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Sample records for merchant sawmills lath

  1. Sawmill, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sawmill, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6181083, -110.3964911 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  2. Merchant Green | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Jump to: navigation, search Name: Merchant Green Place: Holstebro, Denmark Zip: DK7500 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: Denmark-based market intelligence firm...

  3. Energy Merchant Marketing EMM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Energy Merchant Marketing (EMM) Place: New York, New York Zip: 10022 Product: Biodiesel producer. References: Energy Merchant Marketing (EMM)1 This article is a stub....

  4. EA-187 Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc EA-187 Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc Order authorizing Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc to export electric...

  5. EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP Order authorizing Saracen Merchant Energy, LP to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-303-A Saracen Merchant Energy, LP More Documents & Publications EA-409 Saracen Power LP EA-340 Saracen Energy Partners, LP EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP

  6. El Paso Merchant Energy LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: El Paso Merchant Energy LP Place: Texas Phone Number: (713) 369-9000 Website: www.kindermorgan.compagesse Outage Hotline: (713)...

  7. EA-260-A EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260-A EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc Order authorizing EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF ...

  8. EA-260 EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260 EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc Order authorizing EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon ...

  9. EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    60-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc Order authorizing EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc More Documents & Publications EA-260-A EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260 EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-260-C EPCOR Energy Marketing (U.S) Inc

  10. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. Order authorizing Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading to export electric energy to Canada. Name Change from Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. PDF icon EA-359-A Castleton Commodities (CN) Name Change.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis

  11. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Capital (US) Inc: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 43 - Mar. 6, 2009 | Department of Energy 60-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 43 - Mar. 6, 2009 Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 43 - Mar. 6, 2009 Application of EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 43 PDF icon

  12. EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-365-A Centre Lane Trading Limited EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US),...

  13. Precision tool holder with flexure-adjustable, three degrees of freedom for a four-axis lathe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bono, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Hibbard, Robin L. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-04

    A precision tool holder for precisely positioning a single point cutting tool on 4-axis lathe, such that the center of the radius of the tool nose is aligned with the B-axis of the machine tool, so as to facilitate the machining of precision meso-scale components with complex three-dimensional shapes with sub-.mu.m accuracy on a four-axis lathe. The device is designed to fit on a commercial diamond turning machine and can adjust the cutting tool position in three orthogonal directions with sub-micrometer resolution. In particular, the tool holder adjusts the tool position using three flexure-based mechanisms, with two flexure mechanisms adjusting the lateral position of the tool to align the tool with the B-axis, and a third flexure mechanism adjusting the height of the tool. Preferably, the flexures are driven by manual micrometer adjusters. In this manner, this tool holder simplifies the process of setting a tool with sub-.mu.m accuracy, to substantially reduce the time required to set the tool.

  14. Electric load monitoring to support a shared energy savings procurement at the US Maritime Administration Merchant Marine Academy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Parker, G.B.

    1992-06-01

    Equipment from the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing and application program supported by the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) was applied to measure three-phase power demand of three large buildings at the US Merchant Marine Academy (MMA) on Long Island, New York. The selected buildings were Bowditch Hall, Fulton-Gibbs Hall, and the Library. The MEL equipment was installed on March 17, 1991. Instruments to monitor the Bowditch Hall chiller as a separate load were added on June 2, 1991. MEL Test Procedure {number_sign}1, Building Energy Monitoring, was followed in the installation and operation of the monitoring equipment. The monitoring objectives were to (1) provide a baseline for assessing energy savings resulting from future energy conservation measures that are to be implemented in the monitored buildings, and (2) provide information for recommending cost-effective energy conservation opportunities. Results of the long-term, whole building monitoring project at the MMA are presented in this report.

  15. Electric load monitoring to support a shared energy savings procurement at the US Maritime Administration Merchant Marine Academy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Parker, G.B.

    1992-06-01

    Equipment from the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing and application program supported by the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (DOE-FEMP) was applied to measure three-phase power demand of three large buildings at the US Merchant Marine Academy (MMA) on Long Island, New York. The selected buildings were Bowditch Hall, Fulton-Gibbs Hall, and the Library. The MEL equipment was installed on March 17, 1991. Instruments to monitor the Bowditch Hall chiller as a separate load were added on June 2, 1991. MEL Test Procedure {number sign}1, Building Energy Monitoring, was followed in the installation and operation of the monitoring equipment. The monitoring objectives were to (1) provide a baseline for assessing energy savings resulting from future energy conservation measures that are to be implemented in the monitored buildings, and (2) provide information for recommending cost-effective energy conservation opportunities. Results of the long-term, whole building monitoring project at the MMA are presented in this report.

  16. EA-303-A_Saracen_Merchant_Rescission.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  17. SBOT IOWA AMES LAB POC Lisa Rodgers Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IOWA AMES LAB POC Lisa Rodgers Telephone (515) 294-4191 Email rodgers@ameslab.gov GOODS Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer Peripheral Equipment and Software Merchant Wholesalers 423430 Other Commercial Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423440 Other Professional Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423490 Electrical Apparatus and Equipment, Wiring Supplies, and Related Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423610 Electrical and Electronic Appliance,

  18. GOODS CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GOODS CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer Peripheral Equipment and Software Merchant Wholesalers 423430 Other Commercial Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423440 Other Professional Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423490 Electrical Apparatus and Equipment, Wiring Supplies, and Related Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423610 Electrical and

  19. CX-012310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sawmill Creek Stream Bank Erosion CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  20. Apache County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Houck, Arizona Lukachukai, Arizona Many Farms, Arizona McNary, Arizona Nazlini, Arizona Red Mesa, Arizona Rock Point, Arizona Rough Rock, Arizona Round Rock, Arizona Sawmill,...

  1. rlg-uchicago-06-v6.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rigidity of Structure Device- based Data Billions Consumers Case Study 1: Payments Card Fraud System Account Merchant Issuing Bank Merchant Bank Working with your homogeneous...

  2. SBOT IDAHO IDAHO LAB POC Stacey Francis Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IDAHO IDAHO LAB POC Stacey Francis Telephone (208) 526-8564 Email stacey.francis@inl.gov CONSTRUCTION Industrial Building Construction 236210 All Other Specialty Trade Contractors 238990 GOODS Motor Vehicle Supplies and New Parts Merchant Wholesalers 423120 Tire and Tube Merchant Wholesalers 423130 Office Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423420 Other Commercial Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423440 Other Professional Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423490 Electrical Apparatus and

  3. Hydrogen Production in the U.S. and Worldwide - 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the different categories of hydrogen production (captive, by-product, and merchant) and presents production data for 2013 by industry within these categories. Merchant production data is provided for the top-four industrial gas companies.

  4. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Production and Consumption in the U S The Last Years Brown Daryl R hydrogen production U S merchant captive hydrogen production U S merchant captive This article was...

  5. Hydrogen Production and Consumption in the U.S.: The Last 25...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Production and Consumption in the U.S.: The Last 25 Years. Brown, Daryl R. hydrogen; production; U.S.; merchant; captive hydrogen; production; U.S.; merchant; captive This...

  6. Technical Shop Machinist | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and lathes to fabricate complex parts from stainless steel, copper, aluminum, titanium, inconnel, etc from information on blueprints, dxf files, sketches and from verbal...

  7. EA-260-D CP Energy Marketing (US) Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D CP Energy Marketing (US) Inc EA-260-D CP Energy Marketing (US) Inc Order authorizing CP Energy Marketing (US) Inc to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-260-D CP Energy Marketing (US) Inc More Documents & Publications EA-260-A EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc EA-260 EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc

  8. Settler's Trail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developer E.ON Climate & Renewables North America Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Sheldon IL Coordinates 40.7626336, -87.54498482 Show Map Loading map......

  9. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and other liquids. Beginning in 1993, fuel ethanol blended into finished motor gasoline and oxygenate production from merchant MTBE...

  10. NRG Energy Center Paxton | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adjacent to Bruce Mangione Steam Plant. Operates as NRG Energy Center Paxton, a merchant plant owned by parent company NRG Thermal. References: NRG Energy Center Paxton1 This...

  11. Pocahontas Prairie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner Algonquin Power Developer Gamesa Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Pomeroy IA Coordinates 42.62183365, -94.6978569 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  12. Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582, -98.54752 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  13. LG Display | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 150-721 Product: Korea Republic-based manufacturer and merchant supplier of thin-film transistor liquid crystal displays. Manufacturer of thin-film PV. Coordinates:...

  14. Air Products Chemicals Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Air Products & Chemicals Inc Place: Allentown, Pennsylvania Zip: 18195 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Services Product: A global supplier of merchant hydrogen with a portfolio of...

  15. CP Energy Group LLC CP Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Group LLC CP Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: CP Energy Group, LLC (CP Energy) Place: Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 2108 Sector: Services Product: Boston-based merchant...

  16. Laurel Mountain | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laurel Mountain Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AES Corp. Developer AES Corp. Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Belington...

  17. Mozart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner WKN USA LLC Developer WKN USA LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant (ERCOT) Location Kent County TX...

  18. Prospero LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 06854 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Merchant bank providing financial services and capital to companies in the technology and energy sectors Year...

  19. Project Reports for White Mountain Apache Tribe- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The project will involve an examination of the feasibility of a cogeneration facility at the Fort Apache Timber Company (FATCO), an enterprise of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. FATCO includes a sawmill and a remanufacturing operation that process timber harvested on the tribe's reservation. The operation's main facility is located in the reservation's largest town, Whiteriver. In addition, the tribe operates an ancillary facility in the town of Cibeque on the reservation's west side.

  20. appguideformatWeb.pub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind energy has been used since the earliest civilization to grind grain, pump water from deep wells, and power sailboats. Wind- mills in pre-industrial Europe were used for many things, including irrigation or drainage pumping, grain-grinding, saw-milling of timber, and the processing of other commodities such as spices, cocoa, paints and dyes, and tobacco. Before the U.S. installed an infrastructure of electricity wires, both water-pumping windmills and small wind elec- tric turbines

  1. White Mountain Apache Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will involve an examination of the feasibility of a cogeneration facility at the Fort Apache Timber Company (FATCO), an enterprise of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. FATCO includes a sawmill and a remanufacturing operation that process timber harvested on the tribe's reservation. The operation's main facility is located in the reservation's largest town, Whiteriver. In addition, the tribe operates an ancillary facility in the town of Cibeque on the reservation's west side.

  2. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Douglas Gardner, PhD. Advanced Structures & Composite Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ....... Bronze Age .......... Iron Age ................ Nano Age? "From the Sawmill to the Nanomill?" Overarching Research Focus "Establish world-class R&D capacity in the field of ligno-cellulose derived nanomaterials

  3. Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    1993-12-01

    What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.

  4. Energy Management and Marketing Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Sierra Nevada Region Power Marketing Merchant Real Time N6500 114 Parkshore Drive...

  5. Heritage Is a Part of DOE Advisory Board Secretary's Interest...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    One of the hospital trustees was a bank president, and he offered her a job as the bank's marketing director. She later took a job at another bank doing merchant services. But...

  6. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Midland Cogeneration Venture Ltd. Partnership 1765 FE02-26-LNG 043002 Various Sources El Paso Merchant Energy, L.P. (Norway) 1780 FE02-59-NG 082902 Can Midland Cogeneration...

  7. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The CHP systems program aimed to facilitate acceptance of distributed energy in end-use sectors by forming partnerships with industry consortia in the commercial building, merchant stores, light industrial, supermarkets, restaurants, hospitality, health care and high-tech industries.

  8. EA-365-A Centre Lane Trading Limited | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Centre Lane (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P. EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada EA-367-A EDF Trading North America,LLC...

  9. Tres Amigas LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amigas LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tres Amigas LLC Place: Santa Fe, New Mexico Zip: 87501-2643 Product: New Mexico-based merchant transmission company. References: Tres...

  10. Microsoft Word - Hennessy Statement.NE Dominion.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is dedicated to serving our 2.5 million regulated electric customers in Virginia and North Carolina, we also operate almost 4,000 megawatts of merchant generation, heavily...

  11. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-260-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capital (US) Inc: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 43 - Mar. 6, 2009 Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-260-C EPCOR Merchant and Capital (US) Inc: Federal ...

  12. CO2e Capital Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    e Capital Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: CO2e Capital Limited Place: New York City, New York Zip: 10022 Product: New York based merchant bank focused on reducing global...

  13. Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Production and Consumption in the U.S.: The Last 25 Years.Brown, Daryl R.hydrogen; production; U.S.; merchant; captivehydrogen; production; U.S.; merchant; captiveThis article was requested by Cryogas International, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. At the title suggests, the article identifies hydrogen consumption in the U.S., broken out by the major contributors to total production. Explanatory information is provided describing the causes underlying the significant

  14. O:ELECTRICEA-187.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc. Order No. EA-187 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. ツァ824a(e)). On June 25, 1998, Merchant Energy Group of the Americas, Inc., (MEGA) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. MEGA does not own

  15. Business Case Analysis of Prototype Fabrication Division Recapitalization Plan祐ummary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard; Benson, Faith Ann; Dinehart, Timothy Grant

    2015-04-30

    Business case studies were completed to support procurement of new machines and capital equipment in the Prototype Fabrication (PF) Division SM-39 and TA-03-0102 machine shops. Economic analysis was conducted for replacing the Mazak 30Y Mill-Turn Machine in SM-39, the Haas Vertical CNC Mill in Building 102, and the Hardinge Q10/65-SP Lathe in SM-39. Analysis was also conducted for adding a NanoTech Lathe in Building 102 and a new electrical discharge machine (EDM) in SM-39 to augment current capabilities. To determine the value of switching machinery, a baseline scenario was compared with a future scenario where new machinery was purchased and installed. Costs and benefits were defined via interviews with subject matter experts.

  16. Rotary fast tool servo system and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C. (Cambridge, MA); Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH)

    2007-10-02

    A high bandwidth rotary fast tool servo provides tool motion in a direction nominally parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. Three or more flexure blades having all ends fixed are used to form an axis of rotation for a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from the axis of rotation. An actuator rotates a swing arm assembly such that a cutting tool is moved in and away from the lathe-mounted, rotating workpiece in a rapid and controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. A pair of position sensors provides rotation and position information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in-feed slide of a precision lathe.

  17. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Normann, R.A.; Lockwood, G.J.; Gonzales, M.

    1998-03-03

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe. 6 figs.

  18. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Normann, Randy A. (Edgewood, NM); Lockwood, Grant J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gonzales, Meliton (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe.

  19. Development Shop | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development Shop The Ames Laboratory operates a complete machine shop. Our shop consists of the modern equipment needed to fabricate almost any conceivable device required for research project. If you have a need or any questions about the fabrication of items to support your mission in research please contact us. Our machining equipment includes: Lathes CNC Bridgeport Mills Shears Press Brake (for bending) EDM (Electronic Discharge Machining) Grinders Saws We are capable of welding nearly any

  20. SBOT CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 CONSTRUCTION All Other Specialty Trade Contractors 238990 EDUCATION Computer Training 611420 Professional and Management Development Training 611430 GOODS Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer

  1. SBOT ILLINOIS ARGONNE LAB POC Karl Duke Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ILLINOIS ARGONNE LAB POC Karl Duke Telephone (630) 252-8842 Email sblo@anl.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 CONSTRUCTION All Other Specialty Trade Contractors 238990 EDUCATION Computer Training 611420 Professional and Management Development Training 611430 GOODS Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer Peripheral

  2. SBOT NEW YORK BROOKHAVEN LAB POC Jill Clough-Johnston Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    YORK BROOKHAVEN LAB POC Jill Clough-Johnston Telephone (631) 344-3173 Email clough@bnl.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 CONSTRUCTION All Other Specialty Trade Contractors 238990 EDUCATION Computer Training 611420 Professional and Management Development Training 611430 GOODS Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer

  3. Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Bolling

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

  4. Assessment of superheated steam drying of wood waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, B.G.; Nguyen, Y.; Bruce, S.

    1994-12-31

    A 5 MW co-generation facility using wood waste is described which will supply power to Ontario Hydro, steam to the sawmill for process heating, and hot water for district heating customers in the town. The use of superheated steam for drying the wood was investigated to determine the impact on boiler performance, the environmental impact and the economic feasibility. The main benefit with superheated steam drying is the reduction in VOC emissions. The capital cost is currently higher with superheated steam drying, but further investigation is warranted to determine if the cost reductions which could be achieved by manufacturing the major components in North America are sufficient to make the technology cost competitive.

  5. Disclaimers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disclaimers NOTICE: Information from this server resides on a computer system funded by the U. S. Department of Energy. Anyone using this system consents to monitoring of this use by system or security personnel. DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY: With respect to documents available from this server, neither the United States Government nor Iowa State University nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose,

  6. Disclaimers | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disclaimers NOTICE: Information from this server resides on a computer system funded by the U. S. Department of Energy. Anyone using this system consents to monitoring of this use by system or security personnel. DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY: With respect to documents available from this server, neither the United States Government nor Iowa State University nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose,

  7. First National Technology Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Technology First National Technology Center Center Dennis Hughes FMA, RPA, P.E. Lead Property Manager, First National Buildings, Inc. 2 First National Technology First National Technology Center Center First National of Nebraska, Inc. - $12 Billion Assets - 5,400 employees - 6.6 million customers in 50 states - 60 banking locations Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, South Dakota,Texas, Illinois - Largest in house merchant processor in United States Top ten VISAツョ and MasterCardツョ processor Top

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_FG2 scoping_Ameren

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7/2011 FutureGen 2.0 Project at Meredosia Public Scoping Meetings: Taylorville, Christian County, IL Tuscola, Douglas County, IL Jacksonville, Morgan County, IL June 7-9, 2011 2 FG2 Background Presentation Overview * Ameren Energy Resources - Who We Are * Meredosia Project Overview * Description of Oxy-combustion Technology 3 FG2 Background Ameren Energy Resources - Who We Are * Merchant Generation Fleet (Independent Power Producer) - 6,250 MW of total generation capacity - 29.6 TWh of

  9. Hydrogen Pipelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaseous Hydrogen ツサ Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipelines Photo of a hydrogen pipeline. Gaseous hydrogen can be transported through pipelines much the way natural gas is today. Approximately 1,500 miles of hydrogen pipelines are currently operating in the United States. Owned by merchant hydrogen producers, these pipelines are located where large hydrogen users, such as petroleum refineries and chemical plants, are concentrated such as the Gulf Coast region. Transporting gaseous hydrogen via

  10. Draft New England Clean Power Link Power Project Environmental Impact Statement Appendix A-L

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    D APPENDIX D ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED BUT ELIMINATED FROM FURTHER ANALYSIS U.S. Department of Energy May 2015 D-1 Draft New England Clean Power Link EIS Appendix D This Page Intentionally Left Blank U.S. Department of Energy May 2015 D-2 Draft New England Clean Power Link EIS Appendix D New England Clean Power Link Project Alternatives Considered but Eliminated from Further Analysis The New England Clean Power Link (NECPL) Project (Project) would transport electricity from Canada on a merchant

  11. EIS-0399: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0399: Final Environmental Impact Statement Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-KV Transmission Line MATL has proposed to construct an international 230-kV alternating current merchant (private) transmission line that would originate at the existing NorthWestern Energy (NWE) 230-kV Switchyard at Great Falls, Montana, and extend north to a new substation to be constructed northeast of Lethbridge, Alberta, crossing the U.S.-Canada international border north

  12. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  13. The bainitic mechanism of austenite formation during rapid heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaluba, W.J.; Taillard, R.; Foct, J.

    1998-10-09

    Strips of a spheroidized 0.68% C, 0.67% Mn and 0.24% Si pearlitic steel were submitted to rapid heat cycles. The samples were heated by direct electrical conduction up to a peak temperature and immediately water quenched. The morphological features of the {alpha} {r_arrow} {gamma} transformation were studied by light and electron microscopy. It was found that austenite at an early stage of the transformation has a specific lath-like morphology and that its growth always starts directly from a grain boundary of ferrite. Moreover, the presence of retained austenite allows the prediction of relatively high carbon content in the transformation product. The particular interaction of austenite laths with carbide particles gives an indication that the growth mechanism can be displacive at its early stage. Comparing the morphological characteristics of austenite formation observed in this study with those reported for austenite decomposition, a bainitic model of the early stage of {alpha} {r_arrow} {gamma} transformation is proposed.

  14. Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auburn Machinery, Inc.

    2004-07-15

    This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated to what would have been the added municipal (community) management costs involved with maintaining closed landfills. (2) With greater quantities of recovered material being returned to and integrated into manufacturing and the marketplace, reduced demand upon virgin wood sources could help lead the way to promoting improved relations and environmental balance between producers and consumers further expanding the value of our natural resource without adding environmental burden.

  15. TALENT user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion John

    2012-01-01

    The Ground-Based Monitoring R and E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. The software tool used to capture and analyze the data collected from testing is called TALENT: Test and Analysis Evaluation Tool. This document is the manual for using TALENT. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007) and the algorithms employed in the test analysis (Merchant, 2011).

  16. River Corridor Closure Contract Section J, Attachment J-5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 1 SECTION J, ATTACHMENT J-5 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS (A) Washington Closure NAICS Code Description of NAICS Major Group SDB Dollars Percentage** Subtotal (B) Subcontractors NAICS Code Description of NAICS Major Group SDB Dollars Percentage** 238 Specialty Trade Contractors 37,352,000 1.92 423 Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods* 43,104,000 2.21 541 Professional, scientific, & tech srvcs* 13,931,000 0.72 562 Waste mgt

  17. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North America (US), L.P. | Department of Energy Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Doc No. EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. Application from Shell Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-339-A Shell Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-339-A Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-339 Shell Energy North America (US), L.P. EA-359-B Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P.

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Services L.P. | Department of Energy 9 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. Application from Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. More Documents & Publications EA-359 Louis Dreyfus Energy Services L.P. EA-359-A Castleton Commodities Merchant Trading L.P.

  19. Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. 30,256 29,621 28,543 30,139 29,594 31,075 1981-2015 East Coast (PADD 1) 876 854 692 664 664

  20. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage & Liquid Delivery Jacob Leachman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor DOE H 2 Transmission & Delivery Workshop 2/26/2014 H Y P E R H drogen roperties for nergy esearch This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Jacob Leachman * DOE H 2 Transmission & Distribution Workshop * 2/25/2014 H Y P E R Why Cryogenic Hydrogen? * LH 2 tanker trucks delivered 80-90 % of total small merchant H 2 in 2010. 1 * Cryo-H

  1. From: Dave Ulery To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: 2014 Congestion Study Comment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dave Ulery To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: 2014 Congestion Study Comment... Date: Sunday, October 19, 2014 8:15:09 PM First, I feel like I should point out an obvious error in your study report. Unless the plan has changed without anyone knowing about it, the Plains and Eastern Clean Line would be 3,500mW, not 7,000mW as was referenced in the report: "The Plains & Eastern Line is a 7,000 MW capacity, 800-mile line planned by transmission merchant Clean Line Energy that would

  2. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gareth (Berkeley, CA); Ahn, Jae-Hwan (Albany, CA); Kim, Nack-Joon (Laramie, WY)

    1986-01-01

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar.sub.3 temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics.

  3. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  4. Controlled rolling process for dual phase steels and application to rod, wire, sheet and other shapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.; Kim, N.J.

    1986-10-28

    An improved, energy efficient, hot rolling method for direct production of cold formable dual-phase steel is provided. The steel is heated to completely austenitize it and then continuously hot rolled and cooled down into the ferrite-austenite two phase region to a temperature which is just below the effective Ar[sub 3] temperature. The hot rolled steel is then rapidly quenched to provide an alloy containing strong, tough lath martensite (fibers) in a ductile soft ferrite matrix. The method is particularly useful for providing rods in which form the alloy is capable of being drawn into high strength wire or the like in a cold drawing operation without any intermediate annealing or patenting, and has excellent strength, ductility and fatigue characteristics. 3 figs.

  5. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Cynthia M.

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy窶冱 release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  6. Influence of microstructural changes due to tempering at 923 K and 1,023 K on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior in normalized 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, B.; Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis has been used to characterize the microstructural changes in normalized and tempered 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that tempering at 923 K shows a single peak behavior up to 20 h and tempering at 1,023 K shows a two peak behavior. This has been explained on the basis of the two stage process of irreversible domain wall movement during magnetization, associated with two major obstacles to domain wall movement: namely lath/grain boundaries and secondary phase precipitates. At lower fields, existing reverse domain walls at lath/grain boundaries overcome the resistance offered by the grain boundaries and move to a distance before they are pined by the precipitates. Then, at higher field, they overcome these precipitates. These two processes occur over a range of critical field strengths with some mean values. If these two mean values are close to each other, then a single peak in the rms voltage of the magnetic Barkhausen noise, with the associated changes in its shape, is observed. On the other hand, if the mean values of the critical fields for these two barriers are widely separated, then a two peak behavior is the clear possibility. The effect of the microstructural changes due to tempering for different durations at 923 K and 1,023 K in 2.25 Cr-1Mo ferritic steel on magnetic Barkhausen noise is explained based on these two stage processes. The influence of high dislocation density in bainitic structure, dissociation of bainite, and precipitation of different carbides such as Fe{sub 3}C, Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}Ce{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, etc., on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior has been analyzed in this study.

  7. Direct Observations of the (Alpha to Gamma) Transformation at Different Input Powers in the Heat Affected Zone of 1045 C-Mn Steel Arc Welds Observed by Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2005-03-16

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments have been performed during Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel at input powers ranging from 1000 W to 3750 W. In situ diffraction patterns taken at discreet locations across the width of the heat affected zone (HAZ) near the peak of the heating cycle in each weld show regions containing austenite ({gamma}), ferrite and austenite ({alpha}+{gamma}), and ferrite ({alpha}). Changes in input power have a demonstrated effect on the resulting sizes of these regions. The largest effect is on the {gamma} phase region, which nearly triples in width with increasing input power, while the width of the surrounding two phase {alpha}+{gamma} region remains relatively constant. An analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained across this range of locations allows the formation of austenite from the base metal microstructure to be monitored. After the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, a splitting of the austenite peaks is observed at temperatures between approximately 860 C and 1290 C. This splitting in the austenite peaks results from the dissolution of cementite laths originally present in the base metal pearlite, which remain after the completion of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation, and represents the formation of a second more highly alloyed austenite constituent. With increasing temperatures, carbon, originally present in the cementite laths, diffuses from the second newly formed austenite constituent to the original austenite constituent. Eventually, a homogeneous austenitic microstructure is produced at temperatures of approximately 1300 C and above, depending on the weld input power.

  8. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc. , Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from a budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains process flowsheets and maps of the proposed site.

  9. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  10. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  11. Huntsman-Enron close supply deals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-14

    Huntsman Corp. and Enron Liquid Services has signed ethylene supply agreements with consumers for their joint 1.5-billion lbs/year steam cracker. Huntsman says participants will be announced next week. Initial plans call for the unit to be built at Huntsman`s Port Arthur, TX complex, with startup scheduled for 1999. Huntsman says engineering, procurement, and financing should be in place by the end of the year. The unit will supply Huntsman`s growing internal needs for ethylene and propylene and bolster its position in the Gulf merchant market and will increase Huntsman`s ethylene capacity to more than 3.3 billion lbs/year. Enron`s extensive pipeline system will provide feedstock and be used as a distribution network for ethylene customers.

  12. US pipelines report mixed results for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1994-11-21

    US natural gas pipelines started 1994 in generally better conditions than a year earlier. These companies' operational and financial results for 1993 indicate modest but continuing improvement. Petroleum liquids pipelines, on the other hand, suffered reduced revenues and incomes last: increased deliveries and trunkline movement of liquid petroleum products failed fully to offset fewer barrels of crude oil moving through the companies' pipeline systems. Revenues, incomes, mileage operated, and other data are tracked in Oil and Gas Journal's exclusive Economics Report. Additionally, this report contains extensive data on actual costs of pipeline construction compared with what companies expected to spend at the time of projects' approvals. The paper also discusses the continuing shift of natural gas pipelines as merchants to role of transporter; what was spent; the US interstate network; pipeline mileage; deliveries; the top 10 companies; construction activities; cost trends; and cost components.

  13. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  14. He Transport and Fate of Tempered Martensitic Steels: Summary of Recent TEM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2010-02-26

    As an extension of prior work [1-4], we summarize recent observations made on a He-implanted tempered martensitic steel (TMS), F82H mod 3, irradiated in the HFIR, in both as-tempered (AT) and cold-worked (CW) conditions. A novel implantation technique was used to uniformly inject He into 3-mm diameter TEM discs to depths ranging from ? 5-8 オm. The He is generated by two-step transmutation reactions in Ni contained in a NiAl coating layer adjacent to paired 3 mm TEM discs. NiAl layers from 1 to 4 ?m thick produced He/dpa ratios between 5 and 40 appm/dpa. The irradiations were at temperatures of 300, 400 and 500ーC from 3.9 to 9 dpa and 90 to 380 appm He. Electron transparent samples were prepared by a cross-sectional thinning technique that allowed investigating microstructural evolution over a range of implantation depths. Irradiation of the AT alloy to 9 dpa at 500ーC and 380 appm He resulted in relatively large, faceted cavities, that are likely voids, along with a much higher density of smaller He bubbles. The cavities were most often aligned in pearl necklace like strings, presumably due to their formation on pre-existing dislocations. A finer distribution of cavities was also present on precipitate interfaces, lath and grain boundaries. Nine dpa irradiations that produced 190 appm He resulted in a somewhat more random distribution and lower density of smaller matrix cavities; but lower He levels had a less noticeable effect on bubbles in the lath and precipitate boundaries. Corresponding irradiations of the CW F82H produced a larger number of smaller cavities. Irradiation of the AT alloy to 3.9 dpa and 90 ppm He at 400ーC produced a similar cavity population to that observed at 500ーC at 190 appm He, while the corresponding cavities at 500ーC are slightly larger and more numerous at 380 appm He. The cavity strings were less obvious for the 400ーC irradiations, and the bubble distribution appeared to be more random. No cavities were observed in the case of the 300ーC irradiations. Overall the cavity number densities compare favorably with those previously reported [4], but details, including size distributions, are still under investigation. Dislocation structures were complex and varied greatly as a function of irradiation dose and temperature, and will be more thoroughly characterized in the next phase of the work.

  15. Deformation of the UI-14at%Nb shape memory alloy: experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Robert D; Tome, Carlos N; Mc Cabe, Rodney J; Clarke, Amy J; Brown, Donald W; Tupper, Catherine N

    2010-12-22

    U-14at%Nb is a shape memory effect (SME) alloy that undergoes deformation by the motion of complex twins and twin related lath boundaries up to the limit of SME deformation ({approx}7%). All of the twins present in the as-transformed martensite and active during SME deformation are derived from those of the orthorhombic alpha-U phase, modified for the monoclinic distortion of the alpha martensite phase. In the SME regime a simple Bain strain model qualitatively predicts variant selection, texture development in polycrystalline samples, and stress-strain behavior as a function of parent phase orientation in single crystal micropillars. In the post-SME regime, unrecoverable deformation occurs by a combination of slip and twinning, with the first few percent of strain in tension apparently governed by a twin species specifically associated with the monoclinic distortion (i.e. not present in the orthorhombic alpha-U phase). The situation in compression is more complicated, with a combination of slip and twinning systems believed responsible for deformation. A review of the Bain strain model for SME deformation will be presented in conjunction with experimental data. In addition, results from modeling of post-SME behavior using the Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent (VPSC) model will be compared to experimental texture measurements.

  16. Electromagnetic variable degrees of freedom actuator systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C. (Pleasanton, CA); Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH); Kirtley, Jr., James L. (Brookline, MA)

    2009-02-17

    The present invention provides a variable reluctance actuator system and method that can be adapted for simultaneous rotation and translation of a moving element by applying a normal-direction magnetic flux on the moving element. In a beneficial example arrangement, the moving element includes a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from an axis of rotation so as to produce a rotary fast tool servo that provides a tool motion in a direction substantially parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. An actuator rotates a swing arm such that a cutting tool moves toward and away from a mounted rotating workpiece in a controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. Position sensors provide rotation and displacement information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in feed slide of a precision lathe.

  17. Chip breaking system for automated machine tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arehart, Theodore A. (Clinton, TN); Carey, Donald O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a rotary selectively directional valve assembly for use in an automated turret lathe for directing a stream of high pressure liquid machining coolant to the interface of a machine tool and workpiece for breaking up ribbon-shaped chips during the formation thereof so as to inhibit scratching or other marring of the machined surfaces by these ribbon-shaped chips. The valve assembly is provided by a manifold arrangement having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart ports each coupled to a machine tool. The manifold is rotatable with the turret when the turret is positioned for alignment of a machine tool in a machining relationship with the workpiece. The manifold is connected to a non-rotational header having a single passageway therethrough which conveys the high pressure coolant to only the port in the manifold which is in registry with the tool disposed in a working relationship with the workpiece. To position the machine tools the turret is rotated and one of the tools is placed in a material-removing relationship of the workpiece. The passageway in the header and one of the ports in the manifold arrangement are then automatically aligned to supply the machining coolant to the machine tool workpiece interface for breaking up of the chips as well as cooling the tool and workpiece during the machining operation.

  18. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ahre, P.E.; Dupuy, P.C.

    1997-08-19

    A mold assembly is disclosed with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10`s of micros ({micro}m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 {micro}m in length up to 150 {micro}m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly. 6 figs.

  19. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, Shashank E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Suresh, Kurra E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2013-12-16

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  20. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (1428 Whitecliff Way, Walnut Creek, CA 94596); Northrup, M. Allen (923 Creston Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Ahre, Paul E. (1299 Gonzaga Ct., Livermore, CA 94550); Dupuy, Peter C. (1736 Waldo Ct., Modesto, CA 95358)

    1997-01-01

    A mold assembly with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10's of micros (.mu.m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 .mu.m in length up to 150 .mu.m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly.

  1. Fabrication and testing of diamond-machined gratings in ZnSe, GaP, and bismuth germanate for the near infrared and visible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2008-06-22

    High quality immersion gratings for infrared applications have been demonstrated in silicon and germanium. To extend this technology to shorter wavelengths other materials must be investigated. We selected three materials, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide and bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}), based on high refractive index, good visible transmission and commercial availability in useful sizes. Crystal samples were diamond turned on an ultra-precision lathe to identify preferred cutting directions. Using this information we diamond-flycut test gratings over a range of feed rates to determine the optimal cutting conditions. For both ZnSe and GaP good surface quality was achieved at feed rates up to 1.0 cm/minute using a special compound angle diamond tool with negative rake angles on both cutting surfaces. The surface roughness of the groove facets was about 4 nm. A Zygo interferometer measured grating wavefront errors in reflection. For the ZnSe the RMS error was < {lambda}/20 at 633nm. More extensive testing was performed with a HeNe laser source and a cooled CCD camera. These measurements demonstrated high relative diffraction efficiency (> 80%), low random groove error (2.0 nm rms), and Rowland ghost intensities at < 0.1%. Preliminary tests on bismuth germanate show high tool wear.

  2. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual annotators from Europe and the USA). Olivier Vallon has been most active in continued input of annotation information.

  3. Isothermal Martensitic and Pressure-Induced Delta to Alpha-Prime Phase Transformations in a Pu-Ga Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, A J; Wall, M A; Farber, D L; Moore, K T; Blobaum, K M

    2008-01-18

    A well-homogenized Pu-2 at.% Ga alloy can be retained in the metastable face-centered cubic {delta} phase at room temperature. Ultimately, this metastable {delta} phase will decompose via a eutectoid transformation to the thermodynamically stable monoclinic {alpha} phase and the intermetallic compound Pu{sub 3}Ga over a period of approximately 10,000 years [1]. In addition, these low solute-containing {delta}-phase Pu alloys are metastable with respect to an isothermal martensitic phase transformation to the {alpha}{prime} phase during low temperature excursions [2, 3] and are also metastable with respect to a {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} phase transformation with increases in pressure [3-5]. The low temperature {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} isothermal martensitic phase transformation in the Pu-2 at.% Ga alloy only goes to {approx}25% completion with the resultant {approx}20 {micro}m long by 2 {micro}m wide lath-shaped {alpha}{prime} particles dispersed within the {delta} matrix. In recently reported studies, Faure et al. [4] have observed a {delta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {alpha}{prime} pressure-induced phase transformation sequence during a diamond anvil cell investigation and, based on x-ray diffraction and density and compressibility experiments, Harbur [5] has concluded that both {alpha}{prime} and an amorphous phase are present in samples that were pressurized and recovered. In this work, a large volume moissanite anvil cell is constructed to permit the pressurization and recovery of specimens of a size suitable for TEM and electron diffraction studies. The cell, shown in Fig. 1, has an overall diameter of 101.6 mm, a moissanite anvil diameter of 9.00 mm, a culet size of 3 mm, and a spring steel gasket 0.5 mm thick with a hole diameter of 2.5 mm. A 2.3 mm diameter by 100 {micro}m thick sample of {delta}-phase Pu-2 at.% Ga is compressed at a rate of approximately 0.05 GPa/minute to {approx}1 GPa to induce the phase transformation to {alpha}{prime}. Optical microscopy of the recovered specimen reveals a very fine microstructure that appears to be single phase, although the resolution of this technique is insufficient to differentiate between single and multiple phases if the grain size is below approximately 1 {micro}m. X-ray diffraction, using a laboratory Cu K{sub {alpha}} source with wavelength of 1.542{angstrom}, shows the monoclinic reflections from the {alpha}{prime} phase, strong peaks from the aluminum specimen holder, and weak peaks from the face-centered cubic {delta} phase as shown in Fig. 2. The recovered specimen is prepared for TEM and electron diffraction studies as described in Moore et al. [6]. TEM reveals small regions of {delta} phase with a very high dislocation density interspersed between the 10-100's nm {alpha}{prime} grains as shown in Fig. 3. Electron diffraction, shown in the insert in Fig. 3, clearly reveals the presence of the {delta} phase. This microstructure is in contrast to the {alpha}{prime} particles that form as a result of the low-temperature isothermal martensite in which the {alpha}{prime} particles are lath-shaped and significantly larger as shown in the optical micrograph in Fig. 4 of a sample cooled to -120 C and held for 10 hours. In these preliminary results, there is no evidence of either an amorphous phase, as suggested by Harbur [5], or the presence of a {gamma} phase. We expected to observe an amorphous phase based on the similarity of this experiment to that of Harbur [5]. It is possible that the {gamma} phase, as reported by Faure et al. [4], does form as an intermediate, but it is not retained to ambient pressure.

  4. Waste systems progress report, March 1983 through February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickle, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    Preliminary design engineering for a Beryllum Electrorefining Demonstration Process has been completed and final engineering for fabrication of the process will be completed by the fourth quarter of FY-84. A remotely operated Advanced Size Reduction Facility (ASRF) is under construction and, when completed, will be used for sectioning plutonium-contaminated gloveboxes for disposal. Modification and additions were made to the 82 kg/hr Fluidized Bed Incinerator (FBI) in preparation for turning the unit over to Production. Several types of cementation processes are being developed to treat various TRU and low-level waste streams to reduce the dispersibility of the wastes. Portland cement and Envirostone gypsum cement were investigated as immobilization media for wet precipitation sludges and organic liquid wastes. Transuranic contaminated waste is being retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for examination at Rocky Flats Plant for compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria. The removal of unreacted calcium metal from the waste salt formed during the direct oxide reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal is necessary in order to comply with regulations regarding the transportation and storage of waste material containing flammable substances. Chemical methods of denitrification of simulated low-level nitrate wastes were investigated on a laboratory scale. Methods of inserting the carbon composite filters into presently stored and currently generated radioactive waste drums have been investigated and their sealing efficiencies determined. Analyses of carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) recovered from spent lathe coolant revealed contamination levels above usable limits. A handbook covering techniques and processes that have been successfully demonstrated to minimize generation of new transuranic waste is being prepared.

  5. Collector main replacement at Indianapolis Coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickle, R.R. Van

    1997-12-31

    Indianapolis Coke is a merchant coke producer, supplying both foundry and blast furnace coke to the industry. The facility has three coke batteries: two 3 meter batteries, one Wilputte four divided and one Koppers Becker. Both batteries are underjet batteries and are producing 100% foundry coke at a net coking time of 30.6 hours. This paper deals with the No. 1 coke battery, which is a 72 oven, gun fired, 5 meter Still battery. No. 1 battery produces both foundry and blast furnace coke at a net coking rate of 25.4 hours. No. 1 battery was commissioned in 1979. The battery is equipped with a double collector main. Although many renovations have been completed to the battery, oven machinery and heating system, to date no major construction projects have taken place. Deterioration of the collector main was caused in part from elevated levels of chlorides in the flushing liquor, and temperature fluctuations within the collector main. The repair procedures are discussed.

  6. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  7. The Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Hummon, Marissa; Jenkin, Thomas; Palchak, David; Kirby, Brendan; Ma, Ookie; O'Malley, Mark

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  8. Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feister, Uwe; Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

  9. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-06-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  10. Trends In U.S. Electric Power Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of the changes that are occurring in the industry to implement the goals of improved reliability and reduced congestion costs. As the electric industry works to become a more efficient market, transmission stands as a key link between the competitive generation and the regulated distribution sectors. In this role as a key link, transmission is a major focus of government efforts to improve reliability and reduce congestion costs. The scope of the report is to analyze the dominant reliability, investment, siting, and competition/open access trends that are occurring in the domestic electric transmission industry. Topics covered include: the impact of the 2003 Northeast blackout on reliability rules; the move from voluntary to mandatory reliability standards; the advent of real-time transmission system monitoring; ISO/RTO efforts to improve system reliability; the drivers of government intervention in transmission investment; the move towards incentive-based rates for transmission investment; legislative and regulatory efforts to spur transmission investment to support renewable energy resources; the emergence of merchant transmission; the need for federal backstop authority on regional transmission projects; the designation of national interest electric transmission corridors; FERC Orders on siting transmission; the need for changes in open access and competition regulations; FERC efforts to increase open access and competition; legislative efforts to increase competition; and, current competitive issues in the industry.

  11. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  12. Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-04-02

    Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

  13. Capturing the emerging market for climate-friendly technologies: opportunities for Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-11-15

    This paper briefly describes the factors driving the growing demand for climate-friendly technologies, some of the key existing companies, organizations, and resources in Ohio, and the potential for Ohio to become a leading supplier of climate solutions. These solutions include a new generation of lower-emitting coal technologies, components for wind turbines, and the feedstocks and facilities to produce biofuels. Several public-private partnerships and initiatives have been established in Ohio. These efforts have encouraged the development of numerous federal- and state-funded projects and attracted major private investments in two increasingly strategic sectors of the Ohio economy: clean-coal technology and alternative energy technology, with a focus on fuel cells. Several major clean-coal projects have been recently initiated in Ohio. In April 2006, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio approved American Electric Power's (AEP) plan to build a 600 MW clean-coal plant along the Ohio River in Meigs County. The plant will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology which makes it easier to capture carbon dioxide for sequestration. Three other potential coal gasification facilities are being considered in Ohio: a combination IGCC and synthetic natural gas plant in Allen County by Global Energy/Lima Energy; a coal-to-fuels facility in Lawrence County by Baard Energy, and a coal-to-fuels facility in Scioto County by CME North American Merchant Energy. The paper concludes with recommendations for how Ohio can capitalize on these emerging opportunities. These recommendations include focusing and coordinating state funding of climate technology programs, promoting the development of climate-related industry clusters, and exploring export opportunities to states and countries with existing carbon constraints.

  14. Risk management of undesirable substances in feed following updated risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraete, Frans

    2013-08-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of 7 May 2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council on undesirable substances in animal feed is the framework for the EU action on undesirable substances in feed. This framework Directive provides: ?that products intended for animal feed may enter for use in the Union from third countries, be put into circulation and/or used in the Union only if they are sound, genuine and of merchantable quality and therefore when correctly used do not represent any danger to human health, animal health or to the environment or could adversely affect livestock production. ?that in order to protect animal and public health and the environment, maximum levels for specific undesirable substances shall be established where necessary. ?for mandatory consultation of a scientific body (EFSA) for all provisions which may have an effect upon public health or animal health or on the environment. ?that products intended for animal feed containing levels of an undesirable substance that exceed the established maximum level may not be mixed for dilution purposes with the same, or other, products intended for animal feed and may not be used for the production of compound feed. Based on the provisions and principles laid down in this framework Directive, maximum levels for a whole range of undesirable substances have been established at EU level. During the discussions in view of the adoption of Directive 2002/32/EC, the European Commission made the commitment to review all existing provisions on undesirable substances on the basis of updated scientific risk assessments. Following requests of the European Commission, the Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has completed a series of 30 risk assessments undertaken over the last 5 years on undesirable substances in animal feed reviewing the possible risks for animal and human health due to the presence of these substances in animal feed. EU legislation on undesirable substances has undergone recently several changes to take account of these most recent scientific opinions. Furthermore EFSA has assessed the risks for public and animal health following the unavoidable carry-over of coccidiostats into non target feed. Maximum levels for the unavoidable carry-over have been established for the non-target feed and the food of animal origin from non-target animal species.

  15. Phlogopite and Quartz Lamellae in Diamond-bearing Diopside from Marbles of the Kokchetav Massif Kazakhstan: Exsolution or Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L Dobrzhinetskaya; R Wirth; D Rhede; Z Liu; H Green

    2011-12-31

    Exsolution lamellae of pyroxene in garnet (grt), coesite in titanite and omphacite from UHPM terranes are widely accepted as products of decompression. However, interpretation of oriented lamellae of phyllosilicates, framework silicates and oxides as a product of decompression of pyroxene is very often under debate. Results are presented here of FIB-TEM, FEG-EMP and synchrotron-assisted infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of phlogopite (Phlog) and phlogopite + quartz (Qtz) lamellae in diamond-bearing clinopyroxene (Cpx) from ultra-high pressure (UHP) marble. These techniques allowed collection of three-dimensional information from the grain boundaries of both the single (phlogopite), two-phase lamellae (phlogopite + quartz), and fluid inclusions inside of diamond included in K-rich Cpx and understanding their relationships and mechanisms of formation. The Cpx grains contain in their cores lamellae-I, which are represented by topotactically oriented extremely thin lamellae of phlogopite (that generally are two units cell wide but locally can be seen to be somewhat broader) and microdiamond. The core composition is: (Ca{sub 0.94}K{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.06}Fe{sub 0.08}Mg{sub 0.88})(Si{sub 1.98}Al{sub 0.02})O{sub 6.00}. Fluid inclusions rich in K and Si are recognized in the core of the Cpx, having no visible connections to the lamellae-I. Lamellar-II inclusions consist of micron-size single laths of phlogopite and lens-like quartz or slightly elongated phlogopite + quartz intergrowths; all are situated in the rim zone of the Cpx. The composition of the rim is (Ca{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.03}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 0.05}Mg{sub 0.90})Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and the rim contains more Ca, Mg than the core, with no K there. Such chemical tests support our microstructural observations and conclusion that the phlogopite lamellae-I are exsolved from the K-rich Cpx-precursor during decompression. It is assumed that Cpx-precursor was also enriched in H{sub 2}O, because diamond included in the core of this Cpx contains fluid inclusions. The synchrotron IR spectra of such diamond record the presence of OH{sup -} stretching and H{sub 2}O bending motion regions. Lamellar-II inclusions are interpreted as forming partly because of modification of the lamellae-i in the presence of fluid enriched in K, Fe and Si during deformation of the host diopside; the latter is probably related to the shallower stage of exhumation of the UHP marble. This study emphasizes that in each case to understand the mechanism of lamellar inclusion formation more detailed studies are needed combining both compositional, structural and three-dimensional textural features of lamellar inclusions and their host.

  16. Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2012-10-26

    This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. テδεつ「テδづつテδづつ「 Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

  17. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  18. DOE/NNSA/DE-FG03-03NA00069 Annual Report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigney, David A.

    2004-03-13

    OAK-B135 This project was undertaken to enhance our understanding and control of the response of ductile materials to extreme loading conditions such as those involved in impact loading. The project was designed with a focus on the role of friction in high rate deformation and shock studies. The work involves collaboration of the tribology group in Materials Science and Engineering at OSU and two groups at LANL, an impact loading group in the dynamic experimentation division and a computer simulation group in the applied physics division. The two teams are investigating the same materials pairs: Cu/Cu, Al/stainless steel (SS) and Ta/Al. The LANL team is providing impacted specimens for characterization at OS U. The LANL team has designed and built a rotating barrel gas gun apparatus that allows measurement of frictional force at an impacted interface over time scales of 0 to 50 {micro}s. Impact pressures are 0-150 MPa and sliding speeds can be up to 50 m/s. The stainless steel barrel can rotate at rates from 0-5000 rpm. An impactor rod is driven at up to 12 m/s against a target rod of the specimen material. Initial tests have been with OFHC Cu/Cu annealed to relax strains from the machining process. The grains are equiaxed and have 40 {micro}m grain size. In the velocity range 0-6 m/s, the friction force increases with velocity for time scales of order 25 {micro}s. The LANL team has also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of sliding for Cu/Cu and Al/Ta using embedded atom potentials as well as simpler systems using Lennard-Jones potentials (also used at OSU). The results show extensive plastic deformation and, in some cases, the formation of nanocrystals at the sliding interface. The dependence of friction force on sliding velocity, v, shows two regimes: a low speed regime in which friction force rises with v and a high speed regime in which it decreases. The experimental work at OSU has focused on three tasks: (1) designing and building an improved system for sliding tests at intermediate velocities, (2) developing appropriate pre-testing surface preparation and (3) developing post-test characterization techniques. The new pin/disk wear testing system can achieve sliding speeds up to 1 m/s in a range of environments and contact times as small as 0.1 s. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was done on cross-sections of the as-machined annular OFHC copper samples. This revealed substructures consistent with extensive subsurface. These features would complicate our efforts to study the changes produced by impact with sliding. The samples should have a minimal amount of subsurface deformation prior to testing, so the deformation due to sliding will not be obscured. Therefore, a study was conducted to find a test specimen preparation method that would minimize subsurface deformation. Three machining methods were analyzed: lathe turning, fly-cutting, and electrical discharge machining (EDM). Post-machining annealing at 275 C for one hour in a vacuum furnace was also performed to remove deformation remaining from the machining processes. Microhardness was measured as a function of the distance from the machined surface. This was a simple way to determine the extent of subsurface deformation. The results show that annealed fly-cut samples are best for our purposes. Similar tests on pure aluminum samples suggest that annealing of fly-cut samples at 200 C for an hour is sufficient to remove subsurface deformation. The material tested at OSU was characterized using optical microscopy, SEM and TEM. Wear tracks and wear debris were analyzed using SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). TEM samples were prepared using different techniques including dimpling, jet-polishing and chemical polishing. Innovative techniques involving a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) have also been explored. MD modeling at OSU has focused on simple amorphous materials. The results suggest that the flow of material close to the sliding interface is characterized by the formation of eddies, intimate mixing and ''diffusion-like'' growth of the mixed

  19. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2010-04-08

    In the 50 years since the laser was first demonstrated in Malibu, California, on May 16, 1960, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a world leader in laser technology and the home for many of the world's most advanced laser systems. That tradition continues today at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system. NIF's completion in March 2009 not only marked the dawn of a new era of scientific research - it could also prove to be the next big step in the quest for a sustainable, carbon-free energy source for the world. NIF consists of 192 laser beams that will focus up to 1.8 million joules of energy on a bb-sized target filled with isotopes of hydrogen - forcing the hydrogen nuclei to collide and fuse in a controlled thermonuclear reaction similar to what happens in the sun and the stars. More energy will be produced by this 'ignition' reaction than the amount of laser energy required to start it. This is the long-sought goal of 'energy gain' that has eluded fusion researchers for more than half a century. Success will be a scientific breakthrough - the first demonstration of fusion ignition in a laboratory setting, duplicating on Earth the processes that power the stars. This impending success could not be achieved without the valuable partnerships forged with other national and international laboratories, private industry and universities. One of the most crucial has been between LLNL and the community in which it resides. Over 155 businesses in the local Tri-Valley area have contributed to the NIF, from industrial technology and engineering firms to tool manufacturing, electrical, storage and supply companies. More than $2.3B has been spent locally between contracts with nearby merchants and employee salaries. The Tri-Valley community has enabled the Laboratory to complete a complex and far-reaching project that will have national and global impact in the future. The first experiments were conducted on NIF last summer and fall, successfully delivering a world-record level of ultraviolet laser energy - more than 1.2 million joules - to a target. The experiments also demonstrated the target drive and target capsule conditions required to achieve fusion ignition. When ignition experiments begin later this year, NIF's lasers will create temperatures and pressures in the hydrogen target that exist only in the cores of stars and giant planets and inside thermonuclear weapons. As a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Stockpile Stewardship Program, NIF will offer the means for sustaining a safe, secure and reliable U.S. nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. NIF is uniquely capable of providing the experimental data needed to develop and validate computer models that will enable scientists to assess the continuing viability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Along with this vital national security mission, success at NIF also offers the possibility of groundbreaking scientific discoveries in a wide variety of disciplines ranging from hydrodynamics to astrophysics. As a unique facility in the world that can create the conditions that exist in supernovas and in the cores of giant planets, NIF will help unlock the secrets of the cosmos and inspire the next generation of scientists. It is NIF's third mission, energy security that has been generating the most excitement in the news media and the international scientific community. The reasons are obvious: global energy demand, driven by population growth and the aspirations of the developing world, already is straining the planet's existing energy resources. Global need for electricity is expected to double from its current level of about two trillion watts (TW) to four TW by 2030 and could reach eight to ten TW by the end of the century. As many as 10,000 new billion-watt power plants will have to be built to keep up with this demand. Meeting this pressing need will require a sustainable carbon-free energy technology that can supply base load electricity to the world. Successful ignition experim

  20. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil prices topped $70 per barrel (bbl) and catastrophic hurricanes in the Gulf Coast shut down a significant fraction of U.S. refinery capacity. The following year, oil approached $80 per bbl due to supply concerns, as well as continued political tensions in the Middle East. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was enacted in December of that year. By the end of December 2007, oil prices surpassed $100 per bbl for the first time, and by mid-summer 2008, prices approached $150 per bbl because of supply concerns, speculation, and weakness of the U.S. dollar. As fast as they skyrocketed, oil prices fell, and by the end of 2008, oil prices dropped below $50 per bbl, falling even more a month later due to the global economic recession. In 2009 and 2010, oil prices began to increase again as a result of a weak U.S. dollar and the rebounding of world economies.

  1. Water Security Toolkit User Manual Version 1.2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Katherine A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Hart, David; Hart, William E.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Haxton, Terranna; Murray, Regan; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas; Laird, Carl; Seth, Arpan; Hackebeil, Gabriel; McGee, Shawn; Mann, Angelica

    2014-08-01

    The Water Security Toolkit (WST) is a suite of open source software tools that can be used by water utilities to create response strategies to reduce the impact of contamination in a water distribution network . WST includes hydraulic and water quality modeling software , optimizati on methodologies , and visualization tools to identify: (1) sensor locations to detect contamination, (2) locations in the network in which the contamination was introduced, (3) hydrants to remove contaminated water from the distribution system, (4) locations in the network to inject decontamination agents to inactivate, remove, or destroy contaminants, (5) locations in the network to take grab sample s to help identify the source of contamination and (6) valves to close in order to isolate contaminate d areas of the network. This user manual describes the different components of WST , along w ith examples and case studies. License Notice The Water Security Toolkit (WST) v.1.2 Copyright c 2012 Sandia Corporation. Under the terms of Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000, there is a non-exclusive license for use of this work by or on behalf of the U.S. government. This software is distributed under the Revised BSD License (see below). In addition, WST leverages a variety of third-party software packages, which have separate licensing policies: Acro Revised BSD License argparse Python Software Foundation License Boost Boost Software License Coopr Revised BSD License Coverage BSD License Distribute Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License EPANET Public Domain EPANET-ERD Revised BSD License EPANET-MSX GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.3 gcovr Revised BSD License GRASP AT&T Commercial License for noncommercial use; includes randomsample and sideconstraints executable files LZMA SDK Public Domain nose GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 ordereddict MIT License pip MIT License PLY BSD License PyEPANET Revised BSD License Pyro MIT License PyUtilib Revised BSD License PyYAML MIT License runpy2 Python Software Foundation License setuptools Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License six MIT License TinyXML zlib License unittest2 BSD License Utilib Revised BSD License virtualenv MIT License Vol Common Public License vpykit Revised BSD License Additionally, some precompiled WST binary distributions might bundle other third-party executables files: Coliny Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) Dakota GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 PICO Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) i Revised BSD License Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: * Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. * Neither the name of Sandia National Laboratories nor Sandia Corporation nor the names of its con- tributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS %22AS IS%22 AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IM- PLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL SANDIA CORPORATION BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUD- ING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. ii Acknowledgements This work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The material in this document has been subject to technical and policy review by the U.S. EPA, and approved for publication. The views expressed by individual authors, however, are their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Mention of trade names, products, or services does not convey official U.S. EPA approval, endorsement, or recommendation. The Water Security Toolkit is an extension of the Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment-Sensor Place- ment Optimization Tool (TEVA-SPOT), which was also developed with funding from the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The authors acknowledge the following individuals for their contributions to the devel- opment of TEVA-SPOT: Jonathan Berry (Sandia National Laboratories), Erik Boman (Sandia National Laboratories), Lee Ann Riesen (Sandia National Laboratories), James Uber (University of Cincinnati), and Jean-Paul Watson (Sandia National Laboratories). iii Acronyms ATUS American Time-Use Survey BLAS Basic linear algebra sub-routines CFU Colony-forming unit CVAR Conditional value at risk CWS Contamination warning system EA Evolutionary algorithm EDS Event detection system EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EC Extent of Contamination ERD EPANET results database file GLPK GNU Linear Programming Kit GRASP Greedy randomized adaptive sampling process HEX Hexadecimal HTML HyperText markup language INP EPANET input file LP Linear program MC Mass consumed MILP Mixed integer linear program MIP Mixed integer program MSX Multi-species extension for EPANET NFD Number of failed detections NS Number of sensors NZD Non-zero demand PD Population dosed PE Population exposed PK Population killed TAI Threat assessment input file TCE Tailed-conditioned expectation TD Time to detection TEC Timed extent of contamination TEVA Threat ensemble vulnerability assessment TSB Tryptic soy broth TSG Threat scenario generation file TSI Threat simulation input file VAR Value at risk VC Volume consumed WST Water Security Toolkit YML YAML configuration file format for WST iv Symbols Notation Definition Example %7B , %7D set brackets %7B 1,2,3 %7D means a set containing the values 1,2, and 3. [?] is an element of s [?] S means that s is an element of the set S . [?] for all s = 1 [?] s [?] S means that the statement s = 1 is true for all s in set S . P summation P n i =1 s i means s 1 + s 2 + * * * + s n . %5C set minus S %5C T means the set that contains all those elements of S that are not in set T . %7C given %7C is used to define conditional probability. P ( s %7C t ) means the prob- ability of s occurring given that t occurs. %7C ... %7C cardinality Cardinality of a set is the number of elements of the set. If set S = %7B 2,4,6 %7D , then %7C S %7C = 3. v