Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Magic angle spinning NMR applied to membrane protein 2D crystals : the structure and function of VDAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane proteins mediate critical functions in biological systems and are important drug targets for a number of diseases. Determining the three-dimensional structure and function of membrane proteins under physologically ...

Eddy, Matthew T. (Matthew Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Membrane stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

Mingenbach, W.A.

1988-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

4

Membranes Phosphazene  

INLs new phosphazene membrane technology provides a method for making polydichlorophosphazene using solid state reactants that simplifies previous processes with a single pot two-step process. The process eliminates use of chlorinated hydrocarbon ...

5

Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microporous Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification Brian L. Bischoff, Roddie R. Judkins, and Timothy R. Armstrong Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented at: DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen Separation Membranes * Non-Porous - Palladium based films - Ion transport membranes * Porous - Ordered microporous membranes (IUPAC Recommendations 2001), e.g. zeolite membranes - Microporous membranes 3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Microporous Membranes * IUPAC defines micropores as pores smaller than 2nm in diameter * Generally a microporous membrane is made by applying 1 to 3 thin layers to a porous support * Porous support can be ceramic or metallic

6

HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C, probably with the reduction to metallic zinc with the evolution of hydrogen sulfide. The work has shown that ZnS is not a viable candidate for a high-temperature hydrogen separation membrane.

Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To overcome this barrier, at least two improvements are required. First, new and different contactor geometries are necessary to achieve efficient contact with an extremely low pressure drop. Second, the temperature limits of the membranes must be increased. In the absence of these improvements, sweeping gas MD will not be economically competitive. However, the membranes may still find use in hybrid desalination systems.

EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CX-004185: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09272010...

9

CX-004172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09282010...

10

CX-004184: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09272010...

11

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-004916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dais Analytic - Nano Membrane Based Dehumidification Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

12

CX-002285: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-002285: Categorical Exclusion Determination Manufacturing of Low Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Rapid Conditioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9...

13

CX-003663: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oxy-combustion Oxygen Transport Membrane Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08272010...

14

CX-003675: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-003675: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oxy-combustion Oxygen Transport Membrane Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09012010...

15

CX-004084: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-004084: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reaction-Driven Ionic Transport Membranes (ITM) Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09302010 Location(s):...

16

CX-004090: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-004090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reaction-Driven Ionic Transport Membranes (ITM) Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09302010 Location(s):...

17

CX-003132: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Institute of Technology Research Corporation - Metal Organic Frameworks in Hollow Fiber Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06022010...

18

CX-003338: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Pittsburgh,...

19

CX-003336: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003336: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Socorro,...

20

CX-003335: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003335: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 07292010 Location(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09272010...

22

CX-010554: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010554: Categorical Exclusion Determination Yale University- Power Generation from Waste Heat with Closed Loop Membrane-Based System CX(s) Applied:...

23

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 3, 2010 CX-004916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dais Analytic - Nano Membrane Based Dehumidification Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

24

CX-010200: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010200: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04042013...

25

CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10202010 Location(s): Boulder,...

26

CX-008311: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-008311: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04242012 Location(s): Kansas...

27

CX-010198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04042013...

28

CX-010199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-010199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04042013...

29

Applied Quantum Information Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Quantum Information Science. Summary: Theory is being developed and used to devise methods for preserving ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover defining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to and extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivatization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN); Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Composite sensor membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

SOUTHVIEWDR Center for Applied  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Geology Chemistry Biological Sciences Geology Lab Bookstore Reed Milledge Payne Memorial Hall SANFORD DR Center CAES Activity Center Visitors Center (Four Towers) Greenhouses Center for Applied Isotope Study

Hall, Daniel

35

Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Zeltner, Walter A. (Oregon, WI)

1992-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Applied Energy Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Acting Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 663-5538 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to industry. The Applied Energy Program Office manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the

37

Composite zeolite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

Nenoff, Tina M. (Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Supported inorganic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Composite fuel cell membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Polyphosphazene semipermeable membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semipermeable, inorganic membrane is disclosed; the membrane is prepared from a phosphazene polymer and, by the selective substitution of the constituent groups bound to the phosphorous in the polymer structure, the selective passage of fluid from a feedstream can be controlled. Resistance to high temperatures and harsh chemical environments is observed in the use of the phosphazene polymers as semipermeable membranes.

Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McCaffrey, Robert R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cummings, Daniel G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessup, Janine S. (Darlington, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Essays in applied microeconomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three chapters on topics in applied microeconomics. In the first chapter. I investigate whether voters are more likely to support additional spending on local public services when they perceive ...

Aron-Dine, Aviva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

45

Applied Mathematics | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Mathematics Applied Mathematics Our work in applied mathematics ranges from algorithm design, to development of software tools and technology, to advanced simulations in...

46

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Morisato, Atsushi (Tokyo, JP)

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

47

Supported liquid membrane system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cell apparatus for a supported liquid membrane including opposing faceplates, each having a spirally configured groove, an inlet groove at a first end of the spirally configured groove, and an outlet groove at the other end of the spirally configured groove, within the opposing faces of the faceplates, a microporous membrane situated between the grooved faces of the faceplates, said microporous membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for a predetermined chemical species within the pores of said membrane, means for aligning the grooves of the faceplates in an directly opposing configuration with the porous membrane being situated therebetween, such that the aligned grooves form a pair of directly opposing channels, separate feed solution and stripping solution compartments connected to respective channels between the faceplates and the membrane, separate pumping means for passing feed solution and stripping solution through the channels is provided.

Takigawa, D.Y.; Bush, H. Jr.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

Siloxane-grafted membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

1989-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

51

Membranes for Clean Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membranes for Clean Water. Summary: ... Description: Impact. Access to affordable, clean water is vital to the nation's economic growth and security. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Anion exchange membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

Kaschemekat, J.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Microporous alumina ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Sheng, Guangyao (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Microporous alumina ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Membranes with a boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the recently developed theory of multiple membranes. In particular, we consider open membranes, i.e. the theory defined on a membrane world volume with a boundary. We first restrict our attention to the gauge sector of the theory. We obtain a boundary action from the Chern-Simons terms. Secondly, we consider the addition of certain boundary terms to various Chern-Simons theories coupled to matter. These terms ensure the full bulk plus boundary action has the correct amount of supersymmetry. For the ABJM model, this construction motivates the inclusion of a boundary quartic scalar potential. The boundary dynamics obtained from our modified theory produce Basu-Harvey type equations describing membranes ending on a fivebrane. The ultimate goal of this work is to throw light on the theory of fivebranes using the theory of open membranes.

David S Berman; Daniel C Thompson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Applied antineutrino physics workshop.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

Lund, James C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Membranes Improve Insulation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been determined from extensive tests involving test models and home attics that loose fill and fiber batt insulation does not function as expected by the industry. The reason for this deficiency is current test methods do not accurately predict the magnitude of air infiltration into fiber insulation as used in home attics, radiant heat infiltration into the insulation during summer, or radiant heat loss through the insulation during winter conditions. The use of (1) moisture permeable membranes over the insulation, and (2) layered membranes between fiber batts to form closed cells in the insulation both dramatically improve the efficiency of the fiber insulation. The efficiency of this insulation will be improved to an even greater degree if these membranes reflect radiant heat as well as reduce convection air currents. Extensive tests have also been conducted which show that if moisture permeable membranes are used over fiber insulation, the moisture content of the insulation will be reduced.

Bullock, C. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fuel cell membrane humidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

Anderson, Marc A. (2114 Chadbourne Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Sheng, Guangyao (45 N. Orchard St., Madison, WI 53715)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

Yahnke, Mark S. (Berkeley, CA); Shlomo, Golan (Haifa, IL); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Applied and Computational Mathematics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied and Computational Mathematics Division. Topic Areas. Mathematics; Scientific Computing; Visualization; Quantum Computing. ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

Murphy, L.M.

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

Anderson, M.A.; Xu, Q.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

66

Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Membrane heat pipe development for space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect

A self-deploying membrane heat pipe (SMHP) is being designed and fabricated to operate in an in-cabin experiment aboard a STS flight. The heat pipe comprises a mylar membrane with a woven fabric arterial wick and R-11 as the working fluid. Preliminary results indicate that this SMHP design will successfully expand and retract in response to an applied heat load; the retraction force is provided by a constant force spring.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Transformer Life Extension: Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and oxygen are two key factors aging oil and paper in a power transformer; therefore, they must be kept low. An on-line system using a hollow fiber membrane unit removes moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. This technical update describes previous work using hollow fiber membranes and vacuum, and details novel techniques applied to extend power transformer life.The project team designed, built, commissioned, and partially aged two models ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Applied Optoelectronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

optical semiconductor devices, packaged optical components, optical subsystems, laser transmitters, and fiber optic transceivers. References Applied Optoelectronics1...

71

The Automorphic Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a 1-loop toroidal membrane winding sum reproducing the conjectured $M$-theory, four-graviton, eight derivative, $R^4$ amplitude. The $U$-duality and toroidal membrane world-volume modular groups appear as a Howe dual pair in a larger, exceptional, group. A detailed analysis is carried out for $M$-theory compactified on a 3-torus, where the target-space $Sl(3,\\Zint)\\times Sl(2,\\Zint)$ $U$-duality and $Sl(3,\\Zint)$ world-volume modular groups are embedded in $E_{6(6)}(\\Zint)$. Unlike previous semi-classical expansions, $U$-duality is built in manifestly and realized at the quantum level thanks to Fourier invariance of cubic characters. In addition to winding modes, a pair of new discrete, flux-like, quantum numbers are necessary to ensure invariance under the larger group. The action for these modes is of Born-Infeld type, interpolating between standard Polyakov and Nambu-Goto membrane actions. After integration over the membrane moduli, we recover the known $R^4$ amplitude, including membrane instantons. Divergences are disposed of by trading the non-compact volume integration for a compact integral over the two variables conjugate to the fluxes -- a constant term computation in mathematical parlance. As byproducts, we suggest that, in line with membrane/fivebrane duality, the $E_6$ theta series also describes five-branes wrapped on $T^6$ in a manifestly U-duality invariant way. In addition we uncover a new action of $E_6$ on ten dimensional pure spinors, which may have implications for ten dimensional super Yang--Mills theory. An extensive review of $Sl(3)$ automorphic forms is included in an Appendix.

Boris Pioline; Andrew Waldron

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Supported microporous ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

Webster, Elizabeth (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Supported microporous ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

NFRC Procedures for Applied Films  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Films Applied Films Last update: 12/10/2013 07:29 PM NFRC now has a procedure for adding applied films to substrates in Optics5 and importing those applied film constructions into WINDOW5 to be used in a whole product calculation. The information presented below is provided to help simulators with this process. Feel free to contact us at WINDOWHelp@lbl.gov with questions or comments. NFRC Applied Film Procedure Applied Film Procedures (approved by NFRC) (PDF file) Approved Applied Film List (IGDB 33.0) (PDF file) NFRC Laminate Procedure Training Powerpoint with Examples (This Powerpoint presentation was used in the NFRC web based training sessions in December 2006 and January 2007) PowerPoint Presentation (PPT file) PowerPoint Presentation (PDF file) Help and Troubleshooting

76

Thermal casting process for the preparation of anisotropic membranes and the resultant membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing anisotropic polymer membranes from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

Caneba, Gerard T. M. (Albany, CA); Soong, David S. (Albany, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrogen-Selective Membrane  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2.s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2. s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make porous ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels therethrough. The novel membranes are formed by temporarily supporting the sol-gel membrane precursor on an organic support which is ultimately removed from the interior of the membrane, preferably by pyrolysis or by chemical destruction. The organic support may also include an inorganic metal portion that remains on destruction of the organic portion, providing structural support and/or chemical reactivity to the membrane. The channels formed when the organic support is destroyed provide the ability to withdraw small catalytic products or size-separated molecules from the metal oxide membrane. In addition, the channel-containing membranes retain all of the advantages of existing porous ceramic membranes.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make porous ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels therethrough. The novel membranes are formed by temporarily supporting the sol-gel membrane precursor on an organic support which is ultimately removed from the interior of the membrane, preferably by pyrolysis or by chemical destruction. The organic support may also include an inorganic metal portion that remains on destruction of the organic portion, providing structural support and/or chemical reactivity to the membrane. The channels formed when the organic support is destroyed provide the ability to withdraw small catalytic products or size-separated molecules from the metal oxide membrane. In addition, the channel-containing membranes retain all of the advantages of existing porous ceramic membranes. 1 fig.

Anderson, M.A.; Peterson, R.A.

1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Copper Palladium Hydrogen Separation Membranes  

This patent-pending technology, Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance, consists of copper-palladium alloy compositions for hydrogen separation membranes that use less palladium and have a ...

85

Hydrogen separation using silica membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silica membranes were synthesized on tubular supports of alumina by dipping in silica colloidal solutions. The quality and the performance of the silica membranes were tested by experiments on single gas permeation and gas separation of mixed N2, ... Keywords: Knudsen diffusion, colloidal solution, gas permeation, hydrogen separation, silica membranes

Salvador Alfaroa; Miguel A. Valenzuelaa; Pedro Bosch

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Membrane Stability Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electrosynthesis Co. Inc. (ESC) was contracted by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to investigate the long term performance and durability of cell components (anode, membrane, cathode) in an electrochemical caustic recovery process using a simulated SRC liquid waste as anolyte solution. This report details the results of two long-term studies conducted using an ICI FM01 flow cell. This cell is designed and has previously been demonstrated to scale up directly into the commercial scale ICI FM21 cell.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than 2 kBT in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant

Martin Lindn; Pierre Sens; Rob Phillips

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 0927...

92

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 0927...

93

CX-008982: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High Performance Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office"

94

Florida | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office September 3, 2010 CX-004916: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dais Analytic - Nano Membrane Based Dehumidification Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

95

CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09102010 Location(s): Des...

96

CX-004394: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11052010 Location(s): Joliet,...

97

CX-004063: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010...

98

CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08132013...

99

CX-004065: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 10012010...

100

CX-004064: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 10012010...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid MembraneAbsorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09102010 Location(s): Woburn,...

102

CX-010182: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04252013 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): National...

103

Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 CX-003342: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08132010 Location(s): Arizona...

104

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Vehicles with Durable Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) and Lithium-Ion Battery CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08252010 Location(s): Athens, Ohio...

105

CX-004087: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-004087: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reaction-Driven Ionic Transport Membranes (ITM) Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09302010 Location(s): Salt...

106

CX-003330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Lea County,...

107

CX-003337: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-003337: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Lea County,...

108

New Mexico | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2010 CX-003337: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Lea County,...

109

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2010 CX-003338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07292010 Location(s): Pittsburgh,...

110

Tennessee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes (HTM) for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and FutureGen Coal-to-Hydrogen Plants (Kingsport) CX(s) Applied:...

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes (HTM) for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and FutureGen Coal-to-Hydrogen Plants (Boulder) CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

112

CX-008289: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

113

CX-003463: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003463: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 0823...

114

CX-010911: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hybrid Membrane-Absorption Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

115

CX-010910: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hybrid Membrane-Absorption Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

116

CX-009001: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): North Carolina, North Carolina Offices(s): Golden Field Office

117

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Influence of electrode stress on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance : experimental characterization and power optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressive stress applied to the electrode area of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is known to significantly affect power output. In practice, electrode stress arises during operation due to the clamping force ...

Gallant, Betar M. (Betar Maurkah)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Dispersion effects on membrane reactor performance  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed that predicts the effects of design parameters, operating variables and physical properties on the performance of a membrane reactor with a permselective wall. The model consists of the full set of partial differential equations that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and chemical species, coupled with chemical kinetics and appropriate boundary conditions for the physical problem. The solution of this system is obtained by a finite-volume technique. The model was applied to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane. Two membrane types in tubular form were studied: a selective porous glass with low gas permeabilities and a porous alumina with very high gas permeabilities. It is concluded that gas separation and reactor performance are strongly influenced by dispersion effects only in the latter membrane reactor, while in both cases radial concentration profiles do not correspond to those obtained with plug flow. Therefore, simulations of this type of problem should be based on complex dispersion models rather than the existing ideal plug-flow ones.

Koukou, M.K.; Papayannakos, N.; Markatos, N.C. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

BNL | Accelerators for Applied Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators for Applied Research Accelerators for Applied Research Brookhaven National Lab operates several accelerator facilities dedicated to applied research. These facilities directly address questions and concerns on a tremendous range of fields, including medical imaging, cancer therapy, computation, and space exploration. Leading scientists lend their expertise to these accelerators and offer crucial assistant to collaborating researchers, pushing the limits of science and technology. Interested in gaining access to these facilities for research? See the contact number listed for each facility. RHIC tunnel Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)-positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis-produces commercially unavailable radioisotopes for use by the

124

CRC handbook of applied thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emphasis of this book is on applied thermodynamics, featuring the stage of development of a process rather than the logical development of thermodynamic principles. It is organized according to the types of problems encountered in industry, such as probing research, process assessment, and process development. The applied principles presented can be used in most areas of industry including oil and gas production and processing, chemical processing, power generation, polymer production, food processing, synthetic fuels production, specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals production, bioengineered processes, etc.

Palmer, D.A. (Amoco Chemical Corp., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

Repasky, John Michael

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

California Energy Commission Apply Today!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photovoltaic project in the future. Peak Demand Savings: 95 kW Energy Savings: 1,510,849 kWh Annual Energy CostCalifornia Energy Commission Apply Today! "The College implemented all of the recommended projects Programs Office (916) 654-4147 pubprog@energy.state.ca.us "CEC financing allowed us to install many

128

implementing bioenergy applied research & development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Northern Centre for Renewable Energy implementing bioenergy applied research & development plant measures to become carbon neutral and operate on renewable energy. UNBC is uniquely positioned for Climate Solutions, and UNBC. The Green University Centre will be a model of energy efficiency

Northern British Columbia, University of

129

Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Battery Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery...

130

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs. log pO{sub 2} is {approx} 1/5 in the p-type region, pO{sub 2} = 10{sup -5} {approx} 10{sup -1} atm. The pO{sub 2} at which the p-n transition is observed increases with increasing temperature. The activation energy for ionic conduction was estimated to be 0.86 eV from an Arrhenius plot of the minimum conductivity vs. reciprocal temperature. At temperatures below 940 C, a plateau in the conductivity isotherm suggests the presence of a two-phase region. Most likely, phase separation occurs to form a mixture of a perovskite phase and an oxygen vacancy ordered phase related to brownmillerite. Additional data for the oxygen non stoichiometry are presented.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Olefin separation membrane and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane and process are disclosed for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5{times}10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{center_dot}cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Poisson-Boltzmann approach for a lipid membrane in an electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of a non-conductive quasi-planar lipid membrane in an electrolyte and in a static (DC) electric field is investigated theoretically in the nonlinear (Poisson-Boltzmann) regime. Electrostatic effects due to charges in the membrane lipids and in the double layers lead to corrections to the membrane elastic moduli which are analyzed here. We show that, especially in the low salt limit, i) the electrostatic contribution to the membrane's surface tension due to the Debye layers crosses over from a quadratic behavior in the externally applied voltage to a linear voltage regime. ii) the contribution to the membrane's bending modulus due to the Debye layers saturates for high voltages. Nevertheless, the membrane undulation instability due to an effectively negative surface tension as predicted by linear Debye-H\\"uckel theory is shown to persist in the nonlinear, high voltage regime.

Falko Ziebert; David Lacoste

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis of polymers. CMS membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis mixtures such as carbon dioxide / methane and ethane / ethylene separations. While there are many reports including carbon dioxide, methane, ethane and ethylene and also with selected two-component mixtures

McQuade, D. Tyler

135

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells Andrew M. Herring CSM Bryan Pivovar NREL 1 Anion Exchange Membranes (Presented to Parallel Breakout Sessions) * Stability Challenges -...

137

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Project No.: DE-FE0004908 Membranes shown (from top to bottom): ceramic support, activated and coated with palladium...

138

Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Title Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kusoglu, Ahmet, and...

139

Lyotropic Liquid Crystal (LLC) Nanofiltration Membranes - Energy ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; ... Description Control of membrane pore structure is a major challenge for membrane manufacturers.

140

Role Of Calcium In Membrane Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is focused on understanding the role of calcium in membrane fusion at the atomic level. Membrane fusion is an intense area of experimental (more)

Issa, Zeena Kas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Theoretical and experimental investigation of membrane distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Invented in the 1960s, membrane distillation is an emerging technology for water treatment attracting more attention since 1980s. There are four configurations of membrane distillations (more)

Zhang, Jianhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Apparatus for tensioning a heliostat membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for pneumatically or hydraulically tensioning a membrane, which stretched membrane can support a reflective surface for use as a heliostat in a solar energy collection system.

Sallis, Daniel V. (P.O. Box 554, Littleton, CO 80120)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

THREE ESSAYS ON APPLIED ECONOMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation three essays were presented. In the first two essays we measure the consumer welfare changes caused by U.S. meat price changes. In the third essay the dynamic structure of international gasoline prices using the time series methodology is investigated. In chapter II, we investigate the U.S. consumer behavior on meat consumption depending on a linear expenditure system (LES), and then we simulate the welfare effects of a set of price changes on the U.S. meat consumption. The simulation results show that the amount of consumer welfare change for each meat is not same across the meats under the same percentage change of price. The simulation results also show that when all the prices are doubled the total amount of CV reaches almost the same amount of current total quarterly expenditures for the three meats. In chapter III, we apply the compensating variation (CV) approach for the measurement of consumer welfare losses associated with beef price changes. We applied the long-run cointegrating relationship in vector error correction model (VECM) to estimate the Marshallian demand function. Apparently, the use of long-run cointegration in VECM in deriving the direct Marshallian demand function to measure the consumer welfare change is the first attempt in the literature. This is one of the contributions of the study. The simulation results show that the amount of consumer welfare change for beef is compatible with the one derived from LES methodology. In chapter IV, an empirical framework to summarize the interdependence of four international gasoline markets (New York, U.S. Gulf Coast, Rotterdam and Singapore) is presented. For that purpose, we employ a structural VECM and directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). To solve the identification problem in structural VECM, we apply DAGs derived from contemporaneous VECM innovations. The impulse response functions show that the time period in which a shock in a market affects the other market is very short. Forecast error variance decompositions (FEVD) shows that in all markets, except the U.S. Gulf Coast market, current and past shocks in their own market explained the most of the volatility in their own market in the Short-run.

Shin, Sang-Cheol

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Applied Materials | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Materials Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Address 3050 Bowers Avenue Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Sector Solar Stock Symbol AMAT Website http://www.appliedmaterials.co Coordinates 37.3775749°, -121.9794416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3775749,"lon":-121.9794416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

Murphy, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: How to Apply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Apply to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: How to Apply on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: How to Apply on Twitter Bookmark...

153

Computational and experimental study of nanoporous membranes for water desalination and decontamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamentals of ion transport in nanopores were studied through a joint experimental and computational effort. The study evaluated both nanoporous polymer membranes and track-etched nanoporous polycarbonate membranes. The track-etched membranes provide a geometrically well characterized platform, while the polymer membranes are more closely related to ion exchange systems currently deployed in RO and ED applications. The experimental effort explored transport properties of the different membrane materials. Poly(aniline) membranes showed that flux could be controlled by templating with molecules of defined size. Track-etched polycarbonate membranes were modified using oxygen plasma treatments, UV-ozone exposure, and UV-ozone with thermal grafting, providing an avenue to functionalized membranes, increased wettability, and improved surface characteristic lifetimes. The modeling effort resulted in a novel multiphysics multiscale simulation model for field-driven transport in nanopores. This model was applied to a parametric study of the effects of pore charge and field strength on ion transport and charge exclusion in a nanopore representative of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane. The goal of this research was to uncover the factors that control the flux of ions through a nanoporous material and to develop tools and capabilities for further studies. Continuation studies will build toward more specific applications, such as polymers with attached sulfonate groups, and complex modeling methods and geometries.

Hickner, Michael A. (Penn State University, University Park, PA); Chinn, Douglas Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Long, Kevin R. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Debusschere, Bert J.; Zendejas, Frank J.; Tran, Huu M.; Najm, Habib N.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Removal of CO2 from gas mixture using hollow fiber membrane contactors fabricated from PVDF/triacetin/glycerol cast solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hollow fiber membranes were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method and applied for CO2 absorption from gas mixture stream as gas-liquid membrane contactors. The percent removal of CO2 from gas mixture stream ... Keywords: PVDF, hollow fibers, thermally induced phase separation

N. Ghasem; M. Al-Marzouqi; R. Al-Marzouqi; A. Dowaidar; M. Vialatte

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply Apply for Weatherization Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program Weatherization Services

156

Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Battery Research Applied battery research addresses the barriers facing the lithium-ion systems that are closest to meeting the technical energy and power requirements for...

157

Liquid membrane purification of biogas  

SciTech Connect

Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

High temperature size selective membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a high temperature size selective membrane capable of separating gas mixture components from each other based on molecular size, using a molecular sieving mechanism. The authors are evaluating two concepts: a composite of a carbon molecular sieve (CMS) with a tightly defined pore size distribution between 3 and 4 {angstrom}, and a microporous supporting matrix which provides mechanical strength and resistance to thermal degradation, and a sandwich of a CMS film between the porous supports. The high temperature membranes the authors are developing can be used to replace the current low-temperature unit operations for separating gaseous mixtures, especially hydrogen, from the products of the water gas shift reaction at high temperatures. Membranes that have a high selectivity and have both thermal and chemical stability would improve substantially the economics of the coal gasification process. These membranes can also improve other industrial processes such as the ammonia production and oil reform processes where hydrogen separation is crucial. Results of tests on a supported membrane and an unsupported carbon film are presented.

Yates, S.F.; Zhou, S.J.; Anderson, D.J.; Til, A.E. van

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DARPA Learning Applied to Ground Robots (LAGR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DARPA Learning Applied to Ground Robots (LAGR) Project (Concluded). Summary: The National Institute of Standards ...

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes US Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Kickoff Meeting, Washington DC, February 13, 2007 Michel Fouré Project Objectives z To develop a low cost (vs. perfluorosulfonated ionomers), durable membrane. z To develop a membrane capable at 80°C at low relative humidity (25-50%). z To develop a membrane capable of operating at 120°C for brief periods of time. z To elucidate membrane degradation and failure mechanisms. U:jen/slides/pres.07/FC kickoff Washington DC 2-13-07 2 Technical Barriers Addressed z Membrane Cost z Membrane Durability z Membrane capability to operate at low relative humidity. z Membrane capability to operate at 120ºC for brief period of times.

162

High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

Protsailo, Lesia

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Continuous production of polymethylpentene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas separation membranes may be prepared in a continuous manner by passing a porous support which may, if so desired, be backed by a fabric through a solution of polymethylpentene dissolved in an organic solvent such as hexane. The support member is passed through the solution while one side thereof is in contact with a roller, thereby permitting only one side of the support member to be coated with the polymer. After continuously withdrawing the support member from the bath, the solvent is allowed to evaporate and the resulting membrane is recovered.

Epperson, B.J.; Burnett, L.J.; Helm, V.D.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multicomponent Transport through Realistic Zeolite Membranes: Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks  

SciTech Connect

These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

William C. Conner

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology, based on dense ceramic membranes, that uses air as the oxidant for methane conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required, and, if the driving potential of transport is adequate, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen ions, not oxygen molecules. Recent reports in the literature suggest that dense ceramic membranes made of these mixed conductors can successfully separate oxygen from air at flux rates that could be considered commercially feasible. Thus, these membranes have the potential to improve the economics of methane conversion processes. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into hollow-tube reactors, in which air passes over the outside of the membrane and methane flows through the inside. The surfaces can also be reversed. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or other gases. Thus, only oxygen from air can be transported through the membrane to the inside of the reactor surface, where it reacts with methane. Other geometric forms, such as honeycombs or corrugations, of the reactor are possible and can provide substantially greater surface areas for reaction.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Maiya, P.S.; Ma, B.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.; Fleisch, T.H. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States); Bose, A.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

168

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

169

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

170

Preparation of gas selective membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Structural design considerations for stretched-membrane heliostat reflector modules with stability and initial imperfection considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report extends the work of several previous reports that present the background leading to the development of stretched-membrane modules and analysis methods to study the structural response of the stretched-membrane module. Specifically, this report presents and discusses the design implications based on our analysis of single- or double-membrane concepts, and the amplification of initial imperfections and deflections caused by loading, which results from stability considerations. In this document, we present analysis results for both single- and double-membrane concepts corresponding to a range of design and loading conditions. Further, we show that stretched-membrane/frame combinations respond quite differently to external loads than can be inferred by studying the decoupled frame and membrane independently. Thus the coupled membrane/frame problem should be considered to assure an accurate description of its response. For idealized configurations and loadings, we discuss the relative merits of various design features for both of these designs. In addition, we studied the structural stability (i.e., the tendency of structural deformation to grow with little increase in applied load) of the tensioned-membrane, compressed-frame combination. Moreover, we demonstrate how stability considerations are important in determining the amplification of both initial displacement imperfection and the deformations caused by wind and weight loading on the structure.

Murphy, L.M.; Simms, D.; Sallis, D.V.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

173

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

SciTech Connect

One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.] President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Engineering supported membranes for cell biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membranes in structural biology. J Struct Biol 168:12 50.supported membranes for cell biology Cheng-han Yu Jay T.range problems in cell biology. Because lateral mobility of

Yu, Cheng-han; Groves, Jay T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Anion permselective membrane. [For redox fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental anion permeselective membranes were improved and characterized for use as separators in a chemical redox, power storage cell being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The goal of minimal Fe/sup +3/ ion transfer was achieved for each candidate membrane system. Minimal membrane resistivity was demonstrated by reduction of film thickness using synthetic backing materials but usefulness of thin membranes was limited by the scarcity of compatible fabrics. The most durable and useful backing fabrics were modacrylics. One membrane, a copolymer of 4 vinylpyridine and vinyl benzylchloride was outstanding in overall electrochemical and physical properties. Long term (1000 hrs) membrane chemical and thermal durability in redox environment was shown by three candidate polymers and two membranes. The remainder had good durability at ambient temperature. Manufacturing capability was demonstrated for large scale production of membrane sheets 5.5 ft/sup 2/ in area for two candidate systems.

Alexander, S.S.; Hodgdon, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of energy efficient membrane distillation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane distillation (MD) has shown potential as a means of desalination and water purification. As a thermally driven membrane technology which runs at relatively low pressure, which can withstand high salinity feed ...

Summers, Edward K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach ... chemical reaction rates will increase exponentially and environmental attack...

180

Applied Chemicals and Materials Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Chemicals and Materials Staff Directory. ... accept either a name, organizational name, or ... MML Organization. Contact. Material Measurement ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory - Applied Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Physics Division | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

182

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE MIAMI UNIVERSITY 2005-2006 The program leads to the degree, Bachelor of Science in Applied Science, with a major in Chemical Engineering The chemical engineering students learn to apply the concepts of chemistry, biochemistry and biological science

Dollar, Anna

183

Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tsai, Chung-Yi (6 Mount Vernon Dr., Apt. C, Vernon, CT 06066); Lu, Yungfeng (1055 N. Capital Ave., #20, San Jose, CA 95133)

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H2 WGS H2 operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate ­ 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900°C Equivalent O2 Operational Experience Under High Pressure Differential SUMMARY OF ELTRON OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE SYNGAS

185

Separation of metals by supported liquid membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

Takigawa, D.Y.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Separation of metals by supported liquid membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

Takigawa, Doreen Y. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bio-Membrane Flexibility Studied in the Presence of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-Membrane Flexibility Studied in the Presence of Cholesterol and Salt. Living cell membranes are made of phospholipids ...

190

Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is an essential, yet highly expensive component of any polymer electrolyte membrane ...

191

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic

192

NETL: Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0001322 The University of Minnesota is developing a technically and economically viable membrane for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation from typical water-gas-shift (WGS) mixture feeds. The goal of this project is to further develop recently developed membrane technology based on exfoliated zeolite coatings as components for carbon capture in integrated gasification combined cycle plants. These membranes have the potential to contribute to carbon capture by high-temperature separation of hydrogen from CO2 and other gases present in shifted synthesis gas. Molecular sieve membrane for the pre-combustion capture of CO2. Molecular sieve membrane for the pre-combustion capture of CO2. Related Papers and Publications:

193

Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane  

SciTech Connect

Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

Yi, Dandan [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430040 (China)]. E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, The Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao, Li [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430040 (China); Wei, Liang [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, The Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101 (China)

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation of PEMs based on an understanding of chemistry, membrane morphology and proton transport obtained from experiment, theory and computer simulation.

Devanathan, Ramaswami

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method of making membrane-electrode assemblies for electrochemical cells and assemblies made thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making a combination, unitary, membrane and electrode assembly having a solid polymer electrolyte membrane, and first and second electrodes at least partially embedded in opposed surfaces of the membrane. The electrodes each comprise a respective group of finely divided carbon particles, very finely divided catalytic particles supported on internal and external surfaces of the carbon particles and a proton conductive material intermingled with the catalytic and carbon particles. A first group of finely divided carbon particles forming the first electrode has greater water attraction and retention properties, and is more hydrophilic than a second group of carbon particles forming the second electrode. In a preferred method, the membrane electrode assembly of the invention is prepared by forming a slurry of proton conductive material and at least one group of the carbon and catalyst particles. The slurry is applied to the opposed surfaces of the membrane and heated while being pressed to the membrane for a time and at a temperature and compressive load sufficient to embed at least a portion of the particles into the membrane. 10 figs.

Swathirajan, S.; Mikhail, Y.M.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a new generation of efficient bioenergy strategies that will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and help curb carbon emissions. Fundamental and applied bioenergy research at...

199

Applied Control Strategies at a Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of classical strategies for dynamic control on authentic cogeneration processes. These strategies are applied (more)

Burns, Joseph William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Applied Quantum Technology AQT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AQT Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Quantum Technology (AQT) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Product California-based manufacturer of CIGS (copper indium gallium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Applied Solar LLC formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Solar LLC (formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc) Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Sector Solar Product Offers an integrated portfolio of building-integrated PV products such as solar tiles, membranes and asphalt/composition products; also holds license to build concentrating solar power systems. References Applied Solar LLC (formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Applied Solar LLC (formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus Energy Inc) is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "Applied Solar LLC (formerly Open Energy Corp and Barnabus

202

Quantum dynamics of an optical cavity coupled to a thin semitransparent membrane: Effect of membrane absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the quantum dynamics of the cavity optomechanical system formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating membrane at its center. We determine in particular to what extent optical absorption by the membrane hinders reaching a quantum regime for the cavity-membrane system. We show that even though membrane absorption may significantly lower the cavity finesse and also heat the membrane, one can still simultaneously achieve ground state cooling of a vibrational mode of the membrane and stationary optomechanical entanglement with state-of-the-art apparatuses.

Biancofiore, C.; Karuza, M.; Galassi, M.; Natali, R.; Vitali, D. [School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Tombesi, P.; Di Giuseppe, G. [School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); CriptoCam S.r.l., via Madonna delle Carceri 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Applied technology section. Monthly report, March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a monthly report giving the details on research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The following are areas of the research, engineering modeling and simulation, applied statistics, applied physics,experimental thermal hydraulics,and packaging and transportation.

Buckner, M.R.

1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

DRAFT GUIDANCE Applying for Other Uses of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRAFT GUIDANCE Applying for Other Uses of Phosphogypsum: Submitting a Complete Petition 40 CFR 61 Assignment 0-2 #12;Applying for Other Uses of Phosphogypsum: Submitting a Complete Petition Table of Contents phosphogypsum in stacks? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.4. What

205

Applied Materials Inc AMAT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc AMAT Inc AMAT Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Inc (AMAT) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95052-8039 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of equipment used in solar (silicon, thin-film, BIPV), semiconductor, and LCD markets. References Applied Materials Inc (AMAT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Applied Materials Inc (AMAT) is a company located in Santa Clara, California . References ↑ "Applied Materials Inc (AMAT)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Applied_Materials_Inc_AMAT&oldid=342244" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

206

Applied Materials Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Wind Turbine Facility Applied Materials Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Applied Materials Developer Applied Materials Energy Purchaser Applied Materials Location Gloucester MA Coordinates 42.62895426°, -70.65153122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.62895426,"lon":-70.65153122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane  

Cell membranes are the interface between an organism and its environment. These biological structures contain proteins that are extremely important for many cellular ...

208

Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Dense ceramic membranes are used at high temperatures as ... Stability and Oxygen Exchange Kinetics of Oxide Hetero-Junction Electrodes.

209

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to...

210

Composite membranes and methods for making same  

SciTech Connect

Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

Synthesizing Membrane Proteins Using In Vitro Methodology ...  

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have created an in vitro , cell-free system and method for producing several types of protein: membrane ...

212

High Permeability Ternary Palladium Alloy Membranes with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple membranes have been tested under the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Test Protocol with initial promising results from Au containing ...

213

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

EMSL: Science: GC: Membrane Biology - Project Achievements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Achievements EMSL's Membrane Biology Scientific Grand Challenge researchers grew Cyanothece in defined culture conditions and entrained it to a 12-hour light12-hour...

216

Membrane distillation : module design and modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for seawater desalination that is traditionally accomplished by conventional separation processes such as thermal distillation or reverse osmosis. (more)

Yang, Xing.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Semipermeable Membranes for Micromachined Silicon Surfaces ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Sandia National Laboratories has developed semipermeable silicon nitride membranes using an etch process to be co-manufactured on a ...

218

Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was the development and evaluation of novel hydrocarbon fuel cell (FC) membranes that possess high temperature performance and long term chemical/mechanical durability in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC). The major research theme was synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon polymers of the poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) type containing sulfonic acid groups tethered to the backbone via perfluorinated alkylene linkages and in some cases also directly attached to the phenylene groups along the backbone. Other research themes were the use of nitrogen-based heterocyclics instead of acid groups for proton conduction, which provides high temperature, low relative humidity membranes with high mechanical/thermal/chemical stability and pendant moieties that exhibit high proton conductivities in the absence of water, and synthesis of block copolymers consisting of a proton conducting block coupled to poly(perfluorinated propylene oxide) (PFPO) blocks. Accomplishments of the project were as follows: 1) establishment of a vertically integrated program of synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of FC membranes, 2) establishment of benchmark membrane performance data based on Nafion for comparison to experimental membrane performance, 3) development of a new perfluoroalkyl sulfonate monomer, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl) pentafluoropropanesulfonate (HPPS), 4) synthesis of random and block copolymer membranes from HPPS, 5) synthesis of block copolymer membranes containing high-acid-concentration hydrophilic blocks consisting of HPPS and 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (sDCDPS), 6) development of synthetic routes to aromatic polymer backbones containing pendent 1H-1,2,3-triazole moieties, 7) development of coupling strategies to create phase-separated block copolymers between hydrophilic sulfonated prepolymers and commodity polymers such as PFPO, 8) establishment of basic performance properties of experimental membranes, 9) fabrication and FC performance testing of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) from experimental membranes, and 10) measurement of ex situ and in situ membrane durability of experimental membranes. Although none of the experimental hydrocarbon membranes that issued from the project displayed proton conductivities that met DOE requirements, the project contributed to our basic understanding of membrane structure-property relationships in a number of key respects. An important finding of the benchmark studies is that physical degradation associated with humidity and temperature variations in the FC tend to open new fuel crossover pathways and act synergistically with chemical degradation to accelerate overall membrane degradation. Thus, for long term membrane survival and efficient fuel utilization, membranes must withstand internal stresses due to humidity and temperature changes. In this respect, rigid aromatic hydrocarbon fuel cell membranes, e.g. PAES, offer an advantage over un-modified Nafion membranes. The benchmark studies also showed that broadband dielectric spectroscopy is a potentially powerful tool in assessing shifts in the fundamental macromolecular dynamics caused by Nafion chemical degradation, and thus, this technique is of relevance in interrogating proton exchange membrane durability in fuel cells and macromolecular dynamics as coupled to proton migration, which is of fundamental relevance in proton exchange membranes in fuel cells. A key finding from the hydrocarbon membrane synthesis effort was that rigid aromatic polymers containing isolated ion exchange groups tethered tightly to the backbone (short tether), such as HPPS, provide excellent mechanical and durability properties but do not provide sufficient conductivity, in either random or block configuration, when used as the sole ion exchange monomer. However, we continue to hypothesize that longer tethers, and tethered groups spaced more closely within the hydrophilic chain elements of the polymer, will yield highly conductive materials with excellent mech

Storey, Robson, F.; Mauritz, Kenneth, A.; Patton, Derek, L.; Savin, Daniel, A.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine the specific organelle that mesoporous silica nanoparticles could approach via the identification of harvested proteins from exocytosis process. Based on the study of endo- and exocytosis behavior of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials, we can design smarter drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy that can be effectively controlled. The destination, uptake efficiency and the cellular distribution of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials can be programmable. As a result, release mechanism and release rate of drug delivery systems can be a well-controlled process. The deep investigation of an endo- and exocytosis study of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials promotes the development of drug delivery applications.

Fang, I-Ju

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Applying System Engineering to Pharmaceutical Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While engineering techniques are used in the development of medical devices and have been applied to individual healthcare processes, such as the use of checklists in surgery and ICUs, the application of system engineering ...

Couturier, Matthieu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Applied Information Security, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Information Security guides readers through the installation and basic operation of IT Security software used in the industry today. Dos Commands; Password Auditors; Data Recovery & Secure Deletion; Packet Sniffer; Port Scanners; Vulnerability ...

Randy Boyle

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Baldrige FAQs: Applying for the Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... often use their feedback reports in their strategic planning processes to focus ... How long does it take to apply for the ... How long will it take to do a self ...

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied Field Research Initiative Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. Challenge Many vadose zone environments within the DOE complex consist of complex stratified layers of unconsolidated and water-unsaturated sediments that are, in many places, con-

224

Applied Virtual Intelligence in Oil & Gas Industry;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Applied Virtual Intelligence in Oil & Gas Industry; Past, Present, & Future Shahab D. Mohaghegh on a daily basis by almost everyone. Credit Card Fraud Detection Bank Loan Approval Bomb Sniffing Devices

Mohaghegh, Shahab

225

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who are looking for alternative methods to improve conventional refining methods. During the last decade, energy efficient membrane separation technology has evolved dramatically. This thesis reports a study on degumming crude vegetable oil using membrane separation. In the bench-scale study, two membranes were evaluated for their flux and rejection properties. Process parameters including pressure, temperature, feed velocity and volumetric concentration factor were examined. A 99.6% rejection of phospholipids and a flux of 22.4 LMH were achieved at pressure 300 psi, temperature 40'C and feed velocity 220 1/hr using DS-7 membrane, and significant reduction of the coloring pigments was observed as well. In the pilot-scale study, the spiral wound DS-7 membrane was found effective for 100% rejection of phospholipids with a permeate flux of 57.6 LMH. The rejection rates of phospholipids, Mg and Ca were 100%, 99.6% and 54.6%, respectively. Resistance-in-series model of the membrane system was also studied. The membrane resistance, the fouling resistance, and the polarization resistance for the pilotscale system were 0.29, 0.043, and 4.49, respectively. Evaluation on membrane fouling and cleaning showed that flux decreased rapidly during the first several hours and membrane cleaning presented no significant problem. The pilot-scale study confirmed results of the bench-scale system and provides useful data for commercializing membrane refining process in the near future. KEY WORDS: Membrane separation, crude vegetable oil, degumming, phospholipids.

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dense ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required and if the driving potential of transport is sufficient, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen anions, not oxygen molecules. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into a hollow-tube reactor, with air passed over the outside of the membrane and methane through the inside. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or any other gas. Long tubes of La-Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) membrane were fabricated by plastic extrusion, and thermal stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure by high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be acceptable for a reactor material. Fracture of certain SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. However, tubes made with a particular stoichiometry (SFC-2) provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor. Some of the reactor tubes have operated for up to {approx} 1,000 h.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Sweeney, S.M.; Mieville, R.L.; Maiya, P.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Pei, S.; Kobylinski, T.P. [Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (United States); Bose, A.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 2012 27, 2012 CX-008982: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High Performance Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office" August 23, 2012 CX-009018: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Tennessee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 22, 2012 CX-009013: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2012-13 State Energy Program Formula Grant CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 22, 2012 CX-008979: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flexible Assembly Solar Technology CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17

228

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 2012 27, 2012 CX-008982: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High Performance Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office" August 24, 2012 CX-008921: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Virginia Super Circuit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/24/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 24, 2012 CX-008920: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Virginia Super Circuit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/24/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2012 CX-009018: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Tennessee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11

229

Hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of a nanopore induced by an applied voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuum simulation is employed to study ion transport and fluid flow through a nanopore in a solid-state membrane under an applied potential drop. Results show the existence of concentration polarization layers on the surfaces of the membrane. The nonuniformity of the ionic distribution gives rise to an electric pressure that drives vortical motion in the fluid. There is also a net hydrodynamic flow through the nanopore due to an asymmetry induced by the membrane surface charge. The qualitative behavior is similar to that observed in a previous study using molecular dynamic simulations. The current--voltage characteristics show some nonlinear features but are not greatly affected by the hydrodynamic flow in the parameter regime studied. In the limit of thin Debye layers, the electric resistance of the system can be characterized using an equivalent circuit with lumped parameters. Generation of vorticity can be understood qualitatively from elementary considerations of the Maxwell stresses. However, the flow strength is a strongly nonlinear function of the applied field. Combination of electrophoretic and hydrodynamic effects can lead to ion selectivity in terms of valences and this could have some practical applications in separations.

Mao Mao; Sandip Ghosal; Guohui Hu

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hybrid Membranes for Light Gas Separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane separations provide a potentially attractive technology over conventional processes due to their advantages, such as low capital cost and energy consumption. The goal of this thesis is to design hybrid membranes that facilitate specific gas separations, especially olefin/paraffin separations. This thesis focuses on the designing dendrimer-based hybrid membranes on mesoporous alumina for reverse-selective separations, synthesizing Cu(I)-dendrimer hybrid membrane to facilitate olefin/paraffin separations, particularly ethylene/methane separation, and investigating the influence of solvent, stabilizing ligands on facilitated transport membrane. Reverse-selective gas separations have attracted considerable attention in removing the heavier/larger molecules from gas mixtures. In this study, dendrimer-based chemistry was proved to be an effective method by altering dendrimer structures and generations. G6-PIP, G4-AMP and G3-XDA are capable to fill the alumina mesopores and slight selectivity are observed. Facilitated transport membranes were made to increase the olefin/paraffin selectivity based on their chemical interaction with olefin molecules. Two approaches were explored, the first was to combine facilitator Cu(I) with dendrimer hybrid membrane to increase olefin permeance and olefin/paraffin selectivity simultaneously, and second was to facilitate transport membrane functionality by altering solvents and stabilizing ligands. Promising results were found by these two approaches, which were: 1) olefin/paraffin selectivity slightly increased by introducing facilitator Cu(I), 2) the interaction between Cu(I) and dendrimer functional groups are better known.

Liu, Ting

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Colloidal Fouling of Reverse Osmosis Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For the tests involving foulant mass measurements and effect of surfactants, a predetermined initial flux to distinguish between two cases. For RO, nanofiltration (NF), and perhaps "tight" ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and, thus, reduces the product water flux (4). For microfiltration (MF) membranes, pore plugging

Elimelech, Menachem

234

Zein Recovery Using Non-Porous Membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane process for treating zein solutions to increase the zein concentration in the solution. The process uses a non-porous membrane that preferentially permeates the solvent and rejects the zein. Optionally, the process can be operated as a diafiltration process to yield a concentrate of high zein purity.

Mairal, Anurag P. (Fremont, CA); Ng, Alvin (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

237

Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fission of a multiphase membrane tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common mechanism for intracellular transport is the use of controlled deformations of the membrane to create spherical or tubular buds. While the basic physical properties of homogeneous membranes are relatively well-known, the effects of inhomogeneities within membranes are very much an active field of study. Membrane domains enriched in certain lipids in particular are attracting much attention, and in this Letter we investigate the effect of such domains on the shape and fate of membrane tubes. Recent experiments have demonstrated that forced lipid phase separation can trigger tube fission, and we demonstrate how this can be understood purely from the difference in elastic constants between the domains. Moreover, the proposed model predicts timescales for fission that agree well with experimental findings.

Jean-Marc Allain; Cornelis Storm; Aurelien Roux; Martine Ben Amar; Jean-Francois Joanny

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

239

Liners for ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect

Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gas separation with glass membranes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual ``molecular sieving`` behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000{degrees}F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H{sub 2}/CO,N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

Rempe, Susan B.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

How to Apply | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How to Apply How to Apply How to Apply Awards are made through a formal process that has changed dramatically since 2011. So let us walk you through it step by step. "Innovation pays." - John Kao, Innovation Nation Submit a Letter of Intent On October 28, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced on the DOE SBIR website a preview version of the technical topics for which it will later accept funding applications. These topics will be found on the DOE's Funding Opportunity Announcements page. The EE SBIR page lists those topics that are cleantech (specific to EERE). We also recommend that you sign up for the EE-SBIR and DOE-SBIR mailing lists. The EE SBIR mailing list signup is at https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USEERE/subscriber/new?topic_id=USEERE_442.

243

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

244

Applied Process Engineering Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Name Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Address 350 Hills Street, Suite #101 Place Richland, Washington Zip 99354 Region Pacific Northwest Area Coordinates 46.3389754°, -119.2716263° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3389754,"lon":-119.2716263,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute, Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales (CEPII) Focus Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.ifpri.org/book-5076/ourwork/program/mirage-model RelatedTo: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Data Base

246

Applied Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Ventures LLC Applied Ventures LLC Name Applied Ventures LLC Address 3050 Bowers Avenue Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Region Southern CA Area Product Venture capital. Number of employees 1-10 Phone number (408) 727-5555 Website http://www.appliedventures.com Coordinates 37.37751°, -121.978721° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.37751,"lon":-121.978721,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

Caldwell, Karin D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chu, Tun-Jen (Salt Lake City, UT); Pitt, William G. (Orem, UT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to improve the method of fabricating tubular metal supported microporous inorganic membranes. Earlier work focused on the original development of inorganic membranes for the purification of hydrogen. These membranes are now being scaled up for demonstration in a coal gasification plant for the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas for a project funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's Gasification and Coal Fuels programs [1]. This project is part of FutureGen, an initiative to build the world's first integrated sequestration and hydrogen production research power plant. Although previous work in the Advanced Research Materials Program project led to development of a tubular metal supported microporous membrane which was approved by the Department of Energy for testing, the membranes generally have lower than desired selectivities for hydrogen over other gases common in synthesis gas including carbon dioxide. The work on this project over three years will lead to general improvements in fabrication techniques that will result in membranes having higher separation factors and higher fluxes. Scanning electron microscopy and profilometry data will be presented to show qualitatively and quantitatively the surface roughness of the support tubes. We will discuss how the roughness affects membrane quality and methods to improve the quality of the support tube surface.

Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL; Adcock, Kenneth Dale [ORNL; Powell, Lawrence E [ORNL; Sutton, Theodore G [ORNL; Miller, Curtis Jack [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gradient Porous Composite Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications  

The heart of current polymer electrolyte fuel cells are the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), which are composed of (i) an ionomer polymer membrane ...

251

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage...

252

A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS  

Office of Technology Transfer A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS Cell membranes are important biological structures as they ...

253

Corrosion of Membrane Materials for Hydrogen Separation from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, To produce high purity hydrogen fuel from coal, hydrogen can be extracted from syngas using gas separation membranes. No membrane...

254

Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest as membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons (more)

Faraji, Sedigheh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery in Vav Systems for Commercial Office Buildings Title The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...

256

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery in VAV System for Commercial Office Buildings Title The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...

257

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet from Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. about its pilot-scale industrial membrane system that was funded by the SBIR program.

258

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: High Temperature Membrane Working...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically operate at temperatures no higher than 60C-80C due to structural limitations of the membrane. Operating PEM fuel...

259

A membrane reactor process for the production of biodiesel .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bench and pilot scale membrane reactors were designed and assembled to carry out the transesterification of different lipids with methanol. The membrane reactors integrate many (more)

Cao, Peigang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EMSL: Science: EMSL Scientific Grand Challenge: Membrane Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHALLENGE: MEMBRANE BIOLOGY Membrane Biology GC Resources Meet the Team Advisory Committee What Are Cyanobacteria? Project Achievements In the News 2005-2007 Progress Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

262

Applying Adaptive Evolutionary Algorithms to Hard Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Adaptive Evolutionary Algorithms to Hard Problems J.I. van Hemert1 jvhemert into two distinct parts. The main theme is adaptive evolutionary algorithms. The rst part covers. The second part mainly consists of the development of a library. Its use is aimed at evolutionary algorithms

Emmerich, Michael

263

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, and ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, D.B.; Slutz, S.A.

1986-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Anisotropic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

Gollan, A.Z.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype  

SciTech Connect

Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Performance of ceramic membrane filters  

SciTech Connect

CeraMem Corp.`s ceramic-membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters offer a promising alternative to ceramic candle filters providing long-term operational and reliability issues are resolved: regenerability of filter passages by back pulse cleaning, tolerance to alkali-containing combustion gas and thermal/chemical aging. ANL is responsible for analytical modeling of filtration and pulse cleaning operations, flow-through testing, and prediction of filter response to thermal cycling under realistic service conditions. A test apparatus was built to expose ceramic filter specimens to chemical environments simulating operation of pressurized fluidized bed and integrated gasification combined cycle plants. Four long-duration tests have been conducted in which 100-cpsi channel filters were exposed to ash collected downstream of the cyclone separator at the PFBC plant at Tidd. Results are discussed. Focus has now shifted to exposing the advanced candle filter specimens to reducing gas environments containing NaCl, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and gasification ash.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Growth of aqueous foam on flexible membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I study the coarsening dynamics of two-dimensional dry foam sandwiched by deformable membranes. The time-varying deformation of the confining membranes gives rise to a significant alteration in the evolution of polygonal cells of bubbles when compared to the case of rigid membranes. This alteration is attributed to the correlation between the rate of inter-cell gas transfer and temporal fluctuation in surface curvature within a cell domain. The existing material constants are referred to understand the utility of the correlation effect toward the artificial control of the coarsening dynamics.

Hiroyuki Shima

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ); Bischoff, Brian L. (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of todays carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Poriferas carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

Fox, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Title Page Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1 Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1 2 Title Natural Competence in Thermoanaerobacter and Thermoanaerobacterium Species 3 Running Title Thermonanerobacter Natural Competence 4 5 Authors and Affiliations 6 A. Joe Shaw 1,2 , David A. Hogsett 1 , Lee R. Lynd 1,2,3 * 7 1 Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766 8 2 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 9 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 10 11 Corresponding Author 12 Lee R. Lynd 13 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 14 Phone: 603.646.2231 15 Email: lee.lynd@dartmouth.edu 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology and/or the Listed Authors/Institutions. All Rights Reserved.

273

Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy SHARE Fundamental and Applied Bioenergy Steven Brown (left) and Shihui Yang have developed a microbial strain with an improved ability to convert wood products to biofuel as part of research within the DOE BioEnergy Science Center.Source: ORNL News article ORNL researchers are investigating the biological mechanisms underlying production of biofuels so that those mechanisms can be improved and used to develop a new generation of efficient bioenergy strategies that will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and help curb carbon emissions. Fundamental and applied bioenergy research at ORNL includes studies conducted within the BioEnergy Science Center and the following research areas: Bioconversion Science and Technology Plant-Microbe Interfaces

274

Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for Beam Time Apply for Beam Time NEXT PROPOSAL DEADLINE: March 7, 2014 @ 11:59 PM (Chicago time) Submit Proposal » SEE ALSO: Calendar: deadlines, run & review dates Help Page: frequently asked questions, tips for success, common errors, blank forms, instructions Review Criteria Sectors Directory: check CAT websites for info about managed beam time The Run 2014-2 proposal submission deadline is 11:59 p.m. (Chicago time) March 7, 2014. The system will open to accept proposals beginning December 20, 2013. NEW USERS: to avoid delays and to make the most of your time on site, read Become a User. You must register as a user and receive a badge number before submitting a proposal. About the Beam Time Request Process All beam time at the APS must be requested each cycle through the web-based

275

Applying DSM evaluation results to utility planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a study to assess the application of DSM evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The paper has three objectives: (1) identify forecasting and planning applications of evaluation studies, (2) identify major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results to forecasting and planning, and (3) suggest approaches to address the major problems. The paper summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the utility industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The paper also includes results from a detailed case study of Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and Southern California Edison Company (SCE), two utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

277

Critical Casimir forces in cellular membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments suggest that membranes of living cells are tuned close to a miscibility critical point in the 2D Ising universality class. We propose that one role for this proximity to criticality in live cells is to provide a conduit for relatively long-ranged critical Casimir forces. Using techniques from conformal field theory we calculate potentials of mean force between membrane bound inclusions mediated by their local interactions with the composition order parameter. We verify these calculations using Monte-Carlo where we also compare critical and off-critical results. Our findings suggest that membrane bound proteins experience weak yet long range forces mediated by critical composition fluctuations in the plasma membranes of living cells.

Benjamin B. Machta; Sarah L. Veatch; James P. Sethna

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Application of Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Technology to Cat Cracker Recycle Gas Hydrogen* FINAL REPORT DOE FEW FEAC324 June 2003 L.D. Trowbridge *AKA: Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology to Hydrogen-Hydrocarbon Separations ORNL/TM-2003/139 Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology To Hydrogen-hydrocarbon Separations June 2003 Prepared by L. D. Trowbridge DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847)

279

Diffuse charge effects in fuel cell membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that electrolyte membranes in fuel cells are electrically neutral, except in unsteady situations, when the double-layer capacitance is heuristically included in equivalent circuit calculations. Indeed, ...

Biesheuvel, P. M.

280

Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Constant Pressure High Throughput Membrane Permeation Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant flue gas or in natural gas sweetening, and the separation of methane from other biogas components. Membranes can be made from a vast array of organic or inorganic materials...

282

Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.S. Rose. 2002. Aging of reflective roofs: sootAging and Weathering of Cool Roofing Membranes HashemNRC), Canada ABSTRACT Aging and weathering can reduce the

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes for Gas Separation  

SciTech Connect

Ionic liquids have been rapidly gaining attention for various applications including solvent separation and gas capture. These substances are noted for extremely low vapor pressure and high CO2 solubility making them ideal as transport or capture media for CO2 abatement in power generation applications. Ionic liquids, combined with various supports to form membranes, have been proven selective in CO2 separation. Several ionic liquids and a variety of polymer supports have been studied over a temperature range from 37C to 300C and have been optimized for stability. The membranes have demonstrated high permeability and high selectivity since the supported ionic liquid membranes incorporate functionality capable of chemically complexing CO2. A study aimed at improving supported ionic liquid membranes will examine their durability with greater transmembrane pressures and the effects on CO2 permeance, CO2/H2 selectivity and thermal stability.

Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electrokinetic properties of the mammalian tectorial membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tectorial membrane (TM) clearly plays a mechanical role in stimulating cochlear sensory receptors, but the presence of fixed charge in TM constituents suggests that electromechanical properties also may be important. ...

Ghaffari, Roozbeh

285

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with acidic polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte membrane is formed by an acidic polymer and a low-volatility acid that is fluorinated, substantially free of basic groups, and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric.

Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

Cabasso, Israel (131 Buckingham Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210); Korngold, Emmanuel (P.O. Box 1025, Beer-Sheva 84110, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Inorganic Polymer Derived Ceramic Membranes 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic porous membranes capable of molecular sieving represent a promising alternative to energy-intensive distillation or cryogenic separation technologies used for processes such as purification of natural gas, air separation, and flue gas cleanup. Such membranes, fabricated at laboratory scale as part of this study, are capable of operating at temperatures as high as 200 degrees Celsius and can withstand harsh chemical environments and aggressive cleaning after fouling. Their selectivity factors and ...

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Membrane Research for Water and Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes two research projects involving the use of membranes in water treatment: o Technologies for Improving Water Desalination -- The objectives of this study were to compare capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogel and reverse osmosis (RO) for salinity reduction using conventional treatment, conventional treatment with ozone and biologically active filters, and microfiltration as the pretreatment step. o Membrane Pretreatment of Reclaimed Wastewater for Reverse Osmosis Desali...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Carbon-nanotube-based membranes for water desalination by membrane distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates ways to fabricate composite macro-structures made of carbon nanotubes in combination with polymers and metals to enhance membrane lifespan and performance. Carbon (more)

Dumee, Ludovic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents information and data relative to recent advances in the development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory of porous inorganic membranes for high-temperature hydrogen separation. The Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory, which was formerly an organizational element of Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, was formally transferred to Oak Ridge National Laboratory on August 1, 2002, as a result of agreements reached between Bechtel Jacobs Company, the management and integration contractor at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or Oak Ridge K-25 Site); UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office. Research emphasis during the last year has been directed toward the development of high-permeance (high-flux) and high-separation-factor metal-supported membranes. Performance data for these membranes are presented and are compared with performance data for membranes previously produced under this program and for membranes produced by other researchers. New insights into diffusion mechanisms are included in the discussion. Fifteen products, many of which are the results of research sponsored by the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program, have been declared unclassified and have been approved for commercial production.

Bischoff, B.L.; Judkins, R.R.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project objectives are to develop hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes for water-gas shift membrane-reactor suitable for hydrogen production from coal gas, and to evaluate the technical and economic potential of the membrane-reactor. Work performed during reporting period included membrane deposition and stability testing.

Gavalas, G.R.

1992-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Arylene-fluorinated-sulfonimide ionomers and membranes for fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preparation of aromatic sulfonimide polymers useful as membranes in electrochemical cells is described.

Teasley, Mark F. (Landenberg, PA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Applied Environmental Microbiology | VIMSS - Virtual Institute for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection of Soil Samples Collection of Soil Samples Identification of Natural Stressors Profiling of Microbial Population Field and Simulated Conceptual Model Facilities The Applied Environmental Microbiology (AEM) Core is the source of environmental data and samples that determine the stressors that will be studied, pro-vides the environments for growing the organisms to be tested, simulates stressed environments, and verifies the conceptual models to determine how these stress regulatory pathways control the biogeochemistry of contaminated sites. The specific goals of the AEM Core are to: Survey and map DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides using chemical and molecular/ microbiological parameters to determine major microbial populations and potential stressors for Desulfovibrio vulgaris,

295

Statistical Uncertainty Analysis Applied to Criticality Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an uncertainty methodology based on a statistical approach, for assessing uncertainties in criticality prediction using monte carlo method due to uncertainties in the isotopic composition of the fuel. The methodology has been applied to criticality calculations with MCNP5 with additional stochastic input of the isotopic fuel composition. The stochastic input were generated using the latin hypercube sampling method based one the probability density function of each nuclide composition. The automatic passing of the stochastic input to the MCNP and the repeated criticality calculation is made possible by using a python script to link the MCNP and our latin hypercube sampling code.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Susmikanti, Mike; Nursinta, A. W. [Centre for Nuclear Informatics Development, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Graphene as a Prototype Crystalline Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The understanding of the structural and thermal properties of membranes, low-dimensional flexible systems in a space of higher dimension, is pursued in many fields from string theory to chemistry and biology. The case of a two-dimensional (2D) membrane in three dimensions is the relevant one for dealing with real materials. Traditionally, membranes are primarily discussed in the context of biological membranes and soft matter in general. The complexity of these systems hindered a realistic description of their interatomic structures based on a truly microscopic approach. Therefore, theories of membranes were developed mostly within phenomenological models. From the point of view of statistical mechanics, membranes at finite temperature are systems governed by interacting long-range fluctuations. Graphene, the first truly two-dimensional system consisting of just one layer of carbon atoms, provides a model system for the development of a microscopic description of membranes. In this Account, we review key results in the microscopic theory of structural and thermal properties of graphene and compare them with the predictions of phenomenological theories. The two approaches are in good agreement for the various scaling properties of correlation functions of atomic displacements. However, some other properties, such as the temperature dependence of the bending rigidity, cannot be understood based on phenomenological approaches. We also consider graphene at very high temperature and compare the results with existing models for two-dimensional melting. The melting of graphene presents a different scenario, and we describe that process as the decomposition of the graphene layer into entangled carbon chains.

Mikhail I. Katsnelson; Annalisa Fasolino

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)  

SciTech Connect

Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

EG G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system  

SciTech Connect

EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy's Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor's Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, Pay, Leave, and Allowances.'' Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

Not Available

1992-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Case Study of the Applied Learning Academy: Reconceptualized Quantum Design of Applied Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the Applied Learning Academy (ALA) and allow the lessons learned from this public school to emerge from the narrative stories of past students, parents, teachers, administrators, and local business associates who have been directly involved and influenced by the applied learning teaching method. Accountability is critical for all public and charter schools. Districts have been trying to raise the standards with new programs and strategies in an effort to make learning experiences relevant to students? daily lives. Revisiting John Dewey?s philosophy from the progressive movement, project-based, service learning, community partnerships, and portfolio assessment helped to create the applied learning method. In the present study, a qualitative case study approach was utilized to identify successful factors, benefits, and drawbacks of applied learning in order to describe the transition of portfolio assessment, project-based learning, and community-based partnerships within the classroom and to understand the impact and misconceptions of applied learning as experienced through the Recognized Campus, ALA, a 6-8th public middle school within a large urban school district. Participant interviews, field observations, and historical records were collected which indicated that student centered project-based curriculum, small school size creating family relationships, community involvement with partnerships, service learning projects, and metacognitive development from portfolio assessments were the major factors that supported academic rigor and relevance because of the real educational applications in this applied learning middle school. Briefly defined, applied learning is when a problem is seen within the surrounding community, and the solution is generated by the students. This progressive 15-year impact of applied learning ultimately leads to the development of four applied learning schools despite the misconception that applied learning was a remedial or gifted program. Redefining applied learning for a better understanding developed a reconceptualized diagram borrowed from the quantum mechanics model. Reconceptualization expands the interpretation by increasing the intellectual flexibility. As the student becomes energized from the acquired knowledge of learning applicable skills through service learning, project-based curriculum, and portfolio assessment, the student?s academic growth should increase to a higher, educational ?energy level? supported by the critical, situated-learning, and feminist theories.

Gordon, Denise

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effect of operating conditions and membrane quality on the separation performance of composite silicalite-1 membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation capacity of silicalite-1 membranes for various hydrocarbon mixtures is determined as a function of membrane quality, operating conditions, and orientation of the composite membrane with respect to the feed side. The quality of the membranes is judged on the basis of the n-butane/i-butane permselectivity. Membranes with a different n-butane/i-butane permselectivity showed an identical separation capacity for ethane/methane mixtures, but the quality difference was affecting separation of hydrogen from the butane isomers. The selectivity of the membrane is significantly affected by the operating conditions, such as mixture composition, temperature, and absolute pressure. These effects are shown for ethane/methane, propene/ethene, and n-butane/i-butane mixtures. The selectivity for ethane in ethane/methane mixtures, found when the zeolite layer is facing the feed side, is completely lost when the orientation of the composite membrane is reversed, due to concentration polarization. Depending on the membrane orientation, the major resistance of the composite is in the support layer or in the zeolite layer.

Graaf, J.M. van de; Bijl, E. van der; Stol, A.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulign, J.A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Des Plaines, Illinois Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003876: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Woburn, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003839: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficient Innovations for Healthy Buildings CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.1, B3.1, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Syracuse, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

302

Development of high temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in 1991 on the development of ceramic membranes as catalytic reactors. Efforts were focused on the design, construction and startup of a reactor system capable of duplicating relevant commercial operating conditions. With this system, yield enhancement was demonstrated for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a membrane reactor compared to the standard packed bed configuration. This enhancement came with no loss in styrene selectivity. During operation, coke deposition on the membrane was observed, but this deposition was mitigated by the presence of steam in the reaction mixture and a steady state permeability was achieved for run times in excess of 200 hours. Work began on optimizing the membrane reactor by exploring several parameters including the effect of N{sub 2} diluent in the reaction feed and the effect of a N{sub 2} purge on the permeate side of the membrane. This report details the experimental progress made in 1991. Interactions with the University of Wisconsin on this project are also summarized. Finally, current status of the project and next steps are outlined.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

Elangovan, S.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Applied Energy Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Energy Management Place Huntersville, North Carolina Zip 28078 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product North Carolina-based, energy efficiency and renewable energy service and construction company. Coordinates 35.409853°, -80.842716° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.409853,"lon":-80.842716,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

305

How to Apply for ENERGY STAR® Certification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü "How To" Series How to Apply for ENERGY STAR ® Certification Commercial buildings that earn EPA's ENERGY STAR certification perform in the top 25 percent of similar buildings nationwide, as verified by a Licensed Professional (a Professional Engineer or a Registered Architect). ENERGY STAR certified buildings use an average of 35 percent less energy and are responsible for 35 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than average buildings. To qualify for the ENERGY STAR, a property must achieve an ENERGY STAR score of 75 or higher on EPA's 1 - 100 scale, which compares a property's energy performance to

306

FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Navigating without vision: Basic and applied research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: We describe some of the results of our program of basic and applied research on navigating without vision. One basic research topic that we have studied extensively is path integration, a form of navigation in which perceived self-motion is integrated over time to obtain an estimate of current posilion and orientation. In experiments on pathway completion, one test of path integration ability, we have found that subjects who are passively guided over the outbound path without vision exhibit significant errors when attempting to return to the origin but are nevertheless sensitive to turns and segment lengths in the stimulus path. We have also found no major differences in path inlegration ability among blirid and sighted populations. A model we havc developed that attributes errors in path integration to errors in encoding the stimulus path is a good beginning toward understanding path integration performance. In otber research on path integration, in which optic flow information was manipulated in addition to the proprioceptive and vestibular information of nonvisual locomotion, we havc found that optic flow is a weak input to the path integration process. In other basic research, our studies of auditory distance perception in outdoor environments show systematic underestimation oC sound source distance. Our applied research has been concerned with developing and evaluating a navigation system for the visually impaired that uses three recent technologies: the Global Positioning System, Geographic Information Systems, and virtual acouslics. Our work shows that there is considerable promise of these three technologies in allowing visually impaired individuals to navigate and learn about unfamiliar environments without the assistance of human guides. (Optoni Vis Sci 2001;78:282-289)

Jack M. Loomis; Roberta L. Klatzky; Reginald G. Golledge

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Membrane Extraction for Detoxification of Biomass Hydrolysates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane extraction was used for the removal of sulfuric acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural and furfural from corn stover hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid. Microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes were used. The organic extractant consisted of 15% Alamine 336 in: octanol, a 50:50 mixture of oleyl alcohol:octanol or oleyl alcohol. Rapid removal of sulfuric acid, 5-hydroxymethyl and furfural was observed. The rate of acetic acid removal decreased as the pH of the hydrolysate increased. Regeneration of the organic extractant was achieved by back extraction into an aqueous phase containing NaOH and ethanol. A cleaning protocol consisting of flushing the hydrolysate compartment with NaOH and the organic phase compartment with pure organic phase enabled regeneration and reuse of the module. Ethanol yields from hydrolysates detoxified by membrane extraction using 15% Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol were about 10% higher than those from hydrolysates detoxified using ammonium hydroxide treatment.

Grzenia, D. L.; Schell, D. J.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dual-Layer Asymmetric Microporous Silica Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a novel sol-gel dip-coating process to form dual-layer microporous silica membranes with improved membrane performance and reproducibility. First, we deposit a surfactant-templated silica (STS) intermediate layer on top of a commercial {gamma}-alumina support both to improve its ''surface finish'' and to prevent a subsequently deposited microporous overlayer from penetrating into the support. Second, membranes are processed under clean room conditions to avoid dust contamination and, third, membranes are vacuum-calcined to promote further pore shrinkage and impart surface hydrophobicity. The resulting asymmetric membrane exhibits a gradual change in pore diameter from 50{angstrom} ({gamma}-alumina support layer) to 10-12{angstrom} (STS intermediate layer), and then to 3-4{angstrom} (30nm thick, ultramicroporous silica top-layer). Compared to a single-layer process using only the microporous overlayer, the dual-layer process improves both flux and selectivity. For the industrially important problem of natural gas purification, the combined CO{sub 2} flux [(3{approx} 0.5) x 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 3}(STP)/(s{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}cm-Hg)] and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation factors [200{approx}600] are superior to all previously reported values for separation of a 50/50 (v/v) CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture. In addition, the membrane selectively separated hydrogen from a simulated reformate from partial oxidation of methanol as evidenced by a high concentration of hydrogen recovery.

TSAI,CHUNG-YI; TAM,SIU-YUE; LU,YUNFENG; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental understanding Fundamental understanding * Driving membranes towards applications Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity High Priority * A need for a standard/available AEM (similar to Nafion in PEMs) * Define standard experimental conditions and protocols * A need for much more fundamental studies in transport mechanisms and mechanical properties * A need to develop much more new AEMs with alternative chemistries (new cation and backbone chemistries) Fundamental Studies * TRANSPORT * Conductivity (pure OH - hard to measure) * Water content, λ * Diffusion coefficients, NMR * Drag coefficients * Transference * Solubility * Fundamental transport mechanisms for anion and water transport * Computational Modeling * MORPHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY * Vibrational Spectroscopy: FTIR, Raman

311

Effective free energy for pinned membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider membranes adhered through specific receptor-ligand bonds. Thermal undulations of the membrane induce effective interactions between adhesion sites. We derive an upper bound to the free energy that is independent of interaction details. To lowest order in a systematic expansion we obtain two-body interactions which allow to map the free energy onto a lattice gas with constant density. The induced interactions alone are not strong enough to lead to a condensation of individual adhesion sites. A measure of the thermal roughness is shown to depend on the inverse square root of the density of adhesion sites, which is in good agreement with previous computer simulations.

Thomas Speck

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Webster, Elizabeth T. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

Robert W. Finkel

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Novel Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce dependence on oil and emission of greenhouse gases, hydrogen is favored as an energy carrier for the near future. Hydrogen can be converted to electrical energy utilizing fuel cells and turbines. One way to produce hydrogen is to gasify coal which is abundant in the U.S. The coal gasification produces syngas from which hydrogen is then separated. Designing metallic alloys for hydrogen separation membranes which will work in a syngas environment poses significant challenges. In this presentation, a review of technical targets, metallic membrane development activities at NETL and challenges that are facing the development of new technologies will be given.

Dogan, Omer

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Membrane separation advances in FE hydrogen program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its inception in Fiscal Year 2003 the US Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Hydrogen from Coal Program has sponsored more than 60 projects and made advances in the science of separating out pure hydrogen from syngas produced through coal gasification. The Program is focusing on advanced hydrogen separation technologies, which include membranes, and combining the WGS reaction and hydrogen separation in a single operation known as process intensification. The article explains the technologies and describes some key FE membrane projects. More details are available from http://www.fossil.energy.gov. 1 fig.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydrogen separation membrane on a porous substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen permeable membrane is disclosed. The membrane is prepared by forming a mixture of metal oxide powder and ceramic oxide powder and a pore former into an article. The article is dried at elevated temperatures and then sintered in a reducing atmosphere to provide a dense hydrogen permeable portion near the surface of the sintered mixture. The dense hydrogen permeable portion has a higher initial concentration of metal than the remainder of the sintered mixture and is present in the range of from about 20 to about 80 percent by volume of the dense hydrogen permeable portion.

Song, Sun-Ju (Orland Park, IL); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL); Chen, Ling (Woodridge, IL); Dorris, Stephen E. (LaGrange Park, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

201/span>3 Short Course Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Short Course held at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 201/span>3 Short Course Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Applied Fundamentals in Interfacial Phenomena Saturday

319

Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

Solonick, W. [Electric Boat Corp., Groton, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

W.R. Solonick

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

322

Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advances in Applied Energy Computational Advances in Applied Energy Friedmann-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications Director's Perspective by George Miller...

323

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied...

324

Applying Climate Information for Adaptation Decision-Making:...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Climate Information for Adaptation Decision-Making: A Guidance and Resource Document Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Climate Information for...

325

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science | Princeton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy...

326

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Applying infrared thermography as a quality-control tool for the rapid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying infrared thermography as a quality-control tool for the rapid Applying infrared thermography as a quality-control tool for the rapid detection of polymer-electrolyte-membrane-fuel-cell catalyst-layer-thickness variations Title Applying infrared thermography as a quality-control tool for the rapid detection of polymer-electrolyte-membrane-fuel-cell catalyst-layer-thickness variations Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Aieta, Niccolo V., Prodip K. Das, Andrew Perdue, Guido Bender, Andrew M. Herring, Adam Z. Weber, and Michael J. Ulsh Journal Journal of Power Sources Volume 211 Pagination 4 - 11 Date Published 8/2012 ISSN 03787753 Keywords catalyst layer, corrosion, defects, fuel cell, infrared thermography, manufacturing, pemfc, quality control Abstract As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods are needed to enable increased volumes with high quality. One necessary component of this industrial growth will be the accurate measurement of the variability of a wide range of material properties during the manufacturing process. In this study, a method to detect defects in fuel cell catalyst layers is investigated through experiment and mathematical simulation. The method uses infrared thermography and direct-current electronic-excitation methods to detect variations in platinum-containing catalyst-layer thickness with high spatial and temporal resolution. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored, showing the measurement of defects on the millimeter length scale. Overall, the experimental and modeling results demonstrate great potential of this technique as a nondestructive method to measure defects that is amenable to use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

328

Active Transport 1 MEMBRANE FUNCTION, Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active Transport 1 MEMBRANE FUNCTION, Part 3 Active Transport1 Active Transport: If the cell must expenditure is required when a substance is moved up (against) a concentration gradient or when concrete. A good example is the Na+ / K+ pump (also known as the Na+ / K+ ATPase). It translocates both Na

Prestwich, Ken

329

Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film. 11 figs.

Raman, N.K.; Brinker, C.J.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.

Moradi, Afshin [Department of Nano Science, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah 67178-63766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran 19395-5531 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

Wood, R.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine [Ohio University, Athens, OH (US). Ohio Coal Research Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, and Membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

SciTech Connect

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film.

Raman, Narayan K. (400 Maple St. SE., Apartment 112, Albuquerque, NM 87106); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Molecular sieving silica membrane fabrication process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a molecular sieve silica membrane comprising depositing a hybrid organic-inorganic polymer comprising at least one organic constituent and at least one inorganic constituent on a porous substrate material and removing at least a portion of the at least one organic constituent of the hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, forming a porous film.

Raman, Narayan K. (Monroeville, PA); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

Pivovar, Bryan S. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorn, David L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with basic polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an electrolyte membrane comprising an acid and a basic polymer, where the acid is a low-volatile acid that is fluorinated and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric, and where the basic polymer is protonated by the acid and is stable to hydrolysis.

Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Control of size and charge selectivity in amphiphilic graft copolymer nanofiltration membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The throughput and efficiency of membrane separations make polymer filtration membranes an important resource for the pharmaceutical, food and wastewater treatment industries. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes fill an important ...

Lovell, Nathan Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of Novel active transport membrane devices. Phase I. Final report, 31 October 1988--31 January 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to identify and develop a technique for fabricating Active Transport Materials (ATM) into lab-scale membrane devices. Air Products met this objective by applying thin film, multilayer fabrication techniques to support the AT material on a substrate membrane. In Phase IA, spiral-wound hollow fiber membrane modules were fabricated and evaluated. These nonoptimized devices were used to demonstrate the AT-based separation of carbon dioxide from methane, hydrogen sulfide from methane, and ammonia from hydrogen. It was determined that a need exists for a more cost efficient and less energy intensive process for upgrading subquality natural gas. Air Products estimated the effectiveness of ATM for this application and concluded that an optimized ATM system could compete effectively with both conventional acid gas scrubbing technology and current membrane technology. In addition, the optimized ATM system would have lower methane loss and consume less energy than current alternative processes. Air Products made significant progress toward the ultimate goal of commercializing an advanced membrane for upgrading subquality natural gas. The laboratory program focused on developing a high performance hollow fiber substrate and fabricating and evaluating ATM-coated lab-scale hollow fiber membrane modules. Selection criteria for hollow fiber composite membrane supports were developed and used to evaluate candidate polymer compositions. A poly(amide-imide), PAI, was identified for further study. Conditions were identified which produced microporous PAI support membrane with tunable surface porosity in the range 100-1000{Angstrom}. The support fibers exhibited good hydrocarbon resistance and acceptable tensile strength though a higher elongation may ultimately be desirable. ATM materials were coated onto commercial and PAI substrate fiber. Modules containing 1-50 fibers were evaluated for permselectivity, pressure stability, and lifetime.

Laciak, D.V.; Quinn, R.; Choe, G.S.; Cook, P.J.; Tsai, Fu-Jya

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) depends on creating inks or pastes of catalyst and binder, and applying this suspension to either the membrane (catalyst coated membrane) or gas diffusion media (gas diffusion electrode) and respectively laminating either gas diffusion media or gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) to the membrane. One barrier to cost effective fabrication for either of these approaches is the development of stable and consistent suspensions. This program investigated the fundamental forces that destabilize the suspensions and developed innovative approaches to create new, highly stable formulations. These more concentrated formulations needed fewer application passes, could be coated over longer and wider substrates, and resulted in significantly lower coating defects. In March of 2012 BASF Fuel Cell released a new high temperature product based on these advances, whereby our customers received higher performing, more uniform MEAs resulting in higher stack build yields. Furthermore, these new materials resulted in an instant increase in capacity due to higher product yields and material throughput. Although not part of the original scope of this program, these new formulations have also led us to materials that demonstrate equivalent performance with 30% less precious metal in the anode. This program has achieved two key milestones in DOEs Manufacturing R&D program: demonstration of processes for direct coating of electrodes and continuous in-line measurement for component fabrication.

DeCastro, Emory S.; Tsou, Yu-Min; Liu, Zhenyu

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Flow Battery Membrane - David Ofer, Tiax  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flow Battery Membrane Flow Battery Membrane Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update Meeting 2012 Jack Treger treger.jack@tiaxllc.com Washington DC, September 27, 2012 Flow Battery Membrane Background and Purpose 1 Vanadium redox batteries (VRB) for energy storage require improved ion- selective membranes. * Vanadium permeation across current membranes leads to self-discharge and decreases cycling efficiency: - Negative half cell: V 2+ V 3+ + e - E o = -0.255V - Positive half cell: e - + VO 2 + + 2H + VO 2+ + H 2 O E o = 1.00V . * Current perfluorosulfonic acid polymer membranes are costly. * TIAX is developing a novel composite bipolar membrane: - Composite anionic membrane minimizes content of costly perfluorosulfonic acid polymer - Made bipolar by a cationic surface layer to improve selectivity for

345

3D assembly and actuation of nanopatterned membranes using nanomagnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for aligning and actuating membranes for 3D nano-assembly based on the interactions of nanomagnets has been developed. Arrays of nanopatterned magnetic material are integrated onto thin-film membranes. It is ...

Nichol, Anthony John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CO 2 High temp. membrane for CO 2 removal High Temperature CO 2 Selective Membranes Syngas gas CO 2 enriched gas CO 2 High pressure H 2 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 1 10 100...

347

Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Neutron spin echo spectroscopy and membrane dynamics in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... incoherent-quasi-elastic scattering nuclear magnetic resonance etc. ... Page 11. Membrane dynamics theory for bending - Helfrich bending energy ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

2007 Status of Manufacturing: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document we assess the North American industry's current ability to manufacture polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

Wheeler, D.; Sverdrup, G.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced membrane devices. Interim report for October 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

Under this Cooperative Agreement, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has continued to investigate and develop improved membrane technology for removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas. The task schedule for this reporting period included a detailed assessment of the market opportunity (Chapter 2), continued development and evaluation of membranes and membrane polymers (Chapter 3) and a detailed economic analysis comparing the potential of Air Products membranes to that of established acid gas removal processes (Chapter 4).

Laciak, D.V.; Langsam, M.; Lewnard, J.J.; Reichart, G.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose and Other Applications  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an inorganic membrane element and a flowthrough recycle (FTR) process for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass to ...

354

Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon Production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon ... Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies.

355

CX-008996: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High Performance, Durable, Low Cost Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Transportation Applications CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

356

CX-008260: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slipstream Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/28/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

357

CX-008259: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slipstream Testing of a Membrane Carbon Dioxide Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/28/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

358

Chlorine-resistant composite membranes with high organic rejection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a chlorine-resistant composite polyamide membrane having high organic rejection, the essential step of which comprises treating a conventional composite membrane with an acyl halide. The novel membrane is especially suitable for the treatment of water containing chlorine or lower molecular weight organic compounds.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Barss, Robert P. (Bend, OR); Nelson, Leslie D. (The Dalles, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Four-port gas separation membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-separation membrane assembly, and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly incorporates multiple gas-separation membranes in an array within a single vessel or housing, and is equipped with two permeate ports, enabling permeate gas to be withdrawn from both ends of the membrane module permeate pipes.

Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Fremont, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Campbell, CA)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sulfonated polysulfone battery membrane for use in corrosive environments  

SciTech Connect

For batteries containing strong oxidizing electrolyte and a membrane separating two electrolyte solutions, e.g., a zinc ferricyanide battery, an improved membrane is provided comprising an oxidative resistant, conductive, ion-selective membrane fabricated from a catenated aromatic polymer having an absence of tertiary hydrogens, e.g., a sulfonated polysulfone.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Assink, Roger (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membranes by immiscible solvents treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved semipermeable asymmetric fluid separation membranes useful in gas, vapor and liquid separations are disclosed. The membranes are prepared by substantially filling the pores of asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membranes having a finely porous layer on one side thereof with a water immiscible organic liquid, followed by contacting the finely porous layer with water.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.

1989-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Structured SiN membranes as platform for cryogenic bolometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryogenic bolometers detect radiation by measuring the temperature increase in an appropriate absorber. To achieve sufficient detector sensitivity, we place the bolometer on a SiN membrane. Thermal coupling is further decreased by patterning the membrane ... Keywords: Bolometer, Microtechnology, Silicon nitride membranes

Solveig Anders; Torsten May; Viatcheslav Zakosarenko; Michael Starkloff; Gabriel Zieger; Hans-Georg Meyer

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

364

Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Separation and Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

uelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) has developed a novel system concept for separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane (ECM). The salient feature of the ECM is its capability to produce electric power while capturing CO2 from flue gas, such as from an existing pulverized coal (PC) plant. Laboratory scale testing of the ECM has verified the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Recently, FCE was awarded a contract (DE-FE0007634) from the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the use of ECM to efficiently and cost effectively separate CO2 from the emissions of existing coal fired power plants. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from flue gas of an existing PC plant with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE) produced by the plant. The specific objectives and related activities planned for the project include: 1) conduct bench scale tests of a planar membrane assembly consisting of ten or more cells of about 0.8 m2 area each, 2) develop the detailed design for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to an existing PC plant, and 3) evaluate the effects of impurities (pollutants such as SO2, NOx, Hg) present in the coal plant flue gas by conducting laboratory scale performance tests of the membrane. The results of this project are anticipated to demonstrate that the ECM is an advanced technology, fabricated from inexpensive materials, based on proven operational track records, modular, scalable to large sizes, and a viable candidate for >90% carbon capture from existing PC plants. In this paper, the fundamentals of ECM technology including: material of construction, principal mechanisms of operation, carbon capture test results and the benefits of applications to PC plants will be presented.

Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Hunt, Jennifer; Patel, Dilip; Steen, William A.; Richardson, Carl F.; Marina, Olga A.

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermodynamic Modeling of a Membrane Dehumidification System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In warm and humid climates, a primary source of building energy consumption is dehumidification of conditioned air supplied to the building spaces. The proposed system utilizes a selective membrane to remove water vapor from ambient air as opposed to a vapor compression cycle or a desiccant. This work provides an analysis of the membrane dehumidification system with a focus on the energy performance of the system. A system performance goal was set at the beginning for a given inlet and outlet ambient air condition and a total cooling load of one ton. The target COP of the combined sensible and latent cooling is 3.58 with a target value for only the latent system of 3.34. Two different simulations were developed including an initial simulation which uses a basic mass transfer model and a simpler condenser model. The initial model was used to develop the system, analyze operating parameters and provide initial performance results. The initial simulations indicate that the system requires two optimizations to meet the target performance: condenser pressure optimization and the use of multiple membrane segments operating at different pressures. The latent only COP including the optimizations was a maximum of 4.23. A second model was then developed which uses a more detailed mass transfer model and a more detailed condenser model based on the operating conditions. This simulation yielded a maximum latent only COP of 4.37 including the optimizations. The work also analyzes two different combined systems capable of providing both sensible and latent cooling. The first utilizes a conventional vapor compression cycle for sensible cooling and has a maximum COP of 3.93. The second uses multiple evaporative coolers in between multiple membrane dehumidification steps and was found to have a maximum COP of 3.73. Second law analysis of the systems was also conducted and found that the greatest reduction in latent system exergy loss can be obtained by improving the selectivity of the membrane. Apart from improving the membrane selectivity, the results show the greatest improvement can be found in improving the operation of the gas compression devices.

Bynum, John 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a Bloom baffle burner at GTI. The results are positive and confirm that oxygen-enriched combustion can be carried out without producing higher levels of NOx than normal air firing, if lancing of combustion air is used and the excess air levels are controlled. A simple economic study shows that the membrane processes can produce O{sub 2} at less than $40/ton EPO{sub 2} and an energy cost of 1.1-1.5 MMBtu/ton EPO{sub 2}, which are very favorable compared with conventional technologies such as cryogenics and vacuum pressure swing adsorption processes. The benefits of integrated membrane processes/combustion process trains have been evaluated, and show good savings in process costs and energy consumption, as well as reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. For example, if air containing 30% oxygen is used in natural gas furnaces, the net natural gas savings are an estimated 18% at a burner temperature of 2,500 F, and 32% at a burner temperature of 3,000 F. With a 20% market penetration of membrane-based oxygen-enriched combustion in all combustion processes by 2020, the energy savings would be 414-736 TBtu/y in the U.S. The comparable net cost savings are estimated at $1.2-2.1 billion per year by 2020, calculated as the value of fuel savings subtracted from the cost of oxygen production. The fuel savings of 18%-32% by the membrane/oxygen-enriched combustion corresponds to an 18%-32% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, or 23-40 MM ton/y less CO{sub 2} from natural gas-fired furnaces by 2020. In summary, results from this project (Concept Definition phase) are highly promising and clearly demonstrate that membrane processes can produce oxygen-enriched air in a low cost manner that will lower operating costs and energy consumption in industrial combustion processes. Future work will focus on proof-of-concept bench-scale demonstration in the laboratory.

Lin, Haiqing

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Desalination 145 (2002) 1723 Presented at the International Congress on Membranes and Membrane Processes (ICOM), Toulouse, France,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desalination 145 (2002) 17­23 Presented at the International Congress on Membranes and Membrane-gravity casting *Corresponding author. #12;V.P. Khare et al. / Desalination 145 (2002) 17­2318 1. Introduction to prevent membrane thick- ness non-uniformities. #12;V.P. Khare et al. / Desalination 145 (2002) 17­23 19

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

368

A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Ceramic Membrane to Recycle Caustic in Low-Activity Waste Stream Processing The Office of Waste Processing is sponsoring an R&D project with Ceramatec, Inc. to develop a ceramic membrane capable of separating sodium from the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) stream. The Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks must be maintained in a caustic environment to inhibit corrosion. Consequently, they contain large quantities of NaOH. Ultimately the HLW will be retrieved, separated into HLW and LAW streams, with both streams being vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Prior to processing, additional NaOH will be added to the LAW stream to solubilize the alumina, preventing alumina precipitation, but further increasing the NaOH quantity. This project's goal is to separate the sodium from the LAW stream prior to vitrification which will allow the NaOH to be recycled and further

369

Driving Membrane Curvature | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Driving Membrane Curvature JUNE 14, 2012 Bookmark and Share Model of conformational change in the HIV gp41 fusion protein induced by cholesterol composition of lipid monolayers. In biological systems, membranes are as important as water. They form the barrier between the inner world, within our cells, where we perform the chemical reactions of life, and the outside environment.

370

UPGRADING NATURAL GAS VIA MEMBRANE SEPARATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of membrane separation processes for removing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from low-quality natural gas containing substantial amounts of both these ''acid'' gases, e.g., up to 40 mole-% CO{sub 2} and 10 mole-% H{sub 2}S. The membrane processes must be capable of upgrading the crude natural gas to pipeline specifications ({le} 2 mole-% CO{sub 2}, {le} 4 ppm H{sub 2}S). Moreover, these processes must also be economically competitive with the conventional separation techniques, such as gas absorption, utilized for this purpose by the gas industry.

S.A.Stern; P.A. Rice; J. Hao

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 {mu}m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm{sup 2}. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

Wilson, M.S.

1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); York, Cynthia A. (Newington, CT); Waszczuk, Piotr (White Bear Lake, MN); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Proceedings First Workshop on Applications of Membrane computing, Concurrency and Agent-based modelling in POPulation biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This volume contains the papers presented at the first International Workshop on Applications of Membrane Computing, Concurrency and Agent-based Modelling in Population Biology (AMCA-POP 2010) held in Jena, Germany on August 25th, 2010 as a satellite event of the 11th Conference on Membrane Computing (CMC11). The aim of the workshop is to investigate whether formal modelling and analysis techniques could be applied with profit to systems of interest for population biology and ecology. The considered modelling notations include membrane systems, Petri nets, agent-based notations, process calculi, automata-based notations, rewriting systems and cellular automata. Such notations enable the application of analysis techniques such as simulation, model checking, abstract interpretation and type systems to study systems of interest in disciplines such as population biology, ecosystem science, epidemiology, genetics, sustainability science, evolution and other disciplines in which population dynamics and interactions...

Milazzo, Paolo; 10.4204/EPTCS.33

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

Air Products and Chemicals

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advancing the technology base for high-temperature membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses the major issues confronting the implementation of high-temperature membranes for separations and catalysis. We are pursuing high-temperature membrane systems that can have a large impact for DOE and be industrially relevant. A major obstacle for increased use of membranes is that most applications require the membrane material to withstand temperatures above those acceptable for polymer-based systems. Advances made by this project have helped industry and DOE move toward high-temperature membrane applications to improve overall energy efficiency.

Dye, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.; Snow, R.C. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study covering Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. and its membrane vapor processor that recovers fuel vapors from gasoline refueling.

379

Oxy-combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustion: Oxygen Transport combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D

380

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1, and the H2/CO2 separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H2 with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H2 permeance more than one order of magnitude. Increasing the membrane feed pressure increased the H2 flux and the H2 mole fraction in the permeate stream for both H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 mixtures. The H2 separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO2 adsorption inhibited H2 adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO2/H2 separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO2 permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H2 recompression because H2 remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO2/H2 separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO2 feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO2/H2 sorption selectivity with increased CO2 partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H2 from CH4 because CH4 is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation from fuel gas or synthesis gas at temperatures 400-500 C. The membrane chosen for this purpose consists of a dense silica layer coated on a porous support by chemical vapor depositrion (CVD). The support used during the reporting period was zeolite silicalite grown on macroporous alumina tubes. Chemical vapor deposition was carried out using alternating exposure of the support to silicon tetrachloride (SiCl{sub 4}) and water vapor at 400-500 C. Under these conditions it takes about twenty-five reaction cycles to narrow down the pores of the zeolite support sufficiently for separation of hydrogen from other gases. The membranes were characterized by gas adsorption for pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and EDAX for elemental composition. The permeance of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}, and i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} was measured in the temperature range 100-250 C. At 150 C, the H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} permeance ratio was in the range 100-200 at a hydrogen permeance of 5-10x10{sup -8} mol/m{sub 2}-s-Pa.

George R. Gavalas

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

NETL: Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing and Validating Ternay Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance Designing and Validating Ternay Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance Project No.: DE-FE0001181 Gas Permeation Cell and Test Stand Pall Corporation is developing an economically-viable hydrogen/carbon dioxide (H2/CO2) separation membrane system that would allow efficient capture of CO2 at high temperature and pressure from gasified coal in the presence of typical contaminants. Goals for the project include creating an advanced palladium alloy for optimum hydrogen separation performance using combinatorial material methods for high-throughput screening, testing, and characterization and demonstrating durability by long term testing of a pilot membrane module at a commercial coal gasification facility. The advantages of this technology are reduction of CO2 compression costs, lack of need for both upstream and downstream heat exchange and complex heat integration, and the potential for integration with water gas shift in a single compact membrane reactor system.

384

Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Specific objectives of this program are to (1) quantify the extent of the degradation process for the three most detrimental mechanisms by performing laboratory-scale experiments, and (2) develop a predictive model for membrane degradation under operating conditions. At present, no inorganic membranes are commercially available for application in the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas environments encountered in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC), and direct coal fired turbine (DCFT) applications. Most of the inorganic membrane development efforts have focused on hydrogen separation membranes which may be used in an IGCC system for maximizing hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition of these contaminants. The candidate inorganic membranes may be grouped as follows: dense metallic membranes; silica based membranes; alumina based membranes; and carbon based membranes. Results are reported for membrane characterization done so far.

Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Damle, A.S.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ionically Conducting Membranes for Hydrogen Production and Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND SEPARATION Presented by Tony Sammells Eltron Research Inc. Boulder, Colorado www.eltronresearch.com Presented at DOE Hydrogen Separations Workshop Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. TO BE DISCUSSED * Membranes for Hydrogen Production - Compositions - Feedstocks - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles * Membranes for Hydrogen Separation - Compositions - Ex Situ vs. In Situ WGS - Performance - Key Technical Hurdles ELTRON RESEARCH INC. OVERALL SCHEME FOR CONVERTING FEEDSTOCK TO HYDROGEN WITH SIMULTANEOUS CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H 2 WGS H 2 O CO 2 /H 2 1618afs.dsf H 2 CO 2 ELTRON RESEARCH INC. INCENTIVES FOR OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR

387

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 High Temperature 9 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on AddThis.com...

388

NETL: Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007553 Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) is developing a new type of membrane contactor (or mega-module) to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plant flue gas. This module's membrane area is 500 square meters, 20 to 25 times larger than that of current modules used for CO2 capture. A 500-MWe coal power plant requires 0.5 to 1 million square meters of membrane to achieve 90 percent CO2 capture. The new mega-modules can drastically reduce the cost, complexity, and footprint of commercial-scale membrane module integration. Energy savings due to low-pressure drops for gases circulated through the modules, as well as improved countercurrent flow, are additional benefits. The feasibility of using mega-modules in several different hybrid process designs is being evaluated for future development potential.

389

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Membrane Technology and Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR), based in Menlo Park, CA, is a privately- owned developer, manufacturer, and supplier of customized membrane process solutions. Currently, the company's principal membrane products are * VaporSep® systems to remove organic vapors from air and nitrogen * NitroSep TM and fuel gas conditioning systems for natural gas treatment * Hydrogen recovery systems for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes Challenge Membrane technology was first commercialized in the 1960s and 1970s for well-known applications such as water filtration

390

Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB{sub 1{minus}x}B{prime}{sub x}O{sub 3{minus}y} wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B{prime} is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B{prime} ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B{prime} is 1:1{minus}x:x where 0.2{<=}{times}0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the single phase material to obtain a membrane. 6 figs.

White, J.H.; Schwartz, M.; Sammells, A.F.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B' is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated-by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B' ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B' is 1:1-x:x where 0.2.ltoreq..times.0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the singlephase material to obtain a membrane.

White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Novel membrane technology for green ethylene production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethylene is currently produced by pyrolysis of ethane in the presence of steam. This reaction requires substantial energy input, and the equilibrium conversion is thermodynamically limited. The reaction also produces significant amounts of greenhouse gases (CO and CO{sub 2}) because of the direct contact between carbon and steam. Argonne has demonstrated a new way to make ethylene via ethane dehydrogenation using a dense hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to drive the unfavorable equilibrium conversion. Preliminary experiments show that the new approach can produce ethylene yields well above existing pyrolysis technology and also significantly above the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, while completely eliminating the production of greenhouse gases. With Argonne's approach, a disk-type dense ceramic/metal composite (cermet) membrane is used to produce ethylene by dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 C. The gas-transport membrane reactor combines a reversible chemical reaction with selective separation of one product species and leads to increased reactant conversion to the desired product. In an experiment ethane was passed over one side of the HTM membrane and air over the other side. The hydrogen produced by the dehydrogenation of ethane was removed and transported through the HTM to the air side. The air provided the driving force required for the transport of hydrogen through the HTM. The reaction between transported hydrogen and oxygen in air can provide the energy needed for the dehydrogenation reaction. At 850 C and 1-atm pressure, equilibrium conversion of ethane normally limits the ethylene yield to 64%, but Argonne has shown that an ethylene yield of 69% with a selectivity of 88% can be obtained under the same conditions. Coking was not a problem in runs extending over several weeks. Further improved HTM materials will lower the temperature required for high conversion at a reasonable residence time, while the lower temperature will suppress unwanted side reactions and prolong membrane life. With the Argonne approach, oxygen does not contact the ethane/ethylene stream, so oxidation products are not formed. Consequently, higher selectivity to ethylene and fewer by-products can be achieved. Some benefits are: (1) Simplifies overall product purification and processing schemes; (2) Results in greater energy efficiency; (3) Completely eliminates greenhouse gases from the reactor section; and (4) Lowers the cost of the 'back end' purification train, which accounts for about 70% of the capital cost of a conventional ethylene production unit.

Balachandran, U.; Lee, T. H.; Dorris, S. E.; Udovich, C. A.; Scouten, C. G.; Marshall, C. L. (Energy Systems); ( CSE)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

394

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

395

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

396

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

397

Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on Applied Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 26th International Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2011). For the past 25 years, SAC has become a major international venue for computing researchers and applied practitioners to convene and share ideas on recent developments in a ...

William Chu; W. Eric Wong; Mathew J. Palakal; Chih-Cheng Hung

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on Applied Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 25th International Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2010). For the past 24 years, SAC has become a major international venue for computing researchers and applied practitioners to convene and share ideas on recent developments in a ...

Sung Y. Shin; Sascha Ossowski; Michael Schumacher; Mathew J. Palakal; Chih-Cheng Hung

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Case School of Applied Science...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Case School of Applied Science Ohio State University - OH 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University (OH.0-01 ) Eliminated from...

400

Roadmap: Applied Engineering Manufacturing Systems Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Manufacturing Systems ­ Bachelor of Science [AT 15000 Introduction to Human Communication 3 Fulfills Kent Core Additional Kent Core Requirement 3 See #12;Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Manufacturing Systems ­ Bachelor of Science [AT

Sheridan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Open Solicitations and How to Apply: the Loan Guarantee Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Solicitations and How to Apply: the Loan Guarantee Program Invites You to a Free Webinar Open Solicitations and How to Apply: the Loan Guarantee Program Invites You to a Free...

402

PLZT NANO PRE URSORS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY APPLI ATIONS  

APPLI ATIONS & INDUSTRIES ENEFITS Pulsed Power Oil Exploration Capacitors Refer to SD # 12119 Thermistors Transducers Military & Defense Automotive

403

Dixson and Fu Receive NIST Applied Research Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dixson and Fu Receive NIST Applied Research Award. For Immediate Release: December 1, 1999. *. Bookmark and Share. ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Materials Research Applied to National Needs (MARANN) in Honor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Materials Research Applied to National Needs...

405

PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING 1 ADVISER: Immersive Scientific Visualization Applied  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be applied to the terrain (Figure 2b). A custom pixel shader was integrated with ROAM to render the dynamic

Head III, James William

406

Micro/nano-patterning of supported lipid bilayers: biophysical studies and membrane-associated species separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro/nano-patterning of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) has shown considerable potential for addressing fundamental biophysical questions about cell membrane behavior and the creation of a new generation of biosensors. Herein are presented several novel lithographic methods for the size-controlled patterning of SLBs from the microscale to the nanoscale. Using these methods, chemically distinct types of phospholipid bilayers and/or Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) membranes can be spatially addressed on a single microchip. These arrays can, in turn, be employed in the studies of multivalent ligand-receptor interactions, enzyme kinetics, SLBs size limitation, and membrane-associated species separation. The investigations performed in the Laboratory for Biological Surface Science include the following projects. Chapters II and III describe the creation of lab-on-a-chip based platforms by patterning SLBs in microfluidic devices, which were employed in high throughput binding assays for multivalent ligand-receptor interactions between cholera toxin B subunits (CTB) and ganglioside GM1. The studies on the effect of ligand density for multivalent CTB-GM1 interactions revealed that the CTB-GM1 binding weakened with increasing GM1 density. Such a result can be explained by the clustering of GM1 on the supported phospholipid membranes, which in turn inhibits the binding of CTB. Chapter IV characterizes the enzymatic activity of phosphatase tethered to SLBs in a microfluidic device. Higher turnover rate and catalytic efficiency were observed at low enzyme surface densities, ascribing to the low steric crowding hindrance and high enzyme fluidity, as well as the resulting improvement of substrate accessibility and affinity of enzyme catalytic sites. Chapter V presents sub-100 nm patterning of supported biomembranes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoshaving lithography. Stable SLBs formed by this method have a lower size limit of ~ 55 nm in width. This size limit stems from a balance between a favorable bilayer adhesion energy and an unfavorable bilayer edge energy. Finally, chapter VI demonstrates the electrophoretic separation of membrane-associated fluorophores in polymer-cushioned lipid bilayers. This electrophoretic method was applied to the separation of membrane proteins in E. Coli ghost membranes.

Shi, Jinjun

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman Ryszard S. Michalski MLI 00-2 #12;2 ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Kenneth A. Kaufman-2 January 2000 #12;ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Abstract Evolutionary

Michalski, Ryszard S.

408

One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect

GTI developed a plan where efforts were concentrated in 4 major areas: membrane material development, membrane module development, membrane process development, and membrane gasifier scale-up. GTI assembled a team of researchers to work in each area. Task 1.1 Ceramic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by Arizona State University (ASU), Task 1.2 Metallic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Task 1.3 was conducted by SCHOTT, and GTI was to test all membranes that showed potential. The initial focus of the project was concentrated on membrane material development. Metallic and glass-based membranes were identified as hydrogen selective membranes under the conditions of the biomass gasification, temperatures above 700C and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. Membranes were synthesized by arc-rolling for metallic type membranes and incorporating Pd into a glass matrix for glass membranes. Testing for hydrogen permeability properties were completed and the effects of hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide were investigated for perspective membranes. The initial candidate membrane of Pd80Cu20 chosen in 2008 was selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Although the H2A analysis results indicated a $1.96 cost per gge H2 based on a 5A (micron) thick PdCu membrane, there was not long-term operation at the required flux to satisfy the go/no go decision. Since the future PSA case yielded a $2.00/gge H2, DOE decided that there was insufficient savings compared with the already proven PSA technology to further pursue the membrane reactor design. All ceramic membranes synthesized by ASU during the project showed low hydrogen flux as compared with metallic membranes. The best ceramic membrane showed hydrogen permeation flux of 0.03 SCFH/ft2 at the required process conditions while the metallic membrane, Pd80Cu20 showed a flux of 47.2 SCFH/ft2 (3 orders of magnitude difference). Results from NETL showed Pd80Cu20 with the highest flux, therefore it was chosen as the initial and eventually, final candidate membrane. The criteria for choice were high hydrogen flux, long-term stability, and H2S tolerance. Results from SCHOTT using glass membranes showed a maximum of 0.25 SCFH/ft2, that is an order of magnitude better than the ceramic membrane but still two orders of magnitude lower than the metallic membrane. A membrane module was designed to be tested with an actual biomass gasifier. Some parts of the module were ordered but the work was stopped when a no go decision was made by the DOE.

Roberts, Michael J. [Gas Technology Institute; Souleimanova, Razima [Gas Technology Institute

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Glucan synthesis in membranes from Zea mays and Glycine max: Interaction of ER and Golgi membranes  

SciTech Connect

Membranes of the Golgi apparatus from maize (Zea mays L.) were used to synthesize in vitro the (1[yields]3),(1[yields]4)-[beta]-D-glucan that is unique to the cell wall of the Poaceae. Activated charcoal added during homogenization reduced the synthesis of callose and enhanced synthesis of (1[yields]3),(1[yields]4)-[beta]-D-glucan. Charcoal was also effective on stimulating the synthesis of xyloglucan using Golgi apparatus from soybean (Glycine max) hypocotyls. In both cases, a crude membrane fraction containing both endoplasmic synthesis than a purified fraction of Golgi apparatus. The interaction of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus is being investigated.

Gibeaut, D.M.; Carpita, N.C. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to develop hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) technology to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) in coal-derived syngas for IGCC applications. The project team has fabricated palladium based membranes and measured hydrogen fluxes as a function of pressure, temperature, and membrane preparation conditions. Membranes are a commercially-available technology in the chemical industry for CO2 removal and H2 purification. There is, however, no commercial application of membrane processes that aims at CO2 capture for IGCC syngas. Due to the modular nature of the membrane process, the design does not exhibit economy of scale-the cost of the system will increase linearly as the plant system scale increases making the use of commercially available membranes, for an IGCC power plant, cost prohibitive. For a membrane process to be a viable CO2 capture technology for IGCC applications, a better overall performance is required, including higher permeability, higher selectivity, and lower membrane cost.

411

CO2-selective, Hybrid Membranes by Silation of Alumina  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid membranes are feasible candidates for the separation of CO2 from gas produced in coal-based power generation since they have the potential to combine the high selectivity of polymer membranes and the high permeability of inorganic membranes. An interesting method for producing hybrid membranes is the silation of an inorganic membrane. In this method, trichloro- or alkoxy-silanes interact with hydroxyl groups on the surface of ?-AlO3 or TiO2, binding organic groups to that surface. By varying the length of these organic groups on the organosilane, it should be possible to tailor the effective pore size of the membrane. Similarly, the addition of CO2-phillic groups to the silating agent allows for the careful control of surface affinity and the enhancement of surface diffusion mechanisms. This method of producing hybrid membranes selective to CO2 was first attempted by Hyun [1] who silated TiO2 with phenyltriethoxysilane. Later, Way [2] silated ?-AlO3 with octadecyltrichlorosilane. Both researchers were successful in producing membranes with improved selectivity toward CO2, but permeability was not maintained at a commercially applicable level. XPS data indicated that the silating agent did not penetrate into the membrane pores and separation actually occurred in a thin polymer-like surface layer. The present study attempts to overcome the mass transfer problems associated with this technique by producing the desired monolayer coverage of silane, and thus develop a highly-permeable CO2-selective hybrid membrane.

Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Agency/Company /Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/10568/167/1/Innovation_System_Agric_LM.pdf Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Screenshot References: Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module[1] Preface "Sustained agricultural growth requires, among others, increased

413

Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as 134 degrees Celsius. Transmembrane fluxes of water are commercially competitive (~5000 g/m2h) and separation factors have been measured as high as 8000, depending on the membrane and the water content. For the Nafion-117 experiments, the common trade off in membrane performance is observed in that as flux is increased, separation factor decreases. Nafion-112, a thinner membrane, exhibited much higher fluxes than the Nafion-117; however without the expected loss in separation factor indicating that the permeability of iodine and HI through Nafion materials is low. Preliminary data for the sulfuric acid concentration suggests performance similar to the HI experiments. All membranes studied for the HI, HI/iodine and sulfuric acid feeds exhibited no degradation in membrane performance during use.

Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight

415

Ionic Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Separation  

SciTech Connect

Recent scientific studies are rapidly advancing novel technological improvements and engineering developments that demonstrate the ability to minimize, eliminate, or facilitate the removal of various contaminants and green house gas emissions in power generation. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) shows promise for carbon dioxide mitigation not only because of its higher efficiency as compared to conventional coal firing plants, but also due to a higher driving force in the form of high partial pressure. One of the novel technological concepts currently being developed and investigated is membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation, due to simplicity and ease of scaling. A challenge in using membranes for CO2 capture in IGCC is the possibility of failure at elevated temperatures or pressures. Our earlier research studies examined the use of ionic liquids on various supports for CO2 separation over the temperature range, 37C-300C. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3methylimidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([hmim][Tf2N]), was chosen for our initial studies with the following supports: polysulfone (PSF), poly(ether sulfone) (PES), and cross-linked nylon. The PSF and PES supports had similar performance at room temperature, but increasing temperature caused the supported membranes to fail. The ionic liquid with the PES support greatly affected the glass transition temperature, while with the PSF, the glass transition temperature was only slightly depressed. The cross-linked nylon support maintained performance without degradation over the temperature range 37-300C with respect to its permeability and selectivity. However, while the cross-linked nylon support was able to withstand temperatures, the permeability continued to increase and the selectivity decreased with increasing temperature. Our studies indicated that further testing should examine the use of other ionic liquids, including those that form chemical complexes with CO2 based on amine interactions. The hypothesis is that the performance at the elevated temperatures could be improved by allowing a facilitated transport mechanism to become dominant. Several amine-based ionic liquids were tested on the cross-linked nylon support. It was found that using the amine-based ionic liquid did improve selectivity and permeability at higher temperature. The hypothesis was confirmed, and it was determined that the type of amine used also played a role in facilitated transport. Given the appropriate aminated ionic liquid with the cross-linked nylon support, it is possible to have a membrane capable of separating CO2 at IGCC conditions. With this being the case, the research has expanded to include separation of other constituents besides CO2 (CO, H2S, etc.) and if they play a role in membrane poisoning or degradation. This communication will discuss the operation of the recently fabricated ionic liquid membranes and the impact of gaseous components other than CO2 on their performance and stability.

Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preparation and performance of membranes for application to hydrogen separation from coal-derived gas is described. The membrane material investigated was dense amorphous silica deposited on a suitable support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two types of support materials were pursued. One type consisted of a two-layer composite, zeolite silicalite/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the form of tubes approximately 0.7 cm in diameter. The other type was porous glass tubes of diameter below 0.2 cm. The first type of support was prepared starting from {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of 1{micro}m mean pore diameter and growing by hydrothermal reaction a zeolite silicalite layer inside the pores of the alumina at the OD side. After calcination to remove the organic template used in the hydrothermal reaction, CVD was carried out to deposit the final silica layer. CVD was carried out by alternating exposure of the surface with silicon tetrachloride and water vapor. SEM and N2 adsorption measurements were employed to characterize the membranes at several stages during their preparation. Permeation measurements of several gases yielded H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ideal selectivity of 150-200 at room temperature declining to 110 at 250 C. The second type of support pursued was porous glass tubes prepared by a novel extrusion technique. A thick suspension of borosilicate glass powder in a polyethersulfone solution was extruded through a spinneret and after gelation the glass-polymer tube was heat treated to obtain a gas-tight glass tube. Leaching of the glass tube in hot water yielded connected pores with diameter on the order of 100 nm. CVD of the final silica layer was not carried out on these tubes on account of their large pore size.

George R. Gavalas

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Westmont, IL); Gatsis, John G. (Des Plaines, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present project is devoted to developing hydrogen permselective silica membranes supported on composite supports to achieve high flux and selectivity. The supports consist of a thin zeolite silicalite layer coated on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of mean pore size 1 {micro}m. The zeolite layer is grown by reaction in a suitable silicate solution at 95 C. After two or three reaction periods a layer of silicalite crystals about 20 {micro}m thick grows inside the pores of alumina. In addition to the zeolitic pores, this layer contains voids of a few nanometer diameter that remain between the crystals or between the crystals and the pore walls. The quality of the silicalite/alumina composites was evaluated by gas permeation measurements and by nitrogen adsorption and it was found that the residual voids were below 5 nm in diameter. Three techniques were investigated for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of the silica layer on the silicalite/alumina composite support. The first was TEOS pyrolysis at approximately one millibar partial pressure and 650 C. After 8 h reaction the fluxes of hydrogen and nitrogen at ambient temperature had declined by a factor of approximately 100 indicating sealing of defects and zeolitic pores alike. The second CVD technique investigated was SiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis at 90 C. Deposition in this case was conducted in a series of cycles, each cycle comprising two half reactions, i.e. exposure to SiCl{sub 4} followed by exposure to water vapor. The deposition was interrupted every five cycles to measure the permeation properties of the nascent membrane at 120 C. After a few cycles the membrane pores were sealed, but the silica layer was not thermally stable when the temperature was raised to 400 C. In the third technique investigated, silica deposition was carried out by SiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis at 400 C, again in a sequence of half reaction cycles. After 15 cycles the membrane pores were well sealed by a layer stable to at least 400 C.

George R. Gavalas

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ion transport through cell membrane channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling  

SciTech Connect

Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Breakout Group 2: Membrane Electrode Assemblies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 23-24, 2008 January 23-24, 2008 Breakout Group 2: Membrane Electrode Assemblies PARTICIPANTS Name Organization Jim Goldbach Arkema, Inc. Kev Adjemian Nissan Motor Co. Eric Funkenbusch 3M John Kerr Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Jonathan Sharman Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Jean St-Pierre University of South Carolina Huyen Dinh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bryan Pivovar Los Alamos National Laboratory Jim Martin Lockheed Martin Sami Mardini Superprotonic Reg Tyler U.S. Department of Energy/Golden Field Office Craig Gittleman General Motors Don Gervasio Arizona State University Eric Shrader Palo Alto Research Center Robert Miller MTI Micro Kathi Epping (Facilitator) U.S. Department of Energy

424

High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Mexico | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2, 2010 August 2, 2010 CX-004122: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biosafety Level-1 Laboratory in Building 898, Laboratory 1668 - Characterization of Interactions and Flocculation of Cell CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 08/02/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office August 2, 2010 CX-004121: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 840 Asbestos Characterization and Abatement CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 08/02/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office July 29, 2010 CX-003337: Categorical Exclusion Determination Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/29/2010 Location(s): Lea County, New Mexico Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 29, 2010 CX-003336: Categorical Exclusion Determination

426

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001169: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic Carbonate Membrane Reactor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Tempe, Arizona Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 10, 2010 CX-001157: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Sensors Development Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 10, 2010 CX-001167: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction and Operation of Phase and Composition Analysis Facility (PCAF) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

427

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2010 10, 2010 CX-003879: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003878: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Melvindale, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 10, 2010 CX-003877: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Des Plaines, Illinois Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

428

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-008982: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High Performance Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office" August 25, 2012 CX-008918: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove/Demolish T-20, T-14, T-15, T-29 CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 08/25/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 24, 2012 CX-009412: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2012 Access Road Maintenance Along the Path 500 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/24/2012 Location(s): California, California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration August 24, 2012 CX-008927: Categorical Exclusion Determination

429

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 21, 2010 October 21, 2010 CX-004299: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Cutting Cheyenne Field Office Maintenance Area CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/21/2010 Location(s): Larimer, Colorado Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region October 20, 2010 CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004108: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Oil: Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery for America?s Small Oil Producers CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Lakewood, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

430

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2010 13, 2010 CX-003344: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Systems Integration Facility Subsurface Exploration Program for Geothermal Potential; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking Number 10-037 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2010 Location(s): Golden, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 13, 2010 CX-003342: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2010 Location(s): Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 13, 2010 CX-004925: Categorical Exclusion Determination Material Methods - Phononic Heat Pump CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2010 Location(s): Irvine, California

431

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Georgia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 17, 2010 June 17, 2010 CX-002739: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion CX(s) Applied: B2.2, B3.6, A9, B5.1 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Statesboro, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2, 2010 CX-003132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia Institute of Technology Research Corporation - Metal Organic Frameworks in Hollow Fiber Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy May 28, 2010 CX-002514: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - Clean Energy Property Rebate Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/28/2010

432

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Massachusetts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2, 2010 June 2, 2010 CX-003107: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harvard Medical School, Wyss Institute - Engineering a Bacterial Reverse Fuel Cell CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy May 28, 2010 CX-002457: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Novel Non-Platinum Group Metal Electrocatalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Applications CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/28/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 24, 2010 CX-002405: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fluid Flow Optimization of Aerogel Blanket Manufacturing Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 05/24/2010 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

433

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Indiana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 16, 2010 September 16, 2010 CX-003912: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indiana-County-Elkhart CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/16/2010 Location(s): Elkhart County, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 7, 2010 CX-003781: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Spark Ignited Engine Development for Combined Heat and Power Application CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.2, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Columbus, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 1, 2010 CX-003675: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oxy-combustion Oxygen Transport Membrane Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Indianapolis, Indiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

434

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 CX-003402: Categorical Exclusion Determination Corrugated Membrane and Fuel Cell Structures CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/16/2010 Location(s): New Castle, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2010 CX-003497: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research on Fuel Cell Powered by Hydrogen from Biomass to Provide Clean Energy for Remote Farms away from Electric Grid CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Farmingdale, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 17, 2010 CX-003493: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): New Mexico

435

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kentucky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2, 2010 June 2, 2010 CX-002501: Categorical Exclusion Determination Beneficiation of Fine Size Powder River Basin Coal CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Lexington, Kentucky Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2, 2010 CX-003128: Categorical Exclusion Determination University of Kentucky Research Foundation -A Solvent/Membrane Hybrid Post-combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Kentucky Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy May 27, 2010 CX-002516: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Facility Retrofit Showcase - Arch Chemicals, Inc. CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Brandenburg, Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

436

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2010 23, 2010 CX-003463: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Newark, Delaware Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Visitor's Center Conference Room CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.15 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Morgantown,West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003461: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Wet Gas Compressor for Stripper Gas Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003460: Categorical Exclusion Determination

437

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-003499: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature Hydrogen Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/19/2010 Location(s): South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 19, 2010 CX-003496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Biofuels Using Ionic Transfer Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/19/2010 Location(s): Las Vegas, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 19, 2010 CX-003478: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/19/2010 Location(s): Danbury, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 19, 2010 CX-003422: Categorical Exclusion Determination

438

New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-003875: Categorical Exclusion Determination Long Island Biofuels Alliance CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Stony Brook, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 1, 2010 CX-003880: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Independent Agri-Business Outreach CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Cortland County, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 27, 2010 CX-003663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oxy-combustion Oxygen Transport Membrane Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2010 Location(s): Tonawanda, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 26, 2010 CX-003542: Categorical Exclusion Determination

439

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2013 8, 2013 CX-010148: Categorical Exclusion Determination Merritt Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 18, 2013 CX-010319: Categorical Exclusion Determination General Chemical Support Operations for NHS, HP CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office April 18, 2013 CX-010554: Categorical Exclusion Determination Yale University- Power Generation from Waste Heat with Closed Loop Membrane-Based System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): Connecticut, Colorado Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy April 17, 2013 CX-010188: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Demonstration of a Novel Eco-Friendly Production Enhancement Process

440

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-003468: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cyclone Production Tool CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Chickasha, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Visitor's Center Conference Room CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B1.15 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Morgantown,West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003463: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Newark, Delaware Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-003461: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Wet Gas Compressor for Stripper Gas Wells

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2013 August 14, 2013 CX-010791: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2013 CX-010799: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Lead Paint Abatement & Repainting CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 13, 2013 CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 12, 2013 CX-010802: Categorical Exclusion Determination

442

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 3930 of 8,172 results. 21 - 3930 of 8,172 results. Download CX-003616: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficient Engines CX(s) Applied: A7, B1.31, B5.2 Date: 08/27/2010 Location(s): Racine, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003616-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oxy-combustion Oxygen Transport Membrane Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/27/2010 Location(s): Tonawanda, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003663-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pontiac High School Geothermal CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010

443

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2010 September 30, 2010 CX-004092: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies for High Performance Hospitals CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Seattle, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004091: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership - City of Columbus Compressed Natural Gas Station CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Columbus, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 30, 2010 CX-004090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Reaction-Driven Ionic Transport Membranes (ITM) Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6

444

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 21940 of 31,917 results. 31 - 21940 of 31,917 results. Download CX-008284: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008284-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008288-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008289: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9

445

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 21, 2010 January 21, 2010 CX-000625: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Membrane Electrode Assemblies Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance, Durability and Cost CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office January 21, 2010 CX-000626: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office January 21, 2010 CX-000630: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Partnership Model to Build Solar Training Capacity in the Midwest CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

446

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2009 23, 2009 CX-000208: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act - PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan Biogas Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Flint, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

447

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 CX-003556: Categorical Exclusion Determination Morgantown Site Metering Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 25, 2010 CX-003554: Categorical Exclusion Determination Multi-Hybrid Power Vehicles with Durable Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) and Lithium-Ion Battery CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Athens, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 25, 2010 CX-003553: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-up of Indium Nitride Process and Characterization of Product CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

448

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 23, 2009 November 23, 2009 CX-000208: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act - PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 19, 2009 CX-000090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Renewable Energy Solar Demonstration (Medical Clinic) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2009 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 6, 2009 CX-000044: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation Renewable Energy Technologies (Solar) on Government Buildings CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1

449

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 13, 2013 August 13, 2013 CX-010800: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 9, 2013 CX-010746: Categorical Exclusion Determination Better Buildings- Commercial Energy Efficiency Solutions, Pre-Packaged Commercial PACE: The BEERE Menu CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 5, 2013 CX-010811: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Louisiana Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)/Sequestration Research and Development (R&D) Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

450

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Research Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2, 2010 June 2, 2010 CX-003144: Categorical Exclusion Determination ATK - A High Efficiency Inertial Carbon Dioxide Extraction System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy June 2, 2010 CX-003132: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia Institute of Technology Research Corporation - Metal Organic Frameworks in Hollow Fiber Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Georgia Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy June 2, 2010 CX-003131: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory & Wildcat Disc. Technology - High Throughput Tools to Screen New Metal Organic Framework Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010

451

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2009 5, 2009 CX-000591: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A2936 - Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy December 15, 2009 CX-000235: Categorical Exclusion Determination California City Fresno CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): Fresno, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office December 14, 2009 CX-001247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Tank Installation, Solar Installations, and Home Upgrades CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Chula Vista, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 14, 2009

452

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2010 20, 2010 CX-004268: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/20/2010 Location(s): Boulder, Colorado Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Blackwell, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory October 19, 2010 CX-004277: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 10/19/2010 Location(s): Clarkstown, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

453

Silica membranes for hydrogen separation from coal gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a continuation of a previous DOE-UCR project (DE-FG22- 89PC89765) dealing with the preparation of silica membranes highly permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The membranes prepared in the previous project had very high selectivity but relatively low permeance. Therefore, the general objectives of this project were to improve the permeance of these membranes and to obtain fundamental information about membrane structure and properties. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore new silylation reagents and reaction conditions with the purpose of reducing the thickness and increasing the permeance of silica membranes prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), (2) to characterize the membrane structure, (3) to delineate mechanism and kinetics of deposition, (4) to measure the permeability of silica layers at different extents of deposition, and (5) to mathematically model the relationship between structure and deposition kinetics.

Gavalas, G.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Membrane reactor advantages for methanol reforming and similar reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane reactors achieve efficiencies by combining in one unit a reactor that generates a product with a semipermeable membrane that extracts it. One well-known benefit of this is greater conversion, as removal of a product drives reactions toward completion, but there are several potentially larger advantages that have been largely ignored. Because a membrane reactor tends to limit the partial pressure of the extracted product, it fundamentally changes the way that total pressure in the reactor affects equilibrium conversion. Thus, many gas-phase reactions that are preferentially performed at low pressures in a conventional reactor are found to have maximum conversion at high pressures in a membrane reactor. These higher pressures and reaction conversions allow greatly enhanced product extraction as well. Further, membrane reactors provide unique opportunities for temperature management which have not been discussed previously. These benefits are illustrated for methanol reforming to hydrogen for use with PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) fuel cells.

Buxbaum, R.E. [REB Research and Consulting Co., Ferndale, MI (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature Membrane Working Group High Temperature Membrane Working Group The High Temperature Membrane Working Group consists of government, industry, and university researchers interested in developing high temperature membranes for fuel cells. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically operate at temperatures no higher than 60°C-80°C due to structural limitations of the membrane. Operating PEM fuel cell stacks at higher temperatures (120°C for transportation and 150°C for stationary applications), however, would yield significant energy benefits. For example, heat rejection is easier at higher temperatures, which would allow use of smaller heat exchangers in fuel cell power systems. In addition, for reformate fuel cell systems, carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance of the stack is less problematic at higher temperatures, which would reduce the size requirements or possibly eliminate the need for some CO clean-up beds in the fuel processor.

456

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2005 High

457

Argonne CNM News: Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date Thinnest Nanofiltration Membrane to Date Thinnest membrane to date Close-packed nanoparticle monolayers self-assembled from dodecanethiol-ligated gold nanocrystals. TEM image (left) and atomistic simulation of tryptophan transport through a pore. A recent collaboration between users at the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago with the Center for Nanoscale Material's Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group has produced the thinnest nanofiltration membrane achieved thus far, at ~30 nm, made of just four layers of nanoparticles. A separation membrane is a key component in both nanofiltration and reverse osmosis filtration systems. Typically they are microns-thick polymer films. Reducing the thickness of the membrane reduces the pressure that needs to

458

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2004 High

459

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 High

460

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Archives on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2007 High

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "membranes cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objectives are to develop hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes for water-gas shift membrane-reactor suitable for hydrogen production from coal gas and evaluate the technical and economic potential of the membrane-reactor. During the reporting period exploratory experiments begun on a membrane preparation technique aimed at providing higher membrane permeance. The new preparation technique involves two stages. The first stage is the formation of a layer of silica gel by a two-phase interfacial reaction within the pores of the substrate. The gel is then dried and calcined yielding a microporous (pore diameter below 10 [Angstrom]) silica layer within the pores of the substrate tube. The second stage involves one-sided chemical vapor deposition using the SiCl[sub 4]-H[sub 2]O reaction to close up the micropores of the gel layer and produce the final hydrogen permselective membrane. Chemical reactions involved are described.

Gavalas, G.R.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Catalytic membranes for facilitating the water-gas shift reaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed at furthering the development of a metal- membrane-based process for economically producing pure hydrogen from the raw gasifier stream. A related program is directed at developing a metal-membrane-based process for cleanly and efficiently removing hydrogen sulfide from the hot gas stream. Both of these processes would be accomplished at 500{degree}C to 800{degree}C and are based on a novel hydrogen-permeable composite-metal membrane. Specific program objectives include (1) design, fabrication, and demonstration of pre-prototype membrane modules; (2) improving the membrane composition to increase the hydrogen flux; (3) evaluating membrane lifetime; and (4) conducting engineering and economic analyses of the processes.

Edlund, D.J. [Bend Research, Inc., OR (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Transparent Humidity Sensor Using Cross-Linked Polyelectrolyte Membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the fabrication of a porous cross-linked polyelectrolyte membrane and the characterization of its humidity sensitivity performance. Electrostatic self-assembly, combined with acid treatment, and post-deposition annealing produced the membrane. The fabrication process offers the ability to control the thickness of the membrane, as well as enabling the engineering of the humidity sensitivity properties. A transparent humidity sensor was fabricated by integrating the membrane between two parallel electrodes. In order to improve the moisture absorption and diffusion, both the polyelectrolyte layer and the electrode were made porous. The membrane was cross-linked to enhance the durability in high humid environments. Such a polyelectrolyte membrane showed high sensitivity to relative humidity variation over a range of 25%99%. The see-through property of the structure adds extra features and benefits to the sensor.

Zhang, Q.; Smith, James R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Hua, Feng

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Holt, Jason (Berkeley, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Park, Hyung Gyu (Oakland, CA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Develpment of Higher Temperature Membrane and Electrode Assembly (MEA) for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our work will fucus on developing higher temperature MEAs based on SPEKK polymer blends. Thse MEAs will be designed to operatre at 120 degrees C Higher temperatures, up to 200 degrees C will also be explored. This project will develop Nafion-free MEAs using only SPEKK blends in both membrane and catalytic layers.

Susan Agro, Anthony DeCarmine, Shari Williams

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Improved Membrane Materials for PEM Fuel Cell Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to collect and integrate critical structure/property information in order to develop methods that lead to significant improvements in the durability and performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) materials. This project is focused on the fundamental improvement of PEMFC membrane materials with respect to chemical, mechanical and morphological durability as well as the development of new inorganically-modified membranes.

Kenneth A. Mauritz; Robert B. Moore

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

NETL: Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Project No.: DE-FE0007634 FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed a novel system concept for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane. The proposed membrane has its genesis from the company's patented Direct FuelCell® (DFC®) technology. The prominent feature of the DFC membrane is its capability to produce power while capturing CO2 from the flue gas from a pulverized coal (PC) plant. The DFC membrane does not require flue gas compression as it operates on the principles of electrochemistry, resulting in net efficiency gains. The membrane utilizes a fuel (different from the plant flue gas, such as coal-derived syngas, natural gas, or a renewable resource) as the driver for the combined carbon capture and electric power generation. The electrochemical membrane consists of ceramic-based layers filled with carbonate salts, separating CO2 from the flue gas. Because of the electrode's high reaction rates, the membrane does not require a high CO2 concentration in its feed gas. The planar geometry of the membrane offers ease of scalability to large sizes suitable for deployment in PC plants, which is an important attribute in membrane design. The membrane has been tested at the laboratory scale, verifying the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. is advancing the technology to a maturity level suitable for adaption by industry for pilot-scale demonstration and subsequent commercial deployment.

469

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit will be constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the mechanical construction of the permeation unit was completed. Commissioning and shake down tests are being conducted. The unit is capable of operation at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The membranes to be tested will be in disc form with a diameter of about 3 cm. Operation at these high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures will demonstrate commercially relevant hydrogen flux, 10{approx}50 cc/min/cm{sup 2}, from the membranes made of the perovskite type of ceramic material. Preliminary modeling was also performed for a tubular membrane reactor within a gasifier to estimate the required membrane area for a given gasification condition. The modeling results will be used to support the conceptual design of the membrane reactor.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Mike Roberts; Francis Lau

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

470

Development of inorganic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen for commercial coal liquefaction processes may be provided by a coal gasification plant operated to maximize hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a major chemical requirement for coal liquefaction, and the use of liquefaction by-products such as mineral ash residue as feed to the gasifier can improve the overall process efficiency and economics. Also, recovery of hydrogen from gaseous streams in the coal liquefaction plant can have a significant impact on coal liquefaction process economics. In these hydrogen production scenarios, there is a need to improve the quality of the hydrogen produced by separating the other impurity gases from it. The DOE-Fossil Energy AR TD Materials Program is presently developing inorganic membranes for gas separation, including the recovery of valuable resources such as hydrogen from hot-gas streams. A summary of efforts to produce alumina membranes with mean pore radii <5 {angstrom} is presented as well as a status report on declassification of this important technology. 2 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z.; Fain, D.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on a mechanism for oxygen transport through mixed- oxide conductors as used in dense ceramic membrane reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO and H{sub 2}). The in-situ separation of O{sub 2} from air by the membrane reactor saves the costly cryogenic separation step that is required in conventional syngas production. The mixed oxide of choice is SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x}, which exhibits high oxygen permeability and has been shown in previous studies to possess high stability in both oxidizing and reducing conditions; in addition, it can be readily formed into reactor configurations such as tubes. An understanding of the electrical properties and the defect dynamics in this material is essential and will help us to find the optimal operating conditions for the conversion reactor. In this paper, we discuss the conductivities of the SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} system that are dependent on temperature and partial pressure of oxygen. Based on the experimental results, a defect model is proposed to explain the electrical properties of this system. The oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} is estimated by using conductivity data and is compared with that obtained from methane conversion reaction.

Balachandran, U.; Mieville, R.L.; Ma, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability an