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Sample records for memorial hospital methane

  1. Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kiowa County Memorial Hospital Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of...

  2. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure) (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

  3. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 3. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the project description, list of participants, and system specifications for the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii.

  4. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, for November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The data accumulated during November 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, are presented. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  5. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report, for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Vol. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This report presents the data accumulated during January 1983 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  6. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 1. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during January, February, and March 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  7. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 2 for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during April and May 1982 at this intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  8. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 5. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during September 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  9. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for October 1982. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during October 1982 at the intermediate project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  10. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 8. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during December 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphiclaly. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  11. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 4. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for June, July, and August 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during June, July, and August 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weater are provided.

  12. Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane, ethylene, methane, and two isotopically substituted methanes, CH2D2 and CD4, at a momentum constituent. For example, Fig. 1 of Ref. 2 shows that, for gaseous methane, above a certain momentum transfer

  13. Methane oxidation rates by AMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pack, M; Heintz, M; ReeburGh, WS; Trumbore, SE; Valentine, DL; Xu, X

    2009-01-01

    second case. Number of cases Methane oxidation rates by AMSIn the marine environment methane (CH 4 ) oxidation consumes

  14. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  15. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  16. Mechanical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Alburquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  17. Mechanical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  18. Methane sources and sinks in Lake Kivu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and G. T. Harvey (1973), Methane in Lake Kivu: New datagenes associated with methane? oxidizing archaea, Appl.Pace, and L. Tranvik (2004), Methane emissions from lakes:

  19. Electrochemical methane sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

    1984-08-27

    A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

  20. Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 155 (2007) 2834 Electron Compton scattering from methane and methane-d4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2007-01-01

    from methane and methane-d4 G. Coopera, A.P. Hitchcocka,, C.A. Chatzidimitriou-Dreismannb, M. Vosc]. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Quasi-elastic electron scattering; Methane; CD4

  1. Hospital Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hospitals have a range of energy needs that vary from a typical building, and a number of renewable energy options may make more sense for a hospital, including process and biomass heating, photovoltaics (PV), and sustainability.

  2. Mechanistic Studies on the Hydroxylation of Methane by Methane Monooxygenase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baik, Mu-Hyun

    of formaldehyde to carbon dioxide provides energy that is stored for later use as NADH.2 The conversion of methane are bacteria that live on methane as their only source of carbon.1 The first step in their utilization gas (it is currently not economical17 to transport and store methane gas from remote sites

  3. ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM COMPOSTING An Issue Paper for the: Climate Action Reserve...........................................................................................................39 6.2. Standard Methods for Quantifying Methane from Organic Waste in Landfills...40 6.3. GHG

  4. Enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

    2009-01-15

    The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

  5. ARM - Methane Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurementsWarmingMethane BackgroundMethane

  6. The Tri--Methane Rearrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Církva, Vladimír; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

  7. The Tri--Methane Rearrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Cirkva, Vladimir; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

  8. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  9. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

  10. Methane conversion to methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of this research study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane. The specific goals are to demonstrate that we can improve product yield, demonstrate the optimal conditions for membrane reactor operation, determine the transport properties of the membrane, and provide demonstration of the process at the pilot plant scale. The last goal will be performed by Unocal, Inc., our industrial partner, upon successful completion of this study.

  11. Methane conversion to methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane. The specific goals are to demonstrate that we can improve product yield, demonstrate the optimal conditions for membrane reactor operation, determine the transport properties of the membrane, and provide demonstration of the process at the pilot plant scale. The last goal will be performed by Unocal, Inc., our industrial partner, upon successful completion of this study.

  12. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  13. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  14. VIBRATION->VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Peter

    2012-01-01

    VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE Peter Hess, A. H. Kung,Rotation Spectra of Methane, U.S. Nat'L· Tech. Inform.tret t tllll. I. INTRODUCTION Methane is a relatively simple

  15. ARM - Methane Background Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurementsWarmingMethane Background

  16. Biofuels: Microbially Generated Methane and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    ) and methane (CH4) from renewable biomass has the potential to con- tribute to reducing dependence on fossilBiofuels: Microbially Generated Methane and Hydrogen Michael J McAnulty, Pennsylvania State, USA James G Ferry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA The production

  17. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  18. 7.4 Landfill Methane Utilization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A chapter on Landfill Methane Utilization from the Clean Energy Strategies for Local Governments publication.

  19. Methane emissions from upland forest soils and vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megonigal, ABB

    2008-01-01

    Crill. 2006. A source of methane from upland forests in thecontrolling atmospheric methane con- sumption by temperateand T.B. Parkin. 2001. Methane oxidation and produc- tion

  20. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01

    AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryDIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE Kendall F. Haven MarkArrangement Kelp to Methane Processing Plant Schematic.

  1. Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

  2. Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

    2010-01-01

    B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

  3. Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuels from methane: a sustainable, abundant resource that does not compete with the human food chain 3 Sustainable Methane * Methane can be captured from anaerobic digestion of...

  4. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  5. A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Environ. Microbiol. 10(Field observations of methane concentra- tions and oxidationAnaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate

  6. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2011-12-31

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (â??Methane in the Arctic Shelfâ?ť or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (â??metagenomesâ?ť). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

  7. Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions quantities of CH4 are stored in marine sediment in the form of methane hydrate, bubbles, and dissolved CH4 in pore water. Here I discuss the various pathways for methane to enter the ocean and atmosphere

  8. POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE CYCLE UNDER FUTURE the available scientific literature on how natural sources and the atmospheric fate of methane may be affected by future climate change. We discuss how processes governing methane wetland emissions, per- mafrost thawing

  9. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9...

  10. VIBRATION->VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Submitted to the Journal of Chemical Physics VIBRATIONVIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE Peter Hess, A. H. Kung,L K. Fox, Analysis of Vibration-Rotation Spectra of Methane,

  11. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, David T.

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its ...

  12. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); D'Este, Joseph R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time.

  13. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D`Este, J.R.

    1998-02-24

    A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time. 3 figs.

  14. Methane adsorption on Devonian shales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fan-Chang

    1992-01-01

    METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis by FAN-CHANG LI Submitted to thc Office of Graclua4e Sturiics of texas AgiM Ulllvel'sliy in pari, ial fulfilhuent of t, hc requirements I'or t, hc degree of ii IAS'I'Elf OF SCIL'NCE December... 1992 Major Subject, : Chemical Engineering METHANE ADSORPTION ON DEVONIAN SHALES A Thesis l&y I'AN-CHANC LI Approved as to style and contcut by: A. T. 'vtratson (Chair of Commitl. ee) John C. Slattery (Member) Bruce . Hcrhcrt (Memhcr...

  15. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

  16. Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROOFS Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes T. D. Stark1 and H. Choi2 1 flexible geomembranes, and to measure the methane gas transmission rate, permeance, and permeability). The measured methane gas permeability coefficient through a PVC geomembrane is 7.55 3 104 ml(STP).mil/m2.day

  17. Methane Activation Structural and Mechanistic Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Methane Activation Structural and Mechanistic Requirements for Methane Activation and Chemical and petrochemical processes and in fuel cells. The strong bonds in CH4 (439 kJmolŔ1 [1] ) and the endothermic nature by BP as part of the Methane Conversion Cooperative Research Program at the University of California

  18. Methane production by attached film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jewell, William J. (202 Eastwood Ave., Ithaca, NY 14850)

    1981-01-01

    A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

  19. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  20. [ME]morial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Beomki

    2015-01-01

    Challenging an archetypal relationship between collective memory and a multitude of traditional memorials, "[ME]morial" presents a new concept in memorial architecture based on the reinterpretation of Freud's and Bergson's ...

  1. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01

    Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

  2. Methane clathrates in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form in the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  3. Memory Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion MeasurementMemorandum ofMemory Considerations Memory

  4. Memory Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion MeasurementMemorandum ofMemory ConsiderationsMemory

  5. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  6. The Methane to Markets Coal Mine Methane Subcommittee meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: a report from the Administrative Support Group; strategy updates from Australia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland and the USA; coal mine methane update and IEA's strategy and activities; the power of VAM - technology application update; the emissions trading market; the voluntary emissions reduction market - creating profitable CMM projects in the USA; an Italian perspective towards a zero emission strategies; and the wrap-up and summary.

  7. The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    counterpart. Scheme 1 shows the mechanism of the di--methane rearrangement and its potential diversion allylic diradical 4, closure to tri--methane product 6 may compete with 1,3-closure to di--methane product rearrangement. On direct irradiation, tris-diphenylvinyl methane 9 led to 52% of tri--methane product 11

  8. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

  9. Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Methane and Methanotrophic Bacteria as a Biotechnological Platform Breakout Session 2-B: NewEmerging Pathways...

  10. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methane that actually preceded recent concerns about potential emissions from fracking," Dubey said. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over...

  11. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop The Advanced Manufacturing Office...

  12. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof EnergyPresentation:DaisStatesEMCHIEFMeltingMethane

  13. Coalbed Methane (CBM) is natural

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energyof the CleanClient educationCoalbed Methane

  14. Memory Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion MeasurementMemorandum ofMemory Considerations

  15. Memory Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion MeasurementMemorandum ofMemory

  16. Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

  17. Optical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  18. Formation of Liquid Methane-Water Mixture during Combustion of a Laminar Methane Jet at Supercritical Pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Formation of Liquid Methane-Water Mixture during Combustion of a Laminar Methane Jet in laminar jet flames of methane at elevated pressures in a high-pressure combustion chamber, we have MPa, after the laminar methane jet flame had been stabilized on a co-flow circular nozzle-type burner

  19. Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID (flame ionization)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID the methane between the air and water. With the syringe pointing down, eject all the water from the syringe in the syringe We will now move to the GC lab in Starr 332 to measure methane. Repeat the above procedure

  20. Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Goldberg, E.D. , 1976. Methane production and consumption inanaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature, 407 , 623-626.profiles indicate in situ methane flux from underlying gas

  1. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    PACK ET AL. EASTERN PACIFIC METHANE OXIDATIONA method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low-levels of C-labeled methane and accelerator mass

  2. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01

    Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THEEVEN BEYOND MANURE-ASSOCIATED METHANE EMISSIONS, INDUSTRIAL

  3. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of thermogenic and biogenic methane. Science 344, 1500-1503.2014c. Clumped isotopes of methane: applications to both lowEmerging topics in marine methane biogeochemistry. Annu.

  4. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, S.

    2011-01-01

    aspects of atmospheric methane, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 2,Budeus, Fate of vent derived methane in seawater above theHanfland, Pathways of methane in seawater: Plume spreading

  5. Reduced methane growth rate explained by decreased Northern Hemisphere microbial sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, FM; Kai, FM; Tyler, SC; Tyler, SC; Randerson, JT; Blake, DR

    2011-01-01

    rate of the atmospheric methane burden. Nature 393, 447–of global tropospheric methane. Geophys. Res. Lett. 33,M. J. in Atmospheric Methane: its Role in the Global

  6. Environmental impacts on the diversity of methane-cycling microbes and their resultant function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronson, Emma L; Allison, Steven D; Helliker, Brent R

    2013-01-01

    on methane- consuming microbes in rice field and forestof methane- cycling microbes and their resultant function.diversity of methane-cycling microbes and their resultant

  7. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

  8. Methane storage capabilities of diamond analogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haranczyk, M; Lin, LC; Lee, K; Martin, RL; Neaton, JB; Smit, B

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be an alternative fuel for vehicular usage provided that new porous materials are developed for its efficient adsorption-based storage. Herein, we search for materials for this application within the family of diamond analogues. We used density functional theory to investigate structures in which tetrahedral C atoms of diamond are separated by-CC-or-BN-groups, as well as ones involving substitution of tetrahedral C atoms with Si and Ge atoms. The adsorptive and diffusive properties of methane are studied using classical molecular simulations. Our results suggest that the all-carbon structure has the highest volumetric methane uptake of 280 VSTP/V at p = 35 bar and T = 298 K. However, it suffers from limited methane diffusion. Alternatively, the considered Si and Ge-containing analogies have fast diffusive properties but their adsorption is lower, ca. 172-179 VSTP/V, at the same conditions.

  9. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (MHAC) Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to establish the resource potential of methane hydrates via a sustained, long-term production test in the Arctic. DFO Gant reminded the Committee that on May 1, the MHAC members...

  10. Memory abstractions for parallel programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, I-Ting Angelina

    2012-01-01

    A memory abstraction is an abstraction layer between the program execution and the memory that provides a different "view" of a memory location depending on the execution context in which the memory access is made. Properly ...

  11. Using on-package memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3D stacked memory interposed between the KNL chip and the slower off-package DDR memory. Compared to the on-node DDR4 memory, the high-bandwidth memory (HBM) has...

  12. What product might a renewal of Heavy Ion Fusion development offer that competes with methane microbes and hydrogen HTGRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    competes with methane microbes and hydrogen HTGRs? Grantknown. The economics of microbe methane and HTGR hydrogen

  13. Drifting absence :: drafting memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Marlene Eva

    2006-01-01

    The emotive power of a memorial derives from its ability to engage the viewer in active remembrance. The project considers the limitations of a monumentality which embraces a distinct division between viewer and memorial. ...

  14. Numerical modeling of methane venting from lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandella, Benjamin P. (Benjamin Paul)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of methane transport in lake sediments control the release of methane into the water column above, and the portion that reaches the atmosphere may contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect. The observed ...

  15. Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane 1 Funded by Environmental-infrared absorption spectrum of methane at 1665.5nm. · Guided mode design in SOI wafer #12;9 Device Fabrication Steps

  16. Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

    2000-01-01

    Conversion of methane and acetylene to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5) was studied The reaction between methane and acetylene successfully produced high molecular weight hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, benzene...

  17. Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methane hydrate-bearing sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.

    2006-01-01

    through methane hydrate-bearing sand. X-ray CT was usedin partially saturated sand, 229th ACS National Meeting, SanOF METHANE HYDRATE- BEARING SAND Yongkoo Seol, Timothy J.

  18. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    hydrates in subsea sediments where the major challenge comes from implemen- tation of solubility, and mod- eling methane hydrate evolution in subsea sediments (MH). Coalbed methane is a form of natural

  19. ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

  20. Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004) | Open EnergyModelos yModesto Irrigation|

  1. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNew Hampshire:Ohio:GoodsCruzThisOpen

  2. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOE HDBK-1113-2008BroadbandReanna(Brochure) (Revised)

  3. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

  4. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

    1985-06-19

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

  5. RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory & Ecological Engineering. DONOR Ron Miner Memorial Bioengineering Scholarship Fund ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

  6. Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattler, Klaus

    applications including heating systems and gas turbines for electric power generation.62­64 The combustion of natural gas methane is a clean and efficient process. While gas turbines operating with methane pollution than other hydrocarbon fuels. Therefore, gas turbines pow- ered by methane are promising

  7. Introduction In the past two centuries, atmospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    of methane in the atmosphere is controlled by oxidation, mainly in chemical reaction with the hydroxyl by the combination of pre-industrial methane concentration levels from ice cores and bottom-up estimates based important terms in the global methane budget. Anthropogenic source estimates are mainly based on socio

  8. Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Martin J.

    LETTERS Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate-gassing during post-glacial oceanic overturn7 or methane hydrate destabilization8­10 . Here we report the broadest range of oxygen isotope values yet measured in mar- ine sediments (225% to 112%) in methane seeps

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane in an agriculture-dominated landscape on atmospheric methane (CH4) in an agriculture-dominated landscape in the Upper Mid- west of the United States role in the landscape-scale CH4 budget. Keywords Methane . Corn . Soybean . Agriculture . Land surface

  10. Methane Activation with Rhenium Catalysts. 1. Bidentate Oxygenated Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Methane Activation with Rhenium Catalysts. 1. Bidentate Oxygenated Ligands Jason M. Gonzales, Jonas, California 90089 ReceiVed July 31, 2006 Trends in methane activation have been explored for rhenium complexes proceeds with methane activation through a barrier of less than 35 kcal mol-1 . Study

  11. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    6 Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Effects in Microbial Methane from Terrestrial Environments Jeffrey Chanton, Lia Chaser, Paul Glasser,Don Siegel Methane is the ultimate end-product of anaerobic respiration. Methane production via CO2 reduction does not consume CO2. Also, acetate can be written as 2CH20, so Eq. 6

  12. The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton Stephanie Lyn Shaw Center for Global://web.mit.edu/cgcs/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton by Stephanie of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton by Stephanie Lyn Shaw Submitted to the Department of Earth

  13. Physical Controls on Methane Ebullition from Reservoirs and Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    of methane production and flux in aquatic sediments has important geochemical, geotechnical, and global; Anselmann and Crutzen, 1989; and Reeburgh et al., 1993). Because methane has the potential to con- tributePhysical Controls on Methane Ebullition from Reservoirs and Lakes JENNIFER JOYCE PAUL W. JEWELL

  14. Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites in the United States #12;Why to estimates based on this work (Gg/yr) Production emissions reported in 2011 greenhouse gas inventory (annual is methane important? The role of methane in the national greenhouse gas inventory · Most recent national

  15. Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the atmosphere. o Accounts for 20% of methane emissions from human sources. Globally cattle produce about 80 million metric tons of methane annually. o Accounts for 28% of global methane emissions

  16. Reaction dynamics of atomic chlorine with methane: Importance of methane bending and torsional excitation in controlling reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reaction dynamics of atomic chlorine with methane: Importance of methane bending and torsional with methane vibrationally excited in trace quantities into low-energy bending and torsional modes­7 and detailed the effect on reactivity of C­H stretch vibrational excitation.5­7 This paper concerns our most

  17. Factors influencing methane distribution in Texas ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, C.; Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01

    To determine the factors that influence the distribution of methane in Texas ground water, water samples were collected from 40 wells in east-central and central Texas aquifers. Among the chemical parameters examined, sulfate is most important in controlling methane distribution. Methane occurs in high concentration in east-central Texas only where sulfate concentration is low, supporting the hypothesis that abundant microbial methane production does not begin until sulfate is depleted. Because water samples from central Texas are high in either oxygen or sulfate, methane concentrations are low in these waters. A positive correlation between methane and sulfate in these waters indicates a different, perhaps thermogenic, origin for the trace methane. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of dissolved methane ranged from {minus}80{per_thousand} to {minus}21{per_thousand} in east-central Texas and {minus}41.2{per_thousand} to {minus}8.5{per_thousand} in central Texas. Low values of < {minus}50{per_thousand} in the east-central Texas ground water indicate a microbial origin for methane and are consistent with the observed sulfate-methane relationship; high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of > {minus}31{per_thousand} likely result from bacterial methane oxidation. Similarly, methane with high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios in central Texas may reflect partial oxidation of the methane pool. Overall, water samples from both regions show a positive correlation between sulfate concentration and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of methane, suggesting that methane oxidation may be associated with sulfate reduction in Texas ground water.

  18. March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 1 Main Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 1 Main Memory Chapter 8 #12;March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 2 Chapter Outline Background Contiguous Memory Allocation Paging Structure of the Page Table Segmentation #12;March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 3 Objectives To provide

  19. 2, 11971241, 2005 Control of methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Version Interactive Discussion EGU Abstract The North Sea hosts large coal, oil and gas reservoirs of giant sulphide- oxidizing bacteria above patches of black sediments and carbonate crusts, which are exposed 10 to 50 cm above seafloor forming small reefs. These Methane-Derived Au- thigenic Carbonates

  20. Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

  1. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  2. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark R. Swain; Gautam Vasisht; Giovanna Tinetti

    2008-02-07

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thus the detection of methane rather than carbon-monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanisms that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  3. Generating power with drained coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

  4. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  5. Deep oxidation of methane on particles derived from YSZ-supported Pd-Pt-(O) coatings synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horwat, D.

    2009-01-01

    2009) Deep oxidation of methane on particles derived fromAbstract Methane conversion tests were performed on Pd, PdOFigure captions Figure 1: Methane conversion a), methane

  6. Thermodynamic properties and diffusion of water + methane binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvab, I.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2014-03-14

    Thermodynamic and diffusion properties of water + methane mixtures in a single liquid phase are studied using NVT molecular dynamics. An extensive comparison is reported for the thermal pressure coefficient, compressibilities, expansion coefficients, heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, zero frequency speed of sound, and diffusion coefficient at methane concentrations up to 15% in the temperature range of 298–650 K. The simulations reveal a complex concentration dependence of the thermodynamic properties of water + methane mixtures. The compressibilities, heat capacities, and diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing methane concentration, whereas values of the thermal expansion coefficients and speed of sound increase. Increasing methane concentration considerably retards the self-diffusion of both water and methane in the mixture. These effects are caused by changes in hydrogen bond network, solvation shell structure, and dynamics of water molecules induced by the solvation of methane at constant volume conditions.

  7. [MRO] Oligocrystalline Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture ...

  8. Non-linear response of carbon dioxide and methane emissions to oxygen availability in a drained histosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNicol, Gavin; Silver, Whendee L

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Soil respiration; methane; carbon dioxide; oxygen;response of carbon dioxide and methane emissions to oxygenof carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ) greenhouse gas

  9. Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methane–water solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

  10. Self-Diffusion Coefficients of Methane or Ethane Mixtures with Hydrocarbons at High Pressure by NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    Self-Diffusion Coefficients of Methane or Ethane Mixtures with Hydrocarbons at High Pressure by NMR in homogeneous mixtures of methane + hexane, ethane + hexane, methane + octane, ethane + octan, methane + decane, ethane + decane, and methane + hexane + benzene over the whole concentration range, at 303.2 K and 333

  11. TITAN'S TRANSPORT-DRIVEN METHANE CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2012-09-10

    The mechanisms behind the occurrence of large cloud outbursts and precipitation on Titan have been disputed. A global- and annual-mean estimate of surface fluxes indicated only 1% of the insolation, or {approx}0.04 W m{sup -2}, is exchanged as sensible and/or latent fluxes. Since these fluxes are responsible for driving atmospheric convection, it has been argued that moist convection should be quite rare and precipitation even rarer, even if evaporation globally dominates the surface-atmosphere energy exchange. In contrast, climate simulations indicate substantial cloud formation and/or precipitation. We argue that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance is diagnostic of horizontal heat transport by Titan's atmosphere, and thus constrains the strength of the methane cycle. Simple calculations show the TOA radiative imbalance is {approx}0.5-1 W m{sup -2} in Titan's equatorial region, which implies 2-3 MW of latitudinal heat transport by the atmosphere. Our simulation of Titan's climate suggests this transport may occur primarily as latent heat, with net evaporation at the equator and net accumulation at higher latitudes. Thus, the methane cycle could be 10-20 times previous estimates. Opposing seasonal transport at solstices, compensation by sensible heat transport, and focusing of precipitation by large-scale dynamics could further enhance the local, instantaneous strength of Titan's methane cycle by a factor of several. A limited supply of surface liquids in regions of large surface radiative imbalance may throttle the methane cycle, and if so, we predict more frequent large storms over the lakes district during Titan's northern summer.

  12. Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May 28 WebinarProtectMessageFY 2010 Methane Hydrate

  13. Computer memory management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  14. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

    2007-07-31

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  15. UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

  16. Coupling of nitrous oxide and methane by global atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Hsu, J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF’s Atmospheric Chemistry program (grant ATM-Methane by Global Atmospheric Chemistry Michael J. Prathergas, through atmospheric chemistry that en- hances the

  17. ,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"06301989"...

  18. ,"New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"0...

  19. Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

    2010-01-01

    lipid biomarkers for microbes with chemoautotrophicOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microbe-Metazoan Interactions atxiv xvii xviii Chapter 3. Microbes, Macrofauna, and Methane:

  20. Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    lipid biomarkers for microbes with chemoautotrophicOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microbe-Metazoan Interactions atxiv xvii xviii Chapter 3. Microbes, Macrofauna, and Methane:

  1. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources. Authors: Tonkovich, Anna Lee 1 ;...

  2. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution Controlling Methane Emissions in the...

  3. Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane in Cu-3(btc)(2) Previous Next List Hulvey, Zeric; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Mason, Jarad A.; Tsivion, Ehud; Dougherty,...

  4. Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Margrit Evelyn

    1995-01-01

    Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane...

  5. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements on Black Sea water-column methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeburgh, WS; Tyler, SC; Carroll, J

    2006-01-01

    M.A. , Lee, C. , 1994. Methane production during zooplanktonDickens, G.R. , 2003. A methane trigger for global warming?Quinby-Hunt, M.S. , 1994. Methane stability in seawater.

  6. Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

    2013-01-01

    in tropospheric ozone and methane; global 3-D model studies,hydroxyl radical and methane life- time from the Atmosphericof meteorology and emissions on methane trends, 1990–2004,

  7. Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.

    2012-01-01

    S.S.H. , 1987. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition,T. J. , et al. (2007), Methane Hydrate Formation andCharting the future of methane hydrate research in the

  8. Methane from UV-irradiated carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuerger, Andrew C.

    Methane from UV-irradiated carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions Andrew C process was studied for the production of methane from carbonaceous chondrites under simulated Martian conditions. Methane evolution rates from carbonaceous chondrites were found to be positively correlated

  9. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Potential distribution of methane hydrate in the world'sisotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability duringHendy, L.L. , and R.J. Behl, Methane hydrates in quaternary

  10. Analysis of a direct methane conversion to high molecular weight hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghafran, Moh'd. J.

    2000-01-01

    Methane conversion to heavier hydrocarbons was studied using electrical furnaces and a plasma apparatus. The experiments were performed with pure methane for the electrical furnace experiments while pure methane and additions such as hydrogen...

  11. Mechanistic studies of electron transfer, complex formation, C-H bond activation, and product binding in soluble methane monooxygenase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Daniel Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Chapter 1. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase: Activation of Dioxygen and Methane The mechanisms by which soluble methane monooxygenase uses dioxygen to convert methane selectively to methanol have come into sharp focus. Diverse ...

  12. SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

  13. Diffusive Evolution of Gaseous and Diffusive Evolution of Gaseous and Hydrate Horizons of Methane in SeabedHydrate Horizons of Methane in Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Diffusive Evolution of Gaseous and Diffusive Evolution of Gaseous and Hydrate Horizons of Methane in SeabedHydrate Horizons of Methane in Seabed Denis S. Goldobin (University of Leicester),Denis S. Goldobin"")) MethaneNetMethaneNet Early Career Workshop Early Career Workshop MiltonMilton KeynesKeynes 2929

  14. Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations from the March 27th - 28th Methane Hydrates Advisory Committee Meeting International Gas Hydrate...

  15. 1870 Organometallics 1994,13,1870-1877 Mechanism and Energetics for Dehydrogenation of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    1870 Organometallics 1994,13,1870-1877 Mechanism and Energetics for Dehydrogenation of Methane also activate CHI. 1. Introduction Becauseof the enormousworldwidereservesof methane (CH4)andthe

  16. Development of Atmospheric Tracer Methods To Measure Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Facilities and Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01

    an urban area is used with crosswind integrated tracerCWI,) and the average crosswind concen- tration of methane (directly, and the crosswind average methane concentration

  17. Kinetic Consequences of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms during Methane Oxidation on Group VIII Metal Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Ya Huei

    2011-01-01

    Chin, Y-H. ; Resasco, D.E. Catalytic Oxidation of methane onreactions in catalytic partial oxidation, reforming, andoccurrence of direct catalytic partial oxidation of methane

  18. Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

    2013-01-01

    of present-day and future OH and methane lifetime, Atmos.Chemistry and Physics Future methane, hydroxyl, and theirand emission parameters for future predictions C. D. Holmes

  19. Warship : memorial in antithesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchelistcheff, Andre Victor

    1992-01-01

    This thesis is divided into three distinct yet related parts. The first consists of observations and reflections on some of New York City's many war memorials, ranging from one commemorating the Revolutionary War to one ...

  20. Schema and memory consolidation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Dorothy

    2011-06-27

    The traditional view of systems memory consolidation is that it is a gradual process that takes place over days or weeks. Within this approach, the hippocampus (HPC) is thought to be involved in the rapid encoding of ...

  1. Hardware Transactional Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie, Sean

    This work shows how hardware transactional memory (HTM) can be implemented to support transactions of arbitrarily large size, while ensuring that small transactions run efficiently. Our implementation handles small ...

  2. Methane Stakeholder Roundtables | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing Swimming PoolCommercial IndustrialDepartment of68Methane

  3. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillionReservesReserves (BillionCoalbed Methane

  4. File:Methane.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbHFerris State UniversityMethane.pdf Jump

  5. MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress

  6. Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-15

    Methane from oil shale can potentially provide a significant contribution to natural gas industry, and it may be possible to increase and continue methane production by artificially enhancing methanogenic activity through the addition of various substrate and nutrient treatments. Western Research Institute in conjunction with Pick & Shovel Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted microcosm and scaled-up reactor studies to investigate the feasibility and optimization of biogenic methane production from oil shale. The microcosm study involving crushed oil shale showed the highest yield of methane was produced from oil shale pretreated with a basic solution and treated with nutrients. Incubation at 30 C, which is the estimated temperature in the subsurface where the oil shale originated, caused and increase in methane production. The methane production eventually decreased when pH of the system was above 9.00. In the scaled-up reactor study, pretreatment of the oil shale with a basic solution, nutrient enhancements, incubation at 30 C, and maintaining pH at circumneutral levels yielded the highest rate of biogenic methane production. From this study, the annual biogenic methane production rate was determined to be as high as 6042 cu. ft/ton oil shale.

  7. PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    1 PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW F.K. Lu,* C.M. Roseberry, J.M. Meyers and D arc pyrolysis of methane at supersonic conditions, representative of conditions in the reformer location of an aibreathing hypersonic vehicle. The rationale for arc pyrolysis is provided. Major

  8. Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol Catalyzed, with CŔH Activation (generated by dissolution[6] of Au2O3) react with methane at 1808C to selectively generate methanol (as a mixture of the ester and methanol) in high yield (Table 1, entries 1 and 2). As expected, the irreversible

  9. Engineering Methane is a major component of shale gas. Recent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Engineering Methane is a major component of shale gas. Recent oversupply of shale gas has 30% of electricity from natural and shale gas, increasing from 15% in 2010. US chemical industries have begun using ethane from shale gas as a feedstock. The low methane price is expected to push its

  10. METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Vilas, F. E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed

    2010-12-10

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  11. An analog memory using a CCD memory cell 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, James Ray

    1983-01-01

    23 26 29 E. Digital-to-Analog Converter F. Analog-to-Digital Converter G. Operation CHAPTER IV. ANALYSIS OF THE CIRCUIT A. Testing of Major Components B. Performance of the Memory C. Comparison with Digital Memories D. Proposed Modifications... of Memory Cell 24. Four Interconnected Memory Cells 25. Four-to-Sixteen Converter 26. Column Address Decoding Circuit. 27. Row Address Decoding Circuit 28. Digital-to-Analog Converter 29. Comparator Circuit Diagram . 30. DC Transfer Function...

  12. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR. FINAL REPORT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, David

    2012-01-01

    CONSERVATION: CHH1ICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR na 1CONSERVATION CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR DavidCONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR FINAL

  13. Large-eddy simulation of lean hydrogenemethane turbulent premixed flames in the methane-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Large-eddy simulation of lean hydrogenemethane turbulent premixed flames in the methane- dominated to available experimental data. The enriched flame has 20% H2 in terms of mole fraction and lies in the methane methane flame in the methane- dominated regime. Copyright Ş 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  14. Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory-phase transition metal oxide cations can convert methane to methanol. Methane activation by MO+ is discussed reaction are also presented. Introduction The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transportable liquid

  15. A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands M E R R I of atmospheric methane. Here, we assess controls on methane flux using a database of approximately 19 000 latitude regions. Our analyses confirm general controls on wetland methane emissions from soil temperature

  16. DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300401 New Insights into the Oxidative Coupling of Methane from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201300401 New Insights into the Oxidative Coupling of Methane from Spatially coupling of methane (OCM) is a high-temperature process involving the transformation of methane into ethane oxidation of methane to produce CO and H2 in a Pt- and Rh-coated a-Al2O3 foam.[11­13] Experiments were

  17. Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers November 2006; published 4 May 2007. [1] Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils-scale variations in soil methane emissions: (1) consumption of methane by methanotrophic bacteria, (2) quantity

  18. Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean Bruce Buffett of methane clathrate in marine sediments, and use it to predict the sensitivity of the steady-state methane inventory to changes in the deep ocean. The methane inventory is determined by binning the seafloor area

  19. CO2 sequestration by methanogens in activated sludge for methane Nazlina Haiza Mohd Yasin a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    CO2 sequestration by methanogens in activated sludge for methane production Nazlina Haiza Mohd WAS have significant potential for converting the greenhouse gas CO2 into the fuel methane. Methane biofuel (methane) or other valuable products using this single carbon atom. Ó 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  20. Methane Planets and their Mass-Radius Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helled, Ravit; Vos, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of both the mass and radius of an exoplanet allows us to estimate its mean density, and therefore, its composition. Exoplanets seem to fill a very large parameter space in terms of mass and composition, and unlike the solar-system's planets, exoplanets also have intermediate masses (~5-50 M_Earth) with various densities. In this letter, we investigate the behavior of the Mass-Radius relation for methane (CH_4) planets and show that when methane planets are massive enough (M_planet > ~15 M_Earth) the methane can dissociate and lead to a differentiated planet with a carbon core, a methane envelope, and a hydrogen atmosphere. The contribution of a rocky core to the behavior of CH_4 planet is considered as well. We also develop interior models for several detected intermediate-mass planets that could, in principle, be methane/methane-rich planets. The example of methane planets emphasizes the complexity of the Mass-Radius relation and the challenge in inferring the planetary composition uniquely.

  1. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

  2. Using on-package memory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    memory Introduction The NERSC-8 system will include a novel feature on its node architecture: 16 GB of high-bandwidth 3D stacked memory interposed between the KNL chip and the...

  3. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1997-05-01

    The Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was studied by running the methane coupling reactions at different methane to oxygen ratios, temperatures and dilution gas flow rates. For methane to oxygen ratios less than 3, the C{sub 2} yield was almost the same; and C{sub 2} yield began to decrease as the methane to oxygen ratio was further increased. The optimal temperature observed was around 800{degrees}C, where the C{sub 2} yield reached a maximum value. Increasing the dilution gas (helium) flow rate resulted in higher C{sub 2} selectivity; however, after a certain dilution gas flow rate the C{sub 2} yield began to decrease due to a decrease in methane conversion as a result of the reduced contact time. The stability study of the catalyst showed that, after five successive run cycles, the C{sub 2} yield obtained decreased from 24% to 19% at 780 {degrees}C, and methane, oxygen and helium flow rates of 12.2, 4.1, and 44. 3 mm/min, respectively. XRD analysis showed that, after the reaction, the XRD peaks of the cristabolite and Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} phases in the catalyst became smaller than those in the fresh catalyst, and that at least one new, unidentified phase was observed. Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was used as the methane oxidative coupling catalyst in a porous membrane reactor and its performance was compared with a packed reactor operated at similar conditions. Although the membrane reactor showed lower methane conversion at the same reaction conditions, it gave higher C{sub 2} selectivity and C{sub 2} yield at similar methane conversions.

  4. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maitland, Duncan (Pleasant Hill, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Bearinger, Jane P. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, Thomas S. (San Leandro, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Jensen, Wayne A. (Livermore, CA); Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Marion, III, John E. (Livermore, CA); Loge, Jeffrey M. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  5. Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John Martin

    1968-01-01

    . At this point, the bellows valve, E, was closed and the thermocouple pressure elements monitored for an increase in pressure; and if after several hours no increase in pressure was registered, the system was considered thoroughly out-gassed and free of leaks... PPM 0. 5 PPM Figure 3 is a block diagram of the system into which methane was admitted. From the storage cylinder the methane passed through a Hoke-Phoenix gas-ballast high purity regulator. From needle valve, A, the integrity of the methane...

  6. Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures US livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: Slurry, plug flow, complete mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations.

  7. The electronic spectra and structure of bis(2,2'biphenylene) methane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofer, Owen Charles

    1965-01-01

    Transit ion Sysssetries ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 12 Theuretioal Calculation uf Fluorene and Bis(2iiR bipheuyleme) Methane . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 13 Theoretioal Caloulatiun and Experimental Beta Sf Flugrene and Bis(2 2 bkpMenylsne) Methane ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ e... Calouiation of Fluorene ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ 22 P Matrix of Bis(2~2 biphemyleue) Methane ~ ~ ~ 23 P Matrix of Bis(2, 2 biphewylene) Methane (Continued) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 24 P Matrix of Fluorene ~ ~ 25 Gesssa Matrix of Bis(2, 2 biphenyleue) Methane ~ ~ 26...

  8. A survey of methane isotope abundance (14C, 13C, 2H) from five nearshore marine basins that reveals unusual radiocarbon levels in subsurface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Carbon pool analysis of methane hydrate regions in theAerobic production of methane in the sea, Nat. Geosci. , 1(R. Varela (2005), Fossil methane source dominates Cariaco

  9. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, A.

    2010-01-01

    of predicted and measured methane gas production data within the heterogeneous porous methane hydrate sample.Global Distribution of Methane Hydrate in Ocean Hydrate.

  10. Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    al. : Changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methaneal. : Changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methaneal. : Changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane

  11. The effects of dissolved methane upon liquid argon scintillation light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, T

    In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly ...

  12. Commodity chemicals from natural gas by methane chlorination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, S.C.; Minet, R.G.; Giacobbe, F.; Mullick, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ethylene and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) can be produced from natural gas through methane chlorination by reacting methane and chlorine at 900/sup 0/C or higher. Experimental results indicate total ethylene equivalent yield from methane of 45%(wt) and marginal process economics. Fundamental kinetic modeling predicts improved C/sub 2/ yields of up to 70%(wt) at optimum reaction conditions. This optimum condition established the basis for the process design study to evaluate the potential for producing ethylene and VCM from natural gas. HCl by-product is recycled for economic viability. Using the Kel-Chlor process for recycling HCl, the proposed plant produces 27,200 TPA of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 383,800 TPA of VCM. The Midwest is an ethylene consumption area requiring imports of ethylene derivatives from other regions. A methane chlorination plant located on a Midwestern natural gas pipeline network has a good commercial potential.

  13. Diurnal variations in methane emission from rice plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laskowski, Nicholas Aaron

    2004-11-15

    with uncontrolled soil temperature than for plants with controlled soil temperature. Soil temperature at a 5 cm depth explained 46% of the emission variation. Soil temperature affects the source of methane in the soil while transpiration promotes the uptake...

  14. Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

  15. & CH Activation Rhodium Bis(quinolinyl)benzene Complexes for Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    on using the steam-methane reformation process to convert it to syngas (a CO and H2 mixture catalytic process, many ligand frameworks have been explored for the Pt system,[6] and efforts have been

  16. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 93% methane by mass. NETL, 2012. Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment. See ICF, supra note 11 at 78, fn. 40. 39 This report is available...

  17. Biomass Gasification and Methane Digester Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to be eligible for the exemption, methane digester equipment must be certified by the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) and the farm must be verified as compliant under the Michig...

  18. Tetrahedral Symmetry for Methane The infrared spectrum of methane shows two absorptions: a bend at 1306 cm-1 and a stretch at 3019 cm-1. Demonstrate that a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    Tetrahedral Symmetry for Methane The infrared spectrum of methane shows two absorptions: a bend symmetry for methane is consistent with this spectroscopic data. Also predict how many Raman active modes methane should have. E C3 C2 S4 A1 : x2 + y2 + z2 A2 C Td 1 1 2 3 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1

  19. 5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane), 105633-31-6;7, 109745-48-4;8, 109745-49-5;8 (parent methane), 109745-52-0;9,109745-50-8;9 (parent methane), 105633-32-7;10, 109745-53-1;11, 109745-51-9;1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene,634

  20. Method of determining methane and electrochemical sensor therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Otagawa, Takaaki (Westmont, IL); Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about about 1.4 volts versus R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

  1. The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

    2012-02-14

    , such as rank of the coal, coal composition, micropores structure, reservoir pressure, molecular properties of gas adsorbed on the internal surface of coal seam, and reservoir temperature3,7. An idealized model of coalbed methane reservoir consists of a... making process. The uncertainties include the coal density, permeability or gas content as parameters of coal properties. Each coalbed methane reservoir property will govern production performance in a certain degree. Some parameters strongly influence...

  2. Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

  3. Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, K.

    1997-07-15

    A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

  4. Good Samaritan Hospital`s energy efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterrett, R.; Dobberpuhl, W.; Gernet, B.; O`Brien, T.

    1995-06-01

    Arizona Public Service (APS) encourages its customers to use energy wisely by providing incentives to install energy efficient systems. APS provided an incentive to the Good Samaritan Hospital, located in Phoenix, Arizona, to install a Waste Heat Recovery Unit and an Economizer Cooling System to improve the performance of the hospital`s central plant. Waste heat recovered from the boilers stacks is used to preheat combustion air and boiler feed water. The Economizer Cooling System uses a plate and frame heat exchanger to cool the hospital with cold water produced by the cooling tower rather than an electrical chiller. To determine the effectiveness of these two systems APS initiated a project to monitor their performance. Alternative Energy Systems Consulting, Inc. (AESC) has installed instrumentation to monitor the performance of the above systems and will document their energy savings and effectiveness at reducing energy costs.

  5. Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Dublin, OH); Litt, Robert D. (Westerville, OH); Dongming, Qiu (Dublin, OH); Silva, Laura J. (Plain City, OH); Lamont, Micheal Jay (Plain City, OH); Fanelli, Maddalena (Plain City, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Plain city, OH); Perry, Steven (Galloway, OH)

    2011-10-04

    Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

  6. HOSPITAL ENERGY AUDITS: A BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    49:43-6. "Hospital Builds Largest Solar Healthcare 1977ti ng build ings and building plans; buying solar; andBuild- ings and Community Systems, Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Solar

  7. Hospital valuation in emerging countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segawa, Tsuyoshi, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Private health players in emerging countries have increased their presence and contributed to global health issues, but have been undervalued in financing. A variety of health players have evolved and hospitals have played ...

  8. USIMM: the Utah SImulated Memory Module A Simulation Infrastructure for the JWAC Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    memory controllers and four DDR3 memory channels [19, 31]. While other memory channel and memory for DDR3 channels and DIMMs. 1 #12;A modern DDR3 channel typically has a 64-bit data bus and a 23-bit

  9. The memory glasses : wearable computing for just-in-time memory support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVaul, Richard W. (Richard Wayne), 1971-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis documents a body of wearable computing research surrounding the development of the Memory Glasses, a new type of proactive memory support technology. The Memory Glasses combines features of existing memory ...

  10. TED KYCIA MEMORIAL SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LITTENBERG, L.; RUBINSTEIN, R.; SAMIOS, N.; LI, K.; GIACOMELLI, G.; MOCKETT, P.; CARROLL, A.; JOHNSON, R.; BRYMAN, D.; TIPPENS, B.

    2000-05-19

    On the afternoon of May 19 2000, a Memorial Seminar was held in the BNL physics Large Seminar Room to honor the memory of Ted Kyeia, a prominent particle physicist who had been a member of the BNL staff for 40 years. Although it was understandably a somewhat sad occasion because Ted was no longer with us, nevertheless there was much for his colleagues and friends to celebrate in recalling the outstanding contributions that he had made in those four decades. The Seminar speakers were all people who had worked with Ted during that period; each discussed one aspect of his career, but also included anecdotes and personal reminiscences. This booklet contains the Seminar program, listing the speakers, and also copies of transparencies of the talks (and one paper which was a later expansion of a talk); sadly, not all of the personal remarks appeared on the transparencies.

  11. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Venugopal K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  12. Field Exploration of Methane Seep Near Atqasuk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katey Walter, Dennis Witmer, Gwen Holdmann

    2008-12-31

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

  13. Memory effects in quantum channel discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Chiribella; Giacomo M. D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

    2008-04-02

    We consider quantum-memory assisted protocols for discriminating quantum channels. We show that for optimal discrimination of memory channels, memory assisted protocols are needed. This leads to a new notion of distance for channels with memory. For optimal discrimination and estimation of sets of unitary channels memory-assisted protocols are not required.

  14. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gasAnthropogenic emissions of methane in the United States,A. R. , et al. (2014), Methane leaks from North American

  15. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, E.V.L.

    2012-01-01

    Deep Ocean Field Test of Methane Hydrate Formation from aW.J. , and Mason, D.H. , Methane Hydrate Formation inNatural and Laboratory--Formed Methane Gas Hydrate. American

  16. Electrochemistry of soluble methane monooxygenase on a modified gold electrode : implications for chemical sensing in natural waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Janet Duanping

    2005-01-01

    This work explored the possibility of using the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) enzyme, a three-component enzyme which catalyzes the oxygenation of methane and other substrates, to design a methane sensor for use in ...

  17. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, Tim; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta; Myers, Greg; Divins, David; Morell, Margo

    2013-11-30

    This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these e?orts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these e?orts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and o?ers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate “Science Challenges” and linking them with “Technical Challenges” and potential field program locations.

  18. The severe scaling challenges of mainstream memories mo vated recent ac ve research on emerging nonvola le memory (eNVM) technologies. Some promising candidates, i.e., phase change memory, spintronic memory, and resis ve memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMara, Ronald F.

    nonvola le memory (eNVM) technologies. Some promising candidates, i.e., phase change memory, spintronic

  19. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  20. Memorial University Department of Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyet, Alwell

    1 Memorial University Department of Psychology GRADUATE STUDENT & SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK 2014 ­ 2015 .........................................................................................................................5 Masters of Applied Social Psychology (MASP ............................................................................9 Experimental Psychology

  1. 49 new T dwarfs identified using methane imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, C V; Smart, R L; van Spaandonk, L; Baker, D; Smith, L C; Andrei, A H; Bucciarelli, B; Dhital, S; Jones, H R A; Lattanzi, M G; Magazzu, A; Pinfield, D J; Tinney, C G

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of 49 new photometrically classified T dwarfs from the combination of large infrared and optical surveys combined with follow-up TNG photometry. We used multi-band infrared and optical photometry from the UKIRT and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to identify possible brown dwarf candidates, which were then confirmed using methane filter photometry. We have defined a new photometric conversion between CH4s - CH4l colour and spectral type for T4 to T8 brown dwarfs based on a part of the sample that has been followed up using methane photometry and spectroscopy. Using methane differential photometry as a proxy for spectral type for T dwarfs has proved to be a very efficient technique. Of a subset of 45 methane selected brown dwarfs that were observed spectroscopically, 100% were confirmed as T dwarfs. Future deep imaging surveys will produce large samples of faint brown dwarf candidates, for which spectroscopy will not be feasible. When broad wavelength coverage is unavailable, methane imaging...

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

  3. An analysis of MRAM based memory technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Rangarajan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    MRAM is a memory (RAM) technology that uses electron spin to store information. Often been called "the ideal memory", it can potentially combine the density of DRAM with the speed of SRAM and non-volatility of FLASH memory ...

  4. Creating a False Memory in the Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez Moreno, Steve

    Memories can be unreliable. We created a false memory in mice by optogenetically manipulating memory engram–bearing cells in the hippocampus. Dentate gyrus (DG) or CA1 neurons activated by exposure to a particular context ...

  5. Nitinol-reinforced shape-memory polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Leo, Claudio V

    2010-01-01

    Reinforced shape-memory polymers have been developed from an acrylate based thermoset shape-memory polymer and nitinol wires. A rectangular shape-memory polymer measuring approximately 1 by 2 by 0.1 inches has a ten fold ...

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports.

  7. MultiScale: Memory System DVFS with Multiple Memory Controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenisch, Thomas F.

    of server energy consumed by the memory system has been increasing rapidly and is now on par with that consumed by processors. Recent work demonstrates that substantial memory energy can be saved with only to select and apply a frequency combination that will minimize the overall system energy within user

  8. Control of substrate access to the active site in methane monooxygenase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Jae

    Methanotrophs consume methane as their major carbon source and have an essential role in the global carbon cycle by limiting escape of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. These bacteria oxidize methane to methanol by ...

  9. Methane activation using Kr and Xe in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Lee, Dae Hoon Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Woo Seok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-10-15

    Methane has interested many researchers as a possible new energy source, but the high stability of methane causes a bottleneck in methane activation, limiting its practical utilization. To determine how to effectively activate methane using non-thermal plasma, the conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—Ar, Kr, and Xe—as additives. In addition to the methane conversion results at various applied voltages, the discharge characteristics such as electron temperature and electron density were calculated through zero-dimensional calculations. Moreover, the threshold energies of excitation and ionization were used to distinguish the dominant particle for activating methane between electrons, excited atoms, and ionized atoms. From the experiments and calculations, the selection of the additive noble gas is found to affect not only the conversion of methane but also the selectivity of product gases even under similar electron temperature and electron density conditions.

  10. New mineralogy of the outer solar system and the high-pressure behaviour of methane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard-Casely, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis will introduce the study of methane as a mineral. Along with ammonia and water, methane is one of the main planetary-forming materials in the outer solar system. The topic of `new mineralogy of the outer solar ...

  11. MOLECULAR SIMULATION OF PHASE EQUILIBRIA FOR WATER -METHANE AND WATER -ETHANE MIXTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 MOLECULAR SIMULATION OF PHASE EQUILIBRIA FOR WATER - METHANE AND WATER - ETHANE MIXTURES Jeffrey were used to calculate water - methane and water - ethane phase equilibria over a wide range

  12. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of methane in distilled water and seawater, J. Chem. Eng.Paci?c (ETP) Ocean • Water column MO x strongly mitigatesD. M. Lavoie (1983), Upper water column methane geochemistry

  13. Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

  14. Methane drainage with horizontal boreholes in advance of longwall mining: an analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabello, D.P.; Felts, L.L.; Hayoz, F.P.

    1981-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center has implemented a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of coalbed methane as an energy resource. The program is directed toward solution of technical and institutional problems impeding the recovery and use of large quantities of methane contained in the nation's minable and unminable coalbeds. Conducted in direct support of the DOE Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, this study analyzes the economic aspects of a horizontal borehole methane recovery system integrated as part of a longwall mine operation. It establishes relationships between methane selling price and annual mine production, methane production rate, and the methane drainage system capital investment. Results are encouraging, indicating that an annual coal production increase of approximately eight percent would offset all associated drainage costs over the range of methane production rates and capital investments considered.

  15. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  16. Energy Policy Seminar Series: Climate impacts of methane-emitting energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    of greenhouse gases, most notably methane and carbon dioxide, and these gases have dissimilar properties. This research finds that methane-emitting energy such as natural gas becomes significantly more carbon dioxide

  17. Final report for the Iowa Livestock Industry Waste Characterization and Methane Recovery Information Dissemination Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, M.V.; Richard, Thomas L

    2001-11-13

    This report summarizes analytical methods, characterizes Iowa livestock wastes, determines fossil fuel displacement by methane use, assesses the market potential, and offers recommendations for the implementation of methane recovery technologies.

  18. Climate Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Climate Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Policy Design: Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Urban Air Pollution Constraints by Marcus. The third case examines the benefits of increased policy coordination between air pollution constraints

  19. Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    in unconventional production. Estimates of methane emissions from activities on producing oil and gas sites in unconventional oil and gas production is beinDirect measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania Mary

  20. Genepool Memory Heatmaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities Nuclearlong version)shortGate HoursGenepool Memory

  1. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-12-31

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  2. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  3. Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

  4. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    methane production between runnel and polygonal ponds using stable isotope ratios, 14 C signatures, and investigated potential

  5. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    the generation and composition of natural gas. Geochimica etcarbon isotopic composition of methane from natural gases of

  6. Benefits and hurdles for biological methane upgrading; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    The presentation will focus on the technical hurdles for bioconversion of methane into chemical and liquid fuel.

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  8. Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association Pave the Way in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard. Now you can. The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association 900 Asp Ave of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. This brochure was printed at no cost to the taxpayers

  9. Detection of methane on Kuiper Belt Object (50000) Quaoar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Schaller; M. E. Brown

    2007-10-18

    The near-infrared spectrum of (50000) Quaoar obtained at the Keck Observatory shows distinct absorption features of crystalline water ice, solid methane and ethane, and possibly other higher order hydrocarbons. Quaoar is only the fifth Kuiper belt object on which volatile ices have been detected. The small amount of methane on an otherwise water ice dominated surface suggests that Quaoar is a transition object between the dominant volatile-poor small Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) and the few volatile-rich large KBOs such as Pluto and Eris.

  10. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Temelso, B.; Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Mandt, K. E.; Sherrill, C. D.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

  11. Methane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption 26 Milk yield 29 Weight 31 Feed intake and feeding level 31 #12;2 Discussion 32 Methane productionMethane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement and high quality;#12;Methane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement and high quality silage

  12. Acetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Xinhe

    are not commercialized yet. Current industrial technologies for the production of chemicals from methane are mainly basedAcetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts Yafang Fan Ć attracted much attention as a potential route to obtain chemicals. Methane, the main component of natural

  13. Implications of the recent fluctuations in the growth rate of tropospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Implications of the recent fluctuations in the growth rate of tropospheric methane Isobel J] Global measurements show that the mixing ratio of tropo- spheric methane (CH4) increased by 1.1% (19 (0315, 0325) 1. Introduction [2] Methane (CH4) plays critical roles in the chemistry and radiative

  14. FILLING OF METHANE/AIR MIXTURE IN A TUBE FOR PULSE DETONATION ENGINES SHRAVANI DWARAKAPALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    FILLING OF METHANE/AIR MIXTURE IN A TUBE FOR PULSE DETONATION ENGINES By SHRAVANI DWARAKAPALLY. Thanks to my god Lord Shiva for his blessings. November 18, 2011 #12;v ABSTRACT FILLING OF METHANE, was studied using the unsteady flow solver methane and air nominally at STP. Three cases were examined: (i

  15. On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane Jonathan I enhancement. The enrichment in deuterated methane is now much better determined than it was when Pinto et al dissociation rates of normal and deuterated methane. We utilize the improved data and models to compute initial

  16. Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley 2012; accepted 7 October 2012; published 8 December 2012. [1] Airborne measurements of methane (CH4 is not accounted for in the CARB inventory. Citation: Peischl, J., et al. (2012), Airborne observations of methane

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Community structure and nutrition of deep methane-seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Community structure and nutrition of deep methane-seep macrobenthos from the North Methane seeps occur at depths extending to over 7000 m along the world's continental margins signa- tures, the utilization of chemosynthetically fixed and methane-derived organic matter

  18. The variability of methane, nitrous oxide and sulfur hexafluoride in Northeast India*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The variability of methane, nitrous oxide and sulfur hexafluoride in Northeast India* A.L. Ganesan of methane, nitrous oxide and sulfur hexafluoride in Northeast India A. L. Ganesan1, A. Chatterjee2, R. G-frequency atmospheric measurements of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and sulfur hexafluo- ride (SF6) from Darjeeling

  19. Evidence for Methane -Complexes in Reductive Elimination Reactions from TpRh(L)(CH3)H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Evidence for Methane -Complexes in Reductive Elimination Reactions from TpRh(L)(CH3)H Douglas D of methane from TpRh(L)(CH3)H in benzene/perfluorobenzene solvent mixtures is found to be dependent upon the concentration of benzene, indicating an associative component to the reductive elimination of methane. Both

  20. Asymptotic Analysis of the Structure of Moderately Rich Methane-Air Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsch, Heinz

    Asymptotic Analysis of the Structure of Moderately Rich Methane-Air Flames K. SESHADRI,* X. S. BAI Republic of Germany The asymptotic structure of laminar, moderately rich, premixed methane flames structure of laminar, stoichi- ometric, and lean methane flames [1­6]. For rich flames, these analyses did

  1. Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation to seeping fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation of carbon derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), the oxidation of organic matter and from sea water. Methane is the dominant component among other hydrocarbon gases in these sediments. Its

  2. Changing boreal methane sources and constant biomass burning during the last termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    LETTERS Changing boreal methane sources and constant biomass burning during the last termination. Stocker3 Past atmospheric methane concentrations show strong fluctua- tions in parallel to rapid glacial climate changes in the Northern Hemisphere1,2 superimposed on a glacial­interglacial doubling of methane

  3. Net ecosystem methane and carbon dioxide exchanges in a Lake Erie coastal marsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Net ecosystem methane and carbon dioxide exchanges in a Lake Erie coastal marsh and a nearby ecosystem carbon dioxide (FCO2) and methane (FCH4) exchanges were measured by using the eddy covariance ) at the cropland. At the seasonal scale, soil temperature associated with methane (CH4) production provided

  4. Source of methane and methods to control its formation in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source of methane and methods to control its formation in single chamber microbial electrolysis online 31 March 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) Methane Single chamber Exoelectrogenic a b s t r a c t Methane production occurs during hydrogen gas generation in microbial electrolysis

  5. Microscopic Mechanisms and Dynamics Simulations of S3/2) Reacting with Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Microscopic Mechanisms and Dynamics Simulations of O+ (4 S3/2) Reacting with Methane Lipeng Sun: The reaction O+ (4 S3/2) + methane is studied as a benchmark for developing the theory of polymer erosion by O;2 Microscopic Mechanisms and Dynamics Simulations of O+ (4 S3/2) Reacting with Methane spacecraft,3 surprisingly

  6. Author's personal copy Methane evolution from UV-irradiated spacecraft materials under simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuerger, Andrew C.

    Author's personal copy Methane evolution from UV-irradiated spacecraft materials under simulated a b s t r a c t Fifteen organic and three inorganic compounds were tested for methane (CH4) evolution methane at the min- imum detection level 0.5 ppm, or above. In contrast, all organic compounds evolved

  7. Small-scale methane dispersion modelling for possible plume sources on the surface of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    Small-scale methane dispersion modelling for possible plume sources on the surface of Mars K. S 2012; published 11 October 2012. [1] Intense interest in the characteristics of a methane source Laboratory and future landers and orbiters will be tasked with understanding the sources of methane

  8. ADVECTION OF METHANE IN THE HYDRATE ZONE: MODEL, ANALYSIS AND EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVECTION OF METHANE IN THE HYDRATE ZONE: MODEL, ANALYSIS AND EXAMPLES MALGORZATA PESZYNSKA, RALPH for the advective-diffusive trans- port of methane in liquid phase through sediment with the accompanying formation and disso- lution of methane hydrate. This free-boundary problem has a unique generalized solution in L1

  9. Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions September 2007; revised 3 February 2008; accepted 28 February 2008; published 24 May 2008. [1] Methane (CH4 clear. We quantified internal cycling and methane emissions in three lakes during summer stratification

  10. Tricaine methane-sulfonate (MS-222) application in fish anaesthesia By N. Topic Popovic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Review Tricaine methane-sulfonate (MS-222) application in fish anaesthesia By N. Topic Popovic1 , I, Croatia Summary Tricaine methane-sulfonate (MS-222) is one of the most widely used anaesthetics in aquaculture and experimental procedures. Tricaine methane-sulphonate (MS-222), C9H11O2N + CH3SO3H, also known

  11. METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1 K. M. Barkume,1 G. A indicates the clear presence of ethane, an expected product of UV photolysis of methane. No evidence for N2 of 2005 FY9 that leads to large methane grains, abundant sites for ethane formation through UV photolysis

  12. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by Fe.1063/1.1448489 I. INTRODUCTION The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transport- able liquid such as methanol process and as the simplest model for alkane oxidation.1,2 Although no direct, efficient methane­methanol

  13. Methane emissions from lakes: Dependence of lake characteristics, two regional assessments, and a global estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    production rate minus potential methane oxidation) and the hydrostatic pressure which has to be overcome 2004. [1] Lake sediments are ``hot spots'' of methane production in the landscape. However, regional. Present evidence from lakes suggests that the majority of methane production occurs in anoxic sediment

  14. ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential of coalbed methane production using carbon dioxide sequestration in the Central Appalachian BasinANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL dioxide emissions from power plants, while enhancing the recovery of coalbed methane. Injected carbon

  15. Generating Methane Gas From Manure Charles D. Fulhage, Dennis Sievers and James R. Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    potential The immediate and obvious benefit from methane production is the energy value of the gas itself the pH, inhibiting the methane bacteria and stopping gas production. To help buffer the system against of livestock manure. To avoid the problem, loading rates must be carefully controlled. Methane production

  16. Mars long has been considered a cold, dead planet.However,recent reports of methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    investigations and flight missions. Terrestrial Methane Formation: Potential Analogues for Martian Processes Biogenic methane production results from extant biological activity (microbial metha- nogenesis) as well instance, methane is the meta- bolic by-product of a single related group of microorganisms known

  17. Methane Production in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Methanogenesis Cells (MRMCs) Using Thermolytic Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using lowMethane Production in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Methanogenesis Cells (MRMCs) Using Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has

  18. Production of Organic Oxygenates in the Partial Oxidation of Methane in a Silent Electric Discharge Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallinson, Richard

    Production of Organic Oxygenates in the Partial Oxidation of Methane in a Silent Electric Discharge to convert methane into useful products such as higher hydrocarbons, synthesis gas, and organic oxygenate is important for a process to have commercial potential. Thus, this study examines the effect methane

  19. Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production to the methane potential alone indicated that at a C:N ratio of 17, the energy output was greater for the ADBH is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, and organic nitrogen is converted to ammonia. Generally, ammonia

  20. Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessions, Alex L.

    Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps Identified by Stable Isotope Probing Running Title: Novel Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria Section incubating sediment with 13 C-labeled methane, ethane, or propane, we5 confirmed the incorporation of 13 C

  1. Unconditional Room Temperature Quantum Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hosseini; G. Campbell; B. M. Sparkes; P. K. Lam; B. C. Buchler

    2015-02-10

    Just as classical information systems require buffers and memory, the same is true for quantum information systems. The potential that optical quantum information processing holds for revolutionising computation and communication is therefore driving significant research into developing optical quantum memory. A practical optical quantum memory must be able to store and recall quantum states on demand with high efficiency and low noise. Ideally, the platform for the memory would also be simple and inexpensive. Here, we present a complete tomographic reconstruction of quantum states that have been stored in the ground states of rubidium in a vapour cell operating at around 80$^o$C. Without conditional measurements, we show recall fidelity up to 98% for coherent pulses containing around one photon. In order to unambiguously verify that our memory beats the quantum no-cloning limit we employ state independent verification using conditional variance and signal transfer coefficients.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new Arctic Drilling Platform in search of gas hydrate and free gas accumulations at depths of approximately 1200 to 2500 ft MD. A secondary objective was the gas-charged sands of the uppermost Campanian interval at approximately 3000 ft. Summary results of geophysical analysis of the well are presented in this report.

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models and to research teams for developing future gas-hydrate projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and has been documented by the project team. This Topical Report documents drilling and coring operations and other daily activities.

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists planning hydrate exploration and development projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this and other project reports. This Topical Report contains details describing logging operations.

  5. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  6. Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane 1 Funded by Environmental. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin #12;Motivation No other chip based optical Similar to: Doping of Semiconductor 3 #12;4 Photonic Crystal Bio-Chemical Sensors Loncar et al, Appl. Phys

  7. Renewed growth of atmospheric methane R. G. Prinn,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use these data, along with an inverse method applied to a simple model of atmospheric chemistry this observation further using a simple model of atmospheric transport and chemistry to attempt to quantifyRenewed growth of atmospheric methane M. Rigby,1 R. G. Prinn,1 P. J. Fraser,2 P. G. Simmonds,3 R. L

  8. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650?°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110?°C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  9. Variability of the methane trapping in martian subsurface clathrate hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Thomas; Olivier Mousis; Sylvain Picaud; Vincent Ballenegger

    2008-10-23

    Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane CH4 heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 300-600 years on the basis of photochemistry, its release from a subsurface reservoir or an active primary source of methane have been invoked in the recent literature. Among the existing scenarios, it has been proposed that clathrate hydrates located in the near subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of the detected CH4. Here, we accurately determine the composition of these clathrate hydrates, as a function of temperature and gas phase composition, by using a hybrid statistical thermodynamic model based on experimental data. Compared to other recent works, our model allows us to calculate the composition of clathrate hydrates formed from a more plausible composition of the martian atmosphere by considering its main compounds, i.e. carbon dioxyde, nitrogen and argon, together with methane. Besides, because there is no low temperature restriction in our model, we are able to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates formed at temperatures corresponding to the extreme ones measured in the polar caps. Our results show that methane enriched clathrate hydrates could be stable in the subsurface of Mars only if a primitive CH4-rich atmosphere has existed or if a subsurface source of CH4 has been (or is still) present.

  10. GLOBAL SOURCES OF METHANE AND THE BENEFITS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    ; the flaring of natural gas in oil production; in industrial processes and by the inefficient combustion (ESRC). ISSN 0967-8875 #12;Abstract Methane is an important greenhouse gas, the abatement of which-benefit analysis, such as the discount rate, the future trends in agricultural prices and the value of global

  11. Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2009-08-13

    There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

  12. Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2007-01-01

    University, New York, NY 10027, USA Received 1 July 2005; accepted 15 April 2006 Available online 2 AugustRenewable Energy 32 (2007) 1243­1257 Methane generation in landfills Nickolas J. Themelis energy source, to generate electricity or heat. As of 2001, there were about one thousand landfills

  13. Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines Peter Mauermann1,* , Michael Dornseiffer6 , Frank Amkreutz6 1 Institute for Combustion Engines , RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstr. 8, D of the hydrocarbon exhaust of internal combustion engines. In contrast to other gaseous hydrocarbons, significant

  14. RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RICH METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAMES DOPED BY LIGHT UNSATURATED HYDROCARBONS PART I: ALLENE developed in our laboratory for the reactions of C3-C4 unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main reaction pathways2007 #12;3 INTRODUCTION Soots and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are present in the exhaust gas

  15. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Landfill-Leachate Plume E T H A N L . G R O S S M A N , * , L U I.3 to 11 m that were oriented parallel to the flow path. The center of the leachate plume was characterized of leachate contamination into underlying aquifers. Landfills are the U.S.'s largest anthropogenic source

  16. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01

    Municipal Solid Waste-Sewage Sludge. b 4.15 SCF CH 4 / cu ftUP I j methane 31.5 scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scfsewer 65.3 lb ( 7.9 gal) sludge ash 1.74 lb stack emissions

  17. Direct Biological Conversion of Electrical Current into Methane by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 Received December 12, 2008 to a plain carbon cathode where only small amounts of hydrogen gas could be produced. Both produced from renewable energy sources (such as wind, solar, or biomass) into a biofuel (methane) as well

  18. Working memory MARK D'ESPOSITO*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    subjects is usually six to seven digits (Lezak, 1995). In contrast, long-term memory is prop- erly defined underpinnings of memory function. The most common theoretical classification of mem- ory distinguishes short-term and long-term memory. In clinical practice, the terms short-term and long-term memory are used imprecisely

  19. Characterizing Application Memory Error Vulnerability to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    -reliability memory (HRM) Store error-tolerant data in less-reliable lower-cost memory Store error-vulnerable data an application Observation 2: Data can be recovered by software ·Heterogeneous-Reliability Memory (HRM: Data can be recovered by software ·Heterogeneous-Reliability Memory (HRM) ·Evaluation 4 #12;Server

  20. Energy Efficient Phase Change Memory Based Main Memory for Future High Performance Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Thomas M.

    time of a slow PCM based memory and significant energy reductions against a DDR3 commodity DRAM memoryEnergy Efficient Phase Change Memory Based Main Memory for Future High Performance Systems Abstract the point of view of scaling and energy consumption. PCM-only memories suffer from latency issues, high

  1. Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break Kori R the edge of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf confirms that methane is actively venting at the site. Dissolved methane concentrations, which were measured with a commercially available methane sensor (METS

  2. Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

  3. Scalable Dynamic Memory Management Module on Shared Memory Multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    memory multiprocessors. The focus is to achieve scalability; for this purpose, both garbage collector (GC is done on Sun Ultra Enterprise 10000 (symmetric multiprocessor) and Origin 2000 (distributed shared

  4. The architecture of safety: hospital design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Anjali; Rashid, Mahbub

    2007-12-01

    Purpose of review: This paper reviews recent research literature reporting the effects of hospital design on patient safety. Recent findings: Features of hospital design that are linked to patient safety in the literature include noise, air...

  5. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes that control production potential of hydrates in marine settings, Mallik was included because of the extensive data collected in a producible hydrate accumulation. To date, such a location had not been studied in the oceanic environment. The project worked closely with ongoing projects (e.g. GOM JIP and offshore India) that are actively investigating potentially economic hydrate accumulations in marine settings. The overall approach was fivefold: (1) collect key data concerning hydrocarbon fluxes which is currently missing at all locations to be included in the study, (2) use this and existing data to build numerical models that can explain gas hydrate variance at all four locations, (3) simulate how natural gas could be produced from each location with different production strategies, (4) collect new sediment property data at these locations that are required for constraining fluxes, production simulations and assessing sediment stability, and (5) develop a method for remotely quantifying heterogeneities in gas hydrate and free gas distributions. While we generally restricted our efforts to the locations where key parameters can be measured or constrained, our ultimate aim was to make our efforts universally applicable to any hydrate accumulation.

  6. SECTION 2 -HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 -PERSONAL DETAILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    SECTION 2 - HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 - PERSONAL Location UWA School SECTION 4 - UWA SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the University) SECTION 3 - HOSPITAL SUPERANNUATION A base hospital salary amount (including a supplementary clinical loading) plus

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  8. Controls on methane concentration and stable isotope (? 2H-CH4 and ? 13C-CH4) distributions in the water columns of the Black Sea and Cariaco Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, JD; Kessler, JD; Reeburgh, WS; Tyler, SC

    2006-01-01

    99. Reeburgh, W. S. (1976), Methane consumption in CariacoW. S. (1980), Anaerobic methane oxidation: Rate depthW. S. (2003), Global methane biogeochemistry, in Treatise on

  9. Insights into the Mechanism of Memory Allocation Through the Trapping and Activating of Emotional Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogerson, Thomas William Arundel

    2013-01-01

    Secondly, synaptic allocation functions to allocate memorieswhile neuronal allocation functions to allocate memories onwill be how memory allocation functions in the formation of

  10. Remote direct memory access

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  11. Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charnay, Benjamin; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clément; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward propagating linear dunes. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs), which are oriented westward at these latitudes, similar to trade winds on Earth. Different hypotheses have been proposed to address this apparent contradiction, involving Saturn's gravitational tides, large scale topography or wind statistics, but none of them can explain a global eastward dune propagation in the equatorial band. Here we analyse the impact of equinoctial tropical methane storms developing in the superrotating atmosphere (i.e. the eastward winds at high altitude) on Titan's dune orientation. Using mesoscale simulations of convective methane clouds with a GCM wind profile featuring superrotation, we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport, allowing dunes to extend eastward. This analysis therefore suggests a coupling between superrotation, tro...

  12. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  13. Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.

    1994-12-01

    One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a manure management problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations. Finally, anaerobic digestion has considerable potential beyond agribusiness. Examples of digesters currently employed by other industries are provided.

  14. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  15. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  16. New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution |of Energy New Methane Hydrate

  17. Methane Hydrate R&D | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May 28 WebinarProtectMessageFY 2010 Methane

  18. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2001-03-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the deployment of tools and measurement systems for testing on ODP Leg 201, which is intended to study hydrate deposits on the Peru margin as part of other scientific investigations. Additional accomplishments were related to the continuing evolution of tools and measurements systems in preparation for deployment on ODP Leg 204, Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon in July 2002. The design for PCS Gas Manifold was finalized and parts were procured to assemble the gas manifold and deploy this system with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool on ODP Leg 201. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane hydrates. The results of these deployments will be the subject of a future progress report. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, and two FUGRO engineers were deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at sites located offshore Peru. The HYACINTH project is a European Union (EU) funded effort to develop tools to characterize methane hydrate and measure physical properties under in-situ conditions. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The opportunity to test these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were deployed onboard the R/V JOIDES Resolution and used extensively during ODP Leg 201. Preliminary results indicate successful deployments of these tools. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was delivered to JOI/ODP for testing and use on ODP Leg 201 to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. The results of these experiments will be the subject of a future progress report. This report presents an overview of the primary methods used for deploying the ODP memory tools and PCS on ODP Leg 201 and the preliminary operational results of this leg. Discussions regarding the laboratory analysis of the recovered cores and downhole measurements made during these deployments will be covered in a future progress report.

  19. Methane ignition catalyzed by in situ generated palladium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, T.; Abid, A.D.; Poskrebyshev, G.; Wang, H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Nabity, J.; Engel, J.; Yu, J. [TDA Research, Inc., 12345 W. 52nd Ave, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 (United States); Wickham, D. [Reaction Systems, LLC, 19039 E. Plaza Drive, Suite 290, Parker, CO 80134 (United States); Van Devener, B.; Anderson, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Williams, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Mail Stop RZA, 1950 Fifth Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Catalytic ignition of methane over the surfaces of freely-suspended and in situ generated palladium nanoparticles was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were conducted in a laminar flow reactor. The palladium precursor was a compound (Pd(THD){sub 2}, THD: 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) dissolved in toluene and injected into the flow reactor as a fine aerosol, along with a methane-oxygen-nitrogen mixture. For experimental conditions chosen in this study, non-catalytic, homogeneous ignition was observed at a furnace temperature of {proportional_to}1123 K, whereas ignition of the same mixture with the precursor was found to be {proportional_to}973 K. In situ production of Pd/PdO nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning mobility, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of particles collected at the reactor exit. The catalyst particle size distribution was log-normal. Depending on the precursor loading, the median diameter ranged from 10 to 30 nm. The mechanism behind catalytic ignition was examined using a combined gas-phase and gas-surface reaction model. Simulation results match the experiments closely and suggest that palladium nanocatalyst significantly shortens the ignition delay times of methane-air mixtures over a wide range of conditions. (author)

  20. Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

  1. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  2. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  3. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl; Dugan, Brandon; Schultheiss, Peter

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  4. Memory cost of quantum protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Bisio; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti; Michal Sedlak

    2011-12-16

    In this paper we consider the problem of minimizing the ancillary systems required to realize an arbitrary strategy of a quantum protocol, with the assistance of classical memory. For this purpose we introduce the notion of memory cost of a strategy, which measures the resources required in terms of ancillary dimension. We provide a condition for the cost to be equal to a given value, and we use this result to evaluate the cost in some special cases. As an example we show that any covariant protocol for the cloning of a unitary transformation requires at most one ancillary qubit. We also prove that the memory cost has to be determined globally, and cannot be calculated by optimizing the resources independently at each step of the strategy.

  5. Hipikat: A Project Memory for Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    Hipikat: A Project Memory for Software Development Davor CCubranicc, Gail C. Murphy, Member, IEEE's usefulness in software modification tasks. One study evaluated the usefulness of Hipikat's recommendations Terms--Software development teams, project memory, software artifacts, recommender system, user studies

  6. Hardware support for unbounded transactional memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie, Sean, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, I propose a design for hardware transactional memory where the transaction size is not bounded by a specialized hardware buffer such as a cache. I describe an unbounded transactional memory system called ...

  7. E cient Use of Memory-Mapped Network Interfaces for Shared Memory Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Michael L.

    E cient Use of Memory-Mapped Network Interfaces for Shared Memory Computing Nikolaos Hardavellas@cs.rochester.edu Abstract Memory-mapped network interfaces provide users with fast and cheap access to remote memory access capabilities of these networks suggest the need to re-evaluate the assumptions underlying

  8. Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! & ! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION& & & Brain&oscillations&mediate&successful&suppression&of&unwanted&memories& Gerd&T.&Waldhauser1,&Karl1Heinz.de& Phone:&+49(0)753118815707& Fax:&+49(0)753118814829& #12;Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&2

  9. Production and Ebullition of Methane in a Shallow Eutrophic Lake (Lake Elsinore, CA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Denise Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Methane release through resuspension of littoral sediment.its susceptibility to resuspension as well as its particleet al. , 2011). Sediment resuspension brought about through

  10. Future methane, hydroxyl, and their uncertainties: key climate and emission parameters for future predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, C. D; Prather, M. J; Sovde, O. A; Myhre, G.

    2013-01-01

    changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane life-of Global Atmospheric Hydroxyl, Science, 331, 67–69, doi:variability of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals over the past

  11. Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    subsurface life in deep-sea sediments. Science , 295 , 2067-consumption in anoxic marine sediments. Geology , 4 , 297-oxidation in methane-rich sediments overlying the Blake

  12. Memory with memory: Soft assignment in Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poli, Riccardo

    that an instruction of the form x:=y or LOAD R2 R1 completely overwrites the previous value of a memory location or register. That earlier value is lost forever, and has no impact on the future be- havior of the system traditional GP). Instead of having the new value completely overwrite the old value of the register

  13. Memory with Memory: Soft Assignment in Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    that an instruction of the form x:=y or LOAD R2 R1 completely overwrites the previous value of a memory location or register. That earlier value is lost forever, and has no impact on the future be- havior of the system traditional GP). Instead of having the new value completely overwrite the old value of the register

  14. Memory Optimization for Phase-field Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Gaston; John Peterson; Andrew Slaughter; Cody Permann; David Andrs

    2014-08-01

    Phase-field simulations are computationally and memory intensive applications. Many of the phase-field simulations being conducted in support of NEAMS were not capable of running on “normal clusters” with 2-4GB of RAM per core, and instead required specialized “big-memory” clusters with 64GB per core. To address this issue, the MOOSE team developed a new Python-based utility called MemoryLogger, and applied it to locate, diagnose, and eradicate memory bottlenecks within the MOOSE framework. MemoryLogger allows for a better understanding of the memory usage of an application being run in parallel across a cluster. Memory usage information is captured for every individual process in a parallel job, and communicated to the head node of the cluster. Console text output from the application itself is automatically matched with this memory usage information to produce a detailed picture of memory usage over time, making it straightforward to identify the subroutines which contribute most to the application’s peak memory usage. The information produced by the MemoryLogger quickly and effectively narrows the search for memory optimizations to the most data-intensive parts of the simulation.

  15. DESIGNING EFFICIENT MEMORY FOR FUTURE COMPUTING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    , limited pin counts, increasing heterogeneity and complexity, and the diminished importance of cost main memory system with the following innovative features: (i) overfetch-aware re-organized chips, (ii) low-cost silicon photonic memory channels, (iii) largely autonomous memory modules with a packet

  16. Configurable memory system and method for providing atomic counting operations in a memory device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellofatto, Ralph E. (Ridgefield, CT); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2010-09-14

    A memory system and method for providing atomic memory-based counter operations to operating systems and applications that make most efficient use of counter-backing memory and virtual and physical address space, while simplifying operating system memory management, and enabling the counter-backing memory to be used for purposes other than counter-backing storage when desired. The encoding and address decoding enabled by the invention provides all this functionality through a combination of software and hardware.

  17. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  18. SECTION 2 -HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 -PERSONAL DETAILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    SECTION 2 - HOSPITAL SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the hospital) SECTION 1 - PERSONAL with this document. Funding % Base Salary UWA % HOSPITAL % $ Private Practice Allowance $ Head of Department Allowance $ Superannuation $ SECTION 3 - UWA SALARY (salary paid to the employee by the University) Funding

  19. Microbial diversity and dynamics during methane production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bareither, Christopher A.; Wolfe, Georgia L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Benson, Craig H.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ? Similar bacterial communities developed following different start-up operation. ? Total methanogens in leachate during the decelerated methane phase reflected overall methane yield. ? Created correlations between methanogens, methane yield, and available substrate. ? Predominant bacteria identified with syntrophic polysaccharide degraders. ? Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant in the methane generation process. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to characterize development of bacterial and archaeal populations during biodegradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) and to link specific methanogens to methane generation. Experiments were conducted in three 0.61-m-diameter by 0.90-m-tall laboratory reactors to simulate MSW bioreactor landfills. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to characterize microbial communities in both leachate and solid waste. Microbial assemblages in effluent leachate were similar between reactors during peak methane generation. Specific groups within the Bacteroidetes and Thermatogae phyla were present in all samples and were particularly abundant during peak methane generation. Microbial communities were not similar in leachate and solid fractions assayed at the end of reactor operation; solid waste contained a more abundant bacterial community of cellulose-degrading organisms (e.g., Firmicutes). Specific methanogen populations were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, and Methanobacteriales were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, with Methanomicrobiales consistently the most abundant. Methanogen growth phases coincided with accelerated methane production, and cumulative methane yield increased with increasing total methanogen abundance. The difference in methanogen populations and corresponding methane yield is attributed to different initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents of the MSW. Higher initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents supported growth of larger methanogen populations that resulted in higher methane yield.

  20. Mitigation options for methane emissions from rice fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantin, R.S.; Buendia, L.V.; Wassmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The contribution of Philippine rice production to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies conducted in the country are presented in this paper. A significant impact in the reduction of GHG emissions from agriculture can be achieved if methane emissions from ricefields can be abated. This study presents the contribution of Philippine rice cultivation to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies in the country which address the issue of mitigation. Using the derived emission factors from local measurements, rice cultivation contributes 566.6 Gg of methane emission in the Philippines. This value is 62% of the total methane emitted from the agriculture sector. The emission factors employed which are 78% of the IPCC value for irrigated rice and 95% for rainfed rice were derived from measurements with an automatic system taken during the growth duration in the respective ecosystems. Plots drained for 2 weeks at midtillering and before harvest gave a significant reduction in methane emission as opposed to continuously flooded plots and plots drained before harvest. The cultivar Magat reduced methane emission by 50% as compared to the check variety IR72. The application of ammonium sulfate instead of urea reduced methane emission by 10% to 34%. Addition of 6 t ha{sup {minus}1} phosphogypsum in combination with urea reduced emission by 74% as opposed to plots applied with urea alone. It is also from the results of such measurements that abatement strategies are based as regards to modifying treatments such as water management, fertilization, and choice of rice variety. It is not easy to identify and recommend mitigation strategies that will fit a particular cropping system. However, the identified mitigation options provide focus for the abatement of methane emission from ricefields.

  1. Comparison of near-threshold reactivity of ground-state and spin-orbit excited chlorine atoms with methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    with methane Zee Hwan Kim, Andrew J. Alexander,a) Hans A. Bechtel, and Richard N. Zareb) Department of methane with atomic chlorine is initiated by photolysis of BrCl. Near 420 nm, the resulting mixture

  2. Oxidation Reactions Performed by Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Hydroxylase Intermediates H[subscript peroxo] and Q Proceed by Distinct Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinberg, Christine E.

    Soluble methane monooxygenase is a bacterial enzyme that converts methane to methanol at a carboxylate-bridged diiron center with exquisite control. Because the oxidizing power required for this transformation is demanding, ...

  3. Elec 331 -Hospital Safety Power Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    - Hospital Safety 7 Ground Fault Interrupter Test Reset Gnd Ref Hot Ref Hot Test / Reset Relay Relay : 5 to 30 mA, Test Plug Z Downstream GFI Protection #12;Elec 331 - Hospital Safety 8 = get-out-of-jail-free card · Test it before you touch it ­ Done to code? ­ Breaker labels accurate

  4. Potential Cost-Effective Opportunities for Methane Emission Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Hodson, Elke; Heath, Garvin

    2015-08-01

    The energy sector was responsible for approximately 84% of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the U.S. in 2012 (EPA 2014a). Methane is the second most important GHG, contributing 9% of total U.S. CO2e emissions. A large portion of those methane emissions result from energy production and use; the natural gas, coal, and oil industries produce approximately 39% of anthropogenic methane emissions in the U.S. As a result, fossil-fuel systems have been consistently identified as high priority sectors to contribute to U.S. GHG reduction goals (White House 2015). Only two studies have recently attempted to quantify the abatement potential and cost associated with the breadth of opportunities to reduce GHG emissions within natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains in the United States, namely the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (2013a) and ICF (2014). EPA, in its 2013 analysis, estimated the marginal cost of abatement for non-CO2 GHG emissions from the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains for multiple regions globally, including the United States. Building on this work, ICF International (ICF) (2014) provided an update and re-analysis of the potential opportunities in U.S. natural gas and oil systems. In this report we synthesize these previously published estimates as well as incorporate additional data provided by ICF to provide a comprehensive national analysis of methane abatement opportunities and their associated costs across the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains. Results are presented as a suite of marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs), which depict the total potential and cost of reducing emissions through different abatement measures. We report results by sector (natural gas, oil, and coal) and by supply chain segment - production, gathering and boosting, processing, transmission and storage, or distribution - to facilitate identification of which sectors and supply chain segments provide the greatest opportunities for low cost abatement.

  5. Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developed by EMDPower IncMethane Recovery

  6. California--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 ArizonaResidential(MillionFeet) Coalbed Methane

  7. METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy This Revision 3 ofMARVIN 1EARLY RE: RE:4METHANE

  8. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof EnergyPresentation:DaisStatesEMCHIEFMeltingMethaneJune

  9. Chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame perturbed with the addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Alessandro

    Chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame perturbed with the addition of either, P.O. Box 208286, New Haven, CT 06520-8286, USA Abstract The chemical structure of a methane is consistent with the anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes

  10. Diffusion of methane and other alkanes in metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borah, B; Zhang, HD; Snurr, RQ

    2015-03-03

    Diffusion of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane was studied within the micropores of several metal organic frameworks (MOFs) of varying topologies, including the MOFs PCN-14, NU-125, NU-1100 and DUT-49. Diffusion coefficients of the pure components, as well as methane/ethane, methane/ propane and methane/butane binary mixtures, were calculated using molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of the longer alkanes on uptake of natural gas in MOB. The calculated self diffusion coefficients of all four components are on the order of 10(-8) m(2)/s. The diffusion coefficients of the pure components decrease as a function of chain length in all of the MOFs studied and show different behaviour as a function of loading in different MOB. The self-diffusivities follow the trend DPCN-14 < DNU-125 approximate to DNU-1100 < DDUT-49, which is exactly the reverse order of the densities of the MOFs: PCN-14 > NU-125 approximate to NU-1100 > DUT-49. By comparing the diffusion of pure methane and methane mixtures vvith the higher alkancs, it is observed that the diffusivity of methane is unaffected by the presence of the higher alkanes in the MOFs considered, indicating that the diffusion path of methane is not blocked by the higher alkanes present in natural gas. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard methane (CH4 )annually to the world's total CH4 emission of ~550 Tg/yr. Recycling and thermal treatment destined for landfills and to mitigating CH4 emission. Waste generation is estimated to more than double

  12. MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

  13. Electron solvation in methane and ethane Zhihua Liu and Bruce J. Berne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    Electron solvation in methane and ethane Zhihua Liu and Bruce J. Berne Department of Chemistry; accepted 27 August 1993) The solvation of excess electrons in fluid methane and ethane is studied by path that the electron is in an extended state throughout the whole fluid density range studied. In ethane, it is found

  14. Energy of the excess electron in methane and ethane near the critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the excess electron in methane and ethane near the critical point Xianbo Shi a,b , Luxi in ethane are presented as a function of perturber number density at various noncritical temperatures to the simple alka- nes methane and ethane. The quasi-free electron energy V0(P) [9­15] and the electron

  15. A LEAN METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAME DOPED WITH COMPONENTS OF DIESEL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A LEAN METHANE PREMIXED LAMINAR FLAME DOPED WITH COMPONENTS OF DIESEL FUEL PART I: N-BUTYLBENZENE E better understand the chemistry involved during the combustion of components of diesel fuel flow rate analyses. Keywords: Premixed laminar flame, methane, n-butylbenzene, modelling, diesel fuel

  16. Substrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    Substrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics with mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, the hydroxylation of methane. With the current results, recent kinetic data for CH3X (X ) H, CH3, OH, CN, NO2) substrate hydroxylation in MMOH

  17. DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Methane Production and Emissions from Four Reclaimed and Pristine Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Methane Production and Emissions from Four Reclaimed and Pristine% of the plant-mediated emissions. Potential CRi production rates were measured as a function of depth using soil samples obtained at 2-cm increments. Methane production rates were the same order of magni- tude at all

  18. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surfaceControls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate

  19. Molecular Properties of the "Ideal" Inhaled Anesthetic: Studies of Fluorinated Methanes, Ethanes, Propanes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlicky, Tomas

    , Propanes, and Butanes E. 1Eger, 11, MD*, J. Liu, MD*, D. D. Koblin, PhD, MDt, M. J. Laster, DVM*, S. Taheri unfluorinated, partially fluorinated, and perfluorinated methanes, ethanes, propanes, and butanes to define fluorinated methanes, ethanes, propanes, and butanes, also obtaining limited data on longer- chained alkanes

  20. September 1998 ! NREL/SR-580-25145 Methane Recovery from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    September 1998 ! NREL/SR-580-25145 Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities10093 #12;NREL/SR-580-25145 Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities Casebook P. Lusk Resource Development Associates Washington, DC NREL technical monitor: A.E. Wiselogel National

  1. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities Robert DSTP/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays

  2. Methane Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Current Records, Surprise Findings, and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the transition has been a spectacular recent drop in the price of natural gas1 due to deployment of inexpensive not a renewable fuel, natural gas (NG), comprising chiefly methane, has moved to the forefront as a potential is to store methane at very high pressures (250 bar) as is done currently by most natural gas powered vehicles

  3. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    natural gas extraction can lead to signi?cant emissions of methane (CH 4 ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and nitrogen

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Memorial Hospital - NY 0-16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40LomaHoodMaybellMeili

  5. Shape memory alloy/shape memory polymer tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seward, Kirk P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2005-03-29

    Micro-electromechanical tools for minimally invasive techniques including microsurgery. These tools utilize composite shape memory alloy (SMA), shape memory polymer (SMP) and combinations of SMA and SMP to produce catheter distal tips, actuators, etc., which are bistable. Applications for these structures include: 1) a method for reversible fine positioning of a catheter tip, 2) a method for reversible fine positioning of tools or therapeutic catheters by a guide catheter, 3) a method for bending articulation through the body's vasculature, 4) methods for controlled stent delivery, deployment, and repositioning, and 5) catheters with variable modulus, with vibration mode, with inchworm capability, and with articulated tips. These actuators and catheter tips are bistable and are opportune for in vivo usage because the materials are biocompatible and convenient for intravascular use as well as other minimal by invasive techniques.

  6. On-chip methane sensing by near-IR absorption signatures in a photonic crystal slot waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    On-chip methane sensing by near-IR absorption signatures in a photonic crystal slot waveguide Wei­Lambert law for the detection of methane gas. The device combines slow light in a PC waveguide with high absorption path length. A methane concentration of 100 ppm (parts per million) in nitrogen was measured

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of the gas phase reaction of ethynyl radical with methane HCBC CH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    Experimental and theoretical study of the gas phase reaction of ethynyl radical with methane HCBC September 2000 Abstract Absolute rate coecients of the reaction of ethynyl radical with methane were importance. In this work, we set out to investigate the reactivity of ethynyl radicals to- wards methane

  8. Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link with Antarctic temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link; published 24 June 2004. [1] Atmospheric methane (CH4) recorded in Antarctic ice cores represents the closest and Atmospheric Dynamics: Ocean/atmosphere interactions (0312, 4504); KEYWORDS: climate, atmospheric methane, ice

  9. METHANE IMAGING SURVEY FOR PLANETARY MASS OBJECTS IN RHO OPHIUCHI Karl Haisch Jr.1; Mary Barsony2; Chris Tinney3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsony, Mary

    METHANE IMAGING SURVEY FOR PLANETARY MASS OBJECTS IN RHO OPHIUCHI Karl Haisch Jr.1; Mary Barsony2 important is dynamical evolution for cluster mass functions?". In recent years, methane imaging has emerged conducted a methane imaging survey of the Rho Ophiuchi cloud for T dwarfs using the IRIS2 near

  10. Full Text HTML Methane can be a problem or a solution, depending on one's viewpoint or circumstance. For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Full Text HTML Methane can be a problem or a solution, depending on one's viewpoint the researchers want to make hydrogen gas in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), because making methane reduces hydrogen yield. The researchers have been studying the formation of methane in MECs in an effort to avoid

  11. Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies during 19802000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduced methane emissions from large-scale changes in water management of China's rice paddies; accepted 1 July 2002; published 24 October 2002. [1] Decreased methane emissions from paddy rice may have contributed to the decline in the rate of increase of global atmospheric methane (CH4) concentration over

  12. Impact of methane seeps on the local carbon-isotope record: a case study from a Late Jurassic hemipelagic section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Impact of methane seeps on the local carbon-isotope record: a case study from a Late Jurassic dis- sociation of methane hydrates, used to explain e.g. the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM excursions also occur in modern methane-bearing sedimentary succes- sions. These are caused when anae- robic

  13. TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Ehud

    TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation H demonstra- tion that methane can be catalytically activated by an organometallic complex of Pt(II).2 report that although 1 has a very high energy barrier for the liberation of methane, it readily forms

  14. Determination of the Equilibrium Composition of the Product Mixture in the Reaction of Oxidizing Ammonolysis of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammonolysis of Methane By Nikolai V. Trusov, Oleg V. Prezhdo, Grigorii I. Gryn, and Victor V. Prezhdo ammonolysis of methane (OAM). It is shown that the composition crucially depends on the number formation by the oxidizing ammonolysis of methane (OAM) severely impedes investigation of the corresponding

  15. Methane in the southern North Sea: Sources, spatial distribution and budgets Maik Grunwald a,*, Olaf Dellwig a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Methane in the southern North Sea: Sources, spatial distribution and budgets Maik Grunwald a December 2008 Keywords: methane North Sea Wadden Sea Weser pore water budget calculation a b s t r a c t Measurements of methane (CH4) so far have always shown supersaturation in the entire North Sea relative

  16. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and Structure: Biosphere/atmosphere interactions; 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: Ecosys, methane emissions, wetlands, modeling Citation: Grant, R. F., and N. T. Roulet, Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory

  17. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case, and approved February 13, 2015 (received for review September 8, 2014) Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes

  18. DFT Virtual Screening Identifies Rhodium-Amidinate Complexes As Potential Homogeneous Catalysts for Methane-to-Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for Methane-to-Methanol Oxidation Ross Fu, Robert J. Nielsen,* and William A. Goddard, III* Materials methane using trifluoroacetic acid (TFAH) or water as a solvent. In particular, we designed the (NNF transition state barrier (G = 27.6 kcal/mol) for methane activation in TFAH from a pool of four different

  19. Methane Bioattenuation and Implications for Explosion Risk Reduction along the Groundwater to Soil Surface Pathway above a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Methane Bioattenuation and Implications for Explosion Risk Reduction along the Groundwater to Soil aquifers, which could pose an explosion risk if methane migrates into enclosed spaces where ignitable table. Despite methane concentrations within the ethanol plume reaching saturated levels (20-23 mg

  20. Formation of methane on Mars by fluid-rock interaction in the crust James R. Lyons,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Formation of methane on Mars by fluid-rock interaction in the crust James R. Lyons,1 Craig Manning by magmatic degassing from a dike with only 50 ppm C. Atmospheric methane strongly suggests ongoing magmatism and hydrothermal alteration on Mars. Citation: Lyons, J. R., C. Manning, and F. Nimmo (2005), Formation of methane

  1. Hydroxylation of Methane by Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes: Molecular Orbital Analysis of C-H Bond Activation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    Hydroxylation of Methane by Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes: Molecular Orbital Analysis of C-H Bond, 2002 Abstract: The electronic structures of key species involved in methane hydroxylation performed that govern the details of the hydroxylation. Introduction The selective catalytic hydroxylation of methane

  2. Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 19862005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    gradients, and due to variations in methane production and oxidation due to complex freezing and thawing] Methane (CH4), a greenhouse gas, has a much larger radiative forcing potential than CO2, andModeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986­2005, by coupling a large

  3. Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang

    2006-10-07

    A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

  4. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heat exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6˘/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.

  5. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heatmore »exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6˘/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.« less

  6. Phase Equilibria Studies in Water-Methane System: Structural Memory-Effect of Water On Hydrate Re-Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Brice Yoonshik

    2014-12-08

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Ibrahim Yucel Akkutlu Committee Members, Maria Antonieta Barrufet Marcelo-Javier Sanchez Head of Department, Alfred Daniel Hill December 2014 Major Subject: Petroleum...

  7. INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

    2005-08-01

    An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

  8. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  9. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Resource Guide for Hospital Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power (CHP) Resource Guide for Hospital Applications, 2007 Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Resource Guide for Hospital Applications, 2007 The objective of this 2007 guidebook is to...

  10. Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

  11. Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 1 Memory technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Galen H.

    1 Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 1 Memory · Memory technologies · Memory hierarchy of Hawaii 2 Memory Technologies · Read Only Memory (ROM) · Static RAM (SRAM) ­ Basic cell: clocked D latch) ­ Basic cell ­ Faster DRAM, e.g. synchronous DRAM #12;2 Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 3 ROM

  12. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khabat Heshami; Duncan G. England; Peter C. Humphreys; Philip J. Bustard; Victor M. Acosta; Joshua Nunn; Benjamin J. Sussman

    2015-11-12

    Quantum light-matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons are a prominent consequence of superb control over interactions between light and matter, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval into photonic excitations. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This has motivated several groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications and more advanced developments of quantum memories have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation, and nonlinear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  13. Raman Quantum Memory of Photonic Polarised Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong-Sheng Ding; Wei Zhang; Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-11-06

    Quantum entanglement of particles is regarded as a fundamental character in quantum information, in which quantum state should be given for whole system instead of independently describing single particle. Constructing quantum memory of photonic entanglement is essential for realizing quantum networks, which had been performed previously by many memory protocols. Of which Raman quantum memory gives advantages in broadband and high-speed properties, resulting in huge potential in quantum network and quantum computation. However, Raman quantum memory of photonic polarised entanglement is a challenge work and still missing. Here, we report two Raman quantum memories based on gas atomic ensembles: 1. Heralded Raman quantum memory of hybrid entanglement of path and polarization of single photon. 2. Raman storage of two-particle photonic polarised entangled state. Our experimental performances of these two different Raman quantum storages of photonic entanglement show a very promising prospective in quantum information science.

  14. Channel-specific angular distributions of HCl and CH3 products from the reaction of atomic chlorine with stretch-excited methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    with stretch-excited methane Zee Hwan Kim, Hans A. Bechtel, and Richard N. Zarea) Department of Chemistry containing methane and molecular chlorine is expanded into a vacuum where the methane is excited with two to involve the nonadiabatic interaction involving the low frequency bending mode in methane that correlates

  15. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

  16. Absorption Coefficients of the Methane-Nitrogen Binary Ice System: Implications for Pluto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protopapa, S; Tegler, S C; Bergonio, J M

    2015-01-01

    The methane-nitrogen phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983) indicates that at temperatures relevant to the surfaces of icy dwarf planets like Pluto, two phases contribute to the methane absorptions: nitrogen saturated with methane $\\bf{\\bar{N_{2}}}$:CH$_{4}$ and methane saturated with nitrogen $\\bf{\\bar{CH_{4}}}$:N$_{2}$. No optical constants are available so far for the latter component limiting construction of a proper model, in compliance with thermodynamic equilibrium considerations. New optical constants for solid solutions of methane diluted in nitrogen (N$_{2}$:CH$_{4}$) and nitrogen diluted in methane (CH$_{4}$:N$_{2}$) are presented at temperatures between 40 and 90 K, in the wavelength range 1.1-2.7 $\\mu$m at different mixing ratios. These optical constants are derived from transmission measurements of crystals grown from the liquid phase in closed cells. A systematic study of the changes of methane and nitrogen solid mixtures spectral behavior with mixing ratio and temperature is prese...

  17. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  18. Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication, DOE impending...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Communication, DOE impending determination of coverage for commercial and industrial fans, blowers, and fume hoods. Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication, DOE impending...

  19. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  20. Exploiting Data Similarity to Reduce Memory Footprints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; Franklin, D; Sherwood, T; Chong, F T

    2011-01-28

    Memory size has long limited large-scale applications on high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Since compute nodes frequently do not have swap space, physical memory often limits problem sizes. Increasing core counts per chip and power density constraints, which limit the number of DIMMs per node, have exacerbated this problem. Further, DRAM constitutes a significant portion of overall HPC system cost. Therefore, instead of adding more DRAM to the nodes, mechanisms to manage memory usage more efficiently - preferably transparently - could increase effective DRAM capacity and thus the benefit of multicore nodes for HPC systems. MPI application processes often exhibit significant data similarity. These data regions occupy multiple physical locations across the individual rank processes within a multicore node and thus offer a potential savings in memory capacity. These regions, primarily residing in heap, are dynamic, which makes them difficult to manage statically. Our novel memory allocation library, SBLLmalloc, automatically identifies identical memory blocks and merges them into a single copy. SBLLmalloc does not require application or OS changes since we implement it as a user-level library. Overall, we demonstrate that SBLLmalloc reduces the memory footprint of a range of MPI applications by 32.03% on average and up to 60.87%. Further, SBLLmalloc supports problem sizes for IRS over 21.36% larger than using standard memory management techniques, thus significantly increasing effective system size. Similarly, SBLLmalloc requires 43.75% fewer nodes than standard memory management techniques to solve an AMG problem.

  1. Identification of the source of methane at a hazardous waste treatment facility using isotopic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackley, K.C.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Peabody, IL (United States)); Trainor, D.P. (Dames and Moore, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Isotopic analyses have been used to determine the source of methane in subsurface sediments at a hazardous waste treatment facility in the Lake Calumet area of Chicago, Illinois. The study area is surrounded by landfills and other waste management operations and has a long history of waste disposal. The facility property consists of land constructed of approximately 15 feet of fill placed over lake sediments. The fill is underlain by successively older lacustrine and glacial till deposits to a maximum depth of approximately 80 feet. During a subsurface investigation of the site performed for a RCRA Facility Investigation of former solid waste management units (SWMUs) in the fill, significant quantities of methane were encountered in the natural deposits. Gas samples were collected from the headspace of 11 piezometers screened at depths of approximately 30, 40, and 50 feet beneath the surface. Methane concentrations up to 75% by volume were observed in some of the piezometers. Stable isotope analyses were completed on methane and associated CO[sub 2] separated from the gas samples. Radiocarbon (C-14) analyses were also completed on several of the samples. The delta C-13 results for the intermediate and deep zones are indicative of methane produced by microbial reduction of CO[sub 2]. The methane occurring in the shallow zone appears to be a mixture of methane from the intermediate zone and methane produced by microbial fermentation of naturally (nonanthropogenic) buried organic matter within the shallow lacustrine sediments. According to the isotopic and chemical results, the methane does not appear to be related to gas generation from nearby landfills or from organic wastes previously placed in the former facility SWMUs.

  2. Shape memory response of ni2mnga and nimncoin magnetic shape memory alloys under compression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Andrew Lee

    2009-05-15

    In this study, the shape memory response of Ni2MnGa and NiMnCoIn magnetic shape memory alloys was observed under compressive stresses. Ni2MnGa is a magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) that has been shown to exhibit fully ...

  3. Watchdog: Hardware for Safe and Secure Manual Memory Management and Full Memory Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Watchdog: Hardware for Safe and Secure Manual Memory Management and Full Memory Safety Santosh) to become the root cause of exploitable security vulnerabilities. This paper proposes Watchdog, a hardware full hardware-enforced memory safety at low overheads. 1. Introduction Languages such as C and C

  4. Challenges and Opportunities in Academic Hospital Medicine: Report from the Academic Hospital Medicine Summit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanders, Scott A.; Centor, Bob; Weber, Valerie; McGinn, Thomas; DeSalvo, Karen; Auerbach, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Association of Professors of Medicine Brad Sharpe, M.D. ,Staff, Society of Hospital Medicine Amy Woodward, Supportof General Internal Medicine. Disclosures: Dr. Auerbach is a

  5. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Lin, Haiqing (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Scott (Brecksville, OH); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA)

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  6. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH?)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH? emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH?-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH? uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH? sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore »cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH? feedback.« less

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 polarizable force fields. Properties examined include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall slightly better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Several properties calculated using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models differ appreciable from the corresponding results obtained previously using the polarizable TIP4P-FQ model. This appears to be due to the inadequacy of the treatment of polarization, especially, the restriction of polarization to in-plane only, in the TIP4P-FQ model.

  8. Coal companies hope to receive carbon credits for methane reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-09-30

    Each year, underground coal mining in the USA liberates 2.4 million tonnes of coal mine methane (CMM), of which less than 30% is recovered and used. One barrier to CMM recovery is cost. Drainage, collection, and utilization systems are complex and expensive to install. Two coal mines have improved the cost equation, however, by signing on to earn money for CMM emissions they are keeping out of the atmosphere. Jim Walter Resources and PinnOak Resources have joined a voluntary greenhouse gas reduction trading program called the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) to turn their avoided emissions into carbon credits. The example they set may encourage other coal mining companies to follow suit, and may bring new projects on the line that would otherwise have not gone forward. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

  10. Modeling Methane Adsorption in Interpenetrating Porous Polymer Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, RL; Shahrak, MN; Swisher, JA; Simon, CM; Sculley, JP; Zhou, HC; Smit, B; Haranczyk, M

    2013-10-03

    Porous polymer networks (PPNs) are a class of porous materials of particular interest in a variety of energy-related applications because of their stability, high surface areas, and gas uptake capacities. Computationally derived structures for five recently synthesized PPN frameworks, PPN-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6, were generated for various topologies, optimized using semiempirical electronic structure methods, and evaluated using classical grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. We show that a key factor in modeling the methane uptake performance of these materials is whether, and how, these material frameworks interpenetrate and demonstrate a computational approach for predicting the presence, degree, and nature of interpenetration in PPNs that enables the reproduction of experimental adsorption data.

  11. METHANE GAS STABILIZES SUPERCOOLED ETHANE DROPLETS IN TITAN'S CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chia C.; Lang, E. Kathrin; Signorell, Ruth

    2010-03-20

    Strong evidence for ethane clouds in various regions of Titan's atmosphere has recently been found. Ethane is usually assumed to exist as ice particles in these clouds, although the possible role of liquid and supercooled liquid ethane droplets has been recognized. Here, we report on infrared spectroscopic measurements of ethane aerosols performed in the laboratory under conditions mimicking Titan's lower atmosphere. The results clearly show that liquid ethane droplets are significantly stabilized by methane gas which is ubiquitous in Titan's nitrogen atmosphere-a phenomenon that does not have a counterpart for water droplets in Earth's atmosphere. Our data imply that supercooled ethane droplets are much more abundant in Titan's clouds than previously anticipated. Possibly, these liquid droplets are even more important for cloud processes and the formation of lakes than ethane ice particles.

  12. Integration of Non-volatile Memory into Storage Hierarchy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Sheng

    2013-12-04

    In this dissertation, we present novel approaches for integrating non-volatile memory devices into storage hierarchy of a computer system. There are several types of non- volatile memory devices, such as flash memory, Phase ...

  13. Grain constraint and size effects in shape memory alloy microwires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on ...

  14. Saving Energy This Memorial Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saving Energy This Memorial Day Saving Energy This Memorial Day May 19, 2014 - 4:07pm Addthis Be energy efficient while you spend time outside this Memorial Day. | Photo courtesy...

  15. Design Space and Performance Analysis of the Hybrid Memory Cube The Hybrid Memory Cube is an emerging main memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Bruce

    be operated at higher throughput and lower energy per bit compared to traditional DDRx memory. This technology's performance, we compare the execution of HMC, Buffer-on-Board, and quad channel DDR3-1600 main memory systems full-system execution time over an extremely aggressive quad channel DDR3-1600 system by a factor

  16. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-09

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  17. Extra-Large Memory Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan-5 BeamlineGE, Ford,Extra-Large Memory

  18. Memory-2014-salishan.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELINGMeetingsMembranesMemorial Day

  19. LOW-POWER METHODOLOGY FOR FAULT TOLERANT NANOSCALE MEMORY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seokjoong

    2012-01-01

    Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low-Methodologies for Low-Power Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . .Scaling for SEU-Tolerance in Low-Power Memories 7.1 Soft-

  20. Y-12 historian assists in Lincoln Memorial University display...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    assists in Lincoln Memorial University display design NNSA Blog Y-12 historian Ray Smith, left, joins Lincoln Memorial University board of trustees chairman Pete DeBusk in...

  1. NS201: Learning and Memory (8 Lectures)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthy, Aditya

    and Argument Is it unique to humans ? #12;Birth of animal models and search for memory Karl Lashley Trained are not the same #12;The Standard Model and Memory Systems Squire and Zola (PNAS) #12;Priming What are the two Spontaneous Recovery: CR regains with mild presentation of US Renewal : (TBD under contextual conditioni

  2. Mechanisms underlying working memory for novel information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselmo, Michael

    Mechanisms underlying working memory for novel information Michael E. Hasselmo and Chantal E. Stern Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215, USA In this Opinion article we describe a theory that the brain mechanisms modeling indicates that mechanisms for maintaining novel information in working memory could differ from

  3. Designing asymmetric neural networks with associative memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hong [Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2004-12-01

    A strategy for designing asymmetric neural networks of associative memory with controllable degree of symmetry and controllable basins of attraction is presented. It is shown that the performance of the networks depends on the degree of the symmetry, and by adjusting the degree of the symmetry the spurious memories or unwanted attractors can be suppressed completely.

  4. MEMORY HIERARCHY DESIGN FOR STREAM A DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dally, William J.

    . Prior research has shown that stream processors provide an energy-efficient, programmable approachMEMORY HIERARCHY DESIGN FOR STREAM COMPUTING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT of memory and bandwidth hierarchy utilization in stream processors. We first evaluate the appropriate

  5. Android Malware Analysis Based On Memory Forensics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levente, Buttyán

    Android Malware Analysis Based On Memory Forensics Andr´as Gazdag and Levente Butty´an Laboratory for the Android platform using a memory forensics approach. We explore the required modification of the Android gathered from the analysis steps we present a methodology of behaviour analysis of android applications

  6. Energy Splitting Theorems for Materials with Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Favata; Paolo Podio-Guidugli; Giuseppe Tomassetti

    2009-07-30

    We extend to materials with fading memory and materials with internal variables a result previously established by one of us for materials with instantaneous memory: the additive decomposability of the total energy into an internal and a kinetic part, and a representation of the latter and the inertial forces in terms of one and the same mass tensor.

  7. Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-25

    A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

  8. Memorial University of Newfoundland Indirect Costs Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Memorial University of Newfoundland Indirect Costs Report 2012-13 The grant provided through the Government of Canada Indirect Costs Program (ICP) is essential to Memorial's research success. Funding and impact can be found in the following section. Total 2013 Indirect Costs Grant: $4,318,814 Management

  9. Discovery of New Materials to Capture Methane | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Methane, a common gas emitted from natural gas systems, landfills, coal mining, waste water treatment and hydrates in the ocean, is both a great energy source and a greenhouse...

  10. Sorption of Methane and Ethane on Belgian Black Shale Using a Manometric Setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Sorption of Methane and Ethane on Belgian Black Shale Using a Manometric Setup Naeeme Danesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Fundamentals 3 2.1 Shales.1.2 Shale characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.3 Shale gas

  11. Determining the Fate of Methane Released from the Seafloor in Deep and Shallow Water Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Mengran

    2014-08-12

    Marine gas seeps and accidental marine oil spills are sources of methane (CH_(4)) to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. For example, the ultimate...

  12. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  13. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, A.

    We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH[subscript 4]) fluxes for the period June 2009–December 2010 using proxy dry-air ...

  14. The Young Planet-mass Ob ject 2M1207b: A cool, cloudy, and methane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Young Planet-mass Ob ject 2M1207b: A cool, cloudy, and methane-poor atmosphere Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Young Planet-mass Ob ject 2M1207b: A cool, cloudy, and...

  15. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  16. Membrane-Associated Methane Monooygenase from Type X and Type I Methanotrophs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antholine, William E.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2009-11-30

    Membrane-Associated Methane Monooxygenases from Type X and Type I Methanotrophs A.A. DiSirito and W.E. Antholine Project Number: DE-FG02-00ER15446 Final project report.

  17. Methane cycling in upland soils of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Samuel Peter

    2015-06-30

    Significant discrepancies exist in global estimates of the atmospheric methane (CH4) budget. This is particularly true for tropical South America where bottom-up approaches, rooted in field observation, tend to under ...

  18. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document...

  19. Computational heterogeneous catalysis applied to steam methane reforming over nickel and nickel/silver catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaylock, Donnie Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction is the primary industrial means for producing hydrogen gas. As such, it is a critical support process for applications including petrochemical processing and ammonia synthesis. ...

  20. Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

    2006-10-30

    of the various modeling parameters on its reservoir performance. A dual porosity coalbed methane simulator is used to model primary production from a single well coal seam, for a variety of coal properties for this work. Varying different coal properties...

  1. Experimental characterization of an Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) reactor for methane oxyfuel combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apo, Daniel Jolomi

    2012-01-01

    Ion Transport Membranes (ITM) which conduct both electrons and oxygen ions have been investigated experimentally for oxygen separation and fuel (mostly methane) conversion purposes over the last three decades. The fuel ...

  2. Structural and mutagenesis studies of soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatwood, Lisa L., 1979-

    2004-01-01

    The solution structure for the 27 kDa flavin binding domain of soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was solved by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a two domains, an FAD ...

  3. Recent decreases in fossil-fuel emissions of ethane and methane derived from firn air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    distribution and budget of ethane. J. Geophys. Res.Y. et al. Global budget of ethane and regional constraintsin fossil-fuel emissions of ethane and methane derived from

  4. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, T.H.

    2012-01-01

    composed of methane and ethane”; The 6th InternationalGupta et al. (2008) 24 Ethane hydrate (h ? l + g) Nakagawamol gas. 12 On the contrary, ethane (C 2 H 6 ) hydrate (sI

  5. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Doubly C-substituted ethane in shale gases, Goldschmidtoxidation of methane, ethane, propane and butane. Geochimicameasured ? 13 C values of ethane (? 13 C C2H6 ) for some

  6. Impact of UV light on the plant cell wall, methane emissions and ROS production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messenger, David James

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the first attempt to combine the fields of ultraviolet (UV) photobiology, plant cell wall biochemistry, aerobic methane production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mechanisms to investigate the effect ...

  7. Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 1 Supporting Information 1.0 Produced Water Regulatory Framework for WY and NM.................................................................................................................... 4 2.0 Background on Interstate Water Marketing Using Produced Water

  8. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  9. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

  10. Permafrost degradation and methane: low risk of biogeochemical climate-warming feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    Climate change and permafrost thaw have been suggested to increase high latitude methane emissions that could potentially represent a strong feedback to the climate system. Using an integrated earth-system model framework, ...

  11. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  12. Patterns in wetland microbial community composition and functional gene repertoire associated with methane emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; McFarland, Jack W.; Anderson, Frank E.; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; et al

    2015-05-19

    Wetland restoration on peat islands previously drained for agriculture has potential to reverse land subsidence and sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide as peat accretes. However, the emission of methane could potentially offset the greenhouse gas benefits of captured carbon. As microbial communities play a key role in governing wetland greenhouse gas fluxes, we are interested in how microbial community composition and functions are associated with wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and methane emission, which is critical to modeling the microbial component in wetland methane fluxes and to managing restoration projects for maximal carbon sequestration. Here, we couple sequence-based methods with biogeochemical and greenhousemore »gas measurements to interrogate microbial communities from a pilot-scale restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, revealing considerable spatial heterogeneity even within this relatively small site. A number of microbial populations and functions showed strong correlations with electron acceptor availability and methane production; some also showed a preference for association with plant roots. Marker gene phylogenies revealed a diversity of major methane-producing and -consuming populations and suggested novel diversity within methanotrophs. Methanogenic archaea were observed in all samples, as were nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria, indicating that no single terminal electron acceptor was preferred despite differences in energetic favorability and suggesting spatial microheterogeneity and microniches. Notably, methanogens were negatively correlated with nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria and were most abundant at sampling sites with high peat accretion and low electron acceptor availability, where methane production was highest. Wetlands are the largest nonanthropogenic source of atmospheric methane but also a key global carbon reservoir. Characterizing belowground microbial communities that mediate carbon cycling in wetlands is critical to accurately predicting their responses to changes in land management and climate. Here, we studied a restored wetland and revealed substantial spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemistry, methane production, and microbial communities, largely associated with the wetland hydraulic design. We observed patterns in microbial community composition and functions correlated with biogeochemistry and methane production, including diverse microorganisms involved in methane production and consumption. We found that methanogenesis gene abundance is inversely correlated with genes from pathways exploiting other electron acceptors, yet the ubiquitous presence of genes from all these pathways suggests that diverse electron acceptors contribute to the energetic balance of the ecosystem. These investigations represent an important step toward effective management of wetlands to reduce methane flux to the atmosphere and enhance belowground carbon storage.« less

  13. Performing an allreduce operation using shared memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Dozsa, Gabor (Ardsley, NY); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2012-04-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation using shared memory that include: receiving, by at least one of a plurality of processing cores on a compute node, an instruction to perform an allreduce operation; establishing, by the core that received the instruction, a job status object for specifying a plurality of shared memory allreduce work units, the plurality of shared memory allreduce work units together performing the allreduce operation on the compute node; determining, by an available core on the compute node, a next shared memory allreduce work unit in the job status object; and performing, by that available core on the compute node, that next shared memory allreduce work unit.

  14. Performing an allreduce operation using shared memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Charles J; Dozsa, Gabor; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-06-10

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation using shared memory that include: receiving, by at least one of a plurality of processing cores on a compute node, an instruction to perform an allreduce operation; establishing, by the core that received the instruction, a job status object for specifying a plurality of shared memory allreduce work units, the plurality of shared memory allreduce work units together performing the allreduce operation on the compute node; determining, by an available core on the compute node, a next shared memory allreduce work unit in the job status object; and performing, by that available core on the compute node, that next shared memory allreduce work unit.

  15. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  16. Processes for converting methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons via sulfur-containing intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, S.; Palermo, R.E.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a process for converting methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. The process comprising the steps of contacting methane with carbonyl sulfide in the presence of UV light under conditions sufficient to generate Ch/sub 3/SH; and contacting CH/sub 3/SH with a catalyst under conditions sufficient to produce hydrogen sulfide and a mixture of hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms.

  17. Closing the Gaps in the Budgets of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Aslam; Rice, Andrew; Rasmussen, Reinhold

    2013-11-22

    Together methane and nitrous oxide contribute almost 40% of the estimated increase in radiative forcing caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases during the last 250 years (IPCC, 2007). These increases are attributed to human activities. Since the emissions of these gases are from biogenic sources and closely associated with living things in the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world, climate change is expected to cause feedbacks that may further increase emissions even from systems normally classified as natural. Our results support the idea that while past increases of methane were driven by direct emissions from human activities, some of these have reached their limits and that the future of methane changes may be determined by feedbacks from warming temperatures. The greatly increased current focus on the arctic and the fate of the carbon frozen in its permafrost is an example of such a feedback that could exceed the direct increases caused by future human activities (Zimov et al. 2006). Our research was aimed at three broad areas to address open questions about the global budgets of methane and nitrous oxide. These areas of inquiry were: The processes by which methane and nitrous oxide are emitted, new sources such as trees and plants, and integration of results to refine the global budgets both at present and of the past decades. For the process studies the main research was to quantify the effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from rice agriculture. Additionally, the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide under present conditions were estimated using the experimental data on how fertilizer applications and water management affect emissions. Rice was chosen for detailed study because it is a prototype system of the wider terrestrial source, its role in methane emissions is well established, it is easy to cultivate and it represents a major anthropogenic source. Here we will discuss the highlights of the results that were obtained.

  18. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  19. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore »for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a?1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a?1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a?1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a?1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a?1 source from wetlands.« less

  20. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  1. The stereochemistry of excited state atom reorganization processes; the di-pi-methane rearrangement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Jan Kwei

    1972-01-01

    OF FIGURES Page HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Figure 1: General Examples of the Di-. Pi- Methane Rearrangement ~ ~ . . . . 3 Figure 2: Relationships Between Structure and Multiplicity in the Di-Pi- Nethane Rearrangement . ~ . . ~ ~ 9 Figure $I Summary... Figure 10, Non-Concerted Di-Pi-Methane Re- arrangement Pathways . . . ~ ~ . 27 Figure 11. Synthetic Sequence for 1-Phenyl- 3-methyl-3-(1-cis-propenyl)cyclo- hexene ~ , ~ . . . . . . . . . ~ 31 Figure 12: Results of Direct and Sensitized Photolysis...

  2. Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    bills. Gundersen is investing in renewable energy solutions, including a biogas generator that uses methane from a local landfill to produce over 8 million kWh of electricity...

  3. Energy Department's Hospital Energy Alliance Helps Partner Save...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on its energy bills. Gundersen is investing in renewable energy solutions, including a biogas generator that uses methane from a local landfill to produce over 8 million kWh of...

  4. New materials for methane capture from dilute and medium-concentration sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J; Maiti, A; Lin, LC; Stolaroff, JK; Smit, B; Aines, RD

    2013-04-16

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, second only to CO2, and is emitted into the atmosphere at different concentrations from a variety of sources. However, unlike CO2, which has a quadrupole moment and can be captured both physically and chemically in a variety of solvents and porous solids, methane is completely non-polar and interacts very weakly with most materials. Thus, methane capture poses a challenge that can only be addressed through extensive material screening and ingenious molecular-level designs. Here we report systematic in silico studies on the methane capture effectiveness of two different materials systems, that is, liquid solvents (including ionic liquids) and nanoporous zeolites. Although none of the liquid solvents appears effective as methane sorbents, systematic screening of over 87,000 zeolite structures led to the discovery of a handful of candidates that have sufficient methane sorption capacity as well as appropriate CH4/CO2 and/or CH4/N-2 selectivity to be technologically promising.

  5. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  6. Effect of silane concentration on the supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northam, G.B.; Mc Lain, A.G.; Pellett, G.L.; Diskin, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of direct connect combustor tests was conducted to determine the effect of silane concentration on the supersonic combustion characteristics of silane/methane mixtures. Shock tube ignition delay data indicated more than an order of magnitude reduction in ignition delay times for both 10 and 20 percent silane/methane mixtures as compared to methane. The ignition delay time of the 10 percent mixture was only a factor of 2.3 greater than that of the 20 percent mixture. Supersonic combustion tests were conducted with the fuel injected into a model scramjet combustor. The combustor was mounted at the exit of a Mach 2 nozzle and a hydrogen fired heater was used to provide a variation in test gas total temperature. Tests using the 20 percent silane/methane mixture indicated considerable combustion enhancement when compared to methane alone. This mixture had an autoignition total temperature of 1650 R. The addition of 20 percent silane to methane resulted in a pyrophoric fuel with good supersonic combustion performance. Reducing the silane concentration below this level, however, yielded a less pyrophoric fuel that exhibited poor supersonic combustion performance.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE STUDIES: DELINEATING PROPERTIES OF HOST SEDIMENTS TO ESTABLISH REPRODUCIBLE DECOMPOSITION KINETICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan, Devinder; Jones, Keith W.; Feng, Huan; Winters, William J.

    2004-12-01

    The use of methane hydrate as an energy source requires development of a reliable method for its extraction from its highly dispersed locations in oceanic margin sediments and permafrost. The high pressure (up to 70 MPa) and low temperature (272 K to 278 K) conditions under which hydrates are stable in the marine environment can be mimicked in a laboratory setting and several kinetic studies of pure methane hydrate decomposition have been reported. However, the effect of host sediments on methane hydrate occurrence and decomposition are required to develop reliable hydrate models. In this paper, we describe methods to measure sediment properties as they relate to pore-space methane gas hydrate. Traditional geotechnical techniques are compared to the micrometer level by use of the synchrotron Computed Microtomography (CMT) technique. CMT was used to measure the porosity at the micrometer level and to show pore-space pathways through field samples. Porosities for three sediment samples: one from a site on Georges Bank and two from the known Blake Ridge methane hydrate site, from different depths below the mud line were measured by traditional drying and by the new CMT techniques and found to be in good agreement. The integration of the two analytical approaches is necessary to enable better understanding of methane hydrate interactions with the surrounding sediment particles.

  8. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank R.; Dickens, Gerald; Ford, Kathryn; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this report. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was deployed for the first time on ODP Leg 201. This system was used to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. Initial discussions of these experiments are provided in this report. This report is an overview of the field measurements made on recovered sediment cores and the downhole measurements made during ODP Leg 201. These results are currently being used to incorporate the ''lessons learned'' from these deployments to prepare for a dedicated ODP leg to study the characteristics of naturally-occurring hydrates in the subsurface environment of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon during ODP Leg 204, which will take place from July through September, 2002.

  9. 4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane is to be determined using the ideal gas equation and the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-54 4-102 Methane is heated in a rigid container. The final pressure of the methane the ideal gas equation of state, Methane 100 kPa 20qC Q kPa229.7 K293 K673 kPa)100( 1 2 12 T T PP The specific molar volume of the methane is /kmolm36.24 kPa100 K)K)(293/kmolmkPa(8.314 3 3 1 1 21 P TRu vv (b

  10. Exploring the Limits of Methane Storage and Delivery in Nanoporous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Wilmer, CE; Farha, OK; Hupp, JT; Snurr, RQ

    2014-04-03

    The physical limits for methane storage and delivery in nanoporous materials were investigated, with a focus on whether it is possible to reach a methane deliverable capacity of 315 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) in line with the adsorption target established by the ARPA-E agency. Our efforts focused on how both geometric and chemical properties, such as void fraction (V-f), volumetric surface area (S-v), and heat of adsorption (Q(st)), impact methane deliverable capacity, i.e., the amount of methane adsorbed at some storage pressure minus the amount adsorbed at the delivery pressure. With the aid of grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, we studied methane adsorption and delivery properties in a population of 122 835 hypothetical pcu metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and 39 idealized carbon-based porous materials. From the simulation results, we developed an analytical equation that helped us delimit the necessary material properties to reach specific methane deliverable capacity targets. The maximum deliverable capacity between 65 and 5.8 bar among the hypothetical MOFs was 206 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) at 298 K. We found that artificially increasing the methane MOF interaction strength by increasing the Lennard-Jones e parameters of the MOF atoms by 2- and 4-fold only improved the maximum deliverable capacity up to 223 and 228 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3), respectively. However, the effect on the amount stored at 65 bar was more significant, which suggested another strategy; raising the temperature of the system by 100 K can recover 70% of the methane stranded at the delivery pressure. By increasing the delivery temperature to 398 K, the ARPA-E target was reached by a few hypothetical MOFs with quadrupled e values. This work shows the difficulty in reaching the ARPA-E target but also suggests that a strategy that combines a material with a large volumetric density of sites that interact strongly with methane and raising the delivery temperature can greatly improve the performance of nanoporous materials for methane storage and delivery. The optimal heat of adsorption in an isothermal storage and delivery scenario is approximately 10.5-14.5 kJ/mol, whereas in the nonisothermal storage and delivery scenario the optimal heats of adsorption fell within a range of 11.8-19.8 kEmol.

  11. Disaggregated Memory for Expansion and Sharing in Blade Servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenisch, Thomas F.

    1 Disaggregated Memory for Expansion and Sharing in Blade Servers Kevin Lim*, Jichuan Chang-memory co-location on a single system and details the design of a new general-purpose architectural building block--a memory blade--that allows memory to be "disaggregated" across a system ensemble. This remote

  12. Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 1 Memory technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Galen H.

    Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 1 Memory · Memory technologies · Memory hierarchy ­ Cache basics ­ Cache variations ­ Virtual memory · Synchronization Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 2 cell ­ Faster DRAM, e.g. synchronous DRAM #12;Galen Sasaki EE 361 University of Hawaii 3 ROM · Random

  13. Memory Power Management via Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    *Dual 4-core Intel Xeon®, 48GB DDR3 (12 DIMMs), SPEC CPU2006, all cores active. Measured AC power, analytically modeled memory power. #12;Existing Solution: Memory Sleep States? n Most memory energy for SPEC CPU2006 #12;Memory Power can be Scaled Down n DDR can operate at multiple frequencies ŕ

  14. Pseudo Functional Path Delay Test through Embedded Memories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yukun

    2015-04-29

    On-chip memory arrays are widely used in systems-on-chip. Prior research has shown that timing critical paths often go through these memories. Embedded memories are typically tested using memory built-in self-test and macro test. However...

  15. Memory search and the neural representation of context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polyn, Sean

    the most important behavioral observation in memory search is the finding that recent events are remembered

  16. Pore accessibility of methane and carbon dioxide in coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun-Seok Bae; Suresh K. Bhatia; Victor Rudolph; Paul Massarotto [University of Queensland, Qld. (Australia). Division of Chemical Engineering

    2009-05-15

    Two Australian coals were heat-treated, and the accessibility of the pore space to CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} was investigated. Samples heat-treated at 573 and 673 K exhibit larger adsorption/desorption hysteresis and smaller surface areas (measured by CO{sub 2} adsorption at 273 K) than untreated samples. For samples heat-treated at 773 K, however, the surface area increased by 50% and the hysteresis was lower, compared to untreated samples. These results demonstrate that volatile hydrocarbons at pore mouths are the cause of energy barriers that prevent adsorbing molecules from passing through. A conceptual model is proposed to illustrate changes in activation energy at constricted pore mouths. Also, the results suggest that both adsorption and desorption isotherms should be measured to determine kinetically inaccessible pore spaces in order to correctly estimate CH{sub 4} recovery and CO{sub 2} storage capacity. The results have importance to the problem of estimating CH{sub 4} recovery and CO{sub 2} storage capacity for CO{sub 2} geosequestration as part of a CO{sub 2}-enhanced coal bed methane recovery operation. 28 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2015-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for degradation of 1-10,000 eV electrons in an atmosphere of methane. The electron impact cross sections for CH4 are compiled and analytical representations of these cross sections are used as input to the model.model.Yield spectra, which provides information about the number of inelastic events that have taken place in each energy bin, is used to calculate the yield (or population) of various inelastic processes. The numerical yield spectra, obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations, is represented analytically, thus generating the Analytical Yield Spectra (AYS). AYS is employed to obtain the mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of various inelastic processes.Mean energy per ion pair for neutral CH4 is found to be 26 (27.8) eV at 10 (0.1) keV. Efficiency calculation showed that ionization is the dominant process at energies >50 eV, for which more than 50% of the incident electron energy is used. Above 25 eV, dissociation has an efficiency of 27%. Below 10 eV, vibrational e...

  18. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  19. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  20. Low Latency Messages on Distributed Memory Multiprocessors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosing, Matt; Saltz, Joel

    1995-01-01

    This article describes many of the issues in developing an efficient interface for communication on distributed memory machines. Although the hardware component of message latency is less than 1 ws on many distributed memory machines, the software latency associated with sending and receiving typed messages is on the order of 50 ?s. The reason for this imbalance is that the software interface does not match the hardware. By changing the interface to match the hardware more closely, applications with fine grained communication can be put on these machines. This article describes several tests performed and many of the issues involvedmore »in supporting low latency messages on distributed memory machines.« less

  1. Direct access inter-process shared memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brightwell, Ronald B; Pedretti, Kevin; Hudson, Trammell B

    2013-10-22

    A technique for directly sharing physical memory between processes executing on processor cores is described. The technique includes loading a plurality of processes into the physical memory for execution on a corresponding plurality of processor cores sharing the physical memory. An address space is mapped to each of the processes by populating a first entry in a top level virtual address table for each of the processes. The address space of each of the processes is cross-mapped into each of the processes by populating one or more subsequent entries of the top level virtual address table with the first entry in the top level virtual address table from other processes.

  2. FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES May 2008 #12;In recent years, a sustainability movement has taken root at Queen's. The impacts of the movement can be seen across campus sustainability position within the their student government ­The AMS, The Engineer Society open the Tea Room

  3. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital · Early Stage Breast Cancer Support Group · Advanced Stage Cancer Support Group · IMPACT ­ Young Cancer Survivors' Group Contact: Angela Khairallah, LCSW at 203-200-2360 Reach to Recovery ­ American Cancer Society 1-800-227-2345 www.cancer.org Sisters

  4. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in the Haynesville Shale, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 44(24),of methane emissions from shale gas development, Proc. Natl.and northeastern Marcellus shale gas production regions, J.

  5. Methane emissions from rice fields: The effects of climatic and agricultural factors. Final report, March 1, 1994--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, M.A.K.; Rasmussen, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The work reported was performed for the purpose of refining estimates of methane emissions from rice fields. Research performed included methane flux measurements, evaluation of variables affecting emissions, compilation of a data base, and continental background measurements in China. The key findings are briefly described in this report. Total methane emissions, seasonal patterns, and spatial variability were measured for a 7-year periods. Temperature was found to be the most important variable studies affecting methane emissions. The data archives for the research are included in the report. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of methane emissions from shale gas development, Proc. Natl.and northeastern Marcellus shale gas production regions, J.Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions, J.

  7. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850°C. Turnover rate at 850°C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850°C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. Part of the computational time was provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  8. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore »methane source of 539 Tg a?1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a-1.« less

  9. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore »methane source of 539 Tg a?1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a?1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a?1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a?1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a?1.« less

  10. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    T. and Narita, H. , 2006. Methane hydrate crystal growth ina porous medium filled with methane-saturated liquid water.Kneafsey, T.J. et al. , 2007. Methane hydrate formation and

  11. The Cambridge Car Memory Test: A task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchaine, Bradley C.

    The Cambridge Car Memory Test: A task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test a prosopagnosic shows a face-specific or object- general deficit). Here, we present such a task. Our Cambridge Car higher than the mean for females. We demonstrate independence between face memory and car memory

  12. Space applications of shape memory alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Olivier Jean

    2002-01-01

    This work presents an investigation of two new possible space applications of shape memory alloys. The first application uses these alloys as active devices to optimally reorient solar panels in space. The thermal issues related to the actuation...

  13. An optical simulation of shared memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.A.; Matias, Y.; Rao, S.

    1994-06-01

    We present a work-optimal randomized algorithm for simulating a shared memory machine (PRAM) on an optical communication parallel computer (OCPC). The OCPC model is motivated by the potential of optical communication for parallel computation. The memory of an OCPC is divided into modules, one module per processor. Each memory module only services a request on a timestep if it receives exactly one memory request. Our algorithm simulates each step of an n lg lg n-processor EREW PRAM on an n-processor OCPC in O(lg lg n) expected delay. (The probability that the delay is longer than this is at most n{sup {minus}{alpha}} for any constant {alpha}). The best previous simulation, due to Valiant, required {Theta}(lg n) expected delay.

  14. An autoassociative model of recovery in memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Andrew L

    1996-01-01

    A model of memory is presented. The model is a neural system which utilizes an autoassociator trained via the Buhmann learning rule. Context plays a central role in the storage and recovery of stored items. Context is ...

  15. Commercialization of germanium based nanocrystal memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seow, Kian Chiew

    2007-01-01

    This thesis explores the commercialization of germanium-based nanocrystal memories. Demand for smaller and faster electronics and embedded systems supports the development of high-density, low-power non-volatile electronic ...

  16. Hypergraph Partitioning for Automatic Memory Hierarchy Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Catalyurek, Umit; Nieplocha, Jarek; Rountev, Atanas; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2007-11-15

    The paper presents present a mechanism for automatic management of the memory hierarchy, including secondary storage, in the context of a global address space parallel programming framework. The programmer specifies the parallelism and locality in the computation. The scheduling of the computation into stages, together with the movement of the associated data between secondary storage and global memory, and between global memory and local memory, is automatically managed by the framework. A novel formulation of hypergraph partitioning is used to model the optimization problem of minimizing disk I/O by improving locality of access. Experimental evaluation of the proposed approach using a sub-computation from the quantum chemistry domain shows a reduction in the disk I/O cost by upto a factor of 11, and a reduction in turnaround time by upto 97%, as compared to alternatives used in state-of-the-art quantum chemistry codes.

  17. Size Effects in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozdemir, Nevin

    2012-07-16

    The utilization of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) in small scale devices has attracted considerable attention within the last decade. However, the lack of sufficient studies on their reversible shape change ...

  18. Allegories of Modernity, Geographies of Memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Seenhwa

    2012-10-19

    with local and national history as alternative history lessons and challenges the Idea of Progress by revisiting sites of traumatic memory. Midnight's Children constructs counter-stories of Post-Independence India as multiple alternatives to one official...

  19. Memorial University Counselling Centre Professional Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyet, Alwell

    1 Memorial University Counselling Centre Doctoral Professional Psychology Residency Programme 2013-2014 Accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association www of Counseling Services (IACS) www.iacsinc.org Participating Member: Canadian Council of Professional Psychology

  20. Directoryless shared memory coherence using execution migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lis, Mieszko

    We introduce the concept of deadlock-free migration-based coherent shared memory to the NUCA family of architectures. Migration-based architectures move threads among cores to guarantee sequential semantics in large ...