National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for merchandise raw materials

  1. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Publication Year 2009 URL http:www.nrel.govdocsfy09osti46100.pdf Building Models General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline, General Merchandise 2009...

  2. A new copper borophosphate with novel polymeric chains and its structural correlation with raw materials in molten hydrated flux synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Ruijing; Liu, Wei Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Xu, Hongmei; Zhao, Chenggong

    2014-02-15

    A novel copper borophosphate, Cu{sub 3}[B{sub 2}P{sub 3}O{sub 12}(OH){sub 3}] has been prepared by the molten hydrated flux method. Its crystal structure was determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction (monoclinic, Cc, a=6.1895 Å, b=13.6209 Å, c=11.9373 Å, ?=97.62°, V=997.5 Å{sup 3}, Z=4). The three-dimensional framework of the titled compound, is composed by two kinds of polymeric chains and isolated PO{sub 4} tetrahedral. One novel 4-membered tetrahedral rings has been observed in borophosphates. Magnetic measurements indicate that the title compound exits antiferromagnetic interactions. Due to the special reaction medium created by the molten hydrated flux method, a possible structural correlation between the final solids and the raw materials has been noted. - Graphical abstract: The 3D structure consists of a framework composed of CuO{sub x} polyhedra, BO{sub 4} and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. A intersection angle between the metal chains and borophosphate chains can be noted. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel copper borophosphate has been prepared by the molten hydrated flux method. • One novel 4-membered tetrahedral ring has been observed firstly in borophosphates. • A possible structural correlation between the final solids and the raw materials has been noted.

  3. Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Opportunitistic Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of chemodiversity in Nature (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Noel, Joseph

    2011-04-25

    Joseph Noel from the Salk Institute on "Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of Chemodiversity in Nature" on March 26, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  4. Commercial Building Partnership General Merchandise Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  5. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Leach, M.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for medium-box general merchandise stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  6. Improvement of granulation of raw material by using the high-agitating mixer at Kokura No. 3 sintering plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadano, Yasuhiko; Murai, Tatsunori; Kawaguchi, Yosizumi; Komatsu, Shusaku; Sasakawa, Akira; Kawaguchi, Takazo; Matsumura, Masaru

    1995-12-01

    Recently, there have been experiments aimed at increasing the pulverized coal injection rate of a blast furnace. When increasing the pulverized coal injection rate, the gas permeability resistance in a blast furnace increases. One of the methods to decrease the gas permeability resistance in a blast furnace is to use an iron ore burden with high iron content and low slag volume. However, the problem of resource drain has already occurred in the hematite deposit in West Australia, which is the principal supplier of a good quality lumpy iron ore. As a result, pellet feed iron ore must be selected as its substitute. In this paper, the authors investigated a granulation technique for producing an iron ore sinter with high iron content and low slag volume. In addition, they developed the granulation technique of agitating materials and water at high speed. It was used in Kokura No. 3 Sinter Plant.

  7. Environmental and technical assessments of the potential utilization of sewage sludge ashes (SSAs) as secondary raw materials in construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Maozhe [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Blanc, Denise, E-mail: denise.blanc-biscarat@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Gautier, Mathieu; Mehu, Jacques; Gourdon, Rémy [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? We used sewage sludge ashes in ready-mix concrete recipe. ? SSAs were used as a substitution of cement. ? Compressive strength of ready-mix concrete incorporating SSAs were similar as blank one. ? Contaminants leaching from concrete monoliths were above threshold limits. - Abstract: Ashes produced by thermal treatments of sewage sludge exhibit common properties with cement. For example, major elements present in SSA are the same of major elements of cement. Hydraulic properties of SSA are quite the same of cement ones. They may therefore be used to substitute part of cement in concrete or other cementitious materials, provided that technical prescriptions are satisfied and that environmental risks are not significantly increased. The objective of the present study was to determine the appropriate substitution ratios to satisfy both technical and environmental criteria. In a first step, the elemental composition and particle size distribution of the ashes were measured. Then the ashes were used along with Portland cement and sand at different ratios of substitution to produce mortar and concrete which were cured for up to 90 days into parallelepipedic or cylindrical monoliths. The mechanical properties of the monoliths were measured using standard procedures for flexural and compressive strengths, and compared to blanks containing no ashes. The environmental criteria were assessed using leaching tests conducted according to standard protocols both on the ashes and the monoliths, and compared to the blanks. Results showed that the characteristics of the ashes ranged between those of cement and sand because of their larger particle size and higher content in SiO{sub 2} as compared to cement. The monoliths made with the highest substitution ratios exhibited a significant decrease in flexural and compressive strengths. However, when the ashes were used in partial substitution of cement at appropriate ratios, the concrete monoliths exhibited similar compressive strengths as the blank samples. The most appropriate ratios were found to be 10% substitution of cement and 2% substitution of sand. The leaching tests conducted on the ashes in their powdery form revealed that amongst the potential contaminants analyzed only Mo and Se were leached at concentrations above the threshold limits considered. The leaching tests conducted on concrete monoliths showed however that none of the contaminants monitored, including Mo and Se, were leached above the limits. In addition, whether concrete recipe incorporated ashes or not, similar concentrations were measured for each potential contaminant in the leachates. This result indicated that mixing ash with cement and sand to produce mortar or concrete induced a stabilization of Mo and Se and thereby constituted in itself a good treatment of the ashes.

  8. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores Adam Hirsch, Elaine Hale, and Matthew Leach Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study 2010 Pacific Grove, California August 15-20, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-48197 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a

  9. RawSolar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RawSolar Jump to: navigation, search Name: RawSolar Place: Berkeley, California Sector: Solar Product: California-based startup aiming to commercialise concentrating solar thermal...

  10. Conversion of raw carbonaceous fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2007-08-07

    Three configurations for an electrochemical cell are utilized to generate electric power from the reaction of oxygen or air with porous plates or particulates of carbon, arranged such that waste heat from the electrochemical cells is allowed to flow upwards through a storage chamber or port containing raw carbonaceous fuel. These configurations allow combining the separate processes of devolatilization, pyrolysis and electrochemical conversion of carbon to electric power into a single unit process, fed with raw fuel and exhausting high BTU gases, electric power, and substantially pure CO.sub.2 during operation.

  11. ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet overviewing project that reduces the cost of carbon fiber raw materials and processing technologies

  12. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  13. Raw material preparation for ultra high production rate sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Ritz, V.J.; Cappel, F.; Weisel, H.; Richter, G.

    1995-12-01

    An R and D program in pot grate sintering showed, that an intensive preparation of ores, additives and coke breeze improves the sintering capacity. The tests were conducted using an ore mixture composed of typical ores imported to Europe. The highest capacities were attained up to 63.8 t/m{sup 2} {times} 24 h maximum for a sinter which well fulfills the high requirements on chemical, physical and metallurgical properties.

  14. Materials Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Videos Materials

  15. Analysis of the raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV (English version) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV...

  16. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

  17. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012

  18. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Seismic data - raw taken by Apex Hipoint for 1st test 2012

  19. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

  20. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Polsky, Yarom

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  1. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Polsky, Yarom

    2014-05-23

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  2. CORROSIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF RAW AND TREATED PYROLYSIS OILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, Jim; Howell, Michael; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Sam; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-10-14

    Fast pyrolysis offers a relatively low cost method of processing biomass to produce a liquid product that has the potential for conversion to several types of liquid fuels. The liquid product of fast pyrolysis, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, contains a high oxygen content primarily in the form of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. These oils are typically very acidic with a Total Acid Number that is often in the range of 50 to 100, and previous studies have shown this material to be quite corrosive to common structural materials. Removal of at least some of the oxygen and conversion of this oil to a more useful product that is considerably less corrosive can be accomplished through a hydrogenation process. The product of such a treatment is considered to have the potential for blending with crude oil for processing in petroleum refineries. Corrosion studies and chemical analyses have been conducted using as produced bio-oil samples as well as samples that have been subjected to different levels of oxygen removal. Chemical analyses show treatment affected the concentrations of carboxylic acids contained in the oil, and corrosion studies showed a positive benefit of the oxygen removal. Results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

  3. Reliability study: raw and make-up water system, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, S.M.; Wiehle, W.E.; Walder, A.; Houk, T.C.; West, R.M.

    1981-09-01

    A reliability study for determining the ability of the raw and make-up water system to provide reliable and adequate service through the year 2000 has been completed. This study includes an evaluation of the well fields, X-608 Raw Water Pump House, X-605 Booster Station Complex, X-611 Water Treatment Complex, and the associated piping. The raw and make-up water system is in good overall condition, but to maintain this condition, the reliability study team made the following recommendations: (1) increase well field capacity; (2) replace certain speed reducers at X-611; (3) repair deteriorated poles, crossarms, and accessories on F-2 and W-1 feeders; (4) stabilize the landslide in vicinity of the 48 in. raw water main; and (5) initiate further investigation, testing, or engineering studies to correct deficiencies in the supervisory control system between well fields, pump house, and X-611, determine if the 2400 volt underground cables to X-608A wells should be replaced.

  4. Lessons Learned from Raw Treatment in the Slovak Republic - Minimization for Final Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanusik, V.; Hladky, E.; Krajc, T.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M.; Urbanec, M. [Milan Zatkulak, VUJE, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia); Ehn, L.; Kover, M.; Remias, V.; Slezak, M. [JAVYS, a.s., Bohunice (Slovakia)

    2008-07-01

    This paper is referring about the utilization of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of low and intermediate level RAW from operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Slovakia. This experience represents more than 116 reactor years of NPP operation, mainly of NPPs equipped with VVER 440 reactors, 30 years of decommissioning activities, 27 years of development and operation of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of RAW and 7 years of LLW and ILW final repository operation. These technologies are located in two localities: Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce. The complex treatment and conditioning center (cementation, bituminization, incineration, vitrification, fragmentation and compacting) for almost all types of radioactive waste is located in Jaslovske Bohunice NPP site. The treatment and conditioning center for liquid radioactive waste (cementation and bituminization) and the surface type repository for LLW and ILW final disposal are located in Mochovce area. The treated waste forms are disposed to repository in cubical Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) containers. The experience from the phase of technology development and the phase of technology modifications for various types of RAW, the experience from long term operation of technologies and the experience from transportation of original and packed wastes are described in this paper. The method of optimally combined technology utilization in order to maximize the radionuclide inventory at the same time with respect of disposal safety limitations of repository is described, too. The significant RAW volume reduction for final disposal was achieved through mediation of the combination of treatment and conditioning technologies. The disposal of treated RAW in cubic FRC containers allowed the optimal utilization of volume and radiological capacity of LLW and ILW repository in Mochovce and the fulfillment of determined safety requirements at the same time. (authors)

  5. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  6. Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Propulsion Materials FY 2013 Progress Report ii CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 1 Project 18516 - Materials for H1ybrid and Electric Drive Systems ...................................................... 4 Agreement 19201 - Non-Rare Earth Magnetic Materials ............................................................................ 4 Agreement 23278 - Low-Cost

  7. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Materials Physics and Applications» Materials Science and Technology» Institute for Materials Science» Materials Science Rob Dickerson uses a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope at

  8. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter...

  9. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation...

  10. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  11. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  12. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  13. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Institute for Materials Science x

  14. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:17

  15. Materials Physics | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate In materials physics, NREL focuses on realizing materials that transcend the present constraints of photovoltaic (PV) and solid-state lighting technologies. Through materials growth and characterization, coupled with theoretical modeling, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. Capabilities Optimizing New Materials An illustration showing

  16. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  17. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  20. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials (continued) * Generators are required to avoid Las Vegas metropolitan area and Hoover Dam (Section 6.4 of NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria, available at ...

  1. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  2. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  3. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  4. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE ASCR Program Manager Yukiko Sekine Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:5

  5. Engineered Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Engineered Materials Materials design, fabrication, assembly, and characterization for national security needs. Contact Us Group Leader Ross Muenchausen Email Deputy Group Leader Dominic Peterson Email Group Office (505)-667-6887 We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly, characterization, and field support. We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly,

  6. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  7. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  8. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials discovery serves as a foundation for technological progress in renewable energies. Our experimental activities in inorganic solid-state materials innovation span a broad range of technological readiness levels-from basic science through applied research to device development-relying on a high-throughput combinatorial materials science approach, followed by traditional targeted experiments. In addition, our researchers work

  9. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Page...

  10. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  11. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  12. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  13. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences August 3-4, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors [not available] NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion

  14. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics November 12-13, 2009 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  15. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BER Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and BER usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads RequirementsWorkshopCaseStudyTemplate.doc | Word document

  16. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and HEP usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads CaseStudyTemplate.docx | unknown Case Study Worksheet -

  17. A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WINTER* 2000-2001 A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials for the Future A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 2, NO. 4 ALSO: New Materials for Microsystems Predictive Modeling Meets the Challenge S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y ON THE COVER: Bonnie Mckenzie operates a dual beam Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB/SEM). The image on the computer screen shows a cross section of a radiation-hardened device. The cross section was rendered with the FIB/SEM and allowed the

  18. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  19. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials There are a variety of reference materials the NSSAB utilizes and have been made available on its website. Documents Fact Sheets - links to Department of Energy Nevada Field Office webpage Public Reading Room NTA Public Reading Facility Open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (except holidays) 755C East Flamingo Road Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 Phone (702) 794-5106 http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/testingarchive.aspx DOE Electronic Database Also available to the public is an

  20. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Critical Materials: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................. 5 5 2.1 Major Trends in Selected Clean Energy Application Areas ........................................................... 5 6 2.1.1 Permanent Magnets for Wind

  1. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  2. ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies Reducing the Cost of Carbon Fiber Raw Materials and Processing Technologies Introduction Carbon fber is an exceptionally high-strength, lightweight material with numerous applications in energy effciency and the generation of renewable energy. However, the current cost of carbon fbers limits their use to specialty applications and markets willing to pay a premium for the performance they offer. Carbon fber

  3. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  4. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  5. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  6. Winter urban air particles from Rome (Italy): Effects on the monocytic-macrophagic RAW 264.7 cell line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozzi, Roberta . E-mail: pozzi@iss.it; De Berardis, Barbara; Paoletti, Luigi; Guastadisegni, Cecilia

    2005-11-15

    Epidemiological data show an association between exposure to elevated levels of particulate matter (PM), in particular the fine fraction (<2.5{mu}m in diameter), and an increase in cardiovascular mortality and respiratory symptoms. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro toxicity of coarse and fine particulate matter collected with a cascade impactor during winter in an urban area of Rome in relation to their physicochemical characterization (size distribution and chemical composition) as assessed by analytical electron microscopy (SEM/EDX). The X-ray microanalysis data of single particles of coarse and fine matter were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis to determine the principal component of the two granulometric fractions. The main chemical difference between the two fractions was the greater abundance of carbonaceous particles in the fine fraction. We compared the ability of coarse and fine fractions, carbon black (CB), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA) to induce arachidonic acid release and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) production in the monocytic-macrophagic RAW 264.7 cell line at concentrations of 30 and 120{mu}g/mL. Our results showed that CB and ROFA were consistently less effective than both fractions of urban particles at inducing an inflammatory reaction in RAW 264.7 cells. Both PM fractions dose-dependently increased TNF-{alpha} production in RAW 264.7 cells after 5 and 24h of incubation, and only the TNF-{alpha} production induced by coarse particles at 30{mu}g/mL decreased significantly (P<0.01) after 24h of treatment. In our in vitro model the winter fine fraction was more reactive than the winter coarse fraction, in contrast to a previously examined summer sample. In the summer sample, coarse particles produced higher levels of inflammatory mediators than fine particles and the CB was consistently less effective than the urban particles. The different behaviors between summer and winter urban fractions may be due to their different physicochemical characteristics; in fact, the comparison of the two samples' characterization by SEM/EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that in winter the carbonaceous particles are more abundant than in summer and that winter particles carry a greater quantity of organic compounds. We suggest that the higher concentration of organic compounds on fine carbonaceous particles may partially explain the higher activation of RAW 264.7 cells by fine particles.

  7. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  8. Discussion of and reply to ``Thermoselect: Energy and raw material recovery through thermal chemical transformation in a closed-loop system``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, J.W.; Stahlberg, R.; Runyon, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Publication of this paper by Rudi Stahlberg and David J. Runyon has made the public aware of the perfect system which would take garbage in, and produce several streams of valuable by-products while emitting little, if any, pollution streams. Prototype testing of the system was done at Fondotoce, Italy. However, the paper gives the impression that perhaps not all of the suggested processing is a part of the present prototype operation, if this is the case, the reader should be clearly informed as to which of the suggested by-product processing systems is presently operational, and which are thought to be possible. Comments are also made concerning pollution control equipment and the disposition of heavy metals. This article also contains the original authors` reply to the comments.

  9. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  10. Solar synthesis of advanced materials: A solar industrial program initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowski, A.

    1992-06-01

    This is an initiative for accelerating the use of solar energy in the advanced materials manufacturing industry in the United States. The initiative will be based on government-industry collaborations that will develop the technology and help US industry compete in the rapidly expanding global advanced materials marketplace. Breakthroughs in solar technology over the last 5 years have created exceptional new tools for developing advanced materials. Concentrated sunlight from solar furnaces can produce intensities that approach those on the surface of the sun and can generate temperatures well over 2000{degrees}C. Very thin layers of illuminated surfaces can be driven to remarkably high temperatures in a fraction of a second. Concentrated solar energy can be delivered over large areas, allowing for rapid processing and high production rates. By using this technology, researchers are transforming low-cost raw materials into high-performance products. Solar synthesis of advanced materials uses bulk materials and energy more efficiently, lowers processing costs, and reduces the need for strategic materials -- all with a technology that does not harm the environment. The Solar Industrial Program has built a unique, world class solar furnace at NREL to help meet the growing need for applied research in advanced materials. Many new advanced materials processes have been successfully demonstrated in this facility, including the following: Metalorganic deposition, ceramic powders, diamond-like carbon materials, rapid heat treating, and cladding (hard coating).

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  13. Overview of Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Vehicles Technologies Materials Program Jerry Gibbs Technology Development Manager Propulsion Materials Vehicle Technologies Program Overview of Propulsion Materials Project ID PM000 Vehicle Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Materials for Combustion Systems / High Efficiency Engines Turbocharger, Valve Train, Fuel Injection, Structural Components Head/Block, Sensors, Materials/Fuel Compatibility Materials for Exhaust and Energy Recovery DPFs, Catalysts, Thermoelectric Materials,

  14. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  15. Preliminary materials assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, R.R.; Jamieson, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Presently, there are two SPS reference design concepts (one using silicon solar cells; the other using gallium arsenide solar cells). A materials assessment of both systems was performed based on the materials lists set forth in the DOE/NASA SPS Reference System Report: Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This listing identified 22 materials (plus miscellaneous and organics) used in the SPS. Tracing the production processes for these 22 materials, a total demand for over 20 different bulk materials (copper, silicon, sulfuric acid, etc.) and nealy 30 raw materials (copper ore, sand, sulfur ore, etc.) was revealed. Assessment of these SPS material requirements produced a number of potential material supply problems. The more serious problems are those associated with the solar cell materials (gallium, gallium arsenide, sapphire, and solar grade silicon), and the graphite fiber required for the satellite structure and space construction facilities. In general, the gallium arsenide SPS option exhibits more serious problems than the silicon option, possibly because gallium arsenide technology is not as well developed as that for silicon. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

  16. Center for Coal-Derived Low Energy Materials for Sustainable Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewell, Robert; Robl, Tom; Rathbone, Robert

    2012-06-30

    The overarching goal of this project was to create a sustained center to support the continued development of new products and industries that manufacture construction materials from coal combustion by-products or CCB’s (e.g., cements, grouts, wallboard, masonry block, fillers, roofing materials, etc). Specific objectives includes the development of a research kiln and associated system and the formulation and production of high performance low-energy, low-CO2 emitting calcium sulfoaluminate (CAS) cement that utilize coal combustion byproducts as raw materials.

  17. Advanced process research and development to enhance metals and materials recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.

    1997-12-05

    Innovative, cost-effective technologies that have a positive life-cycle environmental impact and yield marketable products are needed to meet the challenges of the recycling industry. Four materials-recovery technologies that are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with industrial partners are described in this paper: (1) dezincing of galvanized steel scrap; (2) material recovery from auto-shredder residue; (3) high-value-plastics recovery from obsolete appliances; and (4) aluminum salt cake recycling. These technologies are expected to be applicable to the production of low-cost, high-quality raw materials from a wide range of waste streams.

  18. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  19. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load Baseline | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  20. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load Baseline ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPLBaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  1. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  2. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  3. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGeneralMerchHPLBaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  4. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load Baseline |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  5. Chapter 6: Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Materials Material Selection Sustainable Building Materials System Integration Issues | Chapter 6 Material Selection Materials The use of durable, attractive, and environmentally responsible building materials is a key element of any high-performance building effort. The use of natural and healthy materials contributes to the well-being of the occupants and to a feeling of connection with the bounty of the natural world. Many construction materials have significant environ- mental impacts from

  6. Chapter 6: Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 6 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide contains information on material selection, sustainable building materials, and system integration issues.

  7. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  8. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Miller, Karen S.

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  9. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Photo left to right: CMI Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Not pictured: Carol Bergman. CMI staff phone 515-296-4500, e-mail CMIdirector@ameslab.gov The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of materials and eliminate the need for materials that are subject to supply disruptions.

  10. About Critical Materials | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Critical Materials Critical materials are found in many commonly used tools, including batteries, cell phones and vehicles. 10 things you didn't know about critical materials Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen CMI factsheet What would we do without rare earths? The Ames Laboratory channel on YouTube Timelines related to rare earth elements and materials Other sources of information about rare earths: GE: Understanding rare earth metals, includes links to a whitepaper "Understanding

  11. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MST Materials Science and Technology Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. MST is metallurgy. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and technology for Los Alamos National Laboratory. READ MORE MST is engineered materials. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and

  12. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Nieman, G. William (Evanston, IL); Weertman, Julia R. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  13. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary PDF icon vtpn04_schutte_lm_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Lightweight Materials Lightweight Materials Overview Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop

  14. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Kristin Persson is one of the founding scientists behind the Materials Project, a computational tool aimed at taking the guesswork out of new materials discoveries, especially those aimed at energy applications like batteries. (Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL) New materials are crucial to building a clean energy

  15. Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Innovating tomorrow's materials today New high-tech materials are the key to breakthroughs in biology, the environment, nuclear energy, transportation and national security. Argonne continues to make revolutionary advances in the science of materials discovery and synthesis, and is designing new materials with advantageous properties - one atom at a time. Examples of these include Argonne's patented technologies for nanoparticle applications, heat transfer and materials for advanced

  16. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-ordinator & Visiting Professor Oxford University Materials United Kingdom "Magnetic" Molecular Dynamics and Other Models for Fusion Reactor Materials Tuesday, September 15,...

  17. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  18. Materials Science Research | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Research For photovoltaics and other energy applications, NREL's primary research in materials science includes the following core competencies. A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate Materials Physics Through materials growth and characterization, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. An image of multiple, interconnecting red and blue particles Electronic Structure Theory We

  19. Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels | Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science | NREL Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels Materials discovery is important across technology readiness levels: basic science, applied research, and device development. Over the past several years, NREL has worked at each of these levels, demonstrating our competence in a broad range of materials discovery problems. Basic Science An image of a triangular diagram with tantalum-cobalt-tin at the top vertex, tantalum at the lower left vertex, and cobalt at the

  20. Estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full field digital mammography images via adaptive fuzzy c-means clustering and support vector machine segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Wang Yan; Zheng Yuanjie; Gee, James C.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The amount of fibroglandular tissue content in the breast as estimated mammographically, commonly referred to as breast percent density (PD%), is one of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Approaches to quantify breast density commonly focus on either semiautomated methods or visual assessment, both of which are highly subjective. Furthermore, most studies published to date investigating computer-aided assessment of breast PD% have been performed using digitized screen-film mammograms, while digital mammography is increasingly replacing screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening protocols. Digital mammography imaging generates two types of images for analysis, raw (i.e., 'FOR PROCESSING') and vendor postprocessed (i.e., 'FOR PRESENTATION'), of which postprocessed images are commonly used in clinical practice. Development of an algorithm which effectively estimates breast PD% in both raw and postprocessed digital mammography images would be beneficial in terms of direct clinical application and retrospective analysis. Methods: This work proposes a new algorithm for fully automated quantification of breast PD% based on adaptive multiclass fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and support vector machine (SVM) classification, optimized for the imaging characteristics of both raw and processed digital mammography images as well as for individual patient and image characteristics. Our algorithm first delineates the breast region within the mammogram via an automated thresholding scheme to identify background air followed by a straight line Hough transform to extract the pectoral muscle region. The algorithm then applies adaptive FCM clustering based on an optimal number of clusters derived from image properties of the specific mammogram to subdivide the breast into regions of similar gray-level intensity. Finally, a SVM classifier is trained to identify which clusters within the breast tissue are likely fibroglandular, which are then aggregated into a final dense tissue segmentation that is used to compute breast PD%. Our method is validated on a group of 81 women for whom bilateral, mediolateral oblique, raw and processed screening digital mammograms were available, and agreement is assessed with both continuous and categorical density estimates made by a trained breast-imaging radiologist. Results: Strong association between algorithm-estimated and radiologist-provided breast PD% was detected for both raw (r= 0.82, p < 0.001) and processed (r= 0.85, p < 0.001) digital mammograms on a per-breast basis. Stronger agreement was found when overall breast density was assessed on a per-woman basis for both raw (r= 0.85, p < 0.001) and processed (0.89, p < 0.001) mammograms. Strong agreement between categorical density estimates was also seen (weighted Cohen's {kappa}{>=} 0.79). Repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated no statistically significant differences between the PD% estimates (p > 0.1) due to either presentation of the image (raw vs processed) or method of PD% assessment (radiologist vs algorithm). Conclusions: The proposed fully automated algorithm was successful in estimating breast percent density from both raw and processed digital mammographic images. Accurate assessment of a woman's breast density is critical in order for the estimate to be incorporated into risk assessment models. These results show promise for the clinical application of the algorithm in quantifying breast density in a repeatable manner, both at time of imaging as well as in retrospective studies.

  1. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  2. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  3. Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the Energy Department webinar, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, held August 13, 2013.

  4. Materials Analysis and Modeling of Underfill Materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal-mechanical properties of three potential underfill candidate materials for PBGA applications are characterized and reported. Two of the materials are a formulations developed at Sandia for underfill applications while the third is a commercial product that utilizes a snap-cure chemistry to drastically reduce cure time. Viscoelastic models were calibrated and fit using the property data collected for one of the Sandia formulated materials. Along with the thermal-mechanical analyses performed, a series of simple bi-material strip tests were conducted to comparatively analyze the relative effects of cure and thermal shrinkage amongst the materials under consideration. Finally, current knowledge gaps as well as questions arising from the present study are identified and a path forward presented.

  5. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  6. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  7. Material Transfer Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Transfer Agreements Material Transfer Agreements Enables the transfer of tangible consumable research materials between two organizations, when the recipient intends to use the material for research purposes Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Overview The ability to exchange materials freely and without delay is an important part of a healthy scientific laboratory. Los Alamos National

  8. Materials for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials for the Future Materials for the Future The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion Mary Hockaday Email Pillar Contact Toni Taylor Email Pillar Contact David Teter Email Materials for the Future Science Overview At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we anticipate the advent of a new era in materials science, when we will transition from observing and exploiting the properties of materials to a science-based

  9. Multi Material Paradigm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi Material Paradigm Glenn S. Daehn Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University Advanced Composites (FRP) Steel Spaceframe Multi Material Concept Composites Advanced Steel body Coil-coated shell Steel thin wall casting High strength Steels Al-Spaceframe Steel Unibody Stainless Steel Spaceframe Affordability of weight reduction Design Materials Processes Approach Advanced M-Spaceframe L > 2012 Multi Material Paradigm Joining problems and methods f Joining

  10. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Troy A. Semelsberger Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Storage Summit Jan 27-29, 2015 Denver, CO Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials 2 Objectives 1. Assess chemical hydrogen storage materials that can exceed 700 bar compressed hydrogen tanks 2. Status (state-of-the-art) of chemical hydrogen storage materials 3. Identify key material characteristics 4. Identify obstacles, challenges and risks for the successful deployment of chemical hydrogen materials in a practical on-board hydrogen

  11. Materials at the Mesoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » Materials at the Mesoscale 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues » submit Materials at the Mesoscale Los Alamos's bold proposal to understand and control material properties December 12, 2015 Materials at the Mesoscale Between the atomic and macro scales lies a gap in our knowledge of materials known as the mesoscale. A gap remains in the understanding of mesoscale properties and responses, especially in extreme temperature,

  12. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  13. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Core Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization Core materials characterization

  14. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  15. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  16. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  17. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  18. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  19. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  20. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  1. Cybersecurity Awareness Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of materials to enhance cyber awareness campaigns, address emerging cyber threats, and examine hot topics. These materials are available to all DOE organizations, and public and private institutions.

  2. Nuclear Materials Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel.  These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for...

  3. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  4. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADEPS » MPA Materials Physics and Applications We develop new technologies that solve pressing national energy and security challenges by exploring and exploiting materials and their properties; developing practical applications of materials, and providing world-class user facilities. Contact Us Division Leader (acting) Michael Hundley Email Deputy Division Leader Rick Martineau Email Chief of Staff Jeff Willis Email Division Office (505) 665-1131 Materials Physics Applications Division

  5. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials/Condensed Matter Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied

  6. ARM - Public Information Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govPublicationsPublic Information Materials Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information...

  7. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE.

  8. A Google for Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kristin Persson A Google for Materials February 4, 2014 Kirstin Persson, Berkeley Lab Downloads Persson-Materials-NUG2014.pdf | Adobe Acrobat PDF file A Google For Materials? - Kirstin Persson, Berkeley Lab Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:07

  9. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  10. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf).

  11. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 Nuclear Materials Science Our multidisciplinary expertise comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and surveillance communities. Contact Us Group Leader David Pugmire (acting) Email Group Office (505) 667-4665 The evaluations performed by our group are essential for the nuclear weapons program as well as nuclear materials storage, forensics, and actinide fundamental science. The evaluations performed by our group are

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Materials Science Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Materials Science Applications VASP VASP is a plane wave ab initio code for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics. It is highly scalable and shows very good parallel performance for a variety of chemical and materials science calculations. VASP is available to NERSC users who already have a VASP license. Read More » Quantum ESPRESSO/PWscf Quantum Espresso is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It builds on

  15. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied research aimed at manipulating

  16. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  17. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Strategy Summary 2010 T he United States is on the cusp of a clean energy rev- olution. In its first Critical Materials Strategy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses on materials used in four clean energy technologies: wind turbines, elec- tric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting (Table 1). The Strategy evaluates the extent to which widespread deployment of these technologies may increase worldwide demand for rare earth elements and certain other

  18. Materials in the news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Materials in the news Discover more about the wide-ranging scope of materials research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Us ADEPS Communications Email Scientists Aditya Mohite, left, and Wanyi Nie are perfecting a crystal production technique to improve perovskite crystal production for solar cells Scientists Aditya Mohite, left, and Wanyi Nie are perfecting a crystal production technique to improve perovskite crystal production for solar cells Read more... Materials science at Los

  19. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  20. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  1. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  2. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  3. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  4. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  5. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  6. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  7. High Risk Material Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spent Fuel Working Group Report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities.

  8. Material Safety Data Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) provide workers and emergency personnel with ways for handling and working with a hazardous substance and other health and safety information.

  9. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. In this talk, I will discuss our recent research in the area of nanoscale materials modeling, using various atomistic simulation techniques, aimed at uncovering the...

  10. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  11. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique...

  12. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for ... Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials ...

  13. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development Overview of Lightweight Materials Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus

  14. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  15. Measurements and material accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The DOE role for the NBL in safeguarding nuclear material into the 21st century is discussed. Development of measurement technology and reference materials supporting requirements of SDI, SIS, AVLIS, pyrochemical reprocessing, fusion, waste storage, plant modernization program, and improved tritium accounting are some of the suggested examples.

  16. Procurement and Materials Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement and Materials Management U.S. Department of Energy | Who We Are | Current Requests for Proposal | Requests for Information | Expression of Interest | Subcontractor Information | Small Business Home Washington River Protection Solutions | Hanford.gov | Energy.gov Procurement and Materials Management Small Business Resources Small Business Calendar Terms & Conditions Procedures to Subcontractors Instructions Forms Vendor Registration Solicitations Small Bus. Events Procedures

  17. Energy Materials Network

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High performance materials hold the key to innovation in many critical clean energy technologies. But with ambitious national targets to reduce America’s carbon footprint, advanced materials’ traditional 15-20 years-to-market timeframe isn’t keeping pace with America’s goals to achieve a clean energy economy. Through the Energy Materials Network (EMN), the Energy Department is taking a different approach to materials research and development (R&D) that aims to solve industry’s toughest clean energy materials challenges. EMN’s targeted, growing network of consortia led by the Energy Department’s national labs is better integrating all phases of R&D, from discovery through deployment, and facilitating industry access to its national laboratories’ capabilities, tools, and expertise to accelerate the materials development cycle and enable U.S. manufacturers to deliver innovative, made-in-America products to the world market. This effort supports the President’s Materials Genome Initiative, which is working to discover, manufacture, and deploy advanced materials twice as fast, at a fraction of the cost. EMN also supports the recommendations of the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership 2.0, a working group with leaders from industry, academia, and labor, which highlighted the importance of producing advanced materials for technologies critical to U.S. competitiveness in manufacturing.

  18. Nanocrystalline heterojunction materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

    2003-07-15

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  19. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  20. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsTara...

  1. Patent: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    graphite network | DOEpatents Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network Citation Details Title: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

  2. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  3. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crosscutting Research and Development | Department of Energy 2. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes. PDF icon 12_materials_crosscutting_rd.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  5. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials MANAGEMENT (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. it is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how ''what is and what if'' questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods.

  6. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. It is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how /open quotes/What is and what if/close quotes/ questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods. 2 refs.

  7. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  8. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  9. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  10. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  11. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  12. Overview of VTO Material Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of VTO Material Technologies Stephen Goguen, Jerry Gibbs, Carol Schutte, and Will Joost LM000 June 9, 2015 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $35.6 M Lightweight Materials $28.5 M Values are FY15 enacted Propulsion Materials $7.1 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials,

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  14. Reactor Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor Materials Reactor Materials The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE objectives. This will be accomplished through innovative materials development, promoting the use of modern materials science and establishing new, shared research partnerships. Research into specific degradation modes or material needs unique to a particular reactor

  15. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  16. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  17. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  18. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notice of intent to issue FOA (December 2013) Energy Department Announces 3 Million to Lower Cost of Geothermal Energy and Boost U.S. Supply of Critical Materials, February 14,...

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  20. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  1. Spectroscopy of semiconductor materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ag 3 VO 4 as a New p-Type Transparent Conducting Material Using systematic design principles, the Center for Inverse Design is exploring a new class of ternary p-type transparent...

  2. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  3. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  4. Small Building Material Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applicants may borrow up to $100,000 for projects that improve the livability of a home, improve energy efficiency, or expand space. The loan can be applied toward building materials, freight or...

  5. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  6. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS is risk group 1 or lower with few other complicating issues. ALS has created an umbrella authorization that most users can use for bio-safety level-1 materials. This...

  7. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ALS is risk group 1 or lower with few other complicating issues. ALS has created an umbrella authorization that most users can use for bio-safety level-1 materials. This...

  8. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  9. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  10. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this tool into a more permanent, flexible and scalable data service built on top of rich modern web interfaces and state-of-the-art NoSQL database technology." The Materials...

  11. Energy Materials Network News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are news stories and blog posts related to the Energy Materials Network (EMN) from the Energy Department and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Please see the Consortia and...

  12. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, supersedes DOE O 410.2.

  13. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. Does not cancel/supersede other directives. Certified 11-18-10.

  14. Next Generation Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Next Generation Materials: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 1 4 1.1 Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 1 5 1.2 Public and private roles and activities .......................................................................................... 3 6 2.

  15. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  16. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Advanced Materials Laboratory Home/Tag:Advanced Materials Laboratory - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine

  17. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  18. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  19. CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 04-01-2015 Introduction The Critical Materials display was initiated by the Outreach and Education Coordinator for the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) and the Director of the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) Geology Museum as an opportunity to leverage the relationship between CSM's very successful museum outreach and CMI's desire to reach audiences of all ages across the nation. The display will be designed to provide a visual outreach opportunity with visitors and guests to the Colorado

  20. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM) provide an intriguing new path for the design of algorithms that are poised to scale to billions of cores [4]. These methods are particularly important for simulating various phases in the presence of extreme deformation and topological change. This brings about the possibility of new simulations enabled at the exascale

  1. Materials processing with light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials processing with light, plasmas and other sources of energy At the ARC various processing technologies are used to create materials, struc- tures, and devices that play an increasingly important role in high value-added manufacturing of computer and communications equipment, physical and chemical sensors, biomedical instruments and treatments, semiconductors, thin films, photovoltaics, electronic components and optical components. For example, making coatings, including paint, chrome,

  2. Effect of large additions of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, to cement raw meal on the composition and the properties of the clinker and the cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    1996-03-01

    The utilization of hydraulic binders to solidify and to stabilize industrial wastes and municipal garbage is presently recognized as one of the solutions to the problem of environment protection. Te addition of important quantities of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn to raw meals of Portland and calcium aluminate cement modifies the mineralogical composition and the properties of the final cement. Portland cement can absorb a large amount of Cd and Zn. This absorption leads to an increase of setting time and a decrease of strengths of the cement. It also can trap chromium with a short setting time and high strengths. Calcium aluminate cements easily trap Cd and Cr with a delayed setting and good strength but also Pb with normal setting time and strengths. Large quantities of zinc oxide have a deleterious effect on calcium aluminate strengths.

  3. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials | Department of Energy Lightweighting Materials Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm039_watkins_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User

  4. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  5. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  6. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  7. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  8. SF 6110-AC Residual Inventory of Material or Equipment Furnished...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification No. and whether item is Classified, Furnished, Acquired, Esplosive, Toxic, Raw Mat'l, Good Part, or Scrap. The above listing is a COMPLETE inventory of residual...

  9. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Materials Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  10. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and ... Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and ...

  11. Material Protection, Control, & Accounting | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Nuclear and Radiological Material Security Material Protection, Control, & Accounting Material Protection, Control, & Accounting NNSA implements material...

  12. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  13. Material isolation enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martell, C.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Gallimore, B.F.; Comer, B.E.; Stone, W.A.; Carlson, D.O.

    1993-04-27

    An enclosure is described, similar to a glove box, for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  14. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  15. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  16. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  17. Material isolation enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martell, Calvin J. (Los Alamos, NM); Dahlby, Joel W. (Los Alamos, NM); Gallimore, Bradford F. (Los Alamos, NM); Comer, Bob E. (Versailles, MO); Stone, Water A. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlson, David O. (Tesugue, NM)

    1993-01-01

    An enclosure similar to a glovebox for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  18. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Paul V.; Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J.; Pierson, Bonnie E.; Gittard, Shaun D.; Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Chae, Weon-Sik; Gough, Dara V.; Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  19. Apparatus for dispensing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Peter Werner (Beach, NY); Sutter, Eli Anguelova (Beach, NY)

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

  20. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  1. Container for radioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  2. Sandia Material Model Driver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-28

    The Sandia Material Model Driver (MMD) software package allows users to run material models from a variety of different Finite Element Model (FEM) codes in a standalone fashion, independent of the host codes. The MMD software is designed to be run on a variety of different operating system platforms as a console application. Initial development efforts have resulted in a package that has been shown to be fast, convenient, and easy to use, with substantialmore » growth potential.« less

  3. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  4. Critical Materials Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy eere.energy.gov Critical Materials Workshop 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration and Continental Breakfast Time (EDT) Activity Speaker Dr. Leo Christodoulou 9:00 am - 9:05 am Welcome and Overview of Workshop Program Manager EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office 9:05 am - 9:35 am Welcome and

  5. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA April 3, 2012, 8 am - 5 pm Time (EDT) Activity Speaker 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration and Continental Breakfast Welcome and Overview of 9:00 am - 9:05 am Workshop Welcome and Overview of Energy 9:05 am - 9:35 am Innovation Hubs 9:35 am - 9:45 am DOE and Critical Materials National Academies Criticality 9:45 am - 9:55 am Methodology and Assessment Department of Energy Critical 9:55 am - 10:10 am

  6. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  7. Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Propulsion Materials Propulsion Materials 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon pm000_gibbs_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Propulsion Materials Overview of Propulsion Materials Overview of Propulsion Materials

  8. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Materials Technologies: Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7. Materials Technologies: Propulsion Materials Advanced materials are essential for boosting the fuel economy of modern automobiles while maintaining safety and performance. Propulsion materials enable higher efficiencies in propulsion systems of all types. For example, many combustion engine components require advanced propulsion materials so they can withstand the high pressures and temperatures of high-efficiency combustion regimes. Similarly, novel propulsion materials may be able to

  9. Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerate rare-earth replacement | Critical Materials Institute Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to accelerate rare-earth replacement CMI research team at a light manufacturing facility Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to accelerate rare-earth replacement The Critical Materials Institute, led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Ames Laboratory, has invented two new phosphors in one year of research, demonstrating the power

  10. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Security Interest Assessment Plan | Department of Energy Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders

  11. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N.

    2014-06-16

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

  12. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-08-01

    Roadmap identifying the efforts of the Materials Technical Team (MTT) to focus primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks) which enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed.

  13. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  14. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  15. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  16. Laser material processing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  17. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Schwarz, Ricardo B. (Westmont, IL)

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  18. Magnetic Materials | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Internal Magnetic Materials The Magnetic Material Group (MMG) is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Our research focuses on the...

  19. Making, Measuring, and Modeling Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making, Measuring, and Modeling Materials Making, Measuring, and Modeling Materials M4 facility aims to accelerate the transition from observation to control of materials providing unique synthesis and characterization tools to advance the frontiers of materials design and discovery. CONTACT Cris W. Barnes (505) 665-5687 Email Predicting and Controlling Materials' Performance MaRIE's Making, Measuring, and Modeling Materials (M4) Facility aims to accelerate the transition from observation to

  20. Physics and Chemistry of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Physics and Chemistry of Materials Developing new science and technologies needed for ... Fundamental and applied theoretical research on the physics and chemistry of materials The ...

  1. invention disclosures | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute will be defined by how well it meets its mission to assure supply chains of materials critical to clean energy technologies. To enable innovation in...

  2. Science Gateway: The Materials Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of pre-computed properties comprises some 35,000 materials, all accessible through a web-based NERSC Science Gateway: The Materials Project (https:materialsproject.org)....

  3. Serious Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Serious Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name: Serious Materials Address: 1250 Elko Drive Place: Sunnyvale, California Zip: 94089 Region: Bay Area Sector: Carbon Product:...

  4. Reactor Materials Newsletter- Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Reactor Materials (RM) newsletter includes information about key nuclear materials programs, results from ongoing projects across the Office of Nuclear Energy, and other relevant information.

  5. Institute for Multiscale Materials Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science and mechanics of soft, responsive, engineered materials. Activities combine theory, experiment, and numerical simulation of phenomena in soft materials spanning 7-14...

  6. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2011-08-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim fiscal year (FY) 2011 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under the Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA)-1 guidelines and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from seven test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault, including tensile tests, creep tests, and cyclic tests. Of the 5,603,682 records currently in the vault, 4,480,444 have been capture passed, and capture testing is in process for the remaining 1,123,238.

  7. ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  8. Handling difficult materials: Textiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, T.

    1994-07-01

    As recyclable materials, textiles are a potentially valuable addition to community collection programs. They make up a fairly substantial fraction--about 4%--of the residential solid waste stream, a higher figure than corrugated cardboard or magazines. Textiles have well-established processing and marketing infrastructures, with annual sales of over $1 billion in the US And buyers are out there, willing to pay $40 to $100 per ton. There doesn't seem to be any cumbersome government regulations standing in the way, either. So why are so few municipalities and waste haulers currently attempting to recover textiles The answers can be found in the properties of the material itself and a lack of knowledge about the existing textile recycling industry. There are three main end markets that come from waste textiles. In descending order of market share, they are: used clothing, fiber for paper and re-processing, and industrial wiping and polishing cloths.

  9. composite materials & process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composite materials & process - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  10. encapsulated witness materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    encapsulated witness materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  11. advanced hydrogen storage materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrogen storage materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  12. Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compatibility of Materials August 13, 2013 DOE EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Webinar Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 SAND2013-6278P 2 Webinar Objectives * Provide context for hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen

  13. Phase Change Material Tower

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Innovative Technology Solutions for Sustainability ABENGOA SOLAR SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 April 24, 2013 Luke Erickson Phase Change Material Tower Innovative technology solutions for sustainability ABENGOA SOLAR Project Details Title: "Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power" Award: $3,875,104 from ARPA-E HEATS Program Project Term: 1/11/2012 to 1/10/2015 Project Plan: 2012: Modeling and begin lab scale demonstration 2013: Lab scale to prototype 2014:

  14. High-Temperature Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  16. MHK Materials Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Database - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  17. Materials, Reliability, & Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials, Reliability, & Standards - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  18. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers The Critical Materials Institute at the The Ames Laboratory, a Department of Energy national laboratory affiliated with Iowa State University, offers a variety of career opportunities. These include: Postdoctoral Research Associate Also, The Ames Laboratory participates in federal programs that help develop the research workforce. These include the following programs with the U.S. Department of Energy: Graduate Student Research Program (new in 2014) Science Undergraduate Laboratory

  19. Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creation Materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  1. Critical Materials Institute |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI outreach at Colorado School of Mines for National Engineer Week 2016 Tour at Colorado School of Mines Geology Musuem for National Engineers Week CMI education and outreach efforts reach students and professionals CMI exhibit opens at Mines museum People view Critical Materials Institute exhibit at Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum. First license granted for a CMI invention Signing ceremony for the first license for a CMI invention. Factsheet outlines expectations for CMI, progress of

  2. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  3. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crosscutting Research and Development | Department of Energy 2. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. PDF icon 12_materials_crosscutting_rd.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report

  4. PHASE I MATERIALS PROPERTY DATABASE DEVELOPMENT FOR ASME CODES AND STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    To support the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes and Standard (BPVC) in modern information era, development of a web-based materials property database is initiated under the supervision of ASME Committee on Materials. To achieve efficiency, the project heavily draws upon experience from development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook and the Nuclear System Materials Handbook. The effort is divided into two phases. Phase I is planned to deliver a materials data file warehouse that offers a depository for various files containing raw data and background information, and Phase II will provide a relational digital database that provides advanced features facilitating digital data processing and management. Population of the database will start with materials property data for nuclear applications and expand to data covering the entire ASME Code and Standards including the piping codes as the database structure is continuously optimized. The ultimate goal of the effort is to establish a sound cyber infrastructure that support ASME Codes and Standards development and maintenance.

  5. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  6. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  7. Radioactive Materials Emergencies Course Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hanford Fire Department has developed this training to assist emergency responders in understanding the hazards in responding to events involving radioactive materials, to know the fundamentals of radioactive contamination, to understand the biological affects of exposure to radioactive materials, and to know how to appropriately respond to hazardous material events involving radioactive materials.

  8. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  9. SC e-journals, Materials Science

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials Science Acta Materialia Advanced Composite Materials Advanced Energy Materials Advanced Engineering Materials Advanced Functional Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Powder Technology Advances in Materials Science and Engineering - OAJ Annual Review of Materials Research Applied Composite Materials Applied Mathematical Modelling Applied Mathematics & Computation Applied Physics A Applied Physics B Applied Surface Science Archives of Computational Materials Science and Surface

  10. Shipping Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipping Materials General Users are not permitted to transport hazardous material on the Argonne site or to arrange for shipment directly to the CNM. Hazardous materials must be processed through Argonne's hazardous materials receiving area. Inbound Shipments Before you ship anything to the CNM, you must notify the User Office and your CNM contact. Nonhazardous Material To ensure that samples and equipment that you ship to the CNM gets here without unnecessary delays, address your shipments as

  11. Research Staff | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff Research staff members in NREL's Materials Science Center are aligned within four groups: Materials Physics, Analytical Microscopy and Imaging Science, Interfacial and Surface Science, and Thin-Film Materials Science and Processing. For lead researcher contacts, see our research areas. For our business contact, see Work with Us. Photo of Nancy Haegel Nancy Haegel Center Director, Materials Science Center Email | 303-384-6548 Materials Physics Photo of Angelo Mascarenhas Angelo

  12. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  13. Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A N E N E R G Y I N N O V A T I O N H U B Alex King, Ames Laboratory 2015 AMO Peer Review - May 28, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Materials criticality is affecting us today * The target date for transition to high-output T5 fluorescent lamps has been delayed by two years because manufacturers claim that there is a shortage of Eu and Tb for the phosphors. * Utility-scale wind turbine installations are overwhelmingly

  14. Metallic carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  15. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  16. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  17. Construction Material And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2006-02-21

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  18. Material Safety Data Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS of LITHIUM POLYMER battery (total 3pages) 1. Product and Company Identification Product 1.1 Product Name: LITHIUM- POLYMER Battery 1.2 System: Rechargeable Lithium-ion Polymer Battery Comapny 1.4 Company Name: YUNTONG POWER CO.,LTD 1.5 Company Address: LINGGANG INDUSTRIAL ZONE JIANGLING Road, Zhongshan, G.D.China 1.6 Emergency Telephone Number: 86-760-8299193 2. Composition Information on Components Components Approximate Percent of Total Weight Aluminum 2-10%

  19. MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    F 742 (08-98) Previous editions are obsolete. MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 75, 150. Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1001; ACT OF JUNE 25, 1948; 62 STAT. 749; MAKES IT A CRIMINAL OFFENSE TO MAKE A WILLFULLY FALSE STATEMENT OR REPRESENTATION TO ANY DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES AS TO ANY MATTER WITHIN ITS JURISDICTION. Printed with soy ink on

  20. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  1. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  2. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  3. Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-07-16

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  4. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-02-12

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  5. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1999-12-21

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  8. Materials Data on PPd6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on URh3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on WSCl4 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on WBr6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on BW2 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on WS2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on W (SG:223) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on PW (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on WCl6 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on PWO5 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on WCl5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on WCl3 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Th (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Th (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Te (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Te (SG:152) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on UF6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Pa (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on PNO (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on PNF2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on NO (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on KNO3 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on KAu2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on KCN (SG:44) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on K (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on KHg2 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on KCd13 (SG:226) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on KNO2 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on KBi (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on KBO2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on VO2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on KI (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Yb (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-14

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on KPHNO2 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on PHF2 (SG:19) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on UAl2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on UIN (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on CI4 (SG:121) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on PICl6 (SG:113) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on I (SG:64) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on IF7 (SG:41) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on ICl3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on UPd3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Pd (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on VPO5 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on YPS4 (SG:142) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on USO (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on S (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on CO2 (SG:136) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Cr (SG:223) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Ni (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ni (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on HRh (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on HBr (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on HCl (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on UH3 (SG:223) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on YH3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on VO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-07

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on VFe (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on VOs (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on La (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on B (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on B (SG:134) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on BN (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on KAg2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on KBH4 (SG:137) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on KHS (SG:160) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on PHN2 (SG:24) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on HBr (SG:19) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on VPO4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on VPO5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on VAu2 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on V (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Hg (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on KHg11 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Hg (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on SBr (SG:41) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on YS (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on SF4 (SG:121) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on BSBr (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on SCl2 (SG:19) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on SNCl (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on SCl (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on UPS (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on USCl9 (SG:19) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on SOF2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on CSO (SG:160) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on He (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on He (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on YZn12 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on YZn3 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on YOF (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on YSF (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on YHg2 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on YGa6 (SG:125) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on YZn5 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on YCBr (SG:59) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Y (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on YOF (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on YHg3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ca (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Fe (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Fe (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Fe (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Te (SG:51) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Tl (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Al (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on URu3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Se (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on P (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on P (SG:64) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on P (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on P (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on USb (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on VPO4 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on C (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on KCO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on C (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on YC2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on C (SG:206) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Sr (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sr (SG:141) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sr (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on YIr (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on YIr2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on UIr3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ir (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:130) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on BPS4 (SG:23) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Mn (SG:217) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: ... Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User ...

  5. CMI Social Media | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Social Media Facebook: Critical Materials Institute Twitter: CMI_hub LinkedIn: Critical Materials Institute Flickr: Critical Materials Institute

  6. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  7. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm028_laracurzio_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success

  8. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories | Department of Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm028_laracurzio_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML

  9. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  10. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  11. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials science worker Sandia materials scientists are creating scientifically tailored materials for U.S. energy applications and critical defense needs....

  13. Division of Materials Science (DMS) meeting presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, C.F.; Weber, M.J.

    1982-11-08

    Materials preparation techniques are listed. Materials preparation capabilities are discussed for making BeF/sub 2/ glasses and other materials. Materials characterization techniques are listed. (DLC)

  14. Packaging - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    Nowadays, a large number of different electrochemical energy storage systems are known. In the last two decades the development was strongly driven by a continuously growing market of portable electronic devices (e.g. cellular phones, lap top computers, camcorders, cameras, tools). Current intensive efforts are under way to develop systems for automotive industry within the framework of electrically propelled mobility (e.g. hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, full electric vehicles) and also for the energy storage market (e.g. electrical grid stability, renewable energies). Besides the different systems (cell chemistries), electrochemical cells and batteries were developed and are offered in many shapes, sizes and designs, in order to meet performance and design requirements of the widespread applications. Proper packaging is thereby one important technological step for designing optimum, reliable and safe batteries for operation. In this contribution, current packaging approaches of cells and batteries together with the corresponding materials are discussed. The focus is laid on rechargeable systems for industrial applications (i.e. alkaline systems, lithium-ion, lead-acid). In principle, four different cell types (shapes) can be identified - button, cylindrical, prismatic and pouch. Cell size can be either in accordance with international (e.g. International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC) or other standards or can meet application-specific dimensions. Since cell housing or container, terminals and, if necessary, safety installations as inactive (non-reactive) materials reduce energy density of the battery, the development of low-weight packages is a challenging task. In addition to that, other requirements have to be fulfilled: mechanical stability and durability, sealing (e.g. high permeation barrier against humidity for lithium-ion technology), high packing efficiency, possible installation of safety devices (current interrupt device, valve, etc.), chemical inertness, cost issues, and others. Finally, proper cell design has to be considered for effective thermal management (i.e. cooling and heating) of battery packs.

  15. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project aims to reduce the time to rate aged materials from three years to a few days, which will speed next-generation cool roofing materials to market.

  16. Melt Processing of Covetic Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    www.netl.doe.gov U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office Program ... of integrally-bound nano-scale carbon phase (i.e., "covetic" nano- materials) in order to produce materials ...

  17. Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-09-30

    To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

  18. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration" held December 13, 2011.

  19. Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 Jack Zhengji NERSC Training Event 09:00 - 12:00 PST June 26, 2012 Concurrently presented on the web and at NERSC's Oakland Scientific Facility Attendance: 45 Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Zhengji Zhao, NERSC User Services Group Jack Deslippe, NERSC User Services Group The first hour of the training is targeted at beginners. We will show you how to get started running material

  20. CMI Factsheet | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Factsheet 3D printer uses laser and metals to build new combinations of materials What is the Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials? Created by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Energy Innovation Hub is operated under the name the Critical Materials Institute. CMI is led by the DOE's Ames Laboratory, and managed by DOE's Advanced Manufacturing Office. It brings together the expertise of DOE national laboratories, universities, and industry partners to eliminate materials criticality

  1. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells Predictive Simulation of Engines...

  2. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Insulation Materials Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass

  3. Inline evenflow material distributor for pneumatic material feed systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thiry, Michael J. (Oakdale, CA)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus for reducing clogs in a pneumatic material feed line, such as employed in abrasive waterjet machining systems, by providing an evenflow feed of material therethrough. The apparatus preferably includes a hollow housing defining a housing volume and having an inlet capable of connecting to an upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, an outlet capable of connecting to a downstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, and an air vent located between the inlet and outlet for venting excess air pressure out from the housing volume. A diverter, i.e. an impingement object, is located at the inlet and in a path of incoming material from the upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, to break up clumps of ambient moisture-ridden material impinging on the diverter. And one or more filter screens is also preferably located in the housing volume to further break up clumps and provide filtering.

  4. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  5. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  7. Dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda, CA)

    1984-07-31

    Apparatus is shown for substantially increasing the feed rate of pulverized material into a pressurized container. The apparatus includes a rotor that is mounted internal to the pressurized container. The pulverized material is fed into an annular chamber defined by the center of the rotor. A plurality of impellers are mounted within the annular chamber for imparting torque to the pulverized material.

  8. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  9. Polyphosphazine-based polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2010-05-25

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  10. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  11. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-09-08

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

  12. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  13. Industrial recycling of glass, plastic and wood materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caccavo, F.N.; Posusney, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The intent of this paper is to discuss in detail the development and implementation of a recycling program encompassing these three residual waste streams at a major plant site of a large United States company. The paper will review the history of the program`s development, the vendor selection and recycling processes, the initial efforts to include failures and successes, and the cost recovery and profit that can be realized through a well-managed recycling program. The facility that is the subject of this paper is located approximately 20 lies north west of Philadelphia, Pa and supports a site population of over 6,200 employees working in three divisions of the parent company. The primary business of this firm is the manufacture, distribution, and sale of pharmaceutical drugs. This plant is the company`s largest facility engaging its employees in predominantly research and manufacturing operations. The manufacturing operations being the largest division encompassing the widest range of activities from the receipt of raw material through packaging and shipping operations. This site and the company it represents enjoy an excellent relationship within the community stemming in part to the commitment to environmental stewardship demonstrated by this successful program. The site retains its own internal waste management and disposal operations for the wide variety of refuse materials generated and it is this department which is responsible for the creation and maintenance of the site`s extensive recycling effort. The paper will review the ongoing development of these elements of this company`s growing recycling operations and attempt to demonstrate that extensive recycling can be both a productive and cost effective alternative to conventional disposal through incineration`s or landfill.

  14. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites | Department of Energy on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm027_payzant_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High

  15. Word Pro - S1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    related material. "Non-Energy Balance" and "Total Merchandise" include foreign exports (i.e., re-exports) and nonmonetary gold and U.S. Department of Defense Grant-Aid shipments. ...

  16. Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemsler, P.

    1981-02-01

    Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

  17. Method for synthesizing powder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.

    1988-01-21

    A method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials, for example, ceramic and metal powders, comprises admitting gaseous reactants from which the powder material is to be formed into a vacuum reaction chamber maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric and at a temperature less than about 400/degree/K (127/degree/C). The gaseous reactants are directed through a glow discharge provided in the vacuum reaction chamber to form the ultrafine powder material. 1 fig.

  18. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. *

  19. Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing Substitutes diagram for focus area 2, developing substitutes (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.) The Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to accelerate rare-earth replacement. CMI has invented two new phosphors in one year of research, demonstrating the power of the Materials Genome Initiative method in a collaborative public-private approach to innovation

  20. Materials Science Application Training 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Application Training 2015 Materials Science Application Training 2015 NERSC will present an one-hour online training class focused on Materials Science applications, VASP and Quantum Espresso on June 5, 2015, Friday, from 10:00-11:00 PDT. This training class will be provided by NERSC consultants, Jack Deslippe and Zhengji Zhao. The targeted audience will be new to intermediate NERSC users who use the pre-installed VASP and QE at NERSC. The class will address the frequently

  1. Radiation Damage/Materials Modification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Damage/Materials Modification High-energy ion irradiation is an important tool for studying radiation damage effects Materials in a nuclear reactor are exposed to extreme temperature and radiation conditions that degrade their physical properties to the point of failure. For example, alpha-decay in nuclear fuels results in dislocation damage to and accumulation of helium and fission gasses in the material. Similarly, neutrons interacting with non-nuclear components can displace atoms

  2. Materials Man (Release) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https://www.jlab.org/news/articles/materials-man-release Materials Man ARC's new associate director sees a wealth of opportunity for bringing applied research to the martketplace Pass a laser light over a juice box and it can suddenly become impervious to microbes. Use the tool on a fabric and its colors become more intense. For Michael Kelley, lasers will be instrumental in developing the next generation of advanced materials used in everyday life, while facilities like the Applied Research

  3. Materials Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Science Materials Science The unique internal construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as its pink fibrous counterparts with less material in less space. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/berkeley-labs-gas-filled-insulation-rivals-fiber-buildings-sector">Learn more about this cost-effective, energy-efficient insulation</a>. The unique internal construction of the

  4. Material Protection, Accounting and Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and future U.S. nuclear fuel cycles, to manage and minimize proliferation and terrorism risk. n Objectives * Develop and demonstrate advanced material control and ...

  5. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to Train Your Bacterium Peidong Yang, a chemist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division, and his researchers are using the bacterium Moorella thermoacetica to perform...

  6. Bioinspired Materials | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanostructure Pilots Badwater Bacteria Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis Nature is replete with hierarchically assembled hybrid materials where the multi-scale...

  7. Applied Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Materials Address: 3050 Bowers Avenue Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Sector: Solar Website: www.appliedmaterials.com...

  8. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Appropriations Subcommittee, is shown some of the technology in the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility by Warehousing and Transportation Operations Manager Byron...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  10. Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California, Santa Barbara NREL Purdue University Los Alamos News May 15, 2014 Multi-junction Solar Cells to Push CPV Efficiencies Beyond 50% Oct 30, 2013 Materials Professor...

  11. Material for Point Design (final summary of DIME material)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2014-02-25

    These slides summarize the motivation of the Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) project, the “point design” of the Polar Direct Drive (PDD) version of the NIF separated reactant capsule, the experimental requirements, technical achievements, and some useful backup material. These slides are intended to provide much basic material in one convenient location and will hopefully be of some use for subsequent experimental projects.

  12. RFI: DOE Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFI: DOE Materials Strategy RFI: DOE Materials Strategy DOE Materials Strategy - request for information PDF icon RFI: DOE Materials Strategy More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010 RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information RFI: DOE Materials Strategy DE-FOA-0001346 -- Request for Information (RFI)

  13. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  14. High Performance Bulk Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Zhifeng

    2013-03-31

    Over 13 plus years, we have carried out research on electron pairing symmetry of superconductors, growth and their field emission property studies on carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires, high performance thermoelectric materials and other interesting materials. As a result of the research, we have published 104 papers, have educated six undergraduate students, twenty graduate students, nine postdocs, nine visitors, and one technician.

  15. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

  16. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  17. Materials for Harsh Service Conditions:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Materials for Harsh Service Conditions: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 1 4 1.1 Overview of Materials for Harsh Service Conditions .................................................................... 1 5 1.2 Challenges and Opportunities ....................................................................................................... 2 6 1.3 Public

  18. Solid electrolyte material manufacturable by polymer processing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An exemplary material can include material components made of diblock polymers or triblock polymers. Many uses are contemplated for the solid polymer electrolyte materials. For ...

  19. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials January 4, 2016 MEETING MATERIALS: DECEMBER 11, 2015 Westin Crystal City ...

  20. Advanced Materials Partners Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Materials Partners Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Advanced Materials Partners Inc Name: Advanced Materials Partners Inc Address: 45 Pine Street Place: New Canaan,...

  1. Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics Transient materials is an emerging area of materials design with the key attribute being the ability to physically...

  2. CMI Unique Facility: Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility The Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility is one of half a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials...

  3. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the ...

  4. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  5. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

  6. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

  7. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  8. Storage depot for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

  9. Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute Each partner within the Critical Materials Institute manages its own hiring. Use these links to find key contacts for CMI partners that are most likely to hire for CMI research projects: The Ames Laboratory | Careers at Iowa State University Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Careers Idaho National Laboratory | Careers Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Careers Colorado School of Mines | Employment

  10. Material Balance Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Material Balance Report Material Balance Report Form supports nuclear material control and accountability. PDF icon Material Balance Report More Documents & Publications DOE/NRC F 742 PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC F 740M

  11. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  12. Materials Classification & Accelerated Property Predictions using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials Classification & Accelerated Property Predictions using Machine Learning Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials Classification & Accelerated Property...

  13. Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials Transport theory and first principles calculations ...

  14. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

  15. Catalyst material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Linehan, John C. (Richland, WA); Bean, Roger M. (Richland, WA); Brewer, Thomas D. (Richland, WA); Werpy, Todd A. (Richland, WA); Darab, John G. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation.

  16. Materials Classification & Accelerated Property Predictions using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Materials Classification & Accelerated Property Predictions using Machine Learning ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Materials Science(36) ...

  17. Catalyst material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, D.W.; Fulton, J.L.; Linehan, J.C.; Bean, R.M.; Brewer, T.D.; Werpy, T.A.; Darab, J.G.

    1997-07-29

    The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation. 7 figs.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science employees and computer research Sandia excels in innovative fundamental materials science research - developing and integrating the theoretical insights,...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies Jerry Gibbs eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $35.6 M Lightweight Materials $28.5 M Values are FY15 enacted Propulsion Materials $7.1 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M $11.9 M FY14

  20. Materials Engineering Research Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Engineering Research Facility Materials Engineering Research Facility exterior 1 of 11 Materials Engineering Research Facility exterior With the Materials Engineering Research Facility's state-of-the-art labs and equipment, Argonne researchers can safely scale up materials from the research bench for commercial testing. Photo courtesy Argonne National Laboratory. Materials Engineering Research Facility exterior 1 of 11 Materials Engineering Research Facility exterior With the Materials