Choo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Bench Scale Kinetics of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors When research into the measurement and control of Hg emissions from coal-fired power plants began in earnest in the early 1990s, it was observed that oxidized mercury can be scrubbed at high efficiency in wet FGD systems, while elemental mercury can not. In many cases, elemental mercury concentrations were observed to increase slightly across wet FGD systems, but this was typically regarded as within the variability of the measurement methods. However, later measurements have shown substantial re-emissions from some FGD systems. The goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the aqueous chemistry of mercury (Hg) absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing liquors. Specifically, the project will determine the chemical reactions that oxidized mercury undergoes once absorbed, the byproducts of those reactions, and reaction kinetics.

148

Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Glossary Term - Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Previous Term (Liquid Nitrogen) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Mole) Mole Mercury Mercury as seen by the Mariner 10 spacecraft on March 24, 1974. Mercury is the...

150

Hydrogen sulfide, trace element and sulfur hexafluoride tracer treatment from the Geysers-Calistoga Geothermal Resource Area based on aircraft and surface sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This four-day study has provided initial data regarding the short-range transport of pollutants from The Geysers geothermal operations. The initial analysis of the data has shown that a measureable plume of gaseous sulfur (H{sub 2}S) is emitted from the Geysers and transported by surface and upper-level winds to distances beyond 20 km. Only one day had concentrations above 30 ppB and on this day H{sub 2}S was detected as a distinct odor at 1500 m (m.s.1.) at 4 km or more from the Geysers. The initial data analysis of the H{sub 2}S and SF{sub 6} plume data have revealed the important role that vertical wind shear plays in changing plume trajectories with height and enhancing diffusion of pollutants. Surface and aircraft sampling of aerosols indicate that small quantities of trace elements such as As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr and Br may be transported from the area.

Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Nickola, P.W.; Schreck, R.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ZZ Mercury Storage Book.indb  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Comment Response Document Environmental Impact Statement Final Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0423 January 2011 Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury For additional information on this Final Mercury Storage EIS, contact: AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-41) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Fax: 877-274-5462 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Cover Sheet Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

152

Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Downers Grove, IL); Livengood, C. David (Lockport, IL)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

The control of mercury vapor using biotrickling filters Ligy Philip a,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for mercury control for flue gases of Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) not only ecological hydrochloric acid (HCl) and elemental mercury (Hg") under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream to the decreasing gas temperature, the elemental mercury is able to react with other flue gas components. The main

154

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Abstracts from a workshop on processes determining the input, behavior and fate of radionuclides and trace elements in continental shelf environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts of workshop presentations concerning input, behavior, and fate of trace metals and radionuclides in the marine system are presented. (ACR)

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mercury Emission Measurement at a CFB Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to pending regulation to control mercury emissions in the United States and Canada, several projects have been conducted to perform accurate mass balances at pulverized coal (pc)-fired utilities. Part of the mercury mass balance always includes total gaseous mercury as well as a determination of the speciation of the mercury emissions and a concentration bound to the particulate matter. This information then becomes useful in applying mercury control strategies, since the elemental mercury has traditionally been difficult to control by most technologies. In this instance, oxidation technologies have proven most beneficial for increased capture. Despite many years of mercury measurement and control projects at pc-fired units, far less work has been done on circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) units, which are able to combust a variety of feedstocks, including cofiring coal with biomass. Indeed, these units have proven to be more problematic because it is very difficult to obtain a reliable mercury mass balance. These units tend to have very different temperature profiles than pc-fired utility boilers. The flexibility of CFB units also tends to be an issue when a mercury balance is determined, since the mercury inputs to the system come from the bed material and a variety of fuels, which can have quite variable chemistry, especially for mercury. In addition, as an integral part of the CFB operation, the system employs a feedback loop to circulate the bed material through the combustor and the solids collection system (the primary cyclone), thereby subjecting particulate-bound metals to higher temperatures again. Despite these issues, CFB boilers generally emit very little mercury and show good native capture. The Energy & Environmental Research Center is carrying out this project for Metso Power in order to characterize the fate of mercury across the unit at Rosebud Plant, an industrial user of CFB technology from Metso. Appropriate solids were collected, and flue gas samples were obtained using the Ontario Hydro method, mercury continuous emission monitors, and sorbent trap methods. In addition, chlorine and fluorine were determined for solids and in the flue gas stream. Results of this project have indicated a very good mercury mass balance for Rosebud Plant, indicating 105 {+-} 19%, which is well within acceptable limits. The mercury flow through the system was shown to be primarily in with the coal and out with the flue gas, which falls outside of the norm for CFB boilers.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Lucinda Hamre

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Uranium Trace Elements Erik Hunter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be made. The electroscope relied upon the ability of the gamma radiation emitted by the sample to ionize that prove anomalous in the field can be subjected to more accurate tests in the lab that will determine #12;associated with the device was reported to be +/- 4% of the actual uranium content in the sample

158

Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Homogeneus Forcing of Mercury Oxidation to provide Low-Cost Capture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trace amounts of mercury are found in all coals. During combustion, or during thermal treatment in advanced coal processes, this mercury is vaporized and can be released to the atmosphere with the ultimate combustion products. This has been a cause for concern for a number of years, and has resulted in a determination by the EPA to regulate and control these emissions. Present technology does not, however, provide inexpensive ways to capture or remove mercury. Mercury that exits the furnace in the oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) is known to much more easily captured in existing pollution control equipment (e.g., wet scrubbers for SO{sub 2}), principally due to its high solubility in water. Work funded by DOE has helped understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to mercury oxidation in furnaces. The scenario is as follows. In the flame the mercury is quantitatively vaporized as elemental mercury. Also, the chlorine in the fuel is released as HCl. The direct reaction Hg+HCl is, however, far too slow to be of practical consequence in oxidation. The high temperature region does supports a small concentration of atomic chlorine. As the gases cool (either in the furnace convective passes, in the quench prior to cold gas cleanup, or within a sample probe), the decay in Cl atom is constrained by the slowness of the principal recombination reaction, Cl+Cl+M{yields}Cl{sub 2}+M. This allows chlorine atom to hold a temporary, local superequilibrium concentration . Once the gases drop below about 550 C, the mercury equilibrium shifts to favor HgCl{sub 2} over Hg, and this superequilibrium chlorine atom promotes oxidation via the fast reactions Hg+Cl+M{yields}HgCl+M, HgCl+Cl+M{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+M, and HgCl+Cl{sub 2}{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+Cl. Thus, the high temperature region provides the Cl needed for the reaction, while the quench region allows the Cl to persist and oxidize the mercury in the absence of decomposition reactions that would destroy the HgCl{sub 2}. Promoting mercury oxidation is one means of getting moderate-efficiency, 'free' mercury capture when wet gas cleanup systems are already in place. The chemical kinetic model we developed to describe the oxidation process suggests that in fuel lean gases, the introduction of trace amounts of H{sub 2} within the quench region leads to higher Cl concentrations via chain branching. The amount of additive, and the temperature at the addition point are critical. We investigated this process in a high-temperature quartz flow reactor. The results do indicate a substantial amount of promotion of oxidation with the introduction of relatively small amounts of hydrogen at around 1000 K ({approx}100 ppm relative to the furnace gas). In practical systems the source of this hydrogen is likely to be a small natural gas steam reformer. This would also produce CO, so co-injection of CO was also tested. The CO did not provide any additional promotion, and in some cases led to a reduction in oxidation. We also examined the influence of NO and SO{sub 2} on the promotion process. We did not see any influence under the conditions examined. The present results were for a 0.5 s, isothermal plug flow environment. The next step should be to determine the appropriate injection point for the hydrogen and the performance under realistic temperature quench conditions. This could be accomplished first by chemical kinetic modeling, and then by tunnel flow experiment.

John Kramlich; Linda Castiglone

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Screening of low cost sorbents for arsenic and mercury capture in gasification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor has been developed to investigate trace metal capture on selected sorbents for cleaning the hot raw gas in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants. The new reactor design is presented, together with initial results for mercury and arsenic capture on five sorbents. It was expected that the capture efficiency of sorbents would decrease with increasing temperature. However, a commercial activated carbon, Norit Darco 'Hg', and a pyrolysis char prepared from scrap tire rubber exhibit similar efficiencies for arsenic at 200 and at 400{sup o}C (70% and 50%, respectively). Meta-kaolinite and fly ash both exhibit an efficiency of around 50% at 200{sup o}C, which then dropped as the test temperature was increased to 400{sup o}C. Activated scrap tire char performed better at 200{sup o}C than the pyrolysis char showing an arsenic capture capacity similar to that of commercial Norit Darco 'Hg'; however, efficiency dropped to below 40% at 400{sup o}C. These results suggest that the capture mechanism of arsenic (As4) is more complex than purely physical adsorption onto the sorbents. Certain elements within the sorbents may have significant importance for chemical adsorption, in addition to the effect of surface area, as determined by the BET method. This was indeed the case for the mercury capture efficiency for all four sorbents tested. Three of the sorbents tested retained 90% of the mercury when operated at 100{sup o}C. As the temperature increased, the efficiency of activated carbon and pyrolysis char reduced significantly. Curiously, despite having the smallest Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area, a pf-combustion ash was the most effective in capturing mercury over the temperature range studied. These observations suggest that the observed mercury capture was not purely physical adsorption but a combination of physical and chemical processes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Cedric Charpenteau; Revata Seneviratne; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

State of Knowledge on Mercury Chemistry in Power Plant Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical transformations may occur in the flue gas plume of coal-fired power plants (CFPP) that convert reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) into gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). Since the chemical form of inorganic Hg determines its solubility in water and therefore its deposition rate, understanding this chemistry has important implications for emission control. This fact sheet summarizes the state-of-knowledge of mercury chemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics in CFPP plumes.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

163

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Neogene Low-latitude Seasonal Environmental Variations: Stable Isotopic and Trace Elemental Records in Mollusks from the Florida Platform and the Central American Isthmus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Ph.D. dissertation integrates stable isotope and trace element geochemistry in modern and fossil gastropod shells to study low-latitude marine paleoenvironments. First, stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) and Sr/Ca ratios are used to examine low-latitude temperature and salinity variations recorded in Plio-Pleistocene (3.5-1.6 Ma) fossils from western Florida during periods of high-latitude warming and "global" cooling. The middle Pliocene Pinecrest Beds (Units 7 and 4) and the overlaying Plio-Pleistocene Caloosahatchee Formation generate significantly different delta18O-derived paleotemperatures but identical Sr/Ca ratios. High delta18O values, together with low delta13C values and brackish fauna, indicate that Unit 4 was deposited in a lagoonal environment similar to modern Florida Bay. In contrast, relatively low delta18O and high delta13C values in Unit 7 and Caloosahatchee Formation represent deposition in an open-marine environment. The observed Unit 7 and Caloosahatchee paleotemperatures are inconsistent with middle Pliocene warming event, but consistent with the Plio-Pleistocene cooling trend. To quantify modern upwelling and freshening signals and contrast these signals between the tropical eastern Pacific (TEP) and southwestern Caribbean (SWC), methodologies are developed for reconstructing seasonal upwelling and freshening patterns from modern tropical gastropod shells from Panama using: 1) paired oxygen and carbon isotopic profiles and delta18O-delta13C (delta-delta) correlations, and 2) deviation from baseline delta18O values that represent conditions free of seasonal upwelling or freshening influences. Shell delta18O values normalized to the baseline faithfully record modern conditions of little or no upwelling in SWC and Gulf of Chiriqui, and strong upwelling in the Gulf of Panama, as well as strong freshwater input in most areas. The baseline and delta-delta methods are applied to identify and quantify changes in upwelling and freshening in the Neogene TEP and SWC seawaters associated with the final closure of Central American Isthmus. The records reveal significant upwelling in late Miocene SWC and mid Pliocene TEP waters, strong freshening in SWC waters from 5.7-2.2 Ma, and minimal seasonal upwelling and/or freshening variations in Plio-Pleistocene SWC waters. The reconstructed paleotemperatures agree with the global cooling trend through the late Miocene, but lack evidence for middle Pliocene warming or late Neogene global cooling.

Tao, Kai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

LFCM (liquid-fed ceramic melter) processing characteristics of mercury  

SciTech Connect

An experimental-scale liquid-fed ceramic melter was used in a series of tests to evaluate the processing characteristics of mercury in simulated defense waste under various melter operating conditions. This solidification technology had no detectable capacity for incorporating mercury into its borosilicate, vitreous, product, and essentially all the mercury fed to the melter was lost to the off-gas system as gaseous effluent. An ejector venturi scrubber condensed and collected 97% of the mercury evolved from the melter. Chemically the condensed mercury effluent was composed entirely of chlorides, and except in a low-temperature test, mercury chlorides (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) was the primary chloride formed. As a result, combined mercury accounted for most of the insoluble mass collected by the process quench scrubber. Although macroscopic quantities of elemental mercury were never observed in process secondary waste streams, finely divided and dispersed mercury that blackened all condensed Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} residues was capable of saturating the quenched process exhaust with mercury vapor. However, the vapor pressure of mercury in the quenched melter exhaust was easily and predictably controlled with an off-gas stream chiller. 5 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

Goles, R.W.; Sevigny, G.J.; Andersen, C.M.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Reducing Mercury Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Combustion (Results of Investigations and Testing at the Camden Resource Recovery Facility)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for mercury control for flue gases of Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) not only ecological hydrochloric acid (HCl) and elemental mercury (Hg") under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream to the decreasing gas temperature, the elemental mercury is able to react with other flue gas components. The main

Columbia University

168

Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model Version 3.0 (D-MCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM) predicts the cycling and fate of the major forms of mercury in lakes. The Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM) is a Windowsbased simulation model for personal computers. It predicts the cycling and fate of the major forms of mercury in lakes, including methylmercury, Hg(II), and elemental mercury. D-MCM is a time-dependent mechanistic model, designed to consider the most important physical, chemical and biological factors affecting fish mercury concentrations in...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mercury and Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Fish Mercury and Fish Name: donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: how does mercury get into fish in rivers. what is the ecological process involved which could produce toxic levels of mercury in fish and eventually get into humans? Replies: Hi Donna! Nowadays mercury or its compounds are used at a high scale in many industries as the manufacture of chemicals, paints, household itens, pesticides and fungicides. These products can contaminate humans (and mamals) by direct contact, ingestion or inhalation. Besides the air can become contaminated also, and since mercury compounds produce harmful effects in body tissues and functions, that pollution is very dangerous. Now for your question: Efluent wastes containing mercury in various forms sometimes are dropped in sea water or in rivers or lakes. There the mercury may be converted by bacteria, that are in the muddy sediments, into organic mercurial compounds particularly the highly toxic alkyl mercurials ( methyl and di-methyl mercury), which may in turn be concentrated by the fishes and other aquatic forms of life that are used as food by men. The fishes dont seem to be affected but they are able to concentrate mercury in high poisoning levels, and if human beings, mamals or birds eat these containing mercury fishes, algae, crabs or oysters they will be contaminated and poisoned.

170

Trace Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Work with national and international ... 00 Optional Open House and Trace Analysis Lab Tours of ... Ethanol in Water Standard Reference Materials to ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Method for removal of mercury from various gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a method for removing elemental mercury from a fluid, the method comprising irradiating the mercury with light having a wavelength of approximately 254 nm. The method is implemented in situ at various fuel combustion locations such as power plants and municipal incinerators.

Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Total and organic mercury in marine fish of the upper gulf of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

In 1975, the total mercury contents in fish of the gulf of Thailand reportedly ranged from 0 to 0.58 ppM. In a recent study, traces of total mercury were found in the marine food chain, which tend to increase at higher trophic levels and according to the animal's size. As Thailand is one of the countries where the nationwide fish consumption is comparatively high, further study on the contamination of organic mercury in fish is essential.

Cheevaparanapivat, V.; Menasveta, P.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Multimedia Mercury Fate at Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped With SCR and Wet FGD Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the current regulatory climate in the United States, a number of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems will be installed at new and existing coal-fired power plants to remove nitrogen oxide (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mercury. The multimedia fate of trace metal species, especially mercury, in SCR/wet FGD systems is not well understood. Understanding and quantifying the amount of mercury removed from the flue gas and distributed to the solid and aqueous ...

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

PRE-SW Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM)Version 4.0, Beta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM) is a Windows based simulation model for personal computers. It predicts mercury cycling and bioaccumulation in aquatic systems. Mercury forms include methylmercury, Hg(II), and elemental mercury. D-MCM is a time-dependent mechanistic model that can be applied deterministically or probabilistically. Version 4.0 is a major update to D-MCM. The model can be applied in 1,2, and 3 dimensional applications for lakes, rivers, estuaries, ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mercury Reactions in Power Plant Plumes: Pleasant Prairie Experiment and Compliance Scenario Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent technical results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury plume reduction based on these results have improved regional model fits with wet deposition data for particular years, while maintaining model-data fits for remaining archive years. Determining speciation changes occurring in a dispersing stack plume is essential for properly estimating atmospheric mercury fate and deposition patte...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mercury in the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI periodically issues updates on critical research on environmental mercury, discussing scientific findings of crucial interest for a complete understanding of mercury sources, transport, fate, cycling, human exposure, and health effects. This document is part of that EPRI series, focusing on several critical reviews of mercury sources and impacts.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Watershed Mercury Loading Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explains and illustrates a simplified stochastic framework, the Watershed Mercury Loading Framework, for organizing and framing site-specific knowledge and information on mercury loading to waterbodies. The framework permits explicit treatment of data uncertainties. This report will be useful to EPRI members, state and federal regulatory agencies, and watershed stakeholders concerned with mercury-related human and ecological health risk.

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

179

Removal of pyrite and trace elements from waste coal by dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation and chelating agents. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation, ultrafine -bubbles are generated by CO{sub 2} dissolved in water. The ultrafine bubbles have the potential to improve the separation efficiency in fine coal cleaning. Chemicals will be used prior to or during dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation to improve the separation efficiency-CO{sub 2} of pyrite and other minerals including trace metals from coal. Chelating agent will be applied to clean coal to further reduce the trace metals from coal. During this period, a 3 in. diameter packed column has been purchased and installed. This column was then modified for use in dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation. Coal samples of Illinois No. 6 coal are being prepared for flotation. Preliminary flotation tests were performed on Illinois No. 6 waste coal.

Shiao, S.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Company (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Removal of pyrite and trace elements from waste coal by dissolved- CO{sub 2} flotation and chelating agents. Technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

In dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation, ultrafine bubbles are generated by CO{sub 2} dissolved in water. The ultrafine bubbles have the potential to improve the separation efficiency in fine coal cleaning. Chemicals will be used prior to or during dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation to improve the separation efficiency of pyrite and other minerals including trace metals from coal. Chelating agents will be applied to clean coal to further reduce the trace metals from coal. During this period, the project planning has begun. A 3in.-diameter packed column has been ordered. This column will be modified for use in dissolved-CO{sub 2} flotation. Clean and waste coal samples of Illinois No. 6 coal have been scheduled to be picked up from Ohio Coal Testing and Development (OCTAD) facility.

Shiao, S.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 entitled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl 2 , and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species,

182

Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including the synergistic enhancement of mercury removal by calcium.

Thomas K. Gale

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT enhancemenT aDDiTive TechnoLogy for mercury conTroL Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The combustion of subbituminous coals typically results in higher fractions of elemental mercury emissions than the combustion of bituminous coals. This complicates mercury capture efforts, particularly for technologies using powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection, because elemental mercury is not readily captured by PAC injection alone. In short, unmodified PACs are better suited for bituminous coals than for subbituminous coals. Various proprietary sorbent enhancement additives (SEA) have been developed to increase the mercury reactivity of PACs, and perhaps fly

185

Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides  

SciTech Connect

Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygennitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygennitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

MERCURY CONTROL WITH CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS AND OXIDIZING AGENTS  

SciTech Connect

The initial tasks of this DOE funded project to investigate mercury removal by calcium-based sorbents have been completed, and initial testing results have been obtained. Mercury monitoring capabilities have been obtained and validated. An approximately 1MW (3.4 Mbtu/hr) Combustion Research Facility at Southern Research Institute was used to perform pilot-scale investigations of mercury sorbents, under conditions representative of full-scale boilers. The initial results of ARCADIS G&M proprietary sorbents, showed ineffective removal of either elemental or oxidized mercury. Benchscale tests are currently underway to ascertain the importance of differences between benchscale and pilot-scale experiments. An investigation of mercury-capture temperature dependence using common sorbents has also begun. Ordinary hydrated lime removed 80 to 90% of the mercury from the flue gas, regardless of the temperature of injection. High temperature injection of hydrated lime simultaneously captured SO{sub 2} at high temperatures and Hg at low temperatures, without any deleterious effects on mercury speciation. Future work will explore alternative methods of oxidizing elemental mercury.

Thomas K. Gale

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Process for low mercury coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal. 4 figures.

Merriam, N.W.; Grimes, R.W.; Tweed, R.E.

1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mercury Detection with Gold Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. J. Warmack, Detection of mercury vapor using resonatingA surface acoustic wave mercury vapor sensor, Ieee Trans.N. E. Selin, Integrating mercury science and policy in the

Crosby, Jeffrey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Process for low mercury coal  

SciTech Connect

A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Grimes, R. William (Laramie, WY); Tweed, Robert E. (Laramie, WY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Atmospheric Mercury Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary and analysis of research findings on utility and environmental mercury from 1997 to 2003. The update categorizes and describes recent work on mercury in utility-burned coal and its route through power plants, the measures for its control, and its fate in the environment following emissions from utility stacks. This fate includes atmospheric chemistry and transport, deposition to land and water surfaces, aquatic cycling, the dynamics of mercury in freshwater fish food webs, and th...

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Provenance Traces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provenance is information about the origin, derivation, ownership, or history of an object. It has recently been studied extensively in scientific databases and other settings due to its importance in helping scientists judge data validity, quality and integrity. However, most models of provenance have been stated as ad hoc definitions motivated by informal concepts such as "comes from", "influences", "produces", or "depends on". These models lack clear formalizations describing in what sense the definitions capture these intuitive concepts. This makes it difficult to compare approaches, evaluate their effectiveness, or argue about their validity. We introduce provenance traces, a general form of provenance for the nested relational calculus (NRC), a core database query language. Provenance traces can be thought of as concrete data structures representing the operational semantics derivation of a computation; they are related to the traces that have been used in self-adjusting computation, but differ in impor...

Cheney, James; Ahmed, Amal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mercury Thermometer Alternatives Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tutorials are designed for educating various industrial user groups about the upcoming and current changes that ban the use of mercury products. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

MERCURY & DIMETHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE & EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies the dose response data available for several toxic mercury compounds and summarizes the symptoms and health effects associated with each of them.

HONEYMAN, J.O.

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mercury Risk Assessment II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection Agency in 2005, will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. In formulating the regulations, a central point of debate...

196

Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury capture in WarM poSt-GaSification GaS clean-up SySteMS Background Power generation systems employing gasification technology must remove a variety of potential air pollutants, including mercury, from the synthetic gas steam prior to combustion. In general, efforts to remove mercury have focused on removal at lower temperatures (under 300 °F). The ability to remove mercury at warm-gas cleanup conditions (300 °F to 700 °F) or in the hot-gas cleanup range (above 1200 °F) would provide plant operators with greater flexibility to choose the treatment method best suited to conditions at their plant. The University of Arizona is investigating the use of paper waste-derived sorbents (PWDS) for the removal of mercury and other trace metals at temperatures in and

197

Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

It's Elemental - The Element Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cadmium Cadmium Previous Element (Cadmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tin) Tin The Element Indium [Click for Isotope Data] 49 In Indium 114.818 Atomic Number: 49 Atomic Weight: 114.818 Melting Point: 429.75 K (156.60°C or 313.88°F) Boiling Point: 2345 K (2072°C or 3762°F) Density: 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. Say what? Indium is pronounced as IN-dee-em. History and Uses: Indium was discovered by the German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter in 1863. Reich and Richter had been looking for traces of the element thallium in samples of zinc ores. A brilliant indigo line in

199

Studies of Mercury in High Level Waste Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During nuclear weapons production, nuclear reactor target and fuel rods were processed in F- and H-Canyons. For the target rods, a caustic dissolution of the aluminum cladding was performed prior to nitric acid dissolution of the uranium metal targets in the large canyon dissolvers. To dissolve the aluminum cladding and the U-Al fuel, mercury in the form of soluble mercury (II) nitrate was added as a catalyst to accelerate the dissolution of the aluminum. F-Canyon began to process plutonium-containing residues that were packaged in aluminum cans and thus required the use of mercury as a dissolution catalyst. Following processing to remove uranium and plutonium using the solvent extraction process termed the Plutonium-Uranium Recovery by Extraction (PUREX) process, the acidic waste solutions containing fission products and other radionuclides were neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The mercury used in canyon processing is fractionated between the sludge and supernate that is transferred from the canyons to the tank farm. The sludge component of the waste is currently vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The vitrified waste canisters are to be sent to the federal repository for High Level Waste. The mercury in the sludge, presumably in an oxide or hydroxide form is reduced to elemental mercury by the chemical additions and high temperatures, steam stripped and collected in the Mercury Collection Tank. The mercury in the dilute supernate is in the form of mercuric ion and is soluble. During evaporation, the mercuric ion is reduced to elemental mercury, vaporizes into the overheads system and is collected as a metallic liquid in the Mercury Removal Tank.

Wilmarth, W.R.

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mercury Control Update 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been evaluating cost-effective methods for reducing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes the current status of mercury control technologies and offers detailed discussion of boiler bromide addition balance-of-plant impacts and activated carbon injection (ACI) tests at selected sites.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

202

Elevated Mercury Concentrations in Humans of Madre de  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enormous increase in practically unregulated mining in Madre de Dios Peru is leading to massive release of liquid elemental mercury to the environment. Rapidly increasing global prices for gold are causing a massive upsurge in artisanal mining in the Peruvian Amazon, considered to be one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. This study identifies the current levels of mercury in the human population, through identifying levels of total mercury in human hair in mining zones of Madre de Dios Department and in the nearby city of Puerto Maldonado. A regression analysis reveals that fish consumption, gender, and location of residence were significant indicators of mercury levels; while duration of residence and age had no significant relationship to mercury levels. Increased fish consumption levels were the strongest indicators of increased total mercury levels across the entire population. The levels of total mercury in hair was significantly (a = 0.05) higher in mining zones, than Puerto Maldonado. In both areas men had significantly higher levels than women, likely due to a difference in metabolism or varying levels of direct involvement in gold mining- a male predominated industry. This is the first study to show the health threat that mercury poses to this region, however further research needs to be done to gain a

Dios Peru; Katy Ashe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

XAS Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

view large image view large image contact info Friday, 29 August 2003 X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish - SSRL Scientists Reveal New Findings in Science Article The presence of "methyl mercury" in fish is well-known, but until now the detailed chemical identity of the mercury has remained a mystery. In an x-ray absorption spectroscopy study published in the August 29 issue of Science (Science 301, 2003: 1203; Science now: Murky Picture on Fish Mercury), SSRL scientists report that the chemical form of mercury involves a sulfur atom (most likely in a so-called aliphatic form). The study presents significant new knowledge - because the toxic properties of mercury (or any element) are critically dependent upon its chemical form - and represents an important milestone in developing an understanding of how harmful mercury in fish might actually be. The study was carried out by SSRL staff scientists Ingrid Pickering and Graham George and postdoctoral fellow Hugh Harris using SSRL's structural molecular biology beam line 9-3. The very high flux, excellent beam stability and state-of-the-art detector technology allowed the team to measure samples of fish containing micromolar levels of mercury, much lower than had previously been possible.

205

Definition: Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Mercury Vapor Mercury is discharged as a highly volatile vapor during hydrothermal activity and high concentrations in...

206

Mercury Sensing with Optically Responsive Gold Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assume that the mass of mercury adsorbed at saturation istactics, nanoparticle based mercury sensing should advancemost sensitive method for mercury sensing. References "1!

James, Jay Zachary

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jennifer Brouner Jennifer Brouner Communications 865.241.0709 ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup ORNL researchers are learning more about the microbial processes that convert elemental mercury into methylmercury. ORNL researchers are learning more about the microbial processes that convert elemental mercury into methylmercury. (hi-res image) OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 5, 2013 - More forms of mercury can be converted to deadly methylmercury than previously thought, according to a study published Sunday in Nature Geoscience. The discovery provides scientists with another piece of the mercury puzzle, bringing them one step closer to understanding the challenges associated with mercury cleanup. Earlier this year, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at Oak Ridge

208

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon injecTion opTions For Mercury conTrol AT TXu's big brown sTATion Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Lignite coal is unique because of its highly variable ash content (rich in alkali and alkaline-earth elements), high moisture levels, low chlorine content, and high calcium content. Unique to Texas lignite coals are relatively high iron and selenium concentrations. When combusting Texas lignite coals, up to 80 percent of the mercury in the flue gas is present as elemental mercury, which is not readily captured by downstream pollution control devices. To better understand the factors that influence mercury control at units firing

209

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

210

Mercury Control Update 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A February 2008 decision by the U.S. District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals remanded the Clean Air Mercury Rule back to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, opening the possibility of more stringent federal emission limits similar to those already adopted by some states. To meet these stringent limits, high mercury removals based on Maximum Achievable Control Technology for individual power plants may be needed. To help electric power companies comply with tightening emission standards in a ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Demonstration of New Technologies Required for the Treatment of Mixed Waste Contaminated with {ge}260 ppm Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) defines several categories of mercury wastes, each of which has a defined technology or concentration-based treatment standard, or universal treatment standard (UTS). RCRA defines mercury hazardous wastes as any waste that has a TCLP value for mercury of 0.2 mg/L or greater. Three of these categories, all nonwastewaters, fall within the scope of this report on new technologies to treat mercury-contaminated wastes: wastes as elemental mercury; hazardous wastes with less than 260 mg/kg [parts per million (ppm)] mercury; and hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury. While this report deals specifically with the last category--hazardous wastes with 260 ppm or more of mercury--the other two categories will be discussed briefly so that the full range of mercury treatment challenges can be understood. The treatment methods for these three categories are as follows: Waste as elemental mercury--RCRA identifies amalgamation (AMLGM) as the treatment standard for radioactive elemental mercury. However, radioactive mercury condensates from retorting (RMERC) processes also require amalgamation. In addition, incineration (IMERC) and RMERC processes that produce residues with >260 ppm of radioactive mercury contamination and that fail the RCRA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limit for mercury (0.20 mg/L) require RMERC, followed by AMLGM of the condensate. Waste with TCLP mercury concentration of 0.20 mg/L be treated by a suitable method to meet the TCLP limit for mercury of 0.025 mg/L. RMERC residues must meet the TCLP value of {ge}0.20 mg/L, or be stabilized and meet the {ge}0.025 mg/L limit. Waste with {ge}260 ppm mercury--For hazardous wastes with mercury contaminant concentrations {ge}260 ppm and RCRA-regulated organic contaminants (other than incinerator residues), incineration or retorting (IMERC or RMERC) is the treatment standard. For wastes with mercury contaminant concentrations {ge}260 ppm that are inorganic, including incinerator and retort residues, RMERC is the treatment standard. Mercury hazardous waste contaminated with {ge}260 ppm mercury is the primary focus of this report.

Morris, M.I.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

NETL: Mercury Emissions Inactive Mercury Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Mercury Projects Completed Mercury Projects View specific project information by clicking the state of interest on the map. Clickable U.S. Map ALABAMA Characterizing Toxic Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants Southern Research Institute The objective of this contract is to perform sampling and analysis of air toxic emissions at commercial coal-fired power plants in order to collect data that the EPA will use in their Congressionally mandated report on Hazardous Air Pollutants from Electric Utilities. CALIFORNIA Assessment of Toxic Emissions from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Utilizing an ESP Energy & Environmental Research Corporation – CA The overall objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions of two coal-fired electric utility power plants. The power plant that was assessed for toxic emissions during Phase I was American Electric Power Service Corporation's Cardinal Station Unit 1.

213

Science and strategies to reduce mercury risks: a critical review Noelle E. Selin*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide, nitrogen oxides, mercury, carbon dioxide) · Recent trends in emissions/impacts · Current policy") · Acid gases (sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides) released from power plants can react in atmospheric to form emissions - elemental and oxidized mercury Global and regional sources Natural emissions Key species: Hg° Hg

214

Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

ORNL DAAC Announces Mercury EOS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Announces Mercury EOS Search and Order April 21, 2003: Mercury EOS, the ORNL DAAC's new search and order system that works with NASA's EOS ClearingHouse (ECHO), is now operational....

216

Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes the status of activities to upgrade the Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM), an EPRI simulation model that predicts mercury cycling and bioaccumulation in lakes.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas-phase mercury oxidation: effects on bromine, chlorine and SO2 under air firing and oxy-fuel conditions, experimental and modeling study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mercury in coal is emitted in its elemental state when the coal is burned. As the combustion flue gas cools, reactions under homogeneous and (more)

Buitrago, Paula Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Program on Technology Innovation: Coastal Halogen Atmospheric Research on Mercury Deposition (CHARMeD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining mercurys atmospheric transformation reactions is essential for atmospheric deposition models that are used for regulatory purposes. It is the oxidation of inorganic elemental Hg (Hg0) to its water-soluble ionic form (Hg2+) that determines the rate of Hg deposited in waterways. Substantial research has been done in the past on atmospheric Hg transformation reactions with ozone (O3) and the hydroxyl radical (OH), but O3 and OH may not be capable of fully causing mercurys observed oxidation an...

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

Groundwater Discharge of Mercury to California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

too much is consumed. This toxic form of mercury is producedfrom inorganic mercury by sulfur- and iron-reducing bacteriadischarge of total mercury and monomethyl mercury to central

Flegal, Russell; Paytan, Adina; Black, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Gas Mileage of 1994 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Mercury Vehicles 4 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1994 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Capri 20 City 21 Combined 24 Highway 1994 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Capri 21 City 23 Combined 26 Highway 1994 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Capri 22 City 24 Combined 28 Highway 1994 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Cougar 17 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1994 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Cougar 16 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1994 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Mercury Grand Marquis 16

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gas Mileage of 1985 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Mercury Vehicles 5 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1985 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 19 City 20 Combined 23 Highway 1985 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Manual 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 21 City 23 Combined 27 Highway 1985 Mercury Capri 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 17 City 18 Combined 20 Highway 1985 Mercury Capri 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 15 City 17 Combined 22 Highway 1985 Mercury Capri 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 15 City 17 Combined 22 Highway 1985 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1985 Mercury Capri 18 City

222

Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream  

SciTech Connect

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, {sup 203}Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste simulant and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl{sub 2} from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. An experimental flowsheet was designed from the batch contact tests and tested counter-currently using 5.5 cm centrifugal contactors. Results from the counter-current test show that mercury can be removed from the acidic mixed SBW simulant and recovered separately from the actinides.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, M.G.

1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Formulated 2-Traces - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... next up previous. Next: Characteristics of truth tables Up: Introduction to Traces Previous: Definition of the n-Trace...

227

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Oxidation of Mercury Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels The objective of the proposed research is to assess the potential for the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalysts in a coal fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. Results from the project will contribute to a greater understanding of mercury behavior across SCR catalysts. Additional tasks include: review existing pilot and field data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts and propose a mechanism for mercury oxidation and create a simple computer model for mercury oxidation based on the hypothetical mechanism. Related Papers and Publications: Final Report - December 31, 2004 [PDF-532KB]

228

Gaseous mercury release during steam curing of aerated concretes that contain fly ash and activated carbon sorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaseous mercury released from aerated concrete during both presteam curing at 25{sup o}C and steam curing at 80{sup o}C was measured in controlled laboratory experiments. Mercury release originated from two major components in the concrete mixture: (1) class F coal fly ash and (2) a mixture of the fly ash and powdered activated carbon onto which elemental mercury was adsorbed. Mercury emitted during each curing cycle was collected on iodated carbon traps in a purge-and-trap arrangement and subsequently measured by cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Through 3 h of presteam curing, the release of mercury from the freshly prepared mixture was less than 0.03 ng/kg of concrete. Releases of total mercury over the 21 h steam curing process ranged from 0.4 to 5.8 ng of mercury/kg of concrete and depended upon mercury concentrations in the concrete. The steam-cured concrete had a higher mercury release rate (ng kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}) compared to air-cured concrete containing fly ash, but the shorter curing interval resulted in less total release of mercury from the steam-cured concrete. The mercury flux from exposed concrete surfaces to mercury-free air ranged from 0.77 to 11.1 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, which was similar to mercury fluxes for natural soils to ambient air of 4.2 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1} reported by others. Less than 0.022% of the total quantity of mercury present from all mercury sources in the concrete was released during the curing process, and therefore, nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Ping Sun; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; Panuwat Taerakul; William E. Wolfe [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MERCURY WASTE.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process was used to treat approximately 90kg of elemental mercury mixed waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Treatment was carried out in a series of eight batches using a 1 ft{sup 3} pilot-scale mixer, where mercury loading in each batch was 33.3 weight percent. Although leach performance is currently not regulated for amalgamated elemental mercury (Hg) mixed waste, Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) testing of SPSS treated elemental mercury waste indicates that leachability is readily reduced to below the TCLP limit of 200 ppb (regulatory requirement following treatment by retort for wastes containing > 260 ppb Hg), and with process optimization, to levels less than the stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) limit of 25 ppb that is applied to waste containing < 260 ppm Hg. In addition, mercury-contaminated debris, consisting of primary glass and plastic containers, as well as assorted mercury thermometers, switches, and labware, was first reacted with SPSS components to stabilize the mercury contamination, then macroencapsulated in the molten SPSS product. This treatment was done by vigorous agitation of the sulfur polymer powder and the comminuted debris. Larger plastic and metal containers were reacted to stabilize internal mercury contamination, and then filled with molten sulfur polymer to encapsulate the treated product.

ADAMS,J.W.; KALB,P.D.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Trace elements in the aluminum value chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrofit of a Combined Breaker Feeder with a Chisel Bath Contact Detection System to Reduce Anode Effect Frequency in a Potroom Simulating Traffic in a...

231

Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2 Anthropogenic emissions 28 2.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 30 2.3.1 Sources of PAHs 30 2.3.2 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 2.3.3 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 CHAPTER THREE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Trace Element Analysis Core Lab methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Hg and Pb (no gas mode). Selenium and Fe are analysed in collision mode with H2. The sample strem a weighed sample is placed in either a 15 ml or 50 ml centrifuge tube and an appropriate volume of optima analysis is performed in the 15 ml centrifuge tubes with addition of 0.5 mls HNO3. For sediment/soils 0

Lotko, William

233

DEPOSITION OF TOXIC TRACE ELEMENTS AND HEAVY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on sub-micrometer (ie, fine) particles was emitted from oil-fired power plants. Likewise, sele- nium is a marker of coal combustion particles; Zn ...

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

SAP for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) have developed and patented a technology for the on-site production of activated carbon (AC). The basic approach of the sorbent activation process (SAP) is to use coal from the plant site to form AC for direct injection into flue gas, upstream of the particulate control device, for mercury adsorption. The SAP is designed to help significantly reduce the cost of AC for power plant mercury control. This report summarizes laboratory and Phase 1 field test...

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mercury Controls Update 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of the proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) ruling for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on March 16, 2011, the requirement to reduce emissions of mercury and other HAPs is one of the key challenges for coal-fired power plants. The proposed MACT ruling limits mercury emissions to 1.2 lb/TBtu at the stack (4.0 lb/TBtu for lignite-fired units), based on a 30-day rolling average including startup and shutdown periods. To help electri...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mercury in FGD Byproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides interim results from two EPRI co-funded projects that pertain to what happens to mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers when the scrubbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by USG Corporation under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080, "Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production." The second project is being co-sponsore...

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Mercury Vapor Details Activities (23) Areas (23) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Anomalously high concentrations can indicate high permeability or conduit for fluid flow Hydrological: Field wide soil sampling can generate a geometrical approximation of fluid circulation Thermal: High concentration in soils can be indicative of active hydrothermal activity Dictionary.png Mercury Vapor: Mercury is discharged as a highly volatile vapor during hydrothermal

238

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,E . 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone the

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 3 Topical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers conducted field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury at a coal-fired power plant equipped with a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results, while confounded by measurement difficulties, showed that under bituminous coal flue gas conditions, two catalysts, Pd #1 and Carbon #6, continued to oxidize at least 85 percent of the inlet elemental mercury after three months.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gas Mileage of 1986 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Mercury Vehicles 6 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1986 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Mercury Capri 18 City 20 Combined 23 Highway 1986 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Manual 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Mercury Capri 21 City 23 Combined 26 Highway 1986 Mercury Capri 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Mercury Capri 17 City 19 Combined 22 Highway 1986 Mercury Capri 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Mercury Capri 15 City 18 Combined 24 Highway 1986 Mercury Capri 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Mercury Capri View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1986 Mercury Cougar 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline

242

Gas Mileage of 1991 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Mercury Vehicles 1 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1991 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1991 Mercury Capri 21 City 22 Combined 24 Highway 1991 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1991 Mercury Capri View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 21 City 23 Combined 26 Highway 1991 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1991 Mercury Capri 22 City 24 Combined 28 Highway 1991 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1991 Mercury Cougar 17 City 20 Combined 24 Highway 1991 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1991 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1991 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline

243

Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

Trujillo, Patricio E. (Santa Fe, NM); Campbell, Evan E. (Los Alamos, NM); Eutsler, Bernard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Trace species emissions for IGFC  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this investigation are to study both the fate and distribution of at least five significant, coal-derived trace elements commonly present in coal-gas, in terms of their vaporization during gasification, their condensation and sorption during hot-gas cleanup, as well as their effects on fuel cells, gas turbines, and ultimately the environment. The definition here of trace does not include the major contaminants of sulfur and chlorine, etc., although the simultaneous presence of such major species is always considered in our thermochemical calculations. Of course, many other elements can vaporize in trace quantities from raw coal as either volatile, molecular compounds or as metallic vapors which, besides their deleterious action on the energy conversion systems, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when emitted into the atmosphere. Hence, an understanding is sought of how the type and quantity of significant trace species in coal-gas changes from the coal pile through cleanup subsystems and the electric generators to the exhaust stack of an integrated system.

Pigeaud, A.E.; Helble, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control With Monolith Traps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Technologies Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Jenny Tennant Technology/Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 MSwanson@undeerc.org PARTNERS Corning, Inc. PROJECT DURATION

248

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mercury Information Clearinghouse  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through analysis and quality assurance programs; and (4) Create and maintain an information clearinghouse to ensure that all parties can keep informed on global mercury research and development activities.

Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dryer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the seventh in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 1,300 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing three percent sulfur. The unit was equipped with an ESP and a limestone-based wet FGD to control particulate and SO2 emissions, respectively. At the time of sampling an SCR was not installed on this unit. Four sampling tests were performed in September 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the FGD inlet flue gas oxidized:elemental mercury ratio was roughly 2:1, with 66% oxidized mercury and 34% elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 53%. The average Hg concentration in the stack flue gas was 4.09 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The average stack mercury emission was 3.47 Ib/TBtu. The mercury material balance closures ranged from 87% to 108%, with an average of 97%. A sampling program similar to this one was performed on a similar unit (at the same plant) that was equipped with an SCR for NOx control. Comparison of the results from the two units show that the SCR increases the percentage of mercury that is in the oxidized form, which, in turn, lends to more of the total mercury being removed in the wet scrubber. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal.

J.A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J.E. Locke

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Poultry manure as raw material for mercury adsorbents in gas applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantity of poultry manure generated each year is large, and technologies that take advantage of the material should be explored. At the same time, increased emphasis on the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired electric power plants has resulted in environmental regulations that may, in the future, require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream, where they could adsorb the mercury. The sorbents (now containing mercury) would be removed via filtration or other means from the flue gas. Our preliminary work has demonstrated that activated carbon made from poultry manure can adsorb mercury from air with good efficiency. In laboratory experiments, an activated carbon made from turkey cake manure removed the majority of elemental mercury from a hot air stream. Other activated carbons made from chicken and turkey litter manure were also efficient. In general, unwashed activated carbons made from poultry manure were more efficient in removing mercury than their acid-washed counterparts. The results suggest that the adsorption of mercury was mainly due to chemisorption on the surface of the carbon. Other potential uses for the activated carbons are the removal of mercury from air and natural gas.

Klasson, K.T.; Lima, I.M.; Boihem, L.L. [USDA ARS, New Orleans, LA (United States)

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas Mileage of 2002 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Mercury Vehicles 2 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2002 Mercury Cougar 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2002 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 21 City 24 Combined 31 Highway 2002 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2002 Mercury Cougar 18 City 21 Combined 26 Highway 2002 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2002 Mercury Cougar 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2002 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2002 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 2002 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2002 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 14 City

253

Gas Mileage of 2008 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Mercury Vehicles 8 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2008 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2008 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV Gas 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway E85 11 City 13 Combined 16 Highway 2008 Mercury Mariner 4WD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2008 Mercury Mariner 4WD 19 City 21 Combined 24 Highway 2008 Mercury Mariner 4WD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2008 Mercury Mariner 4WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 17 City 19 Combined 22 Highway 2008 Mercury Mariner FWD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2008 Mercury Mariner FWD 20 City 22 Combined 26 Highway 2008 Mercury Mariner FWD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2008 Mercury Mariner FWD

254

Gas Mileage of 1987 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Mercury Vehicles 7 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1987 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1987 Mercury Cougar 17 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1987 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1987 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1987 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1987 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1987 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1987 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 16 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1987 Mercury Lynx 4 cyl, 1.9 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1987 Mercury Lynx 23

255

Gas Mileage of 1990 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 Mercury Vehicles 90 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1990 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1990 Mercury Cougar 15 City 18 Combined 21 Highway 1990 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 17 City 20 Combined 24 Highway 1990 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1990 Mercury Cougar 15 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1990 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1990 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 15

256

Gas Mileage of 1999 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1999 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1999 Mercury Cougar 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1999 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By...

257

Gas Mileage of 1984 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1984 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1984 Mercury Capri 18 City 20 Combined 22 Highway 1984...

258

Gas Mileage of 1988 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1988 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1988 Mercury Cougar 18 City 21 Combined 25 Highway 1988...

259

Gas Mileage of 1992 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1992 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1992 Mercury Capri View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle...

260

Gas Mileage of 1996 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1996 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1996 Mercury Cougar 17 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1996...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas Mileage of 2007 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2007 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2007 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates...

262

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas Mileage of 1989 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Mercury Vehicles 9 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1989 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1989 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 17 City 20 Combined 25 Highway 1989 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1989 Mercury Cougar 15 City 17 Combined 21 Highway 1989 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Manual 5-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1989 Mercury Cougar 15 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis Wagon 15

265

Gas Mileage of 1993 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Mercury Vehicles 3 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1993 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Mercury Capri 20 City 21 Combined 24 Highway 1993 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Mercury Capri View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 21 City 23 Combined 26 Highway 1993 Mercury Capri 4 cyl, 1.6 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Mercury Capri View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 22 City 24 Combined 28 Highway 1993 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Mercury Cougar 17 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1993 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15

266

BEHAVIOR OF MERCURY DURING DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL PROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility has experienced significant issues with the stripping and recovery of mercury in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The stripping rate has been inconsistent, often resulting in extended processing times to remove mercury to the required endpoint concentration. The recovery of mercury in the Mercury Water Wash Tank has never been high, and has decreased significantly since the Mercury Water Wash Tank was replaced after the seventh batch of Sludge Batch 5. Since this time, essentially no recovery of mercury has been seen. Pertinent literature was reviewed, previous lab-scale data on mercury stripping and recovery was examined, and new lab-scale CPC Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were conducted. For previous lab-scale data, many of the runs with sufficient mercury recovery data were examined to determine what factors affect the stripping and recovery of mercury and to improve closure of the mercury material balance. Ten new lab-scale SRAT runs (HG runs) were performed to examine the effects of acid stoichiometry, sludge solids concentration, antifoam concentration, form of mercury added to simulant, presence of a SRAT heel, operation of the SRAT condenser at higher than prototypic temperature, varying noble metals from none to very high concentrations, and higher agitation rate. Data from simulant runs from SB6, SB7a, glycolic/formic, and the HG tests showed that a significant amount of Hg metal was found on the vessel bottom at the end of tests. Material balance closure improved from 12-71% to 48-93% when this segregated Hg was considered. The amount of Hg segregated as elemental Hg on the vessel bottom was 4-77% of the amount added. The highest recovery of mercury in the offgas system generally correlated with the highest retention of Hg in the slurry. Low retention in the slurry (high segregation on the vessel bottom) resulted in low recovery in the offgas system. High agitation rates appear to result in lower retention of mercury in the slurry. Both recovery of mercury in the offgas system and removal (segregation + recovery) from the slurry correlate with slurry consistency. Higher slurry consistency results in better retention of Hg in the slurry (less segregation) and better recovery in the offgas system, but the relationships of recovery and retention with consistency are sludge dependent. Some correlation with slurry yield stress and acid stoichiometry was also found. Better retention of mercury in the slurry results in better recovery in the offgas system because the mercury in the slurry is stripped more easily than the segregated mercury at the bottom of the vessel. Although better retention gives better recovery, the time to reach a particular slurry mercury content (wt%) is longer than if the retention is poorer because the segregation is faster. The segregation of mercury is generally a faster process than stripping. The stripping factor (mass of water evaporated per mass of mercury stripped) of mercury at the start of boiling were found to be less than 1000 compared to the assumed design basis value of 750 (the theoretical factor is 250). However, within two hours, this value increased to at least 2000 lb water per lb Hg. For runs with higher mercury recovery in the offgas system, the stripping factor remained around 2000, but runs with low recovery had stripping factors of 4000 to 40,000. DWPF data shows similar trends with the stripping factor value increasing during boiling. These high values correspond to high segregation and low retention of mercury in the sludge. The stripping factor for a pure Hg metal bead in water was found to be about 10,000 lb/lb. About 10-36% of the total Hg evaporated in a SRAT cycle was refluxed back to the SRAT during formic acid addition and boiling. Mercury is dissolved as a result of nitric acid formation from absorption of NO{sub x}. The actual solubility of dissolved mercury in the acidic condensate is about 100 times higher than the actual concentrations measured. Mercury metal present in the MWWT from previous batch

Zamecnik, J.; Koopman, D.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms speciation and fractionation in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to determine the speciation, it is a useful practice to do fractionation instead. Fractionation is the process of classification of an analyte or a group of analytes from a certain sample according to physical (e.g. size, solubility) or chemical (e.g. bonding, reactivity) properties."

Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Mercury Oxidation Across SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effects of addition of various acid gas species on the oxidation of elemental mercury across two commercial SCR catalysts in a pilot SCR reactor operating on a slipstream from a Powder River Basin coal-fired power plant. Tests were conducted by the Western Kentucky University (WKU) to evaluate the impact of flue gas constituents (HCl, HF, HBr, HI, SO3, NH3:NO), operating conditions, and catalyst design on mercury oxidation. The results and data were reviewed by Reaction Engineer...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Public Health Guidance Note Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) occurs in nature as the mineral cinnibar (red mercuric sulfide) and has found widespread use in industry. The commercial

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

PUBLIC HEALTH STATEMENT MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Mercury. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQs, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method for mercury refinement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Selected elemental distributions as determined by reference retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to determine potential hindrances to the commercial development of the oil shale industry mass balance Fischer assay was used as a reference retorting method to examine the distribution of selected elements generally considered as contaminants in the final retort products. The elements examined were nitrogen, sulfur, silver, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead, selenium, and zinc. The shales used in this study were an eastern (New Albany) interim reference shale, a western (Green River Formation) interim reference shale, and a series of stratigraphically differentiated shales from Colorado corehole No. 1 in the Piceance Creek Basin. Analysis of the raw shale and retort products was accomplished using instrumental elemental methods including inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy and graphite furnace atomic absorption. Carbon balances indicated a high potential for achieving good mass closures existed. However, instrumental limitations combined with a high potential for contamination and/or representative sampling problems resulted in poor closures for many of the trace elements. Consistent closures were obtained for arsenic, barium, copper, and zinc. Given the operating conditions of the retort all elements under consideration remained primarily in the spent shale. Elements verified in the oil product included nitrogen and sulfur compounds and arsenic and selenium. The water product was also contaminated by nitrogen and sulfur compounds and arsenic and selenium. Evidence suggests the sulfur occurs primarily as organic sulfur. Quantitative results for the gas product were poor. However, sulfur and mercury were determined to be present at significant levels in the gas stream. The data presented here concurs with previously reported data that suggests the existence of several potential problem areas in the development of an oil shale industry. 42 refs., 1 fig., 42 tabs.

Johnson, L.S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas Mileage of 2000 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2000 Mercury Vehicles 2000 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2000 Mercury Cougar 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2000 Mercury Cougar 21 City 25 Combined 31 Highway 2000 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2000 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 18 City 21 Combined 26 Highway 2000 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2000 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 18 City 21 Combined 26 Highway 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 2000 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

283

Gas Mileage of 2004 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Mercury Vehicles 4 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2004 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2004 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 2004 Mercury Marauder 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 2004 Mercury Marauder View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 17 Combined 21 Highway 2004 Mercury Monterey Wagon FWD 6 cyl, 4.2 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2004 Mercury Monterey Wagon FWD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 17 Combined 21 Highway 2004 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2004 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 13 City 15 Combined 18 Highway 2004 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

284

Gas Mileage of 1997 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Mercury Vehicles 7 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1997 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1997 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1997 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1997 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1997 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1997 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1997 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1997 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 12 City 14 Combined 17 Highway 1997 Mercury Mountaineer 4WD 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline

285

Gas Mileage of 2001 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Mercury Vehicles 1 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2001 Mercury Cougar 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2001 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 21 City 24 Combined 31 Highway 2001 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2001 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 18 City 21 Combined 26 Highway 2001 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2001 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2001 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2001 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 2001 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

286

Gas Mileage of 1998 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Mercury Vehicles 8 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1998 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1998 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 22 Highway 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 14 City 16 Combined 18 Highway 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD 12 City 14 Combined 17 Highway 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 4WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 14 City 15 Combined 18 Highway 1998 Mercury Mountaineer 4WD 8 cyl, 5.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline

287

Gas Mileage of 2005 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Mercury Vehicles 5 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 16 City 19 Combined 23 Highway 2005 Mercury Mariner 2WD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2005 Mercury Mariner 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 19 City 21 Combined 24 Highway 2005 Mercury Mariner 2WD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2005 Mercury Mariner 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 17 City 19 Combined 23 Highway 2005 Mercury Mariner 4WD 4 cyl, 2.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2005 Mercury Mariner 4WD 17 City 19 Combined 21 Highway 2005 Mercury Mariner 4WD 6 cyl, 3.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline

288

Gas Mileage of 1995 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Mercury Vehicles 5 Mercury Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1995 Mercury Cougar 6 cyl, 3.8 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1995 Mercury Cougar 17 City 19 Combined 24 Highway 1995 Mercury Cougar 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1995 Mercury Cougar View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway 1995 Mercury Mystique 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1995 Mercury Mystique View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 21 City 24 Combined 29 Highway 1995 Mercury Mystique 6 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline

289

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Evaluation of Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Technology Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities w/ SCR and FGD Systems Control Technology Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities w/ SCR and FGD Systems CONSOL is evaluating the mercury removal co-benefits achieved by SCR-FGD combi nations. Specific issues that will be addressed include the effects of SCR, catalyst degradation, and load changes on mercury oxidation and capture. This objective will be achieved by measuring mercury removal achieved by SCR-FGD combinations at ten plants with such equipment configurations. These plants include five with wet limestone, three wet lime, and two with dry scrubbing. Material balance will be conducted. Related Papers and Publications: Final Report - April 2006 [PDF-377KB] Topical Report # 11 - January 2006 [PDF-19MB] Topical Report # 9 - January 2006 [PDF-6MB]

290

The Clean Air Mercury Rule  

SciTech Connect

Coming into force on July 15, 2005, the US Clean Air Mercury Rule will use a market-based cap-and-trade approach under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act to reduce mercury emissions from the electric power sector. This article provides a comprehensive summary of the new rule. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Michael Rossler [Edison Electric Institute, Washington, DC (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Freeman, Mark C. (South Park Township, PA); Hargis, Richard A. (Canonsburg, PA); O' Dowd, William J. (Charleroi, PA)

2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

295

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury. 2 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Surface soil-mercury surveys are an inexpensive and useful exploration tool for geothermal resources. ---- Surface geochemical surveys for mercury were conducted in 16 areas in 1979-1981 by ARCO Oil and Gas Company as part of its geothermal evaluation program. Three techniques used together have proved satisfactory in evaluating surface mercury data. These are contouring, histograms and cumulative frequency plots of the data. Contouring geochemical data and constructing histograms are standard

298

Recovery from Mercury Contamination in the Second Songhua River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. , & Rubin, J. R. (2005). Mercury levels and relationshipsJ. , et al. (1999). Mercury in contaminated coastalEnvironmental costs of mercury pollution. Science of the

Zhang, Z. S.; Sun, X. J.; Wang, Q. C.; Zheng, D. M.; Zheng, N.; Lv, X. G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Mercury Isotope Fractionation by Environmental Transport and Transformation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements of atomic mercury. Applied Physics B, 87(2),M. & Covelli, S. , 2000. Mercury speciation in sedimentsarea of the Idrija mercury mine, Slovenia. Environmental

Koster van Groos, Paul Gijsbert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mercury oxidization in dielectric barrier discharge plasma system  

SciTech Connect

The pronounced volatility of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and some of its compounds, coupled with their extreme toxicity, makes these substances extremely hazardous. Conversion of Hg{sup 0} to HgO would significantly enhance mercury removal from flue gases. This investigation is focused on studying the effect of some of the constituents such as O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and NOx present in flue gases on elemental mercury oxidation in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The results show that Hg vapors (6 ppbv) in a stream of 0.1% O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} are effectively oxidized at the energy density of up to 114 J/L. Hg conversion of over 80% is achieved when present in a gas mixture of 8% O{sub 2}, 2% H{sub 2}O, and 10% CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} balance. The presence of NOx enhanced mercury oxidation in the DBD reactor. The oxidation chemistry is discussed. Studies show that Hg can be simultaneously removed along with the other two major pollutants, NOx and SO{sub 2}, in one DBD reactor followed by a wet scrubber system. This avoids the need of three techniques for the removal of major gaseous pollutants from coal-fired power plants.

Chen, Z.Y.; Mannava, D.P.; Mathur, V.K. [University New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Understanding Mercury Chemistry in Coal-Fired Boilers: Biennial Report December 2001 December 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress on a research program cosponsored by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The overall objective of this program is to gain an understanding of the chemistry and kinetics of mercury speciation in post-furnace regions of coal-fired utility boilers, in order to enhance the oxidation of elemental mercury for subsequent capture by air pollution controls, such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), baghouses, and especially sulfur d...

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,140 yd{sup 3} of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations ({approximately} 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system.

Kalb, P.; Adams, J.; Milian, L.

2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

305

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in the flue gas; this was true for all SCR catalyst types and sources. Although chlorine has been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas, coal chlorine was not a statistically significant factor affecting mercury speciation at the economizer exit or at the air heater exit. The only statistically significant factors were the coal ash CaO content and the fly ash carbon content; the fraction of mercury in the elemental form at the economizer exit was positively correlated with both factors. In a direct comparison at four SCR-equipped units vs. similar units at the same sites without SCR (or with the SCR bypassed), the elemental mercury fractions (measured at the ESP outlet) were lower, and the coal-to-stack mercury removals were higher, when the SCR was present and operating. The average coal-to-stack mercury removal at the four units without an operating SCR was 72%, whereas the average removal at the same sites with operating SCRs was 88%. The unit mercury mass balance (a gauge of the overall quality of the tests) at all of the units ranged from 81% to 113%, which were within our QA/QC criterion of 80-120%.

J.A. Withum

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Contamination of ground and surface waters due to uranium mining and milling. Volume I: Biological processes for concentrating trace elements from uranium mine waters. Open file report 25 Jul 79-14 Sep 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from uranium mines in the Ambrosia Lake district near Grants, N. Mex., contains uranium, selenium, radium, and molybdenum. A novel treatment process for waters from two mines, sections 35 and 36, to reduce the concentrations of the trace contaminants was developed. Particulates are settled by ponding and the waters are passed through an ion exchange resin to remove uranium; barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and radium from the mine waters. The mine waters are subsequently passed through three consecutive algae ponds prior to discharge. Water, sediment, and biological samples were collected over a 4-year period and analyzed to assess the role of biological agents in removal of inorganic trace contaminants from the mine waters.

Brieley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Introduction to Traces - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... Section 2 describes patterns that arise in the construction of truth tables for traces and their theoretical interest for the completeness problem.

308

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was greater. Catalyst coating of low-pressure-drop screens was of particular interest as this project was being developed. However, it was discovered that URS was already heavily involved in the pursuit of this same technology, being funded by DOE, and reporting significant success. Hence, testing of SCR catalysts became a major focus of the project. Three different commercial SCR catalysts were examined for their ability to oxidize mercury in simulated flue-gas. Similar performance was observed from each of the three commercial catalysts, both in terms of mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} generation. Ammonia injection hindered mercury oxidation at low HCl concentrations (i.e., {approx}2 ppmv), yet had little impact on mercury oxidation at higher HCl concentrations. On the other hand, SO{sub 2} oxidation was significantly reduced by the presence of ammonia at both low and high concentrations of HCl.

Thomas K. Gale

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

Merriam, N.W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Testing of Mercury Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents Testing of Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, Alabama Subcontractor- ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller The overall goal of this project is to test the effectiveness of calcium-based sorbents and oxidizing agents for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plant boilers. ARCADIS Geraghty & Miller, with EPA support, has developed calcium-based sorbents to remove SO2 and mercury simultaneously. The sorbents consist of hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and an added oxidant and a silica-modified calcium (CaSiO3) with an added oxidant. The mercury capacity in ug Hg/g sorbent for the two sorbents is 20 and 110-150, respectively, verses a mercury capacity for the current standard sorbent, activated carbon, of 70-100. The advantages of a lime based sorbent verses carbon is lower cost, simultaneous removal of sulfur, and allowance of ash to be utilized for a cement additive.

311

Development of new sorbents to remove mercury and selenium from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) are two of the volatile trace metals in coal, which are often not captured by conventional gas clean up devices of coal-fired boilers. An alternative is to use sorbents to capture the volatile components of trace metals after coal combustion. In this project sorbent screening tests were performed in which ten sorbents were selected to remove metallic mercury in N{sub 2}. These sorbents included activated carbon, char prepared from Ohio No. 5 coal, molecular sieves, silica gel, aluminum oxide, hydrated lime, Wyoming bentonite, kaolin, and Amberite IR-120 (an ion-exchanger). The sorbents were selected based on published information and B&W`s experience on mercury removal. The promising sorbent was then selected and modified for detailed studies of removal of mercury and selenium compounds. The sorbents were tested in a bench-scale adsorption facility. A known amount of each sorbent was loaded in the column as a packed bed. A carrier gas was bubbled through the mercury and selenium compounds. The vaporized species were carried by the gas and went through the sorbent beds. The amount of mercury and selenium compounds captured by the sorbents was determined by atomic absorption. Results are discussed.

Shiao, S.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mercury Control Technology Selection Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, and various other organizations have undertaken extensive RD programs over the past decade to develop cost-effective methods for reducing mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. The field tests sponsored by these organizations have produced a significant amount of pilot and full-scale mercury control data for a variety of technologies at power plant sites with different boiler types, firing different coals, and equipped with various air emiss...

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mercury Stability in FGD Byproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant fraction of the mercury in coals fired for power generation currently is removed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems and incorporated in the byproducts from those systems. This report summarizes the results of an EPRI-sponsored project to measure the stability of mercury in FGD byproducts from coal-fired generating plants under simulated landfill and reuse conditions. The current effort repeated portions of a 2003 project, documented in EPRI report 1004254, to determine whether th...

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Mercury Atomic Clock Sets Time-Keeping Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury Atomic Clock Sets Time-Keeping Record. ... A prototype mercury optical clock originally was demonstrated at NIST in 2000. ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

GPU ray tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NVIDIA OptiX ray tracing engine is a programmable system designed for NVIDIA GPUs and other highly parallel architectures. The OptiX engine builds on the key observation that most ray tracing algorithms can be implemented using a small ...

Steven G. Parker; Heiko Friedrich; David Luebke; Keith Morley; James Bigler; Jared Hoberock; David McAllister; Austin Robison; Andreas Dietrich; Greg Humphreys; Morgan McGuire; Martin Stich

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ray tracing visualization toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ray Tracing Visualization Toolkit (rtVTK) is a collection of programming and visualization tools supporting visual analysis of ray-based rendering algorithms. rtVTK leverages layered visualization within the spatial domain of computation, enabling ... Keywords: ray tracing, ray-based rendering, visualization

Christiaan Gribble; Jeremy Fisher; Daniel Eby; Ed Quigley; Gideon Ludwig

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning Midwestern and Eastern coals, which are higher in sulfur and chlorine. Also, the isolation of such gases as hydrogen chloride (HCl), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) will be investigated. All of these efforts will be used to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to flue gas composition, temperature, and flow rate.

Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of New Optical Sensors for Measurements of Mercury Concentrations, Speciation, and Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for elemental mercury was developed and applied for measurements in a high-temperature flow reactor and in the exhaust stream of a coal-fired combustor. The final version of the sensor incorporates a 375-nm single-mode laser and a 784-nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The output of these lasers is sum-frequency mixed in a non-linear beta-barium borate crystal to generate a 254-nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency is tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7-nm. The tuning range is large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. Because of this large tuning range, the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Broadband absorption is a major concern for lamp-based mercury sensor, and the sample to be monitored must be chemically treated prior to analysis to remove species such as SO{sub 2} that absorb near 253.7 nm. No pretreatment is required when our diode-laser-based sensor is used for elemental mercury measurements. Our laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA), and were generally in good agreement except that the insitu diode-laser-based sensor measurements tended to give somewhat higher concentrations than the CMA measurements, presumably due to absorption of elemental mercury in the sampling lines needed for the CMA measurements. At Texas A&M University, the homogeneous oxidation of elemental mercury was studied using a high-temperature flow reactor.

Robert Lucht

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mercury reduction and complexation by natural organic matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercuric Hg(II) species form complexes with natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) such as humic acid (HA), and this binding is known to affect the chemical and biological transformation and cycling of mercury in aquatic environments. Dissolved elemental mercury, Hg(0), is also widely observed in sediments and water. However, reactions between Hg(0) and DOM have rarely been studied in anoxic environments. Here, under anoxic dark conditions we show strong interactions between reduced HA and Hg(0) through thiol-ligand induced oxidative complexation with an estimated binding capacity of about 3.5 umol Hg(0)/g HA and a partitioning coefficient greater than 10^6 mL/g. We further demonstrate that Hg(II) can be effectively reduced to Hg(0) in the presence of as little as 0.2 mg/L reduced HA, whereas production of purgeable Hg(0) is inhibited by complexation as HA concentration increases. This dual role played by DOM in the reduction and complexation of mercury is likely widespread in anoxic sediments and water and can be expected to significantly influence the mercury species transformations and biological uptake that leads to the formation of toxic methylmercury.

Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Bian, Yongrong [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Dong, Wenming [ORNL; Jiang, Xin [Institute of Soil Science, China; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Predictable SCR co-benefits for mercury control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test program, performed in cooperation with Dominion Power and the Babcock and Wilcox Co., was executed at Dominion Power's Mount Storm power plant in Grant County, W. Va. The program was focused on both the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst capability to oxide mercury as well as the scrubber's capability to capture and retain the oxidized mercury. This article focuses on the SCR catalyst performance aspects. The Mount Storm site consists of three units totaling approximately 1,660 MW. All units are equipped with SCR systems for NOx control. A full-scale test to evaluate the effect of the SCR was performed on Unit 2, a 550 MWT-fired boiler firing a medium sulfur bituminous coal. This test program demonstrated that the presence of an SCR catalyst can significantly affect the mercury speciation profile. Observation showed that in the absence of an SCR catalyst, the extent of oxidation of element a mercury at the inlet of the flue gas desulfurization system was about 64%. The presence of a Cornertech SCR catalyst improved this oxidation to levels greater than 95% almost all of which was captured by the downstream wet FGD system. Cornertech's proprietary SCR Hg oxidation model was used to accurately predict the field results. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Pritchard, S. [Cormtech Inc. (USA)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Correlations Between Gene Expression and Mercury Levels in Blood of Boys With and Without Autism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AJ (2005) Inorganic mercury dissociates preassembledmetabolize toxicants, such as mercury, differently. RNA wasexpression microarrays. Mercury levels were measured using

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

It's Elemental - The Element Fermium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Einsteinium Previous Element (Einsteinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mendelevium) Mendelevium The Element Fermium Click for Isotope Data 100 Fm Fermium 257...

324

It's Elemental - The Element Neptunium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Previous Element (Uranium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Plutonium) Plutonium The Element Neptunium Click for Isotope Data 93 Np Neptunium 237 Atomic...

325

It's Elemental - The Element Ruthenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technetium Previous Element (Technetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhodium) Rhodium The Element Ruthenium Click for Isotope Data 44 Ru Ruthenium 101.07 Atomic...

326

It's Elemental - The Element Actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radium Previous Element (Radium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thorium) Thorium The Element Actinium Click for Isotope Data 89 Ac Actinium 227 Atomic Number: 89...

327

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Mercury Control For Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control For Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD Mercury Control For Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD URS Group, Inc., in collaboration with EPRI, Apogee Scientific, AEP, Texas Genco, and TXU Power, ADA-ES, will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control in an 85/15 blend Texas lignite/PRB derived flue gas, upstream of a cold-side ESP – wet FGD combination. Full-scale sorbent injection tests conducted with various sorbents and combinations of fuel and plant air pollution control devices (APCD) have provided a good understanding of variables that affect sorbent performance. However, many uncertainties exist regarding long-term performance and data gaps remain for specific plant configurations. For example, sorbent injection has not been demonstrated at full-scale for plants firing Texas lignite, which represent approximately 10% of the annual U.S. power plant mercury emissions. The low and variable chloride content of Texas lignite may pose a challenge to achieving high levels of mercury removal with sorbent injection. Furthermore, activated carbon injection may render the fly ash unsuitable for sale, posing an economic liability to Texas lignite utilities. Alternatives to standard activated carbon, such as non-carbon sorbents and alternate injection locations (Toxecon II), have not been fully explored. Toxecon II involves sorbent injection in the middle field(s) of an ESP, thus preserving the integrity of the fly ash in the first fields.

328

Development of a sorbent-based technology for control of mercury in flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of research being, conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the capture of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases by using dry sorbents. Experimental results from investigation of various sorbents and chemical additives for mercury control are reported. Of the sorbents investigated thus far, an activited-carbon-based sorbent impregnated with about 15% (by weight) of sulfur compound provided the best results. The key parameters affecting mercury control efficiency in a fixed-bed reactor, such as reactor loading, reactor temperature, sorbent size distribution, etc., were also studied, and the results ire presented. In addition to activated-carbon-based sorbents, a non-carbon-based sorbent that uses an inactive substrate treated with active chemicals is being developed. Preliminary, experimental results for mercury removal by this newly developed sorbent are presented.

Wu, Jiann M.; Huang, Hann S.; Livengood, C.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Mercury switch with non-wettable electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury switch device comprising a pool of mercury and a plurality of electrical contacts made of or coated with a non-wettable material such as titanium diboride.

Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

1986-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mercury switch with non-wettable electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury switch device comprising a pool of mercury and a plurality of electrical contacts made of or coated with a non-wettable material such as titanium diboride.

Karnowsky, Maurice M. (Albulquerque, NM); Yost, Frederick G. (Carlsbad, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Mercury Reactions in Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Reactions in Power Plant Plumes: Bowen Study DOE-NETL is participating in a field study, managed by EPRI, to document the changes in mercury speciation that may be...

332

Mercury Solar Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI by expanding it. Mercury Solar Systems is a company located in New Rochelle, New York . References "Mercury Solar Systems" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

333

Gas Mileage of 2009 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comb Hwy 2009 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2009 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV Gas 16 City 19 Combined 24 Highway E85 12 City...

334

Gas Mileage of 2010 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comb Hwy 2010 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2010 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners Gas...

335

Gas Mileage of 2011 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comb Hwy 2011 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2011 Mercury Grand Marquis FFV View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners Gas...

336

Gas Mileage of 2003 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highway 2003 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD FFV 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2003 Mercury Mountaineer 2WD FFV Gas 14 City 16 Combined 19 Highway E85 10 City...

337

Gas Mileage of 2006 Vehicles by Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 Highway 2006 Mercury Grand Marquis 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2006 Mercury Grand Marquis Gas 15 City 18 Combined 23 Highway E85 11 City 13...

338

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, Clay E. (Knoxville, TN); Vass, Arpad A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mercury Oxidation Performance of Advanced SCR Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts to oxidize mercury is an important aspect of many utilities mercury control strategies. Improved SCR mercury oxidation will facilitate its capture in downstream wetflue gas desulfurization systems and will generally result in lower emission rates. Recently, catalyst manufacturers have attempted to maximize mercury oxidation through advanced catalyst formulations.This study documents the performance of an advanced ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transitioning from Mercury Thermometers to Alternative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... methods in the petroleum industry continue to specify mercury- in-glass thermometers. ... Thermometers are available from many commercial sources ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Combined homo- and heterogeneous model for mercury speciation in pulverized fuel combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A new model is developed to predict Hg{sup 0}, Hg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+}, and Hg{sub p} in the post-combustion zone upstream of a particulate control device (PCD) in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The model incorporates reactions of mercury with chlorinating agents (HCl) and other gaseous species and simultaneous adsorption of oxidized mercury (HgCl{sub 2}) on fly ash particles in the cooling of flue gases. The homogeneous kinetic model from the literature has been revised to understand the effect of the NO + OH + M {longleftrightarrow} HONO + M reaction on mercury oxidation. Because it is a pressure-dependent reaction, the choice of proper reaction rates was very critical. It was found that mercury oxidation reduces from 100 to 0% while going from high- to low-pressure limit rates with 100 ppmv NO. The heterogeneous model describes selective in-duct Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption of mercury chloride on ash particles. The heterogeneous model has been built using Fortran and linked to Chemkin 4.0. The final predictions of elemental, oxidized, and particulate mercury were compared to mercury speciation from power plant data. Information collection request (ICR) data were used for this comparison. The model results follow very similar trends compared to those of the plant data; however, quantitative deviation was considerable. These deviations are due to the errors in the measurement of mercury upstream of PCD, lack of adsorption kinetic data, accurate homogeneous reaction mechanisms, and certain modeling assumptions. The model definitely follows a new approach for the prediction of mercury speciation, and further refinement will improve the model significantly. 43 refs., 1 figs., 6 tabs.

Shishir P. Sable; Wiebren de Jong; Hartmut Spliethoff [Delft University Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Section Energy Technology, Department of Process and Energy

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mercury Flux Measurements: An Intercomparison and Assessment: Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of the contribution of natural nonpoint mercury sources to regional and global atmospheric mercury pools is critical for developing emission inventories, formulating environmental regulations, and assessing human and ecological health risks. This report discusses the results of the Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP) and takes a close look at the emerging technologies used to obtain mercury flux field data. In specific, it provides an intercomparison of mercury flux measurements obt...

1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Lumex Mercury CEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations; with stakeholder groups that consist of buyers, vendor organizations, and permitters; and with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center, one of six technology centers under ETV, is operated by Battelle in cooperation with EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory. The AMS Center has recently evaluated the performance of continuous emission monitors used to measure mercury in flue gases. This

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sensor Data Trace Communication  

This is a method and process for detecting, locating and quantifying physical phenomena using a data trace that may be incorporated and/or installed on structures including oil and gas pipes and bridges, buildings, etc.

346

The current state of the science related to the re-release of mercury from coal combustion products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of mercury associated with CCPs is an issue that has only recently been under investigation but has become a prominent question as the industry strives to determine if current management options for CCPs will need to be modified. Mercury and other air toxic elements can be present in fly ash, FGD material and bottom ash and boiler slag. Mercury concentrations ranging from {lt} 0.01 to 2.41 ppm in fly ash and from 0.001 to 0.342 ppm in bottom ash have been reported. Stability of mercury must be evaluated by tests that include 1) direct leachability; 2) vapor-phase release at ambient and elevated temperatures; and 3) microbiologically induced leachability and vapor-phase release. The amount of mercury leached from currently produced CCPs is extremely low and does not appear to represent an environmental or re-release hazard. Concentrations of mercury in leachates from fly ashes and FGD material using either the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) or the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) are generally below detection limits. The release of mercury vapor from CCPs resulting from the use of mercury control technologies has been evaluated on a limited basis. Research indicates that mercury bound to the ash or activated carbon is fairly stable. The EERC found that organomercury species were detected at very low levels both in the vapor and leachate generated from the microbiologically mediated release experiments. The current state of the science indicates that mercury associated with CCPs is stable and highly unlikely to be released under most management conditions, including utilisation and disposal. The exception to this is exposure to high temperatures such as those that may be achieved in cement and wallboard production. Therefore, existing CCPs management options are expected to be environmentally sound options for CCPs from systems with mercury control technologies installed. 2 refs., 2 photos.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink; Tera D. Buckley [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Measuring Mercury Isotopes in the Atmosphere and Rainfall near a Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work has shown that the seven naturally occurring stable isotopes of mercury (Hg) undergo mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) during transformation processes, especially during chemical oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions that can occur in the atmosphere. The isotopic patterns resulting from fractionation can be used to help trace the sources of Hg in the environment and to help clarify the mechanisms of Hg cycling. This project was designed with ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Confounding effects of aqueous-phase impinger chemistry on apparent oxidation of mercury in flue gases  

SciTech Connect

Gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and chlorine are a possible pathway to producing oxidized mercury species such as mercuric chloride in combustion systems. This study examines the effect of the chemistry of a commonly used sample conditioning system on apparent and actual levels of mercury oxidation in a methane-fired, 0.3 kW, quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, NOx, SO{sub 2}) and quench rate were varied. The sample conditioning system included two impingers in parallel: one containing an aqueous solution of KCl to trap HgCl{sub 2}, and one containing an aqueous solution of SnCl{sub 2} to reduce HgCl{sub 2} to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}). Gas-phase concentrations of Cl{sub 2} as low as 1.5 ppmv were sufficient to oxidize a significant fraction of the elemental mercury in the KCl impinger via the hypochlorite ion. Furthermore, these low, but interfering levels of Cl{sub 2} appeared to persist in flue gases from several doped rapidly mixed flames with varied post flame temperature quench rates. The addition of 0.5 wt% sodium thiosulfate to the KCl solution completely prevented the oxidation from occurring in the impinger. The addition of thiosulfate did not inhibit the KCl impinger's ability to capture HgCl{sub 2}. The effectiveness of the thiosulfate was unchanged by NO or SO{sub 2}. These results bring into question laboratory scale experimental data on mercury oxidation where wet chemistry was used to partition metallic and oxidized mercury without the presence of sufficient levels of SO{sub 2}. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; Joann S. Lighty; Jost O.L. Wendt; Andrew Fry; Constance L. Senior [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

DFJ Mercury | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFJ Mercury DFJ Mercury Jump to: navigation, search Name DFJ Mercury Place Houston, Texas Zip 77046 Product Houston-based seed and early-stage venture capital firm that targets the information technology, advanced materials, and bioscience sectors. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Apparatus for control of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods. As such, further testing, demonstration and economic analysis as described in the Phase II effort is warranted and should be pursued.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fuel-mercury combustion emissions: an important heterogeneous mechanism and an overall review of its implications  

SciTech Connect

An extensive examination of combustion gases containing trace amounts of mercury shows unambiguously mercury's propensity for heterogeneous chemistry. Although additional mechanisms for the oxidation chemistry of mercury have been implied by the continuing inadequacy of modeling attempts, details of the specific chemistry have remained unknown. Now it is shown that mercury can efficiently chemi-deposit onto surfaces encountered in practical combustors. If sulfur is present, condensed mercuric sulfate forms momentarily. This is then converted by gaseous HCl to HgCl{sub 2} that may sublime into the flow or be retained. This elusive and efficient noncatalytic mechanism most likely explains the observed fractional conversions to the dichloride observed in coal combustors. A receptive surface acts solely as an intermediary, facilitating the conversion while disguising its role. Without sulfur, a corresponding mechanism occurs but via HgO that is similarly converted to the dihalide. Such heterogeneous dynamics have significant repercussions for both full-scale combustors and bench-type experiments, which data have been reassessed and reviewed. Conclusions imply that observations concerning mercury will be system dependent and no two combustors can be exactly alike. This fundamental understanding now lays a foundation for meaningful interpretations and program planning. It has indicated also the extreme care needed in sampling and monitoring the speciation of mercury in such combustion flows for reliable results. It now points to a simple low-cost surface-induced mitigation method for effectively converting the mercury in flue gases to the water-soluble dichloride. It is in essence no more than an optimization of the natural process that is currently occurring in combustors but to only limited degrees. 185 refs., 7 figs.

Keith Schofield [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Mercury Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Apogee Scientific, Inc. (Apogee) will lead a Team comprised of Southern Company Services, TXU, Tennessee Valley Authority, EPRI, URS Group, University of Illinois-Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Southern Research Institute (SRI), Calgon Carbon, and TDA Research, Inc., to evaluate a number of advanced sorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas that have minimal impact on by-product utilization and/or on existing particulate collection devices (PCD). The main objective of this program is to evaluate several advanced sorbents for removing mercury from coal-fired flue gas while posing minimal impact on plant operations through three advanced sorbent concepts: 1) Sorbents which minimize impact on concrete production through selective chemical passivation of activated carbon and use of non-carbon material, 2) sorbents that minimize baghouse pressure drop and ESP emissions, and 3) sorbents that can be recovered and reused.

356

Emissions, Monitoring and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) identified a need to re-test stack gas emissions from power plants that burn subbituminous coal relative to compliance with the EPA mercury control regulations for coal-fired plants. In addition, the SEC has also identified the specialized monitoring needs associated with mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEM). The overall objectives of the program were to develop and demonstrate solutions for the unique emission characteristics found when burning subbituminous coals. The program was executed in two phases; Phase I of the project covered mercury emission testing programs at ten subbituminous coal-fired plants. Phase II compared the performance of continuous emission monitors for mercury at subbituminous coal-fired power plants and is reported separately. Western Research Institute and a number of SEC members have partnered with Eta Energy and Air Pollution Testing to assess the Phase I objective. Results of the mercury (Hg) source sampling at ten power plants burning subbituminous coal concluded Hg emissions measurements from Powder River Basin (PBR) coal-fired units showed large variations during both ICR and SEC testing. Mercury captures across the Air Pollution Control Devices (APCDs) present much more reliable numbers (i.e., the mercury captures across the APCDs are positive numbers as one would expect compared to negative removal across the APCDs for the ICR data). Three of the seven units tested in the SEC study had previously shown negative removals in the ICR testing. The average emission rate is 6.08 lb/TBtu for seven ICR units compared to 5.18 lb/TBtu for ten units in the SEC testing. Out of the ten (10) SEC units, Nelson Dewey Unit 1, burned a subbituminous coal and petcoke blend thus lowering the total emission rate by generating less elemental mercury. The major difference between the ICR and SEC data is in the APCD performance and the mercury closure around the APCD. The average mercury removal values across the APCDs are 2.1% and 39.4% with standard deviations (STDs) of 1990 and 75%, respectively for the ICR and SEC tests. This clearly demonstrates that variability is an issue irrespective of using 'similar' fuels at the plants and the same source sampling team measuring the species. The study also concluded that elemental mercury is the main Hg specie that needs to be controlled. 2004 technologies such as activated carbon injection (ACI) may capture up to 60% with double digit lb/MMacf addition of sorbent. PRB coal-fired units have an Hg input of 7-15 lb/TBtu; hence, these units must operate at over 60% mercury efficiency in order to bring the emission level below 5.8 lb/TBtu. This was non-achievable with the best technology available as of 2004. Other key findings include: (1) Conventional particulate collectors, such as Cold-side Electro-Static Precipitators (CESPs), Hot-side Electro-Static Precipitator (HESP), and Fabric Filter (FF) remove nearly all of the particulate bound mercury; (2) CESPs perform better highlighting the flue gas temperature effect on the mercury removal. Impact of speciation with flue gas cooling is apparent; (3) SDA's do not help in enhancing adsorption of mercury vapor species; and (4) Due to consistently low chlorine values in fuels, it was not possible to analyze the impact of chlorine. In summary, it is difficult to predict the speciation at two plants that burn the same fuel. Non-fuel issues, such as flue gas cooling, impact the speciation and consequently mercury capture potential.

Alan Bland; Kumar Sellakumar; Craig Cormylo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Microsoft Word - Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Tech Brief DRAFT bbl 08-24.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE  eliminates excavation expense  applicable to large or small sites  straightforward deployment  uses heat to distribute sulfur throughout a soil  mercury reacts with sulfur to form immobile and insoluble minerals  patent applied for TechBrief Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Amendment for Sequestering Mercury in Contaminated Soil Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a method of targeting mercury in contaminated soil zone by use of sulfur vapor heated gas. Background Mercury contamination in soil is a common problem in the environment. The most common treatment is excavation - a method that works well for small sites where the

358

Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.

Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Rauch, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Division of Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 8, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Cho, P.; Steenari, B.-M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, First-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers are conducting field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury. Testing will be conducted at two sites for 14 months at each site. This report summarizes the first year of work on the project, including installation, and four months of testing of the pilot at the first site.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents and discusses results from the project 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production', performed at five different full-scale commercial wallboard plants. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study has been to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere at wallboard manufacturing plants when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project has been co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope included seven discrete tasks, each including a test conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different wet FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a base-case test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5,could not be conducted as planned and instead was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3. Subsequently an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced from the Task 5 FGD system, but with an additive expected to impact the stability of mercury, so Task 6 was added to the project. Finally, Task 7 was added to evaluate synthetic gypsum produced at a power plant from an additional coal type. In the project, process stacks in the wallboard plant were sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. In every task, the stack locations sampled included a gypsum dryer and a gypsum calciner. In Tasks 1 and 4 through 7, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. These results and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. The results from the project showed a wide range of percentage mercury losses from the synthetic gypsum feedstocks as measured by the Ontario Hydro method at the process stacks, ranging from 2% to 55% of the mercury in the gypsum feedstock. For the tasks exceeding 10% mercury loss across the wallboard plant, most of the loss occurred across the gypsum calciner. When total wallboard emissions remained below 10%, the primary emission location varied with a much less pronounced difference in emission between the gypsum dryer, calciner and board dryer. For all seven tasks, the majority of the mercury emissions were measured to be in the elemental form (Hg{sup 0}). Overall, the measured mercury loss mass rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 grams of mercury per dry ton of synthetic gypsum processed, or 0.01 to 0.4 pounds of mercury released per million square feet of wallboard produced from synthetic gypsum. The Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey from the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) indicate that 7,579,187 short tons of synthetic gypsum were used for wallboard production in 2006. Extrapolating the results of this study to the ACAA industry usage rate, we estimate that mercury releases from wallboard production plants in 2006 ranged between 150 to 3000 pounds for the entire U.S. wallboard industry. With only seven sets of wallboard plant measurements, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about what variables impact the mercury loss percentages across the wallboard plants. One significant o

Jessica Sanderson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Sampling and analysis of natural gas trace constituents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major and minor components of natural gas are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), using a thermal conductivity (TC). The best results obtained by these methods can report no better than 0.01 mole percent of each measured component. Even the extended method of analysis by flame ionization detector (FID) can only improve on the detection limit of hydrocarbons. The gas industry needs better information on all trace constituents of natural gas, whether native or inadvertently added during gas processing that may adversely influence the operation of equipment or the safety of the consumer. The presence of arsenic and mercury in some gas deposits have now been documented in international literature as causing not only human toxicity but also damaging to the field equipment. Yet, no standard methods of sampling and analysis exist to provide this much needed information. In this paper the authors report the results of a three-year program to develop an extensive array of sampling and analysis methods for speciation and measurement of trace constituents of natural gas. A cryogenic sampler operating at near 200 K ({minus}99 F) and at pipeline pressures up to 12.4 {times} 10{sup 6}Pa (1800 psig) has been developed to preconcentrate and recover all trace constituents with boiling points above butanes. Specific analytical methods have been developed for speciating and measurement of many trace components (corresponding to US EPA air toxics) by GC-AED and GC-MS, and for determining various target compounds by other techniques. Moisture, oxygen and sulfur contents are measured on site using dedicated field instruments. Arsenic, mercury and radon are sampled by specific solid sorbents for subsequent laboratory analysis.

Attari, A.; Chao, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Trace Impurities and Activation Products in Base Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of research related to the concentrations of trace impurities and activation products in stainless steel alloys used for reactor vessels and internals. While present in extremely low concentrations, these trace elements and radionuclides can impact radioactive waste disposal of the components upon decommissioning.BackgroundThe primary basis of activity in a decommissioning source term is activated metals from the reactor and ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Mercury orientation model including non-zero obliquity and librations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-period forcing of Mercurys libration in longitude.M. : Resonant forcing of Mercurys libration in longitude.A revised control network for Mercury. J. Geophys. Res. 104,

Margot, Jean-Luc

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ultraviolet Light Initiated Oxidation of Elemental Hg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The PCO Process for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas The PCO Process for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Christopher R. McLarnon, Ph.D. Powerspan Corp., P.O. Box 219, 54 Old Bay Road, New Durham, NH 03855 Evan J. Granite* and Henry W. Pennline National Energy Technology Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, P.O. Box 10940, MS 58-106, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 *Corresponding author. Tel.: +1412-386-4607; fax: +1412-386-6004 E-mail address: evan.granite@netl.doe.gov Abstract A promising technology has been developed to capture and remove elemental mercury species from coal-fired power plants. Powerspan Corp. has licensed the technology and initiated a bench and pilot test program to develop the Photochemical Oxidation, or PCO(tm), process for

368

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Control of mercury methylation in wetlands through iron addition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mason, R. P. ; Flegal, A. R. , Mercury speciation in the SanP. ; Flegal, A. R. , Decadal mercury trends in San FranciscoP. G. ; Nelson, D. C. , Mercury methylation from unexpected

Sedlak, David L; Ulrich, Patrick D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Amended Silicated for Mercury Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly ash is sold as a by-product.

James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

372

Mercury in Alaskan Eskimo mothers and infants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential danger of natural mercury accumulation in the diet of the Eskimo is evaluated through mercury levels determined in cord blood, placenta, maternal blood, hair, and milk of 38 maternal-infant pairs from Anchorage and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Although mercury levels are not discernably dangerous, trends to larger accumulations in maternal and fetal RBC and placental tissue with proximity to the sea and consumption of seals during pregnancy provide the basis for considering possible indicators of neonatal involvement. Mercury level in RBC from cord blood appeared as the best potential indicator of this involvement, although relationships with the mother's diet and level of mercury in the placenta also appear useful. In this area, average and maximal mercury levels in cord blood are 39 and 78 ng/ml, respectively, far below the acknowledged toxic level in infants of these mothers who eat seals or fish every day during their pregnancy.

William A. Galster

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mercury in the Lake Powell ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Flameless atomic absorption analyses of samples from Lake Powell yield the following mercury levels (in mean parts per billion): 0.01 in lake water, 30 in bottom sediments, 10 in shoreline substrates, 34 in plant leaves, 145 in plant debris, 28 in algae, 10 in crayfish, and 232 in fish muscle. Bioamplification and the association of mercury with organic matter are evident in this recently created, relatively unpolluted reservoir. Formulation of an estimated mercury budget suggests that the restriction of outflow in the impounded Colorado River leads to mercury accumulation, and that projected regional coal-fired power generation may produce sufficient amounts of mercury to augment significantly the mercury released by natural weathering.

Standiford, D.R.; Potter, L.D.; Kidd, D.E.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Assessment of Low Cost Novel Mercury Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Mercury Control Technologies Testing of Mercury Control Technologies for Coal-Fired Power Plants by Thomas J. Feeley, III 1. , Lynn A. Brickett 1. , B. Andrew O'Palko 1. , and James T. Murphy 2. 1. U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory 2. Science Applications International Corporation The U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is conducting a comprehensive research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program directed at advancing the performance and economics of mercury control technologies for coal- fired power plants. The program also includes evaluating the fate of mercury in coal by-products and studying the transport and transformation of mercury in power plant plumes. This paper presents results from ongoing full-scale and slip-stream field testing of several mercury control

375

The proximity of Mercury's spin to Cassini state 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the value of the normalized moment of inertia, $C/MR^2$, from the location of Cassini 1 is crucial. If Mercury's spin axis occupies Cassini state 1, its position defines the location of the state. The spin might be displaced from the Cassini state if the spin is unable to follow the changes in the state position induced by the variations in the orbital parameters and the geometry of the solar system. The spin axis is expected to follow the Cassini state for orbit variations with time scales long compared to the 1000 year precession period of the spin about the Cassini state because the solid angle swept out by the spin axis as it precesses is an adiabatic invariant. Short period variations in the orbital elements of small amplitude should cause displacements that are commensurate with the amplitudes of the short period terms. By following simultaneously the spin position and the Cassini state position during long time scale orbital variations over past 3 million years (Quinn {\\it et al.}, 1991) and short time scale variations from JPL Ephemeris DE 408 (Standish, 2005) we show that the spin axis will remain within one arcsec of the Cassini state after it is brought there by dissipative torques. We thus expect Mercury's spin to occupy Cassini state 1 well within the uncertainties for both radar and spacecraft measurements, with correspondingly tight constraints on $C/MR^2$.

S. J. Peale

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Mercury Contamination in Pelagic Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of mercury concentrations in fish is essential for human health protection. Mercury is a naturally occurring element that acts as a neurotoxin to humans and other species. The biologically available mercury form, methylmercury (MeHg), bio accumulates from small benthic invertebrates to large pelagic fish, and therefore high end consumers and terminal predators have elevated Hg concentrations. The main pathway of MeHg exposure in humans is by consumption of contaminated fish. In this study total Hg concentrations were measured in 10 Gulf of Mexico pelagic fish species using a DMA 80 analyzer. Total Hg concentrations ranged from 0.004 to 3.55 ppm (wet wt). The highest mean concentration (1.04 ppm, wet wt) recorded in king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) exceeded FDA recommended criteria of 1ppm. Dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) and vermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens) had lowest mean Hg concentrations (tuna (Thunnus atlanticus) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacores) had moderate Hg concentrations (0.39 and 0.36 ppm wet wt respectively). Little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus) and blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) had mean concentrations of 0.69 and 0.51 ppm respectively. The relationship between fish length and Hg concentrations was significant for four species.

Kuklyte, Ligita

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Release of Mercury During Curing of Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Mercury Sorbent Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides laboratory data on mercury release during the initial curing stage of concrete made with fly ash or mixtures of fly ash and activated carbon containing mercury. These experiments suggest that mercury is not released from these concretes during initial curing.

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Communication Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled.

Claudia P. Peregrino; Myriam V. Moreno; Silvia V. Mir; Alma D. Rubio; Luz O. Leal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, Second-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the second year of technical progress on the project entitled "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems." The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. ...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 2 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installation...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

THE EFFECT OF MERCURY CONTROLS ON WALLBOARD MANUFACTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending EPA regulations may mandate 70 to 90% mercury removal efficiency from utility flue gas. A mercury control option is the trapping of oxidized mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization systems (FGD). The potential doubling of mercury in the FGD material and its effect on mercury volatility at temperatures common to wallboard manufacture is a concern that could limit the growing byproduct use of FGD material. Prediction of mercury fate is limited by lack of information on the mercury form in the FGD material. The parts per billion mercury concentrations prevent the identification of mercury compounds by common analytical methods. A sensitive analytical method, cold vapor atomic fluorescence, coupled with leaching and thermodecomposition methods were evaluated for their potential to identify mercury compounds in FGD material. The results of the study suggest that the mercury form is dominated by the calcium sulfate matrix and is probably associated with the sulfate form in the FGD material. Additionally, to determine the effect of high mercury concentration FGD material on wallboard manufacture, a laboratory FGD unit was built to trap the oxidized mercury generated in a simulated flue gas. Although the laboratory prepared FGD material did not contain the mercury concentrations anticipated, further thermal tests determined that mercury begins to evolve from FGD material at 380 to 390 F, consequently dropping the drying temperature should mitigate mercury evolution if necessary. Mercury evolution is also diminished as the weight of the wallboard sample increased. Consequently, mercury evolution may not be a significant problem in wallboard manufacture.

Sandra Meischen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

386

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Non-Thermal Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma Based Removal of Mercury Project Summary Powerspan Corp. will pilot test a multi-pollutant technology that converts mercury into mercuric oxide, nitrogen oxide...

387

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

388

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area...

389

Mercury Vapor At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not...

390

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Integrated Approach to Mercury Control This project will demonstrate a novel multi-pollutant control technology for coal-fired power plants that can reduce...

391

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases The following are links to various recent news stories related to mercury in the environment. These links are provided strictly as a convenience to the general...

392

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Brominated Sorbents...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESPs, and Fly Ash Use in Concrete Sorbent Technology will test two technologies for mercury removal from flue gas. Their concrete safe brominated sorbent will be tested at...

393

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Establishing Measurement Traceability for Gaseous Mercury ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST already provides mercury traceability to the SI for many solid- and liquid-matrix materials, including fossil fuels, through the SRM program, but ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,494,632 entitled "Mercury Sorbent Delivery System for Flue Gas." Disclosed in...

399

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - University of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using SCR and SNCR NOx Control Technologies Determination of the Speciated Mercury Inventory at Four Coal-Fired Boilers Using Continuous Hg Monitors Longer-Term Testing of...

400

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Field Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or without performance additives, to reduce mercury emissions from a Texas utility burning either Texas lignite or a blend of Texas lignite and subbituminous coals. Sorbents...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mercury trace elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, G.M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

403

Controls on Fluxes of Mercury in Aquatic Food Webs: Application of the Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model to Four Enclosure Experiments w ith Additions of Stable Mercury Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New controls on utility mercury emissions are under consideration in order to limit human exposure to mercury resulting from fish consumption. Evaluation of such measures requires an understanding of how mercury cycles through lakes and streams. This report describes the application of EPRI's Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM) to experiments involving the addition of stable mercury Hg(II) isotopes to four 10-meter-diameter enclosures in a lake.

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

405

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

406

Mercury: the planet and its orbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The planet closest to the Sun, Mercury, is the subject of renewed attention among planetary scientists, as two major space missions will visit it within the next decade. These will be the first to return to Mercury, after the flybys by NASA's Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974--5. The difficulties of observing this planet from the Earth make such missions necessary for further progress in understanding its origin, evolution and present state. This review provides an overview of what is known about Mercury and what are the major outstanding issues. Mercury's orbital and rotation periods are in a unique 2:3 resonance; an analysis of the orbital dynamics of Mercury is presented here, as well as Mercury's special role in testing theories of gravitation. These derivations provide a good insight into the complexities of planetary motion in general, and how, in the case of Mercury, its proximity to the Sun can be described and exploited in terms of general relativity. Mercury's surface, superficially similar to that of the Moon, presents intriguing differences, representing a different, and more complex history in which the role of early volcanism remains to be clarified and understood. Mercury's interior presents the most important puzzles: it has the highest uncompressed density among the terrestrial planets, implying a very large, mostly iron core. This does not appear to be the completely solidified yet, as Mariner 10 found a planetary magnetic field that is probably generated by an internal dynamo, in a liquid outer layer of the large iron core. The current state of the core, once established, will provide a constraint for its evolution from the time of the planet's formation. Mercury's environment is highly variable. There is only a tenuous exosphere around Mercury; its sourc...

Andr Balogh; Giacomo Giampieri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mercury Vapor At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and carbon dioxide (CO2) all appear in anomalously high concentrations near the hot springs and at the junction of the Fumarole Valley and the HSBV. This indicates either that Hg is being lost from a reservoir due to boiling and steam loss, probably northwest of the junction, or erosion has carried these elements in sediment from the higher elevation manifestations. The presence of such volatiles in

409

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. This document, the second in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 330 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 1.0% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR system for NOx control and a spray dryer absorber for SO{sub 2} control followed by a baghouse unit for particulate emissions control. Four sampling tests were performed in March 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. Due to mechanical problems with the boiler feed water pumps, the actual gross output was between 195 and 221 MW during the tests. The results showed that the SCR/air heater combination oxidized nearly 95% of the elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 87%. The mercury material balance closures for the four tests conducted at the plant ranged from 89% to 114%, with an average of 100%. These results appear to show that the SCR had a positive effect on mercury removal. In earlier programs, CONSOL sampled mercury at six plants with wet FGDs for SO{sub 2} control without SCR catalysts. At those plants, an average of 61 {+-} 15% of the mercury was in the oxidized form at the air heater outlet. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential Hg removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of Hg chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize Hg removal.

J. A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

It's Elemental - The Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Helium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium The Element Lithium Click for Isotope Data 3 Li Lithium 6.941 Atomic Number: 3 Atomic Weight: 6.941...

411

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

It's Elemental - The Element Plutonium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Element (Americium) Americium The Element Plutonium Click for Isotope Data 94 Pu Plutonium 244 Atomic Number: 94 Atomic Weight: 244 Melting Point: 913 K (640C or...

413

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

2006 Mercury Control Technology Conference Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Technology Conference Mercury Control Technology Conference December 11-13, 2006 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Introduction Sorbent Injection By-Product Characterization/Management Mercury Oxidation and Co-Removal with FGD Systems Other Mercury Control Technology Panel Discussions Posters New 2006 Phase III Mercury Field Testing Projects Sorbent Injection Pretreatment of Coal Oxidation of Mercury Environmental Studies on Mercury Mercury in CUBs Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

418

Trace metals in sediments of coastal Siberia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the work described in this thesis, a total of 218 samples from 104 cores from the East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, and Pechora Seas and the Ob and Yenisei Rivers were analyzed for the trace metals Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn. To make comparisons between locations easier, the concentration of all elements was normalized to Fe to account for variability in grain size and mineralogy. For the metals Ag, Cd, and Hg there was poor correlation with Fe, likely partially due to analytical variations caused by the low concentrations of these elements. Copper, Ni and Zn showed good correlation with Fe, suggesting these elements are from natural inputs to the sediments. Arsenic, Ba, Cr, Pb, and Sb showed variable correlations, suggesting a more mafic (basaltic) mineral phase at some locations and/or diagenetic redistribution of these metals. No statistically significant differences were found between metal to Fe ratios at the surface (0-2.5 cm) of the sediment cores and the bottoms (5- 1 00 cm), with a few exceptions. There was also no statistically significant difference in the average metal to Fe ratios of the East Siberian and Laptev Seas. There was, however, a significant difference when these two seas were compared to the Kara and Pechora Seas, suggesting different mineralogy in the drainage basins of eastern and western Siberia. Sediment from the Kara Sea was similar in trace metal concentration to sediment from its likely source, the Ob and Yenisei rivers.

Esnough, Teresa Elizabeth

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Flexible reference trace reduction for VM simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unmanageably large size of reference traces has spurred the development of sophisticated trace reduction techniques. In this article we present two new algorithms for trace reduction: Safely Allowed Drop (SAD) and Optimal LRU Reduction ... Keywords: cache hierarchies, locality, reference traces, trace compression, trace reduction

Scott F. Kaplan; Yannis Smaragdakis; Paul R. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power plant. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), WE Energies demonstrated the TOXECON(TM) process in a $52.9million project at the Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Mich. TOXECON is a relatively cost-effective option for achieving significant reductions in mercury emissions and increasing the

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