National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for melting includes graphite

  1. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  2. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  3. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von L. Richards

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ???¢???????¢ Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  4. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM CARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kane, J.S.; Carpenter, J.H.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1962-01-16

    A method is given for coating graphite with a hard, tenacious layer of niobium carbide up to 30 mils or more thick. The method makes use of the discovery that niobium metal, if degassed and heated rapidly below the carburization temperature in contact with graphite, spreads, wets, and penetrates the graphite without carburization. The method includes the obvious steps of physically contacting niobium powders or other physical forms of niobium with graphite, degassing the assembly below the niobium melting point, e.g., 1400 deg C, heating to about 2200 to 2400 deg C within about 15 minutes while outgassing at a high volume throughput, and thereafter carburizing the niobium. (AEC)

  5. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  6. Coating method for graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  7. Coating method for graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  8. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  9. Metal-bonded graphite foam composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Klett, James W

    2015-04-28

    A metal-bonded graphite foam composite includes a ductile metal continuous phase and a dispersed phase that includes graphite foam particles.

  10. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  11. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  12. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Bird, Eugene L.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  13. Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

    2012-09-25

    Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

  14. Do Ag{sub n} (up to n = 8) clusters retain their identity on graphite? Insights from first-principles calculations including dispersion interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2014-04-28

    Adsorption of pre-formed Ag{sub n} clusters for n = 1 ? 8 on a graphite substrate is studied within the density functional theory employing the vdW-DF2 functional to treat dispersion interactions. Top sites above surface layer carbon atoms turn out to be most favorable for a Ag adatom, in agreement with experimental observations. The same feature is observed for clusters of almost all sizes which have the lowest energies when the Ag atoms are positioned over top sites. Most gas phase isomers retain their structures over the substrate, though a couple of them undergo significant distortions. Energetics of the adsorption can be understood in terms of a competition between energy cost of disturbing AgAg bonds in the cluster and energy gain from AgC interactions at the surface. Ag{sub 3} turns out to be an exceptional candidate in this regard that undergoes significant structural distortion and has only two of the Ag atoms close to surface C atoms in its lowest energy structure.

  15. PROCESS OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM-TITANIUM CARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halden, F.A.; Smiley, W.D.; Hruz, F.M.

    1961-07-01

    A process of coating graphite with niobium - titanium carbide is described. It is found that the addition of more than ten percent by weight of titanium to niobium results in much greater wetting of the graphite by the niobium and a much more adherent coating. The preferred embodiment comprises contacting the graphite with a powdered alloy or mixture, degassing simultaneously the powder and the graphite, and then heating them to a high temperature to cause melting, wetting, spreading, and carburization of the niobium-titanium powder.

  16. Chemical modification of graphite surfaces using chitosan as a mediator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatley, M.E.; Albahadily, F.N.

    1995-12-01

    Several techniques for modifying graphite surfaces have been utilized the last two decades. Some of these techniques have a few limitations which include monolayer coverage and nonspecific binding to the graphite surfaces. In this report, we describe a novel approach to modify graphite surfaces using chitosan. The graphite is coated with an acidic chitosan solution. After drying, a chitosan film is formed on the graphite surfaces. Glutaraldehyde is attached to the chitosan through an amide linkage. The desired modifiers which contain amine groups are then attached to the free end of the glutaraldehyde. Utilization of the modified graphite surfaces in paste electrodes will be discussed.

  17. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical nuclear grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  18. NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, T.; Bratton, R.; Windes, W.

    2007-09-30

    The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently

  19. Melt containment member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  1. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  2. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappano, Peter J; Rogers, Michael R

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  3. NEW METHOD OF GRAPHITE PREPARATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.; Harper, W.T.

    1961-08-29

    BS>A method is described for producing graphite objects comprising mixing coal tar pitch, carbon black, and a material selected from the class comprising raw coke, calcined coke, and graphite flour. The mixture is placed in a graphite mold, pressurized to at least 1200 psi, and baked and graphitized by heating to about 2500 deg C while maintaining such pressure. (AEC)

  4. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few ?m in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  5. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  6. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  7. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  8. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  9. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  10. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  11. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  12. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-17

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  14. SIMPLIFIED SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickinson, R.W.

    1963-03-01

    This patent relates to a nuclear power reactor comprising a reactor vessel, shielding means positioned at the top of said vessel, means sealing said reactor vessel to said shielding means, said vessel containing a quantity of sodium, a core tank, unclad graphite moderator disposed in said tank, means including a plurality of process tubes traversing said tank for isolating said graphite from said sodium, fuel elements positioned in said process tubes, said core tank being supported in spaced relation to the walls and bottom of said reactor vessel and below the level of said sodium, neutron shielding means positioned adjacent said core tank between said core tank and the walls of said vessel, said neutron shielding means defining an annuiar volume adjacent the inside wall of said reactor vessel, inlet plenum means below said core tank for providing a passage between said annular volume and said process tubes, heat exchanger means removably supported from the first-named shielding means and positioned in said annular volume, and means for circulating said sodium over said neutron shielding means down through said heat exchanger, across said inlet plenum and upward through said process tubes, said last-named means including electromagnetic pumps located outside said vessel and supported on said vessel wall between said heat exchanger means and said inlet plenum means. (AEC)

  15. GRAPHITE IMPREGNATION METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, F.; Buttram, H.J.

    1962-04-24

    ABS>A method for impregnating a refractory material by filling its pores with a first salt having a high melting temperature is described. The salt is mixed with another, more volatile salt, giving the mixture a much lower melting temperature than that of the first salt. The material is coated with the mixture, then heated to drive off the volatile salt, leaving the first salt in place. (AEC)

  16. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  17. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  18. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  19. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  20. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  1. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  2. Oxidation state of cross-over manganese species on the graphite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    species on the graphite electrode of lithium-ion cells Authors: Gowda, Sanketh R. ; ... Language: English Subject: energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), charge ...

  3. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  4. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  5. Understanding Interfaces in Metal-Graphitic Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Star, Alexander

    2013-01-03

    Metalgraphitic interfaces formed between metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or graphene play an important role in the properties of such hybrid nanostructures. This Perspective summarizes different types of interfaces that exist within the metalcarbon nanoassemblies and discusses current efforts on understanding and modeling the interfacial conditions and interactions. Characterization of the metalgraphitic interfaces is described here, including microscopy, spectroscopy, electrochemical techniques, and electrical measurements. Recent studies on these nanohybrids have shown that the metalgraphitic interfaces play critical roles in both controlled assembly of nanoparticles and practical applications of nanohybrids in chemical sensors and fuel cells. Better understanding, design, and manipulation of metalgraphitic interfaces could therefore become the new frontier in the research of MNP/CNT or MNP/graphene hybrid systems.

  6. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  7. Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

  8. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcwilliams, A. J.

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  9. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanuel M.

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  10. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  11. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  12. Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strizak, Joe P; Burchell, Timothy D; Windes, Will

    2011-12-01

    Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

  13. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Albert J. (Ten Mile, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

  14. RECOVERY OF VALUABLE MATERIAL FROM GRAPHITE BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fromm, L.W. Jr.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process for recovering uranium from a graphite fuel element is described. The uraniumcontaining graphite body is disposed as the anode of a cell containing a nitric acid electrolyte and a 5 amp/cm/sup 2/ current passed to induce a progressive disintegration of the graphite body. The dissolved uranium is quickly and easily separated from the resulting graphite particles by simple mechanical means, such as centrifugation, filtration, and decontamination.

  15. X-10 Graphite Reactor | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor When President Roosevelt in December 1942 authorized the Manhattan Project, the Oak Ridge site in eastern Tennessee had already been obtained and plans laid for an air-cooled experimental pile, a pilot chemical separation plant, and support facilities. The X-10 Graphite Reactor, designed and built in ten months, went into operation on November 4, 1943. The X-10 used neutrons emitted in the fission of uranium-235 to convert

  16. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  17. Method and apparatus for drawing monocrystalline ribbon from a melt

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.; Schwuttke, Guenter H.

    1981-11-10

    A method and apparatus for drawing a monocrystalline ribbon or web from a melt comprising utilizing a shaping die including at least two elements spaced one from the other each having a portion thereof located below the level of the melt and another portion located above the level of the melt a distance sufficient to form a raised meniscus of melt about the corresponding element.

  18. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency ...

  19. GRAFEC: A New Spanish Program to Investigate Waste Management Options for Radioactive Graphite - 12399

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, Eva; Pina, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Marina; Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz; Leganes Nieto, Jose Luis; Quiros Gracian, Maria

    2012-07-01

    graphite in a long term stable glass matrix. The principal applicability has been already proved by FNAG. Crushed graphite mixed with a suitable glass powder has been pressed at elevated temperature under vacuum. The vacuum is required to avoid gas enclosures in the obtained product. The obtained products, named IGM for 'Impermeable Graphite Matrix', have densities above 99% of theoretical density. The amount of glass has been chosen with respect to the pore volume of the former graphite parts. The method allows the production of encapsulated graphite without increasing the disposal volume. This paper will give a short overview of characterisation results of different irradiated graphite materials obtained at CIEMAT and in the Carbowaste project as well as the proposed methods and the actual status of the program including first results about leaching of non-radioactive IGM samples and hopefully first tendencies concerning the C-14 separation from graphite of Vandellos I by thermal treatment. Both processes, the thermal treatment as well as the IGM, have the potential to solve problems related to the management of irradiated graphite in Spain. However the methods have only been tested with different types of i-graphite and virgin graphite, respectively. Only investigations with real i-graphite from Spain will reveal whether the described methods are applicable to graphite from Vandellos I. However all partners are convinced that one of these new methods or a combination of them will lead to a feasible option to manage i-graphite in Spain on an industrial scale. (authors)

  20. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  1. Improved MK42 Melting Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tudor, A.A.

    2001-09-19

    An improved Mark 42 melting model has been defined for establishing confinement protection limits (CPLs). This report describes the new melting model and its application in computing CPLs.

  2. Disposal options for burner ash from spent graphite fuel. Final study report November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, A.P.

    1994-08-01

    Three major disposal alternatives are being considered for Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSVR) and Peach Bottom Reactor (PBR) spent fuels: direct disposal of packaged, intact spent fuel elements; (2) removal of compacts to separate fuel into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW); and (3) physical/chemical processing to reduce waste volumes and produce stable waste forms. For the third alternative, combustion of fuel matrix graphite and fuel particle carbon coatings is a preferred technique for head-end processing as well as for volume reduction and chemical pretreatment prior to final fixation, packaging, and disposal of radioactive residuals (fissile and fertile materials together with fission and activation products) in a final repository. This report presents the results of a scoping study of alternate means for processing and/or disposal of fissile-bearing particles and ash remaining after combustion of FSVR and PBR spent graphite fuels. Candidate spent fuel ash (SFA) waste forms in decreasing order of estimated technical feasibility include glass-ceramics (GCs), polycrystalline ceramic assemblages (PCAs), and homogeneous amorphous glass. Candidate SFA waste form production processes in increasing order of estimated effort and cost for implementation are: low-density GCs via fuel grinding and simultaneous combustion and waste form production in a slagging cyclone combustor (SCC); glass or low-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by conventional melting of SFA and frit; PCAs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of SFA/frit mixtures; and high-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by HIPing of Calcine/Frit/SFA mixtures.

  3. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  4. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  5. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactors lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  6. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  7. INITIAL COMPARISON OF BASELINE PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR THE VHTR CANDIDATE GRAPHITE GRADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Mark C

    2014-09-01

    produced via an isomolding process. An analysis of the comparison between each of these grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear-grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  8. Using Graphite to view network data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Has own RRD like database called Carbon * RRD Compatible ESxSNMP Integration * via REST interface * Easy integration, Graphite is well written Lawrence Berkeley National ...

  9. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating...

  10. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    located at certain surfaces or interfaces between semiconducting crystalline regions with Bernal stacking order inside graphite samples. Recently published theoretical works...

  11. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    located at certain surfaces or interfaces between semiconducting crystalline regions with Bernal stacking order inside graphite samples. Recently published theoretical works 9,10...

  12. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  13. Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-28

    A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

  14. DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-01-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

  15. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of finite effective mass and defect-induced localized states. Goodbye Silicon Valley, Hello Graphite Gulch? Why are scientists suddenly interested in graphite? It is, after all,...

  16. PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; GRAPHITE; CREEP; PHYSICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    creep of graphite) Kennedy, C.R. 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; GRAPHITE; CREEP; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; JAPAN; MEETINGS; TRAVEL; ASIA; CARBON;...

  17. PROCESS OF IMPREGNATING GRAPHITE WITH A URANIUM COMPOUND

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanz, M.C.; Randolph, R.R.; Starr, C.

    1960-07-26

    A process of forming reactor material is given comprising impregnating graphite with uranyl nitrate and heating the graphite until the salt is converted into an oxide.

  18. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th...

  19. Graphite design handbook (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of MHTGR graphite components of the Reactor System, namely, core support, permanent ... The reference graphite in the reactor internal components is the nuclear grade 2020. There ...

  20. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site (280.28 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  1. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  2. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the possibility of higher strength

  3. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  4. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.W.; Spencer, C.

    1994-11-29

    A graphite panel with a hole having a damaged thread is repaired by drilling the hole to remove all of the thread and making a new hole of larger diameter. A bolt with a lubricated thread is placed in the new hole and the hole is packed with graphite cement to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread in the cement which is at least as strong as that of the original thread. 8 figures.

  5. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, William W.; Spencer, Cecil

    1994-01-01

    A graphite panel (10) with a hole (11) having a damaged thread (12) is repaired by drilling the hole (11) to remove all of the thread and make a new hole (13) of larger diameter. A bolt (14) with a lubricated thread (17) is placed in the new hole (13) and the hole (13) is packed with graphite cement (16) to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement (16) is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread (20) in the cement (16) which is at least as strong as that of the original thread (12).

  6. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lockwood, Frances E.

    2008-03-25

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  7. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  8. Method for the melting of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C.; Traut, Davis E.

    1992-01-01

    A method of quantitatively determining the molten pool configuration in melting of metals. The method includes the steps of introducing hafnium metal seeds into a molten metal pool at intervals to form ingots, neutron activating the ingots and determining the hafnium location by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  9. Laboratory for Characterization of Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2010-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center (IRC). The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research is in support of the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment — a major material irradiation experiment within the NGNP Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials.

  10. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  11. X-10 Graphite Reactor | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in eastern Tennessee had already been obtained and plans laid for an air-cooled experimental pile, a pilot chemical separation plant, and support facilities. The X-10 Graphite...

  12. GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

    1964-03-10

    ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

  13. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  14. Isothermal Melting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Energy-Efficient Melting Process Saves Energy and Reduces Production Losses Aluminum ... thermal, and mechanical robustness required in an industrial molten aluminum environment. ...

  15. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  16. Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01

    A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

  17. Electron beam melting of charge based on titanium sponge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikhonovsky, A.L.; Tikhonovsky, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    An experience of 0.8 MW consumable box melting furnace operation and theoretical simulation have led to the further development of the FIKO plant under construction on the base of melting of two consumable box-like bullets which move opposite each other and form narrow heated space between melted butt ends. It allows to reduce vaporization, spatter and radiation losses by several times and to reach two times increase in melting rate and 99%(97%) yield for c.p. titanium (alloys) without furnace power add. Future furnace design will provide the optimum protection of vacuum pumps against chlorides, the safety when melting titanium sponge and will permit hot ingots to move to the special furnace for EB surface conditioning. The maximum productivity is to be 18,000 t/year. The furnace can be used for the manufacture of aluminum-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, tungsten-based alloys and others of any charge including salvage.

  18. Immobilization of Rocky Flats graphite fines residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.; Marra, J.C.; Peeler, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt% graphite, 15 wt% calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and 12 wt% plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Approximately 950 kg of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO{sub 2} concentration in the residue averages 12 wt%, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF{sub 2} dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF{sub 2} and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.

  19. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  20. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  1. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH); Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (i) the electrode, (ii) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (iii) a counterelectrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes.

  2. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1998-05-26

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (1) the electrode, (2) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (3) a counter electrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes. 3 figs.

  3. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  4. Behavior of melts during softening and melting down of iron ore sinter under load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.H.

    1995-12-01

    In order to achieve effective operation in the blast furnace, the distribution control and quality improvement of burden materials are very important. In spite of the difficulties in obtaining suitable samples and making direct observation, significant progress including the placement of probes into the stack, tuyere drilling and laboratory simulation studies has been made. Investigation of the behavior of melts during softening and melting down was carried out in the temperature range of 800 C to 1,515 C. In this report, emphasis is given to investigating the mineral formation and properties of melts during softening and melting down of the iron ore sinter. Sized coke layers were placed above and below the sample to maintain uniform upward flow of gas and insure a smooth downward flow of melts. When the temperature of the sample reached the set point during the test the power was shut off and the sample was cooled in the furnace air. The weight, the height, porosity and contraction of each sample were measured. Chemical composition, observation of microstructures, SEM analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were conducted. Results are presented.

  5. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  6. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray energies up to 22 keV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals ...

  7. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been...

  8. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2010-11-09

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  9. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    web site | Department of Energy 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site (280.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  10. METHOD OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH STABLE METAL CARBIDES AND NITRIDES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1959-10-27

    A method is presented for forming protective stable nitride and carbide compounds on the surface of graphite. This is accomplished by contacting the graphite surface with a fused heavy liquid metal such as bismuth or leadbismuth containing zirconium, titanium, and hafnium dissolved or finely dispersed therein to form a carbide and nitride of at least one of the dissolved metals on the graphite surface.

  11. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKernan, M.A.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Chen, C.W.

    1994-02-08

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface. 2 figures.

  12. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKernan, Mark A.; Alford, Craig S.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Chen, Chih-Wen

    1994-01-01

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface.

  13. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air “helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  15. NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES studies of a unique presolar supernova graphite grain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groopman, Evan; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst; Nittler, Larry R.

    2014-07-20

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the nanocrystalline cores of HD graphite grains. We also report on X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements of G6. The complex isotopic- and micro-structure of G6 provides evidence for mixing and/or granular transport in SN ejecta.

  16. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lei, Huaping; Lii-Rosales, Ann; Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W.; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2016-06-13

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison withmore » the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. As a result, this island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.« less

  17. Thermally efficient melting for glass making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael S. K.; Painter, Corning F.; Pastore, Steven P.; Roth, Gary; Winchester, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is an integrated process for the production of glass utilizing combustion heat to melt glassmaking materials in a glassmaking furnace. The fuel combusted to produce heat sufficient to melt the glassmaking materials is combusted with oxygen-enriched oxidant to reduce heat losses from the offgas of the glassmaking furnace. The process further reduces heat losses by quenching hot offgas from the glassmaking furnace with a process stream to retain the heat recovered from quench in the glassmaking process with subsequent additional heat recovery by heat exchange of the fuel to the glassmaking furnace, as well as the glassmaking materials, such as batch and cullet. The process includes recovery of a commercially pure carbon dioxide product by separatory means from the cooled, residual offgas from the glassmaking furnace.

  18. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trammell, Michael P; Pappano, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB2000 is a

  19. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  20. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  1. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  2. Comparison between the Strength Levels of Baseline Nuclear-Grade Graphite and Graphite Irradiated in AGC-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Mark Christopher

    2015-07-01

    This report details the initial comparison of mechanical strength properties between the cylindrical nuclear-grade graphite specimens irradiated in the second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC-2) experiment with the established baseline, or unirradiated, mechanical properties compiled in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. The overall comparative analysis will describe the development of an appropriate test protocol for irradiated specimens, the execution of the mechanical tests on the AGC-2 sample population, and will further discuss the data in terms of developing an accurate irradiated property distribution in the limited amount of irradiated data by leveraging the considerably larger property datasets being captured in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. Integrating information on the inherent variability in nuclear-grade graphite with more complete datasets is one of the goals of the VHTR Graphite Materials program. Between “sister” specimens, or specimens with the same geometry machined from the same sub-block of graphite from which the irradiated AGC specimens were extracted, and the Baseline datasets, a comprehensive body of data will exist that can provide both a direct and indirect indication of the full irradiated property distributions that can be expected of irradiated nuclear-grade graphite while in service in a VHTR system. While the most critical data will remain the actual irradiated property measurements, expansion of this data into accurate distributions based on the inherent variability in graphite properties will be a crucial step in qualifying graphite for nuclear use as a structural material in a VHTR environment.

  3. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T. S.

    1998-11-06

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the

  4. Method for reproducibly preparing a low-melting high-carbon yield precursor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Wesley E.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing a reproducible synthetic carbon precursor by the autoclave polymerization of indene (C.sub.9 H.sub.8) at a temperature in the range of 470.degree.-485.degree. C, and at a pressure in the range of about 1000 to about 4300 psi. Volatiles in the resulting liquid indene polymer are removed by vacuum outgassing to form a solid carbon precursor characterized by having a relatively low melting temperature, high-carbon yield, and high reproducibility which provide for the fabrication of carbon and graphite composites having strict requirements for reproducible properties.

  5. Decontamination and melting of low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.W.

    1997-03-01

    This article describes the decommissioning project of the Capenhurst Diffusion Plant in Europe. Over 99 percent of the low-level waste was successfully treated and recycled. Topics include the following: decommissioning philosophy; specialized techniques including plant pretreatment, plant dismantling, size reduction, decontamination, melting, and encapsulation of waste; recycled materials and waste stream; project safety; cost drivers and savings. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanter, M.A.

    1958-05-20

    A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

  7. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. ...

  8. Role of Nuclear Grade Graphite in Oxidation in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willaim Windes; G. Strydom; J. Kane; R. Smith

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  9. Novel Electrolyte Enables Stable Graphite Anodes in Lithium Ion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel Electrolyte Enables Stable Graphite Anodes in Lithium Ion Batteries Lawrence ... Coulombic Efficiency for Lithium Ion Batteries," Journal of the Electrochemical ...

  10. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transition metals on the...

  11. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  12. Low-melting elemental metal or fusible alloy encapsulated polymerization initiator for delayed initiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    An encapsulated composition for polymerization includes an initiator composition for initiating a polymerization reaction, and a capsule prepared from an elemental metal or fusible alloy having a melting temperature from about 20.degree. C. to about 200.degree. C. A fluid for polymerization includes the encapsulated composition and a monomer. When the capsule melts or breaks open, the initiator is released.

  13. JACKETED FUEL ELEMENTS FOR GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szilard, L.; Wigner, E.P.; Creutz, E.C.

    1959-05-12

    Fuel elements for a heterogeneous, fluid cooled, graphite moderated reactor are described. The fuel elements are comprised of a body of natural uranium hermetically sealed in a jacket of corrosion resistant material. The jacket, which may be aluminum or some other material which is non-fissionable and of a type having a low neutron capture cross-section, acts as a barrier between the fissioning isotope and the coolant or moderator or both. The jacket minimizes the tendency of the moderator and coolant to become radioactive and/or contaminated by fission fragments from the fissioning isotope.

  14. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hanyung; Ve Cheah, Chang; Jeong, Namjo; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-08-04

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm{sup 3} in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

  15. Note on Graphite Oxidation by Oxygen and Moisture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichner, Robert; Burchell, Timothy D; Contescu, Cristian I

    2009-02-01

    Simplified equations of graphite oxidation are reviewed for semi-infinite slab, finite slab, and cylinder geometries, using the principal assumptions of linearized oxidation kinetics and quasi-steady state oxidation profile. All equations are coupled to a general surface mass transfer boundary condition. The equations include those for oxidant concentration distribution, surface oxidation rate, burnoff profile, and oxidation efficiency. This review also covers some areas that may not be well recognized. The key role of the effective diffusivity is highlighted, with a brief review of measured values. The temperature-dependence of the surface oxidation rate is shown to be more complex than usually shown for the diffusion-affected zone. Assumption of linear kinetics permits ready estimation of equilibration time for development of the quasi-steady burnoff profile. In addition, approximations for the time-steady hydrogen concentration profiles are developed for the case of oxidation by H2O. All cited methods can be readily evaluated by spreadsheet calculation.

  16. Wave propagation in an epoxy-graphite laminate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, B.E.; Johnson, J.N.; Addessio, F.L.

    1997-11-01

    The third-order, nonhomogenized, dynamic method of cells is used to calculate the particle velocity for a shock wave experiment involving an epoxy{endash}graphite laminate. Constitutive relations suitable for the various materials are used. This includes linear and nonlinear elasticity and, when appropriate, viscoelasticity. It is found to be beneficial to incorporate artificial viscosity into the analysis. Artificial viscosity successfully removes the unphysical high-frequency ringing in the numerical solutions of the theory, while leaving the physical oscillations, characteristic of wave propagation in a periodic laminate, largely undiminished. It also allows the viscoelastic relaxed moduli to be closer to their unrelaxed counterparts than in a previous calculation, thus making them more acceptable. The results agree well with the corresponding plate-impact experiment, and are compared to the second-order theory of Clements, Johnson, and Hixson [Phys. Rev. E, {bold 54}, 6876 (1996)]. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Meyer III, Harry M; Howe, Jane Y; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew; Lance, Michael J; Yoon, Steve; Denlinger, Matthew; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  18. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energys lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the

  19. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  20. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  1. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce themore » specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .« less

  2. Method of forming impermeable carbide coats on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of forming an impermeable refractory metal carbide coating on graphite is described in which a metal containing oxidant and a carbide former are applied to the surface of the graphite, heated to a temperature of between 1200 and 1500 deg C in an inert gas, under a vacuum and continuing to heat to about 2300 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  3. Pyrotek Graphitization Facility Expansion Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt016_es_sekedat_2011_p.pdf (756.86 KB) More Documents & Publications Pyrotek Graphitization Facility Expansion Project Pyrotek Graphitization Facility Expansion Project EA-1720: Finding of No Significant Impact

  4. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  5. Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besser, Matthew F.; Terpstra, Robert L.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Anderson, Iver E.

    2002-03-19

    A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

  6. Developing vanadium valence state oxybarometers (spinel-melt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    olivine-melt, spinel-olivine) and V(Cr+Al) partitioning (spinel-melt) for ... olivine-melt, spinel-olivine) and V(Cr+Al) partitioning (spinel-melt) for ...

  7. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  8. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-06-10

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  9. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  10. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  11. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based onmore » point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.« less

  12. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windes, William; Smith, Rebecca; Carroll, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  13. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print Wednesday, 27 June 2007 00:00 The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute

  14. Recent developments in graphite. [Use in HTGR and aerospace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications.

  15. Chemistry modification of high oxygen-carbon powder by plasma melting: Follow up to complete the story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, P.S.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Garcia, F.G.; Michaluk, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    State of the art melting of tantalum and tantalum alloys has relied on electron beam (EB) or vacuum arc remelting (VAR) for commercial ingot production. Plasma arc melting (PAM) provides an alternative for melting tantalum that contains very high levels of interstitials where other melting techniques can not be applied. Previous work in this area centered on plasma arc melt quality and final interstitial content of tantalum feedstock containing excessive levels of interstitial impurities as a function of melt rate and plasma gas. This report is an expansion of this prior study and provides the findings from the analysis of second phase components observed in the microstructure of the PAM tantalum. In addition, results from subsequent EB melting trials of PAM tantalum are included.

  16. Graphite fiber as a positive electrode of rechargeable lithium cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Y.; Katsuma, H.; Morita, M.

    1984-01-01

    Graphite compounds have gained interest as possible positive electrodes for rechargeable lithium cells. Their charge-discharge characteristics have been studied in organic electrolytic solutions such as sulfolane dimethylsulfite, and propylene carbonate.

  17. Dry synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite powders and carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    potential and SEM data show that the reactivity of the lithiated battery-grade graphite and the carbon fiber can be related to the density of edgedefect sites on the surfaces. ...

  18. Aluminum for bonding Si-Ge alloys to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eggemann, Robert V.

    1976-01-13

    Improved thermoelectric device and process, comprising the high-temperature, vacuum bonding of a graphite contact and silicon-germanium thermoelectric element by the use of a low void, aluminum, metallurgical shim with low electrical resistance sandwiched therebetween.

  19. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute graphene's surprising current capacity (as well as a number of even stranger

  20. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  1. Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal | Department of Energy Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The

  2. Manufacturing Challenges for BOP and Graphite Stack Components

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENTEGRIS PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL Feb 28, 2014 Manufacturing Challenges for BOP & Graphite Stack Components CONFIDENTIAL | 2 Areas of Development  C.T.E  Semi Dissipative Materials  Impregnation of Metal into Graphite - Titanium  Chemical Vapor Deposition/Physical Vapor Deposition  Silicon Carbide  Graphene CONFIDENTIAL | 3 Balance of Plant Manifold Assembly  Material selection process  High-density Polyethylene (HDPE)  Polyoxymethylene (POM)  Polyamide (PA)

  3. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute graphene's surprising current capacity (as well as a number of even stranger

  4. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute graphene's surprising current capacity (as well as a number of even stranger

  5. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute graphene's surprising current capacity (as well as a number of even stranger

  6. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been driven by the discovery that electron mobility in graphene is ten times higher than in commercial-grade silicon, raising the possibility of high-efficiency, low-power, carbon-based electronics. Scientists attribute graphene's surprising current capacity (as well as a number of even stranger

  7. Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

    2011-04-01

    Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

  8. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation.

  9. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1996-01-09

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation. 9 figs.

  10. Graphitic biocarbon from metal-catalyzed hydrothermal carbonization of lignin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demir, Muslum; Kahveci, Zafer; Aksoy, Burak; Palapati, Naveen K. R.; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Cullinan, Harry T.; El-Kaderi, Hani M.; Harris, Charles T.; Gupta, Ram B.

    2015-10-09

    Lignin is a high-volume byproduct from the pulp and paper industry and is currently burned to generate electricity and process heat. Moreover, the industry has been searching for high value-added uses of lignin to improve the process economics. In addition, battery manufacturers are seeking nonfossil sources of graphitic carbon for environmental sustainability. In our work, lignin (which is a cross-linked polymer of phenols, a component of biomass) is converted into graphitic porous carbon using a two-step conversion. Lignin is first carbonized in water at 300 °C and 1500 psi to produce biochar, which is then graphitized using a metal nitratemore » catalyst at 900–1100 °C in an inert gas at 15 psi. Graphitization effectiveness of three different catalysts—iron, cobalt, and manganese nitrates—is examined. The product is analyzed for morphology, thermal stability, surface properties, and electrical conductivity. Both temperature and catalyst type influenced the degree of graphitization. A good quality graphitic carbon was obtained using catalysis by Mn(NO3)2 at 900 °C and Co(NO3)2 at 1100 °C.« less

  11. Characterisation of graphite using boron as a marker element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja; Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Kameswaran, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2013-06-12

    Graphite has many industrial applications. Two of the most important applications are as electrodes in industries and as moderator in nuclear industry. Determination of the Boron Equivalent of the impurity elements in graphite is the most important parameter for certifying the grade of graphite electrode [1]. The use of a suitable method with low limits of determination of boron is therefore necessary. A method has been standardised in Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC for determining trace amounts of boron in graphite electrodes. It involves controlled dissolution of graphite sample powder and measurement of boron by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) using matrix matched standards. The method detection limit is 1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The method Relative Standard Deviation was 5%. The method was verified by spike recovery experiments. Recoveries were found to be within 100{+-}2% in the concentration range of 1 to 100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The developed method has been adopted for the compositional characterization of several graphite electrode samples.

  12. Graphitic biocarbon from metal-catalyzed hydrothermal carbonization of lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, Muslum; Kahveci, Zafer; Aksoy, Burak; Palapati, Naveen K. R.; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Cullinan, Harry T.; El-Kaderi, Hani M.; Harris, Charles T.; Gupta, Ram B.

    2015-10-09

    Lignin is a high-volume byproduct from the pulp and paper industry and is currently burned to generate electricity and process heat. Moreover, the industry has been searching for high value-added uses of lignin to improve the process economics. In addition, battery manufacturers are seeking nonfossil sources of graphitic carbon for environmental sustainability. In our work, lignin (which is a cross-linked polymer of phenols, a component of biomass) is converted into graphitic porous carbon using a two-step conversion. Lignin is first carbonized in water at 300 °C and 1500 psi to produce biochar, which is then graphitized using a metal nitrate catalyst at 900–1100 °C in an inert gas at 15 psi. Graphitization effectiveness of three different catalysts—iron, cobalt, and manganese nitrates—is examined. The product is analyzed for morphology, thermal stability, surface properties, and electrical conductivity. Both temperature and catalyst type influenced the degree of graphitization. A good quality graphitic carbon was obtained using catalysis by Mn(NO3)2 at 900 °C and Co(NO3)2 at 1100 °C.

  13. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  14. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  15. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  16. Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Olszanski, Theodore W.; Battles, James E.

    1977-03-08

    A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such as solid lithium-aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF THE SHOCK-HEATED MELT CURVE OF LEAD USING PYROMETRY AND REFLECTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Partouche-Sebban and J. L. Pelissier, Commissariat a` l'Energie Atomique,; F. G. Abeyta, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W. W. Anderson, Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. E. Byers, Los Alamos National Laboratory; D. Dennis-Koller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. S. Esparza, Los Alamos National Laboratory; S. D. Borror, Bechtel Nevada; C. A. Kruschwitz, Bechtel Nevada

    2004-01-01

    Data on the high-pressure melting temperatures of metals is of great interest in several fields of physics including geophysics. Measuring melt curves is difficult but can be performed in static experiments (with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells for instance) or dynamically (i.e., using shock experiments). However, at the present time, both experimental and theoretical results for the melt curve of lead are at too much variance to be considered definitive. As a result, we decided to perform a series of shock experiments designed to provide a measurement of the melt curve of lead up to about 50 GPa in pressure. At the same time, we developed and fielded a new reflectivity diagnostic, using it to make measurements on tin. The results show that the melt curve of lead is somewhat higher than the one previously obtained with static compression and heating techniques.

  18. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  19. Approaches to Deal with Irradiated Graphite in Russia - Proposal for New IAEA CRP on Graphite Waste Management - 12364

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Ustinov, Oleg

    2012-07-01

    The problems of spent reactor graphite are being shown, the options of its disposal is considered. Burning method is selected as the most efficient and waste-free. It is made a comparison of amounts of {sup 14}C that entering the environment in a natural way during the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and as a result of the proposed burning of spent reactor graphite. It is shown the possibility of burning graphite with the arrival of {sup 14}C into the atmosphere within the maximum allowable emissions. This paper analyzes the different ways of spent reactor graphite treatment. It is shown the possibility of its reprocessing by burning method in the air flow. It is estimated the effect of this technology to the overall radiation environment and compared its contribution to the general background radiation due to cosmic radiation and NPPs emission. It is estimated the maximum permissible speeds of burning reactor graphite (for example, RBMK graphite) for areas with different conditions of agricultural activities. (authors)

  20. Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-06-01

    e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ΔQ/ΔV analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

  1. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  2. Toughened Graphite Electrode for High Heat Electric Arc Furnaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL to melt steel, titanium, and other scrap metal in industrial electric arc furnaces. ... Applications and Industries Electric arc furnace steel manufacturing Steel refinement and ...

  3. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1994-08-02

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. 6 figs.

  4. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material.

  5. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated...

  6. ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and ...

  7. Sandia Energy - Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salt Home Renewable Energy Energy News Concentrating Solar Power Solar Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt Previous Next Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt The Molten Salt Test...

  8. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Snead, Lance L.; Contescu, C. I.; Byun, T. S.; Porter, W.

    2016-04-23

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ~400 C up to 9.3x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV.) Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free condition. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase inmore » dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3-40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.« less

  9. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Arctic and Antarctica are covered with large, heavy sheets of ice. Other islands like New Zealand have ice masses in the form of glaciers on them. When land-based ice melts, ...

  10. Gold nanorod melting | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gold nanorod melting Share Topic Programs Materials science Materials simulation & theory Nanoscience Surface & interface studies Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling, simulation, & visualization Supercomputing & high-performance computing

  11. Energy-Efficient Glass Melting: Submerged Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    Oxy-gas-fired submerged combustion melter offers simpler, improved performance. For the last 100 years, the domestic glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass on an industrial scale.

  12. Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdez, James A; Byler, Darrin D

    2012-06-08

    This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  14. Graphitization of polymer surfaces by scanning ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, Yuri [Department of Physics, Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    Graphitization of polymer surfaces was performed by low-energy Ar{sup +} and He{sup +} ion irradiation. A method of scanning irradiation was implemented. It was found that by scanning ion irradiation, a significantly higher electrical conductivity in the graphitized layers can be achieved in comparison with a conventional broad-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the conductance becomes more pronounced for narrower and better collimated ion beams. In order to analyze these results in more detail, the temperature dependence of conductance of the irradiated samples was investigated. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of weak localization corrections to conductance in disordered metals. The observed effects can be explained by enlargement of graphitic patches, which was achieved with the scanning ion irradiation method.

  15. Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting Research Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connors, John J.; McConnell, John F.; Henry, Vincent I.; MacDonald, Blake A.; Gallagher, Robert J.; Field, William B.; Walsh, Peter M.; Simmons, Michael C.; Adams, Michael E.; Leadbetter, James M.; Tomasewski, Jack W.; Operacz, Walter J.; Houf, William G.; Davis, James W.; Marvin, Bart G.; Gunner, Bruce E.; Farrell, Rick G.; Bivins, David P.; Curtis, Warren; Harris, James E.

    2004-08-01

    solution of proprietary glass production problems. As a consequence of the substantial increase in scale and scope of the initial furnace concept in response to industry recommendations, constraints on funding of industrial programs by DOE, and reorientation of the Department's priorities, the OIT Glass Program is unable to provide the support for construction of such a facility. However, it is the present investigators' hope that a group of industry partners will emerge to carry the project forward, taking advantage of the detailed furnace design presented in this report. The engineering, including complete construction drawings, bill of materials, and equipment specifications, is complete. The project is ready to begin construction as soon as the quotations are updated. The design of the research melter closely follows the most advanced industrial practice, firing by natural gas with oxygen. The melting area is 13 ft x 6 ft, with a glass depth of 3 ft and an average height in the combustion space of 3 ft. The maximum pull rate is 25 tons/day, ranging from 100% batch to 100% cullet, continuously fed, with variable batch composition, particle size distribution, and raft configuration. The tank is equipped with bubblers to control glass circulation. The furnace can be fired in three modes: (1) using a single large burner mounted on the front wall, (2) by six burners in a staggered/opposed arrangement, three in each breast wall, and (3) by down-fired burners mounted in the crown in any combination with the front wall or breast-wall-mounted burners. Horizontal slots are provided between the tank blocks and tuck stones and between the breast wall and skewback blocks, running the entire length of the furnace on both sides, to permit access to the combustion space and the surface of the glass for optical measurements and sampling probes. Vertical slots in the breast walls provide additional access for measurements and sampling. The furnace and tank are to be fully instrumented

  16. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  17. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W.; Janney, Mark A.

    2005-02-15

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  18. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  19. High strength graphite and method for preparing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overholser, Lyle G.; Masters, David R.; Napier, John M.

    1976-01-01

    High strength graphite is manufactured from a mixture of a particulate filler prepared by treating a particulate carbon precursor at a temperature in the range of about 400.degree. to 1000.degree. C., an organic carbonizable binder, and green carbonizable fibers in a concentration of not more than 2 weight per cent of the filler. The use of the relatively small quantity of green fibers provides a substantial increase in the flexural strength of the graphite with only a relatively negligible increase in the modulus of elasticity.

  20. Early Damage Mechanisms in Nuclear Grade Graphite under Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Dr. Jacob [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Krishna, Dr Ram [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL] [ORNL; Murty, Prof K.L. [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01

    Using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,we delineate the bond and defect structures in nuclear block graphite (NBG-18) under neutron and ion irradiation. The strengthening of the defect (D) peak in the Raman spectra under irradiation is attributed to an increase in the topological, sp2-hybridized defects. Using transmission electron microscopy, we provide evidence for prismatic dislocations as well as a number of basal dislocations dissociating into Shockley partials. The non-vanishing D peak in the Raman spectra, together with a generous number of dislocations, even at low irradiation doses, indicates a dislocation-mediated amorphization process in graphite.

  1. Graphite fiber reinforced structure for supporting machine tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Kovach, Louis; Hurst, John S.

    1978-01-01

    Machine tools utilized in precision machine operations require tool support structures which exhibit minimal deflection, thermal expansion and vibration characteristics. The tool support structure of the present invention is a graphite fiber reinforced composite in which layers of the graphite fibers or yarn are disposed in a 0/90.degree. pattern and bonded together with an epoxy resin. The finished composite possesses a low coefficient of thermal expansion and a substantially greater elastic modulus, stiffness-to-weight ratio, and damping factor than a conventional steel tool support utilized in similar machining operations.

  2. Graphit-ceramic RF Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, David L.; Hosea, Joel C.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process of brazing a ceramic mater to graphite. In particular, the brazing procedure is directed to the production of a novel brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield.

  3. Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for supercritical CO2 power cycles for concentrated solar power Title Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat...

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  5. Electroanalytical applications of screen-printable surfactant-induced sol-gel graphite composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guadalupe, Ana R.; Guo, Yizhu

    2001-05-15

    A process for preparing sol-gel graphite composite electrodes is presented. This process preferably uses the surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and eliminates the need for a cosolvent, an acidic catalyst, a cellulose binder and a thermal curing step from prior art processes. Fabrication of screen-printed electrodes by this process provides a simple approach for electroanalytical applications in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents. Examples of applications for such composite electrodes produced from this process include biochemical sensors such as disposable, single-use glucose sensors and ligand modified composite sensors for metal ion sensitive sensors.

  6. Method for making hot-pressed fiber-reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, Robert E.; Wallace Sr., Terry C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the chemical vapor deposition of a uniform coating of tantalum metal on fibers of a woven graphite cloth is described. Several layers of the coated cloth are hot pressed to produce a tantalum carbide-graphite composite having a uniformly dispersed, fine grained tantalum carbide in graphite with compositions in the range of 15 to 40 volume percent tantalum carbide.

  7. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  8. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  9. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  10. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  11. ESR Process Instabilities while Melting Pipe Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melgaard, D.K.; Shelmidine, G.J.

    1999-01-06

    With the demonstration of the viability of using the electroslag remelting process for the decontamination of radionuclides, interest has increased in examining the unique aspects associated with melting steel pipe electrodes. These electrodes consist of several nested pipes, welded concentrically to atop plate. Since these electrodes can be half as dense as a solid electrode, they present unique challenges to the standard algorithms used in controlling the melting process. Naturally the electrode must be driven down at a dramatically increased speed. However, since the heat transfer is greatly influenced and enhanced with the increased area to volume ratio, considerable variation in the melting rate of the pipes has been found. Standard control methods can become unstable as a result of the variation at increased speeds, particularly at shallow immersion depths. The key to good control lies in the understanding of the melting process. Several experiments were conducted to observe the characteristics of the melting using two different control modes. By using a pressure transducer to monitor the pressure inside the pipes, the venting of the air trapped inside the electrode was observed. The measurements reveal that for a considerable amount of time. the pipes are not completely immersed in the slag, allowing the gas inside to escape without the formation of bubbles. This result has implications for the voltage swing as well as for the decontamination reactions.

  12. Distribution of radionuclides during melting of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurber, W.C.; MacKinney, J.

    1997-02-01

    During the melting of steel with radioactive contamination, radionuclides may be distributed among the metal product, the home scrap, the slag, the furnace lining and the off-gas collection system. In addition, some radionuclides will pass through the furnace system and vent to the atmosphere. To estimate radiological impacts of recycling radioactive scrap steel, it is essential to understand how radionuclides are distributed within the furnace system. For example, an isotope of a gaseous element (e.g., radon) will exhaust directly from the furnace system into the atmosphere while a relatively non-volatile element (e.g., manganese) can be distributed among all the other possible media. This distribution of radioactive contaminants is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous chemical and physical factors, including composition of the steel bath, chemistry of the slag, vapor pressure of the particular element of interest, solubility of the element in molten iron, density of the oxide(s), steel melting temperature and melting practice (e.g., furnace type and size, melting time, method of carbon adjustment and method of alloy additions). This paper discusses the distribution of various elements with particular reference to electric arc furnace steelmaking. The first two sections consider the calculation of partition ratios for elements between metal and slag based on thermodynamic considerations. The third section presents laboratory and production measurements of the distribution of various elements among slag, metal, and the off-gas collection system; and the final section provides recommendations for the assumed distribution of each element of interest.

  13. Melt processing of radioactive waste: A technical overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlienger, M.E.; Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.

    1997-04-01

    Nuclear operations have resulted in the accumulation of large quantities of contaminated metallic waste which are stored at various DOE, DOD, and commercial sites under the control of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste will accumulate at an increasing rate as commercial nuclear reactors built in the 1950s reach the end of their projected lives, as existing nuclear powered ships become obsolete or unneeded, and as various weapons plants and fuel processing facilities, such as the gaseous diffusion plants, are dismantled, repaired, or modernized. For example, recent estimates of available Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex have suggested that as much as 700,000 tons of contaminated 304L stainless steel exist in the gaseous diffusion plants alone. Other high-value metals available in the DOE complex include copper, nickel, and zirconium. Melt processing for the decontamination of radioactive scrap metal has been the subject of much research. A major driving force for this research has been the possibility of reapplication of RSM, which is often very high-grade material containing large quantities of strategic elements. To date, several different single and multi-step melting processes have been proposed and evaluated for use as decontamination or recycling strategies. Each process offers a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses, and ultimately, no single melt processing scheme is optimum for all applications since processes must be evaluated based on the characteristics of the input feed stream and the desired output. This paper describes various melt decontamination processes and briefly reviews their application in developmental studies, full scale technical demonstrations, and industrial operations.

  14. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  15. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Ramsey, Philip B.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  16. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  17. Method and apparatus for melting metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Alan F.; Schechter, Donald E.; Morrow, Marvin Stanley

    2006-03-14

    A method and apparatus for melting metals uses microwave energy as the primary source of heat. The metal or mixture of metals are placed in a ceramic crucible which couples, at least partially, with the microwaves to be used. The crucible is encased in a ceramic casket for insulation and placed within a microwave chamber. The chamber may be evacuated and refilled to exclude oxygen. After melting, the crucible may be removed for pouring or poured within the chamber by dripping or running into a heated mold within the chamber. Apparent coupling of the microwaves with softened or molten metal produces high temperatures with great energy savings.

  18. Recovery of flake graphite from steelmaking kish. Report of investigations/1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laverty, P.D.; Nicks, L.J.; Walters, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of its research efforts to encourage conservation and reuse of natural resources, the Bureau of Mines has developed a processing method to produce high-quality flake graphite from the steelmaking waste known as kish. The kish produced by current steelmaking practices is a mixture of graphite, desulfurization slag, and iron that is skimmed from the molten iron feed to the basic oxygen furnace. It is estimated that the graphite content of kish discarded by American steel plants is more than sufficient to meet the total U.S. demand for flake graphite. That need is now filled by natural graphite from foreign sources. Kish was treated by a combination of screening and hydraulic classification to produce a concentrate containing greater than 70 pct graphite. Leaching of the concentrate with hydrochloric acid solution gave a graphite product with 95 pct purity.

  19. Silicon purification melting for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; HO,PAULINE; GEE,JAMES M.

    2000-04-01

    The availability of polysilicon feedstock has become a major issue for the photovoltaic (PV) industry in recent years. Most of the current polysilicon feedstock is derived from rejected material from the semiconductor industry. However, the reject material can become scarce and more expensive during periods of expansion in the integrated-circuit industry. Continued rapid expansion of the PV crystalline-silicon industry will eventually require a dedicated supply of polysilicon feedstock to produce solar cells at lower costs. The photovoltaic industry can accept a lower purity polysilicon feedstock (solar-grade) compared to the semiconductor industry. The purity requirements and potential production techniques for solar-grade polysilicon have been reviewed. One interesting process from previous research involves reactive gas blowing of the molten silicon charge. As an example, Dosaj et all reported a reduction of metal and boron impurities from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with 0{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2}. The same authors later reassessed their data and the literature, and concluded that Cl{sub 2}and 0{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2} gas blowing are only effective for removing Al, Ca, and Mg from the silicon melt. Researchers from Kawasaki Steel Corp. reported removal of B and C from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with an 0{sub 2}/Ar plasma torch. Processes that purify the silicon melt are believed to be potentially much lower cost compared to present production methods that purify gas species.

  20. Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomczuk, Z.; Olszanski, W.; Battles, J.E.

    1975-12-09

    A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such a solid lithium--aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided. 1 figure, 1 table.

  1. Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rundong Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

  2. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  3. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  4. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  5. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  6. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  7. Carbon K-Edge XANES Spectromicroscopy of Natural Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes,J.; Cody, G.; Rumble, D.; Haberstroh, P.; Wirick, S.; Gelinas, Y.; Morais-Cabral, J.

    2008-01-01

    The black carbon continuum is composed of a series of carbon-rich components derived from combustion or metamorphism and characterized by contrasting environmental behavior and susceptibility to oxidation. In this work, we present a micro-scale density fractionation method that allows isolating the small quantities of soot-like and graphitic material usually found in natural samples. Organic carbon and {delta}{sup 13}C mass balance calculations were used to quantify the relative contributions of the two fractions to thermally-stable organic matter from a series of aquatic sediments. Varying proportions of soot-like and graphitic material were found in these samples, with large variations in {delta}{sup 13}C signatures suggesting important differences in their origin and/or dynamics in the environment.

  8. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  9. Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryRobert Kostecki and Marek Marcinek of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a method to improve the performance and operational life of composite electrodes by direct deposition of a continuous,

  10. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders [7]. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very

  11. Pre-conceptual Development and characterization of an extruded graphite composite fuel for the TREAT Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik; Rooyen, Isabella van; Leckie, Rafael; Papin, Pallas; Nelson, Andrew; Hunter, James

    2015-03-01

    In an effort to explore fuel systems that are more robust under accident scenarios, the DOE-NE has identified the need to resume transient testing. The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility has been identified as the preferred option for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuel in the United States. In parallel, NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert program is exploring the needs to replace the existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core with low enriched uranium (LEU) core. In order to construct a new LEU core, materials and fabrication processes similar to those used in the initial core fabrication must be identified, developed and characterized. In this research, graphite matrix fuel blocks were extruded and materials properties of were measured. Initially the extrusion process followed the historic route; however, the project was expanded to explore methods to increase the graphite content of the fuel blocks and explore modern resins. Materials properties relevant to fuel performance including density, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity were measured. The relationship between process defects and materials properties will be discussed.

  12. Anomalous dielectric relaxation of water confined in graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Ji; Tian, Yuchen; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2015-09-28

    Nonmonotonic thermal dependence of dielectric relaxation of water has been observed in hydrated graphite oxide (GO). Graphite oxide prepared via Hummers method then imbued with specific water contents were characterized, with {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ambient- and variable-temperature X-ray diffractometries, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. Pressed pellets provided with either conducting or blocking electrodes yielded dielectric loss, which was shown to originate from dielectric relaxation of the confined water. Three relaxation processes were observed in impedance spectroscopy. Our previous work has identified two different types of water in GO, namely, intercalated water and water in inter-grain voids. P{sub 1} expresses the reorientation of water confined inside inter-grain voids, and P{sub 2}, the rotation of intercalated water molecules confined in interlayers. The present work reveals a new process P{sub 3}, which also relates to intercalated water. It slows down with temperature, and this apparent anomaly is explained by the decrease in water content and consequent narrowing of interlayer spacing in graphite oxide, as confirmed by characterization techniques. The present study should contribute to our understanding of surface water dynamics.

  13. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  14. Model of fracture of metal melts and the strength of melts under dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, P. N. Mayer, A. E.

    2015-07-15

    The development of a continuum model of deformation and fracture of melts is needed for the description of the behavior of metals in extreme states, in particular, under high-current electron and ultrashort laser irradiation. The model proposed includes the equations of mechanics of a two-phase continuum and the equations of the kinetics of phase transitions. The change (exchange) of the volumes of dispersed and carrier phases and of the number of dispersed particles is described, and the energy and mass exchange between the phases due to phase transitions is taken into account. Molecular dynamic (MD) calculations are carried out with the use of the LAMMPS program. The continuum model is verified by MD, computational, and experimental data. The strength of aluminum, copper, and nickel is determined at various temperatures and strain rates. It is shown that an increase in the strain rate leads to an increase in the strength of a liquid metal, while an increase in temperature leads to a decrease in its strength.

  15. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf (572.12 ...

  16. Evaluation of replacement thread lubricants for red lead and graphite in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungling, T.L.; Rauth, D.R.; Goldberg, D.

    1998-04-30

    Eight commercially available thread lubricants were evaluated to determine the best replacement for Red Lead and Graphite in Mineral Oil (RLGMO). The evaluation included coefficient of friction testing, high temperature anti-seizing testing, room temperature anti-galling testing, chemical analysis for detrimental impurities, corrosion testing, off-gas testing, and a review of health and environmental factors. The coefficient of friction testing covered a wide variety of factors including stud, nut, and washer materials, sizes, manufacturing methods, surface coatings, surface finishes, applied loads, run-in cycles, and relubrication. Only one lubricant, Dow Corning Molykote P37, met all the criteria established for a replacement lubricant. It has a coefficient of friction range similar to RLGMO. Therefore, it can be substituted directly for RLGMO without changing the currently specified fastener torque values for the sizes, materials and conditions evaluated. Other lubricants did not perform as well as Molykote P37 in one or more test or evaluation categories.

  17. Dynamics and pattern selection at the crystal-melt interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses: light scattering at the crystal-melt interface; morphological instability and pattern selection; and sidebranching.

  18. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

  19. Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-04-07

    A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

  20. Melt behavior of aluminum clad rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, G.T.; Long, T.A.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Since the Li-Al alloy cores in control rods used to control production reactors are susceptible to corrosion by heavy water, they were clad with Al. This paper reports results of an experimental and numerical study of the behavior of control rods heated to the point of clad and rod-core failure. Results show that the core of the rod melts first; the clad fails only after significant additional heating. Once the rod breaks and drops to the bottom of the quartz tube in the furnace, the lower section of the rod fails by ``poker-chipping`` downward as the topmost portion fails before the portion below it. Part of the core in the remaining top of the rod relocates immediately after rod separation, leaving a hollow tube of Al which also melts upon further heating.

  1. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  2. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  3. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  4. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted

  5. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  6. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

    2014-06-02

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  7. Method of fabricating graphite for use as a skeletal prosthesis and product thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eatherly, Walter P.; Robbins, J. M.; Rosson, Sr., David E.

    1978-01-01

    A method for producing porous graphite for use as bone replacement with a structure for osteon penetration. Graphite is produced with ordered circular pores of 100 to 1000 microns in diameter covering at least 25% of the exposed surfaces. A cylindrical fiber is coated with a carbon flour-pitch mix and is then wound on a bobbin in a predetermined manner. The product of winding is dried, pressed, carbonized, and then graphitized. The fibers are removed either chemically or by volatilization during carbonization or graphitization.

  8. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Burchell, Timothy D; Mee, Robert

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  9. Tunable Graphitic Carbon Nano-Onions Development in Carbon Nanofibers for Multivalent Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Haiqing L.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel porous graphitic carbon nanofiber material using a synthesis strategy combining electrospinning and catalytic graphitization. RF hydrogel was used as carbon precursors, transition metal ions were successfully introduced into the carbon matrix by binding to the carboxylate groups of a resorcinol derivative. Transition metal particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the carbon matrix, which are used as in-situ catalysts to produce graphitic fullerene-like nanostructures surrounding the metals. The success design of graphitic carbons with enlarged interlayer spacing will enable the multivalent ion intercalation for the development of multivalent rechargeable batteries.

  10. Photo of the Week: The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Photo of the Week: The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor May 30, 2014 - 1:12pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II. Over 18 years, an estimated 25,000 scientific experiments were carried out using the neutrons produced in the facility's 700-ton graphite core. In addition to advancing the understanding of atomic nuclei and the

  11. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  12. On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite

  13. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  14. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  15. Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eash, D. T.

    2013-07-08

    Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20°K and 300°K were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

  16. MHK technology developments include current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology developments include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, for example, hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering, design, and analysis of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high- performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  17. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  18. Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging: First year progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizia, R.E.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1994-03-01

    As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult. The problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technologies for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of pilot scale melting demonstrations (100-500 lbs) to be conducted at selected commercial facilities. This program will identify methods that can be used to recycle stainless steel RSM which will be used to fabricate high and low level waste canisters for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility. This report summarizes the results of an extensive literature review and the first year`s progress on slag design, small-scale melt refining of surrogate-containing stainless steel (presently only a three month effort), and pilot-scale preparation of surrogate master ingots.

  19. Decontamination of metals by melt refinings/slagging: An annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizia, R.E.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1993-07-01

    As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--500 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development.

  20. Systematic prediction of high-pressure melting curves of transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieu, Ho Khac, E-mail: hieuhk@duytan.edu.vn [Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, K7/25 Quang Trung, Danang (Viet Nam)

    2014-10-28

    The pressure effects on melting temperatures of transition metals have been studied based on the combination of the modified Lindemann criterion with statistical moment method in quantum statistical mechanics. Numerical calculations have been performed for five transition metals including Cu, Pd, Pt, Ni, and Mn up to pressure 100?GPa. Our results are in good and reasonable agreements with available experimental data. This approach gives us a relatively simple method for qualitatively calculating high-pressure melting temperature. Moreover, it can be used to verify future experimental and theoretical works. This research proposes the potential of the combination of statistical moment method and the modified Lindemann criterion on predicting high-pressure melting of materials.

  1. Density impact on performance of composite Si/graphite electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dufek, Eric J.; Picker, Michael; Petkovic, Lucia M.

    2016-01-27

    The ability of alkali-substituted binders for composite Si and graphite negative electrodes to minimize capacity fade for lithium ion batteries is investigated. Polymer films and electrodes are described and characterized by FTIR following immersion in electrolyte (1:2 EC:DMC) for 24 h. FTIR analysis following electrode formation displayed similar alkali-ion dependent shifts in peak location suggesting that changes in the vibrational structure of the binder are maintained after electrode formation. The Si and graphite composite electrodes prepared using the alkali-substituted polyacrylates were also exposed to electrochemical cycling and it has been found that the performance of the Na-substituted binder is superiormore » to a comparable density K-substituted system. However, in comparing performance across many different electrode densities attention needs to be placed on making comparisons at similar densities, as low density electrodes tend to exhibit lower capacity fade over cycling. This is highlighted by a 6% difference between a low density K-substituted electrode and a high density Na-substituted sample. As a result, this low variance between the two systems makes it difficult to quickly make a direct evaluation of binder performance unless electrode density is tightly controlled.« less

  2. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  3. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  4. Eutectic precipitation of melt quenched titanium-silicon-neodymium alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.P.; Liu, Y.Y.; Li, D.; Hu, Z.Q. . Inst. of Metal Research)

    1995-01-15

    Titanium based metallic glasses have attracted keen interest because of the promise of industrial applications owing to their improves corrosion resistance, better mechanical properties, occurrence of superconductivity and superior magnetic properties. The titanium alloy systems where metallic glass has been obtained include Ti-Cu, Ti-Be, Ti-Si, Ti-B. Polk et al. had reported that they were able to produce an amorphous phase in binary Ti[sub 80]Si[sub 20] alloy system by using an arc-melting piston and anvil apparatus. In the present study, the authors have investigated the effect of adding rare earth element Nd on eutective precipitation of the amorphous Ti[sub 80]Si[sub 20] alloy and the orientation relationship which exists between the [beta]-Ti and Ti[sub 5]Si[sub 3].

  5. Preliminary analysis of graphite dust releasing behavior in accident for HTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, W.; Yang, X. Y.; Yu, S. Y.; Wang, J.

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of the graphite dust is important to the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. This study investigated the flow of graphite dust in helium mainstream. The analysis of the stresses acting on the graphite dust indicated that gas drag played the absolute leading role. Based on the understanding of the importance of gas drag, an experimental system is set up for the research of dust releasing behavior in accident. Air driven by centrifugal fan is used as the working fluid instead of helium because helium is expensive, easy to leak which make it difficult to seal. The graphite particles, with the size distribution same as in HTR, are added to the experiment loop. The graphite dust releasing behavior at the loss-of-coolant accident will be investigated by a sonic nozzle. (authors)

  6. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  7. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  8. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  9. ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? As the northern polar zone warms up, sea ice could melt (very probable) and the sea/ice interface could retreat to the north. This is likely to

  10. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  11. Ultralow viscosity of carbonate melts at high pressures (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultralow viscosity of carbonate melts at high pressures Authors: Kono, Yoshio ; Kenney-Benson, Curtis ; Hummer, Daniel ; Ohfuji, Hiroaki ; Park, Changyong ; Shen, Guoyin ; ...

  12. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; ABLATION; DESERTS; GLASS; MELTING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; LIBYAN ARAB ...

  13. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph G.; Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2011-04-12

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid comprising a mixture of LiNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.3, KNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.2 and KNO.sub.2 salts where the Li, Na and K cations are present in amounts of about 20-33.5 mol % Li, about 18.6-40 mol % Na, and about 40-50.3 mol % K and where the nitrate and nitrite anions are present in amounts of about 36-50 mol % NO.sub.3, and about 50-62.5 mol % NO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures between 70.degree. C. and 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  14. Designing a TAC thermometer from a VHTR graphite structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James A. Kotter, Dale; Garrett, Steven L.; Ali, Randall A.

    2015-03-31

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. Very High Temperature Reactors are pushing the in core temperatures even higher. A unique sensing approach will be discussed to address the necessary high temperature measurements. Thermoacoustic thermometry exploits high temperatures and uses materials that are immune to the effects of ionizing radiation to create a temperature sensor that is self-powered and wireless. In addition, the form-factor for the Thermoacoustic Thermometer (TACT) can be designed to be integrated within common in-pile structures. There are no physical moving parts required for TACT and the sensor is self-powered, as it uses the nuclear fuel for its heat source. TACT data will be presented from a laboratory prototype mimicking the design necessary for a VHTR graphite structure.

  15. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

  16. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2011-01-19

    A collaborative study has been established under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management International Program between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, to investigate potential improvements in melt rate via chemical additions to the glass frit. Researchers at KRI suggested a methodology for selecting frit additives based on empirical coefficients for optimization of glass melting available in the Russian literature. Using these coefficients, KRI identified B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, and MnO as frit additives that were likely to improve melt rate without having adverse effects on crystallization of the glass or its chemical durability. The results of the melt rate testing in the SMK melter showed that the slurry feed rate (used as a gauge of melt rate) could be significantly increased when MnO or CuO were added to Frit 550 with the SMR-2 sludge. The feed rates increased by about 27% when MnO was added to the frit and by about 26% when CuO was added to the frit, as compared to earlier results for Frit 550 alone. The impact of adding additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the frit was minor when added with CuO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed a more significant, 39% improvement in melt rate when added with MnO. The additional B{sub 2}O{sub 3} also reduced the viscosity of the glasses during pouring. Samples of the glasses from the melt rate testing characterized at SRNL showed that there were no significant impacts on crystallization of the glasses. All of the glasses had very good chemical durability. Chemical composition measurements showed that the frit additives were present in concentrations below the targeted values in some of the glasses. Therefore, it is possible that higher concentrations of these additives may further improve melt rate, although the impacts of higher concentrations of these components on crystallization and durability would need to

  17. Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Mee, Robert; Wang, Peng; Romanova, Anna V; Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-10-01

    Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

  18. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  19. A safety assessment of the use of graphite in nuclear reactors licensed by the US NRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Gurinsky, D.H.; Kaplan, E.; Sastre, C.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews existing literature and knowledge on graphite burning and on stored energy accumulation and releases in order to assess what role, if any, a stored energy release can have in initiating or contributing to hypothetical graphite burning scenarios in research reactors. It also addresses the question of graphite ignition and self-sustained combustion in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The conditions necessary to initiate and maintain graphite burning are summarized and discussed. From analyses of existing information it is concluded that only stored energy accumulations and releases below the burning temperature (650/sup 0/C) are pertinent. After reviewing the existing knowledge on stored energy it is possible to show that stored energy releases do not occur spontaneously, and that the maximum stored energy that can be released from any reactor containing graphite is a very small fraction of the energy produced during the first few minutes of a burning incident. The conclusions from these analyses are that the potential to initiate or maintain a graphite burning incident is essentially independent of the stored energy in the graphite, and depends on other factors that are unique for these reactors, research reactors, and for Fort St. Vrain. In order to have self-sustained rapid graphite oxidation in any of these reactors, certain necessary conditions of geometry, temperature, oxygen supply, reaction product removal, and a favorable heat balance must be maintained. There is no new evidence associated with either the Windscale Accident or the Chernobyl Accident that indicates a credible potential for a graphite burning accident in any of the reactors considered in this review.

  20. Vitrification of waste with conitnuous filling and sequential melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris

    2001-09-04

    A method of filling a canister with vitrified waste starting with a waste, such as high-level radioactive waste, that is cooler than its melting point. Waste is added incrementally to a canister forming a column of waste capable of being separated into an upper zone and a lower zone. The minimum height of the column is defined such that the waste in the lower zone can be dried and melted while maintaining the waste in the upper zone below its melting point. The maximum height of the column is such that the upper zone remains porous enough to permit evolved gases from the lower zone to flow through the upper zone and out of the canister. Heat is applied to the waste in the lower zone to first dry then to raise and maintain its temperature to a target temperature above the melting point of the waste. Then the heat is applied to a new lower zone above the melted waste and the process of adding, drying and melting the waste continues upward in the canister until the entire canister is filled and the entire contents are melted and maintained at the target temperature for the desired period. Cooling of the melted waste takes place incrementally from the bottom of the canister to the top, or across the entire canister surface area, forming a vitrified product.

  1. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  2. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1994-01-01

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  3. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  4. Flow induced migration in polymer melts – Theory and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorgan, John Robert Rorrer, Nicholas Andrew

    2015-04-28

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms.

  5. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouby, Johanna

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  6. Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Shahid N.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids (HPAs) or polyoxoanions (POAs) deposited on a graphite surface. The HPAs and POAs are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

  7. Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaikh, S.N.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids or polyoxoanions deposited on a graphite surface. The heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

  8. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  9. Vitrification of surrogate mixed wastes in a graphite electrode arc melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Ball, L.

    1995-11-01

    Demonstration tests for vitrifying mixed wastes and contaminated soils have been conducted using a small (800 kVA), industrial-scale, three-phase AC, graphite electrode furnace located at the Albany Research Center of the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM). The feed mixtures were non-radioactive surrogates of various types of mixed (radioactive and hazardous), transuranic-contaminated wastes stored and buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The feed mixtures were processed with added soil from the INEL. Objectives being evaluated include (1) equipment capability to achieve desired process conditions and vitrification products for different feed compositions, (2) slag and metals tapping capability, (3) partitioning of transuranic elements and toxic metals among the furnace products, (4) slag, fume, and metal products characteristics, and (5) performance of the feed, furnace and air pollution control systems. The tests were successfully completed in mid-April 1995. A very comprehensive process monitoring, sampling and analysis program was included in the test program. Sample analysis, data reduction, and results evaluation are currently underway. Initial results indicate that the furnace readily processed around 20,000 lb of widely ranging feed mixtures at feedrates of up to 1,100 lb/hr. Continuous feeding and slag tapping was achieved. Molten metal was also tapped twice during the test program. Offgas emissions were efficiently controlled as expected by a modified air pollution control system.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-03-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  11. REACTOR HAVING NaK-UO$sub 2$ SLURRY HELICALLY POSITIONED IN A GRAPHITE MODERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodin, M.B.; Carter, J.C.

    1962-05-15

    A reactor utilizing 20% enriched uranium consists of a central graphite island in cylindrical form, with a spiral coil of tubing fitting against the central island. An external graphite moderator is placed around the central island and coil. A slurry of uranium dioxide dispersed in alkali metal passes through the coil to transfer heat externally to the reactor. There are also conventional controls for regulating the nuclear reaction. (AEC)

  12. Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K.

    2013-06-12

    Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a {sup 233}U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

  13. Putting the Spin on Graphite: Observing the Spins of Impurity Atoms Align |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Putting the Spin on Graphite: Observing the Spins of Impurity Atoms Align Friday, February 28, 2014 The existence of magnetism in graphite is a very intriguing subject. The possibility to exploit the magnetic properties of a lightweight and robust material based on carbon that can also be produced and manipulated on the nanoscale fascinates scientists and engineers alike. Carbon-based materials can be made e.g. in the form of thin wires (1D), single

  14. GUM Analysis for SIMS Isotopic Ratios in BEP0 Graphite Qualification Samples, Round 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  15. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  16. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of a glass melting furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egelja, A.; Lottes, S. A.

    2000-05-09

    The glass production industry is one of the major users of natural gas in the US, and approximately 75% of the energy produced from natural gas is used in the melting process. Industrial scale glass melting furnaces are large devices, typically 5 or more meters wide, and twice as long. To achieve efficient heat transfer to the glass melt below, the natural gas flame must extend over a large portion of the glass melt. Therefore modern high efficiency burners are not used in these furnaces. The natural gas is injected as a jet, and a jet flame forms in the flow of air entering the furnace. In most current glass furnaces the energy required to melt the batch feed stock is about twice the theoretical requirement. An improved understanding of the heat transfer and two phase flow processes in the glass melt and solid batch mix offers a substantial opportunity for energy savings and consequent emission reductions. The batch coverage form and the heat flux distribution have a strong influence on the glass flow pattern. This flow pattern determines to a significant extent the melting rate and the quality of glass.

  17. Treatment of Asbestos Wastes Using the GeoMelt Vitrification Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finucane, K.G. [AMEC Nuclear Holdings Ltd., GeoMelt Div., Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L.E. [Capto Group LLC, Dallas, TX (United States); Abuku, T. [ISV Japan Ltd., Yokohama-city (Japan); Nakauchi, H. [Mie Chuo Kaihatsu Co. Ltd., Hachiya, Iga City (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The disposal of waste asbestos from decommissioning activities is becoming problematic in countries which have limited disposal space. A particular challenge is the disposal of asbestos wastes from the decommissioning of nuclear sites because some of it is radioactively contaminated or activated and disposal space for such wastes is limited. GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification is being developed as a treatment method for volume and toxicity minimization and radionuclide immobilization for UK radioactive asbestos mixed waste. The common practice to date for asbestos wastes is disposal in licensed landfills. In some cases, compaction techniques are used to minimize the disposal space requirements. However, such practices are becoming less practical. Social pressures have resulted in changes to disposal regulations which, in turn, have resulted in the closure of some landfills and increased disposal costs. In the UK, tens of thousands of tonnes of asbestos waste will result from the decommissioning of nuclear sites over the next 20 years. In Japan, it is estimated that over 40 million tonnes of asbestos materials used in construction will require disposal. Methods for the safe and cost effective volume reduction of asbestos wastes are being evaluated for many sites. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process is being demonstrated at full-scale in Japan for the Japan Ministry of Environment and plans are being developed for the GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes. The full-scale treatment operations in Japan have also included contaminated soils and debris. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process result in the maximum possible volume reduction, destroys the asbestos fibers, treats problematic debris associated with asbestos wastes, and immobilizes radiological contaminants within the resulting glass matrix. Results from recent full-scale treatment operations in Japan are discussed and plans for GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site

  18. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  19. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  20. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  1. Melting of Ice Under Pressure | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Melting of Ice Under Pressure Authors: Schwegler, E., Sharma, M., Gygi, F., Galli, G. The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 Publication Date: August, 2008 Name of Publication Source: The National Academy of Sciences Proceedings Publisher: The National Academy of Sciences of the USA Volume: 0 Issue: 0

  2. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  3. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  4. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  5. Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act funds help clean up the Hanford site, retrograde melting (melting as something cools) and how open-cell clouds could help predict climate change.

  6. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that

  7. Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (PGV) well field, on the island of Hawaii, a 75-meter interval of diorite containing brown glass inclusions was penetrated at a depth of 2415 m. At a depth of 2488 m a melt of...

  8. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the Arctic tundra. And new research suggests they are melting fast, which is bad news for the ecosystem at the top of the ...

  9. Confinement effects of shock waves on laser-induced plasma from a graphite target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Feiling; Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Hua; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2015-06-15

    The spatial confinement effects of shock waves on the laser-induced plasma (LIP) from a graphite target in air were studied by probe beam deflection (PBD) measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A clear relationship between the confinement of the LIP by the shock wave and the effects on the LIP emission was observed, and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. PBD monitoring revealed that the laser-ablation induced shock wave could be well analogized to the shock wave generated by a point explosion and would be reflected by a block. OES measurements indicated that the optical emission of the LIP exhibited significant variations with the block placement. A first enhancement and then a fast decay of CN molecular emission as well as a suppression of carbon atomic emission were observed in the presence of the block. The results revealed that the reflected shock wave spatially confined the expansion of the LIP and compressed the LIP after encountering it, pushing back the species of the LIP and changing the density of the LIP species including luminous carbon atoms and CN molecules. It is suggested that the change of the LIP emission is attributed to the density variation of the LIP species due to the compression of the LIP and the reactions occurring in the plasma.

  10. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can we someday predict earthquakes? Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming New ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes-and when. March 14, 2016 Ice throughout the Arctic is vanishing due to a rapidly warming climate. Ice throughout the Arctic is vanishing due to a rapidly warming climate. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the

  11. Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.; Hurd, Jeffery L.

    1986-01-01

    An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

  12. Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

    1981-02-25

    An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

  13. ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry | Department of Energy Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry advancedmeltingtechnologies.pdf (1.83 MB) More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: Theoretical/Best Practice Energy Use in Metalcasting Operations ITP Metal Casting: Energy and

  14. MELT RATE FURNACE TESTING FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 FRIT OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D; Fox, K; Pickenheim, B; Stone, M

    2008-10-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to provide the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) with a frit composition for Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) to optimize processing. A series of experiments were designed for testing in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF). This dry fed tool can be used to quickly determine relative melt rates for a large number of candidate frit compositions and lead to a selection for further testing. Simulated Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product was made according to the most recent SB5 sludge projections and a series of tests were conducted with frits that covered a range of boron and alkali ratios. Several frits with relatively large projected operating windows indicated melt rates that would not severely impact production. As seen with previous MRF testing, increasing the boron concentration had positive impacts on melt rate on the SB5 system. However, there appears to be maximum values for both boron and sodium above which the there is a negative effect on melt rate. Based on these data and compositional trends, Frit 418 and a specially designed frit (Frit 550) have been selected for additional melt rate testing. Frit 418 and Frit 550 will be run in the Slurry Fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF), which is capable of distinguishing rheological properties not detected by the MRF. Frit 418 will be used initially for SB5 processing in DWPF (given its robustness to compositional uncertainty). The Frit 418-SB5 system will provide a baseline from which potential melt rate advantages of Frit 550 can be gauged. The data from SMRF testing will be used to determine whether Frit 550 should be recommended for implementation in DWPF.

  15. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated than we thought December 22, 2014 The newly discovered rolling movement shown in (A) three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy image of ribosome, and (B) computer-generated atomic-resolution model of the human ribosome consistent with microscopy. An international team of researchers deployed to

  16. Melt-castable energetic compounds comprising oxadiazoles and methods of production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip F; Zhang, Mao X

    2013-11-12

    In one embodiment, a melt-castable energetic material comprises at least one of: 3,5-bis(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole (DNFO), and 3-(4-amino-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-5-(4-nitro-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,2- ,4-oxadiazole (ANFO). In another embodiment, a method for forming a melt-castable energetic material includes reacting 3,5-bis(4-amino-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole (DAFO) with oxygen or an oxygen-containing compound to form a mixture of at least: DNFO, and ANFO.

  17. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  18. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, Gerald W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  19. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  20. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sames, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits or fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.

  1. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sames, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits ormore » fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.« less

  2. Prediction and measurement of thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic solids and graphitic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.; Smoyer, Justin L.; Duda, John C.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon allotropes, there have been many attempts to incorporate such structures into existing thermal abatement technologies. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic materials (i.e., graphite and graphene flakes or stacks) have garnered much interest due to the combination of both their thermal and mechanical properties. However, the introduction of these carbon-based nanostructures into thermal abatement technologies greatly increases the number of interfaces per unit length within the resulting composite systems. Consequently, thermal transport in these systems is governed as much by the interfaces between the constituent materials as it is by the materials themselves. This paper reports the behavior of phononic thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic thin films and graphite substrates. Elastic and inelastic diffusive transport models are formulated to aid in the prediction of conductance at a metal-graphite interface. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductance at Au-graphite interfaces is measured via transient thermoreflectance from 78 to 400 K. It is found that different substrate surface preparations prior to thin film deposition have a significant effect on the conductance of the interface between film and substrate.

  3. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kraus, D.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Frydrych, S.; Helfrich, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Schaumann, G.; Nagler, B.; et al

    2016-03-14

    Here, the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic andmore » polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites.« less

  4. Nanoscale calcium aluminate coated graphite for improved performance of alumina based monolithic refractory composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sol–gel Ca-doped γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} accomplished graphite retention. • Nanocoating considerably improved matrix-aggregate bonding. • Less porous simulated matrix upgraded slag resistance. - Abstract: The synthesis and properties of high alumina castable containing nanostructured calcium aluminate coated graphite were studied in terms of slag resistance and overall physical characteristics. Raman spectroscopy, BET surface area and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed to exclusively understand the coating characteristics and its compatibility in refractory composite. The coating not only secured graphite in castable for prolonged period but also noticeably improved matrix to aggregate contact. The microstructural aspects of castables were investigated, with special emphasis on a representative matrix prepared and infiltrated with slag at elevated temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of fired composite containing surface-treated graphite was quite prospective. It circumvented the problems of incorporating as-received graphite in castables and should be in the attention of refractory researchers and producers.

  5. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  6. Microwave Melting | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 2:90 min. Ed Ripley and Kenneth Evans explain some of the benefits of microwave heating technology, including how its uses...

  7. FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008–FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  8. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  9. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which themore » melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.« less

  10. Theoretical calculation of the melting curve of Cu-Zr binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-11-14

    Helmholtz free energies of the dominant binary crystalline solids found in the Cu-Zr system at high temperatures close to the melting curve are calculated. This theoretical approach combines fundamental measure density functional theory (applied to the hard-sphere reference system) and a perturbative approach to include the attractive interactions. The studied crystalline solids are Cu(fcc), Cu51Zr14(β), CuZr(B2), CuZr2(C11b), Zr(hcp), and Zr(bcc). The calculated Helmholtz free energies of crystalline solids are in good agreement with results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the same perturbation approach, the liquid phase free energies are calculated as a function of composition and temperature, from which the melting curve of the entire composition range of this system can be obtained. Phase diagrams are determined in this way for two leading embedded atom method potentials, and the results are compared with experimental data. Furthermore, theoretical melting temperatures are compared both with experimental values and with values obtained directly from MD simulations at several compositions.

  11. Device and method for skull-melting depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Heestand, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A method of skull-melting comprises the steps of: a. providing a vessel adapted for a skull-melting process, the vessel having an interior, an underside, and an orifice in connecting the interior and the underside; b. disposing a waveguide in the orifice so that the waveguide protrudes sufficiently into the interior to interact with the skull-melting process; c. providing a signal energy transducer in signal communication with the waveguide; d. introducing into the vessel a molten working material; e. carrying out the skull-melting process so that a solidified skull of the working material is formed, the skull and the vessel having an interface therebetween, the skull becoming fused to the waveguide so the signal energy can be transmitted through the waveguide and the skull without interference from the interface; f. activating the signal energy transducer so that a signal is propagated through the waveguide; and, g. controlling at least one variable of the skull-melting process utilizing feedback information derived from the propagated signal energy.

  12. Device and method for skull-melting depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Heestand, R.L.

    1993-02-09

    A method of skull-melting comprises the steps of: (a) providing a vessel adapted for a skull-melting process, the vessel having an interior, an underside, and an orifice connecting the interior and the underside; (b) disposing a waveguide in the orifice so that the waveguide protrudes sufficiently into the interior to interact with the skull-melting process; (c) providing a signal energy transducer in signal communication with the waveguide; (d) introducing into the vessel a molten working material; (e) carrying out the skull-melting process so that a solidified skull of the working material is formed, the skull and the vessel having an interface therebetween, the skull becoming fused to the waveguide so the signal energy can be transmitted through the waveguide and the skull without interference from the interface; (f) activating the signal energy transducer so that a signal is propagated through the waveguide; and, (g) controlling at least one variable of the skull-melting process utilizing feedback information derived from the propagated signal energy.

  13. A facile approach to prepare graphene via solvothermal reduction of graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Bihe; Bao, Chenlu; Qian, Xiaodong; Wen, Panyue; Xing, Weiyi; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was prepared via a novel and facile solvothermal reduction method for graphite oxide. • Most of the oxygen functional groups of graphite oxide were removed. • The reduced graphene oxide obtained was featured with bilayer nanosheets. - Abstract: In this work, a facile reduction strategy is reported for the fabrication of graphene. Graphite oxide (GO) is reduced via a novel solvothermal reaction in a mixed solution of acetone and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). The structure, surface chemistry, morphology and thermal stability of the as-prepared reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that most of the oxygenated groups in GO are effectively removed in this solvothermal reaction. The novel reduction method provides a simple, cost-effective and efficient strategy for the fabrication of graphene.

  14. Evaluation of graphite/steam interactions for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolik, G.R.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1990-09-01

    In this report we present the results of an experimental/analytical study designed to determine the quantity of hydrogen generated during a coolant inleakage accident in ITER. This hydrogen could represent a potential explosive hazard, provided the proper conditions exist, causing machine damage and release of radioactive material. We have measured graphite/steam reaction rates for several graphites and carbon-based composites at temperatures between 1000 C and 1700 C. The effects of steam flow rate, and partial pressure were also examined. The measured reaction rates correlated well with two Arrhenius type relationships. We have used the relationships for GraphNOL N3M in a thermal model to determine that for ITER the quantity of hydrogen produced would range between 5 and 35 kg, depending upon how the graphite tiles are attached to the first wall. While 5 kg is not a significant concern, 35 kg presents an explosive hazard. 20 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Woven graphite fiber structures for use in ultra-light weigth heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Loveland, Erick R; Sharp, Keith W; Schartow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As part of U.S. Department of Energy efforts to find novel approaches for thermal management and heat recovery, work was undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the use of graphite-based materials for heat exchanger and thermal management devices. From this effort, lightweight, robust woven graphite-fiber structures were developed which provide high conductivity paths along the direction of the graphite fibers. These structures were produced and characterized for air permeability/pressure drop and thermal (heat transfer) performance. Results have been shown to be favorable for using such structures in ultra-light weight heat exchanger applications such as vehicle radiators or other areas where light weight, compact, conformable heat transfer devices are needed.

  16. Phonon mean free path of graphite along the c-axis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Weiyu; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Manufacture of Micro/Nano Biomedical Instruments and School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Li, Deyu, E-mail: deyu.li@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1592 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Phonon transport in the c-axis direction of graphite thin films has been studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results show that the c-axis thermal conductivities for films of thickness ranging from 20 to 500 atomic layers are significantly lower than the bulk value. Based on the MD data, a method is developed to construct the c-axis thermal conductivity as an accumulation function of phonon mean free path (MFP), from which we show that phonons with MFPs from 2 to 2000?nm contribute ?80% of the graphite c-axis thermal conductivity at room temperature, and phonons with MFPs larger than 100?nm contribute over 40% to the c-axis thermal conductivity. These findings indicate that the commonly believed value of just a few nanometers from the simple kinetic theory drastically underestimates the c-axis phonon MFP of graphite.

  17. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R.; Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W.; Shen, Yaogen; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-03

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d > 1.4 nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0 eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d ≤ 1.4 nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline graphite from coconut shell with heating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachid, Frischa M. E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com Perkasa, Adhi Y. E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com Prasetya, Fandi A. E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com Rosyidah, Nurul E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com Darminto E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com

    2014-02-24

    Graphite were synthesized and characterized by heating process of coconut shell with varying temperature (400, 800 and 1000°C) and holding time (3 and 5 hours). After heating process, the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analyzed by X'pert HighScore Plus Software, Scanning Electron Microcope-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX) and Transmission Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (TEM-EDX). Graphite and londsdaelite phase were analyzed by XRD. According to EDX analysis, the sample was heated in 1000°C got the highest content of carbon. The amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline graphite were observed by SEM-EDX and TEM-EDX.

  19. The semi-empirical tight-binding model for carbon allotropes between diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lytovchenko, V.; Kurchak, A.; Strikha, M.

    2014-06-28

    The new carbon allotropes between diamond and graphite have come under intensive examination during the last decade due to their numerous technical applications. The modification of energy gap in thin films of these allotropes was studied experimentally using optical methods. The proposed simple model of carbon clusters with variable lengths of chemical bonds allows us to imitate the transfer from diamond and diamond-like to graphite-like structures, as well as the corresponding modification of hybridization sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} for diamond-like and sp{sub z} for graphite-like phases. This enables us to estimate various allotropes parameters, like the gap E{sub g}, energies of valence E{sub v}, and conduction E{sub c} band edges, and the value of electronic affinity, i.e., optical work function X, which are all of practical importance. The obtained estimations correspond to the experimental data.

  20. FY-09 Report: Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Gen-IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have identified that an air ingress event following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization is a very important incident. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. If this accident occurs, the oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will eventually cause the release of fission products. The potential collapse of the core bottom structures causing the release of CO and fission products is one of the concerns. Therefore, experimental validation with the analytical model and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model developed in this study is very important. Estimating the proper safety margin will require experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods Research and Development project. The second year of this three-year project (FY-08 to FY-10) was focused on (a) the analytical, CFD, and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow; (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments and modeling; (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) implementation of advanced

  1. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields: Electron-phonon coupling and magnetophonon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Younghee; Smirnov, Dmitry; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-12-04

    The magneto-Raman measurements of graphite were performed in a back-scattering Faraday geometry at temperature 10 K in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental data reveal the rich structure of Raman-active excitations dominated by K-point massive electrons. At high magnetic fields the graphite E{sub 2g} Raman line shows complex multi- component behavior interpreted as magnetophonon resonance coupled electron-phonon modes at graphite’s K-point. Also we found the clear signature of the fundamental, strongly dumped, n=0 magnetophonon resonance associated with H point massless holes.

  2. First approximations of phonon thermal transport at solid-graphite interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.; Beechem, Thomas Edwin, Iii; Smoyer, Justin L.; Duda, John C.

    2010-04-01

    This model predicts thermal boundary conductance at interfaces where one material comprising the junction is characterized by high elastic anisotropy (i.e, graphite). The thermal properties of graphite are determined through a simplified vibrational model, where the bulk structure is treated as an linear assembly of two-dimensional systems. This model is validated at temperatures above cryogenic through comparison to experimentally determined values of specific heat. Elastic processes are accounted for through traditional diffuse transport theory. Inelastic contributions due to multi-phonon processes are also addressed and quantified.

  3. Melt processing of Bi--2212 superconductors using alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting articles and a method of forming them, where the superconducting phase of an article is Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.y (Bi-2212). Alumina is combined with Bi-2212 powder or Bi-2212 precursor powder and, in order to form an intimate mixture, the mixture is melted and rapidly cooled to form a glassy solid. The glassy solid is comminuted and the resulting powder is combined with a carrier. An alternative to melting is to form the mixture of nanophase alumina and material having a particle size of less than about 10 microns. The powder, with the carrier, is melt processed to form a superconducting article.

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk; Li, Delin

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using

  5. Melting of Uranium Metal Powders with Residual Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin-Mok Hur; Dae-Seung Kang; Chung-Seok Seo

    2007-07-01

    The Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute focuses on the conditioning of Pressurized Water Reactor spent oxide nuclear fuel. After the oxide reduction step of the ACP, the resultant metal powders containing {approx} 30 wt% residual LiCl-Li{sub 2}O should be melted for a consolidation of the fine metal powders. In this study, we investigated the melting behaviors of uranium metal powders considering the effects of a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O residual salt. (authors)

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions ...

  7. Topic A Note: Includes STEPS Subtopic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Topic A Note: Includes STEPS Subtopic 33 Total Projects Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs

  8. Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charbonneau, Mark William

    2015-08-04

    Processes of controlling submerged combustion melters, and systems for carrying out the methods. One process includes feeding vitrifiable material into a melter vessel, the melter vessel including a fluid-cooled refractory panel in its floor, ceiling, and/or sidewall, and heating the vitrifiable material with a burner directing combustion products into the melting zone under a level of the molten material in the zone. Burners impart turbulence to the molten material in the melting zone. The fluid-cooled refractory panel is cooled, forming a modified panel having a frozen or highly viscous material layer on a surface of the panel facing the molten material, and a sensor senses temperature of the modified panel using a protected thermocouple positioned in the modified panel shielded from direct contact with turbulent molten material. Processes include controlling the melter using the temperature of the modified panel. Other processes and systems are presented.

  9. Tunable mega-ampere electron current propagation in solids by dynamic control of lattice melt

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    MacLellan, D.  A.; Carroll, D.  C.; Gray, R.  J.; Booth, N.; Burza, M.; Desjarlais, M.  P.; Du, F.; Neely, D.; Powell, H.  W.; Robinson, A.  P. L.; et al

    2014-10-31

    The influence of lattice-melt-induced resistivity gradients on the transport of mega-ampere currents of fast electrons in solids is investigated numerically and experimentally using laser-accelerated protons to induce isochoric heating. Tailoring the heating profile enables the resistive magnetic fields which strongly influence the current propagation to be manipulated. This tunable laser-driven process enables important fast electron beam properties, including the beam divergence, profile, and symmetry to be actively tailored, and without recourse to complex target manufacture.

  10. Kelvin probe characterization of buried graphitic microchannels in single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardi, E. Battiato, A.; Olivero, P.; Vittone, E.; Picollo, F.

    2015-01-14

    In this work, we present an investigation by Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) of buried graphitic microchannels fabricated in single-crystal diamond by direct MeV ion microbeam writing. Metal deposition of variable-thickness masks was adopted to implant channels with emerging endpoints and high temperature annealing was performed in order to induce the graphitization of the highly-damaged buried region. When an electrical current was flowing through the biased buried channel, the structure was clearly evidenced by KPM maps of the electrical potential of the surface region overlying the channel at increasing distances from the grounded electrode. The KPM profiling shows regions of opposite contrast located at different distances from the endpoints of the channel. This effect is attributed to the different electrical conduction properties of the surface and of the buried graphitic layer. The model adopted to interpret these KPM maps and profiles proved to be suitable for the electronic characterization of buried conductive channels, providing a non-invasive method to measure the local resistivity with a micrometer resolution. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique as a powerful diagnostic tool to monitor the functionality of all-carbon graphite/diamond devices to be fabricated by MeV ion beam lithography.

  11. Critical role of intercalated water for electrocatalytically active nitrogen-doped graphitic systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinez, Ulises; Dumont, Joseph H.; Holby, Edward F.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Purdy, Geraldine M.; Singh, Akhilesh; Mack, Nathan H.; Atanassov, Plamen; Cullen, David A.; More, Karren L.; et al

    2016-03-18

    Graphitic materials are very essential in energy conversion and storage because of their excellent chemical and electrical properties. The strategy for obtaining functional graphitic materials involves graphite oxidation and subsequent dissolution in aqueous media, forming graphene-oxide nanosheets (GNs). Restacked GNs contain substantial intercalated water that can react with heteroatom dopants or the graphene lattice during reduction. We demonstrate that removal of intercalated water using simple solvent treatments causes significant structural reorganization, substantially affecting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability of nitrogen-doped graphitic systems. Amid contrasting reports describing the ORR activity of GN-based catalysts in alkaline electrolytes, we demonstratemore » superior activity in an acidic electrolyte with an onset potential of ~0.9 V, a half-wave potential (E½) of 0.71 V, and a selectivity for four-electron reduction of >95%. Finally and further, durability testing showed E½ retention >95% in N2- and O2-saturated solutions after 2000 cycles, demonstrating the highest ORR activity and stability reported to date for GN-based electrocatalysts in acidic media.« less

  12. Graphite Waste Tank Cleanup and Decontamination under the Marcoule UP1 D and D Program - 13166

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomasset, Philippe [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France); Chabeuf, Jean-Michel [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France); Thiebaut, Valerie [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France)] [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The UP1 plant in Marcoule reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. During more than 40 years, the decladding operations produced thousands of tons of processed waste, mainly magnesium and graphite fragments. In the absence of a French repository for the graphite waste, the graphite sludge content of the storage pits had to be retrieved and transferred into a newer and safer pit. After an extensive R and D program, the equipment and process necessary for retrieval operations were designed, built and tested. The innovative process is mainly based on the use of two pumps (one to capture and the other one to transfer the sludge) working one after the other and a robotic arm mounted on a telescopic mast. A dedicated process was also set up for the removal of the biggest fragments. The retrieval of the most irradiating fragments was a challenge. Today, the first pit is totally empty and its stainless steel walls have been decontaminated using gels. In the second pit, the sludge retrieval and transfer operations have been almost completed. Most of the non-pumpable graphite fragments has been removed and transferred to a new storage pit. After more than 6 years of operations in sludge retrieval, a lot of experience was acquired from which important 'lessons learned' could be shared. (authors)

  13. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2014-07-15

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  14. Mixing of Isotactic and Syndiotactic Polypropylenes in the Melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLANCY,THOMAS C.; PUTZ,MATHIAS; WEINHOLD,JEFFREY D.; CURRO,JOHN G.; MATTICE,WAYNE L.

    2000-07-14

    The miscibility of polypropylene (PP) melts in which the chains differ only in stereochemical composition has been investigated by two different procedures. One approach used detailed local information from a Monte Carlo simulation of a single chain, and the other approach takes this information from a rotational isomeric state model devised decades ago, for another purpose. The first approach uses PRISM theory to deduce the intermolecular packing in the polymer blend, while the second approach uses a Monte Carlo simulation of a coarse-grained representation of independent chains, expressed on a high-coordination lattice. Both approaches find a positive energy change upon mixing isotactic PP (iPP) and syndiotactic polypropylene (sPP) chains in the melt. This conclusion is qualitatively consistent with observations published recently by Muelhaupt and coworkers. The size of the energy chain on mixing is smaller in the MC/PRISM approach than in the RIS/MC simulation, with the smaller energy change being in better agreement with the experiment. The RIS/MC simulation finds no demixing for iPP and atactic polypropylene (aPP) in the melt, consistent with several experimental observations in the literature. The demixing of the iPP/sPP blend may arise from attractive interactions in the sPP melt that are disrupted when the sPP chains are diluted with aPP or iPP chains.

  15. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  16. Decontamination of steel by melt refining: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    It has been reported that a large amount of metal waste is produced annually by nuclear fuel processing and nuclear power plants. These metal wastes are contaminated with radioactive elements, such as uranium and plutonium. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain level. Because of high cost, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low level contaminated metals. It has been shown by some investigators that a melt refining technique can be used for the processing of the contaminated metal wastes. In this process, contaminated metal is melted wit a suitable flux. The radioactive elements are oxidized and transferred to a slag phase. In order to develop a commercial process it is important to have information on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Therefore, a literature search was carried out to evaluate the available information on the decontamination uranium and transuranic-contaminated plain steel, copper and stainless steel by melt a refining technique. Emphasis was given to the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Data published in the literature indicate that it is possible to reduce the concentration of radioactive elements to a very low level by the melt refining method. 20 refs.

  17. Decontamination of transuranic contaminated metals by melt refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Melt refining of transuranic contaminated metals is a possible decontamination process with the potential advantages of producing metal for reuse and of simplifying chemical analyses. By routinely achieving the 10 nCi/g( about0.1ppm) level by melt refining, scrap metal can be removed from the transuranic waste category. (To demonstrate the effectiveness of this melt refining process, mild steel, stainless steel, nickel, and copper were contaminated with 500 ppm (..mu..g/g) PuO/sub 2/ and melted with various fluxes. The solidified slags and metals were analyzed for their plutonium contents, and corresponding partition ratios for plutonium were calculated. Some metals were double refined in order to study the effect of secondary slag treatment. The initial weight of the slags was also varied to investigate the effect of slag weight on the degree of plutonium removal. In general, all four metals could be decontaminated below 1 ppm (..mu..g/g) Pu ( about100 nCi/g) by a single slag treatment. Doubling the slag weight did not improve decontamination significantly; however, double slag treatment using 5 wt.% slag did decontaminate the metals to below 0.1 ppm (..mu..g/g) Pu (10 nCi/g).)

  18. Laser thermoelastic generation in metals above the melt threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2013-11-28

    An approach is presented for calculating thermoelastic generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation. Detailed consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the appearance and subsequent growth and then contraction of the melt pool, and the time dependent thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid throughout. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place during and shortly after the laser pulse and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. It is shown how, because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be expressed as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response to these force distributions is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green's functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported on the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12 mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold.

  19. Structural Properties and Melting of 2D-Plasma Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapek, C.; Samsonov, D.; Zhdanov, S.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.E.

    2005-10-31

    Melting of a monolayer plasma crystal was induced by an electric pulse. We investigated, how structural parameters like defect fraction and correlation lengths as well as dynamical properties like the particle kinetic energy changed during the recrystallisation. As an indication of the phase transition, the change of the Lindemann parameter and the Coulomb coupling parameter were considered.

  20. Microstructure of selective laser melted nickeltitanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bormann, Therese; Mller, Bert; Kessler, Anja; Thalmann, Peter

    2014-08-15

    In selective laser melting, the layer-wise local melting of metallic powder by means of a scanning focused laser beam leads to anisotropic microstructures, which reflect the pathway of the laser beam. We studied the impact of laser power, scanning speed, and laser path onto the microstructure of NiTi cylinders. Here, we varied the laser power from 56 to 100 W and the scanning speed from about 100 to 300 mm/s. In increasing the laser power, the grain width and length increased from (33 7) to (90 15) ?m and from (60 20) to (600 200) ?m, respectively. Also, the grain size distribution changed from uni- to bimodal. Ostwald-ripening of the crystallites explains the distinct bimodal size distributions. Decreasing the scanning speed did not alter the microstructure but led to increased phase transformation temperatures of up to 40 K. This was experimentally determined using differential scanning calorimetry and explained as a result of preferential nickel evaporation during the fabrication process. During selective laser melting of the NiTi shape memory alloy, the control of scanning speed allows restricted changes of the transformation temperatures, whereas controlling the laser power and scanning path enables us to tailor the microstructure, i.e. the crystallite shapes and arrangement, the extent of the preferred crystallographic orientation and the grain size distribution. - Highlights: Higher laser powers during selective laser melting of NiTi lead to larger grains. Selective laser melting of NiTi gives rise to preferred <111> orientation. The observed Ni/Ti ratio depends on the exposure time. Ostwald ripening explains the bimodal grain size distribution.

  1. Dry Synthesis of Lithium Intercalated Graphite Powder and Fiber...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (fuels), energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel ...

  2. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Dirac fermions have been invoked recently to explain various peculiar phenomena in condensed-matter physics, including the novel quantum Halleffect in graphene, the ...

  3. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  4. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 °C) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantified by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 °C.

  5. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 °C) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantifiedmore » by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 °C.« less

  6. GeoMelt{sup R} ICV{sup TM} Treatment of Sellafield Pond Solids Waste - 13414

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, Keith; Woosley, Steve; Campbell, Brett; Wong, Martin; Hill, Joanne

    2013-07-01

    Kurion, Inc., in partnership with AMEC Ltd., is demonstrating its GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} Technology to Sellafield Ltd. (SL). SL is evaluating the proposition of directly converting a container (skip/box/drum) of raw solid ILW into an immobilized waste form using thermal treatment, such that the resulting product is suitable for interim storage at Sellafield and subsequent disposal at a future Geological Disposal Facility. Potential SL feed streams include sludges, ion-exchange media, sand, plutonium contaminated material, concrete, uranium, fuel cladding, soils, metals, and decommissioning wastes. The solid wastes have significant proportions of metallic constituents in the form of containers, plant equipment, structural material and swarf arising from the nuclear operations at Sellafield. GeoMelt's proprietary ICV process was selected for demonstration, with the focus being high and reactive metal wastes arising from solid ILW material. A composite surrogate recipe was used to demonstrate the technology towards treating waste forms of diverse types and shapes, as well as those considered difficult to process; all the while requiring few (if any) pre-treatment activities. Key strategic objectives, along with their success criterion, were established by SL for this testing, namely: 1. Passivate and stabilize the raw waste simulant, as demonstrated by the entire quantity of material being vitrified, 2. Immobilize the radiological and chemo-toxic species, as demonstrated via indicative mass balance using elemental analyses from an array of samples, 3. Production of an inert and durable product as evidenced by transformation of reactive metals to their inert oxide forms and satisfactory leachability results using PCT testing. Two tests were performed using the GeoMelt Demonstration Unit located at AMEC's Birchwood Park Facilities in the UK. Post-melt examination of the first test indicated some of the waste simulant had not fully

  7. Influence of Fe-doped Graphite Electrode Characteristics on Ar-H2 Carbon Arc Plasma and SWCNT Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huczko, A.; Lange, H.; Bystrzejewski, M.; Ando, Y.; Zhao, X.; Inoue, S.

    2005-09-27

    Two Fe-doped (ca. 1 at.%) homogeneous graphite electrodes (different graphite microcrystals, degree of graphitization and, thereby, electrical conductivities) electrodes were used in the process of production of single-walled carbon nanotubes in Ar-H2 arc plasma under pressure 26 kPa. The C2 content (namely carbon vapor pressure) and temperature distributions in the arc plasma were determined using optical emission spectroscopy. The mechanism of CNT formation based on carbon dimers as the building blocks seems to be at least questionable.

  8. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  9. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials

  10. INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interval technical basis document Chiaro, P.J. Jr. 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORS; DOSEMETERS;...

  11. Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging. An annotated bibliography: Update on stainless steel and steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worchester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.; Mizia, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The following presentation is an update to a previous annotation, i.e., WINCO-1138. The literature search and annotated review covers all metals used in the nuclear industries but the emphasis of this update is directed toward work performed on mild steels. As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste problems, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co (LITCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small wide melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--2,000 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste and Pit 9/RWMC boxes. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development. The program plan will be jointly developed by Montana Tech and LITCO.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  13. An Integrated Method for Accurate Determination of Melting in High-Pressure Laser Heating Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, L R; Antonangeli, D; Farber, D L; Mezouar, M

    2007-11-19

    We present an integrated approach for melting determination by monitoring several criteria simultaneously. In particular we combine x-ray diffraction observations with the detection of discontinuities in the optical properties by spectroradiometric measurements. This approach significantly increases the confidence of melt identification, especially with low-Z samples. We demonstrate the method with observations of melt in oxygen at 47 and 55 gigapascals.

  14. Method of melting metals to reduce contamination from crucibles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, John G.; Wigginton, Hubert L.

    1977-01-01

    Contamination of metals from crucible materials during melting operations is reduced by coating the interior surface of the crucible with a ceramic non-reactive with the metallic charge and disposing a metal liner formed from a portion of the metallic charge within the coated crucible. The liner protects the ceramic coating during loading of the remainder of the charge and expands against the ceramic coating during heat-up to aid in sintering the coating.

  15. Advanced coal-fired glass melting development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The objective of Phase 1 of the current contract was to verify the technical feasibility and economic benefits of Vortec's advanced combustion/melting technology using coal as the fuel of choice. The objective of the Phase 2 effort was to improve the performance of the primary components and demonstrate the effective operation of a subscale process heater system integrated with a glass separator/reservoir. (VC)

  16. Melt-spin processing of high {Tc} oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folkerts, T.J.; Wu, Hengning; Yoo, S.I.; Merkle, B.D.; Arrasmith, S.R.; Dennis, K.W.; Kramer, M.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1993-10-01

    Containerless techniques offer distinct advantages for the melt processing of oxide superconductors. The majority of these materials form liquids which are highly reactive with standard crucible materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt, resulting in non-negligible contamination. We have developed a containerless melt-spin processing technique where in 50--400 {mu}m particles of REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} high temperature oxide superconductors are melted in free fall through a vertical tube furnace and quenched onto a copper wheel. Previously this method has been successful in producing glasses of NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}. In this report we discuss the results for both stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (Y123). Thermal, microstructural, and superconducting characterization of both the as-quenched and the annealed materials will be presented.

  17. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  18. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditions oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).

  19. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr = 4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of

  20. Efficient graphite ring heater suitable for diamond-anvil cells to 1300 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Zhixue; Amulele, George; Lee, Kanani K. M.; Miyagi, Lowell

    2013-02-15

    In order to generate homogeneous high temperatures at high pressures, a ring-shaped graphite heater has been developed to resistively heat diamond-anvil cell (DAC) samples up to 1300 K. By putting the heater in direct contact with the diamond anvils, this graphite heater design features the following advantages: (1) efficient heating: sample can be heated to 1300 K while the DAC body temperature remains less than 800 K, eliminating the requirement of a special alloy for the DAC; (2) compact design: the sample can be analyzed with in situ measurements, e.g., x-ray, optical, and electrical probes are possible. In particular, the side access of the heater allows for radial x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in addition to traditional axial XRD.

  1. Tetracyanoethylene oxide-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman and Auger spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frolova, Liliya V.; Magedov, Igor V.; Harper, Aaron; Jha, Sanjiv K.; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Chandler, Gary; Garcia, Jill; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A.; Vasiliev, Igor; et al

    2014-09-28

    The tetracyanoethylene oxide (TCNEO) functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using reaction of TCNEO with carbon surface in chlorobenzene. The successful functionalization has been confirmed by Raman and Auger spectroscopy, and by numerical modeling of the structure and vibrational modes of TCNEO-functionalized graphene. Raman spectra of TCNEO-functionalized graphene and graphite show several groups of lines corresponding to vibrations of attached carbonyl ylide. Lastly, one of key signatures of TCNEO attachment is the high intensity Raman band at ~1450 cm₋1, which represents the C-C=C in plane vibrations in functionalization-distorted graphene. We find Raman spectramore » indicate the existence of central (pristine) attachment of TCNEO to graphene surface.« less

  2. Tetracyanoethylene oxide-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman and Auger spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolova, Liliya V.; Magedov, Igor V.; Harper, Aaron; Jha, Sanjiv K.; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Chandler, Gary; Garcia, Jill; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A.; Vasiliev, Igor; Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2014-09-28

    The tetracyanoethylene oxide (TCNEO) functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using reaction of TCNEO with carbon surface in chlorobenzene. The successful functionalization has been confirmed by Raman and Auger spectroscopy, and by numerical modeling of the structure and vibrational modes of TCNEO-functionalized graphene. Raman spectra of TCNEO-functionalized graphene and graphite show several groups of lines corresponding to vibrations of attached carbonyl ylide. Lastly, one of key signatures of TCNEO attachment is the high intensity Raman band at ~1450 cm₋1, which represents the C-C=C in plane vibrations in functionalization-distorted graphene. We find Raman spectra indicate the existence of central (pristine) attachment of TCNEO to graphene surface.

  3. Research into Oil-based Colloidal-Graphite Lubricants for Forging of Al-based Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, A.; Petrov, P.; Petrov, M.

    2011-05-04

    The presented paper describes the topical problem in metal forging production. It deals with the choice of an optimal lubricant for forging of Al-based alloys. Within the scope of the paper, the properties of several oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricants were investigated. The physicochemical and technological properties of these lubricants are presented. It was found that physicochemical properties of lubricant compositions have an influence on friction coefficient value and quality of forgings.The ring compression method was used to estimate the friction coefficient value. Hydraulic press was used for the test. The comparative analysis of the investigated lubricants was carried out. The forging quality was estimated on the basis of production test. The practical recommendations were given to choose an optimal oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricant for isothermal forging of Al-based alloy.

  4. Atomic friction at exposed and buried graphite step edges: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-08

    The surfaces of layered materials such as graphite exhibit step edges that affect friction. Step edges can be exposed, where the step occurs at the outmost layer, or buried, where the step is underneath another layer of material. Here, we study friction at exposed and buried step edges on graphite using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and complementary molecular dynamics simulations of the AFM tip apex. Exposed and buried steps exhibit distinct friction behavior, and the friction on either step is affected by the direction of sliding, i.e., moving up or down the step, and the bluntness of the tip. These trends are analyzing in terms of the trajectory of the AFM tip as it moves over the step, which is a convolution of the topography of the surface and the tip shape.

  5. Evidence of transition-metal accumulation on aged graphite anodes by SIMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, D. P.; Spila, T.; Furczon, M. M.; Sammann, E.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-01-01

    In cells containing Li{sub 1.05}(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}){sub 0.95}O{sub 2}-based positive and graphite-based negative electrodes, a significant portion of cell impedance rise on aging is known to be from the negative electrode. One possible reason for this impedance rise is the dissolution of transition-metal elements from the oxide electrode that accumulate and create a high-impedance layer at the negative electrode-electrolyte interface. This article details dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, which provide a relative comparison of Mn, Co, and Ni contents on fresh, formed, and aged graphite electrodes. The data clearly indicate that these transition-metal elements accumulate at the electrode surface and diffuse into the electrode during cell aging.

  6. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Yingying; Fang, Yin; Qian, Xufang; Tu, Bo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Zhangxiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department and The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Zhao, Dongyuan, E-mail: dyzhao@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ?2200 m{sup 2}/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li{sup +} ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  7. Continious production of exfoliated graphite composite compositions and flow field plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-07-20

    A process of continuously producing a more isotropic, electrically conductive composite composition is provided. The process comprises: (a) continuously supplying a compressible mixture comprising exfoliated graphite worms and a binder or matrix material, wherein the binder or matrix material is in an amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the mixture; (b) continuously compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi or 0.035 MPa to about 50,000 psi or 350 MPa in at least a first direction into a cohered graphite composite compact; and (c) continuously compressing the composite compact in a second direction, different from the first direction, to form the composite composition in a sheet or plate form. The process leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  8. Relationships between strength, electrical conductivity, and density for oxidized PGX graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.; Prince, J.M.

    1983-07-01

    The core of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) rests on massive graphite core support blocks; which, in turn, are supported by core support posts. PGX graphite was used for the core support blocks of the Fort St. Vrain HTGR (the only operating HTGR); and, evidently, is the leading candidate material for use in advanced HTGRs. Therefore, PGX was chosen for the initial tests on the use of eddy current techniques to monitor strength changes as a result of oxidation. The results of these initial tests showed that both compressive strength and electrical conductivity correlated very well with density. However, only a single log of PGX was used for the initial tests; therefore, it was necessary to determine if the correlations could be extended to other logs of PGX.

  9. SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis: Passive mode measurements of graphite waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1997-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. To this end a modified statistical sampling and verification approach has been developed to determine the total uncertainty of a PAN measurement. In this approach the total performance of the PAN nondestructive assay system is simulated using computer models of the assay system and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. This paper is one of a series of reports quantifying the results of the uncertainty analysis of the PAN system measurements for specific waste types and measurement modes. In particular this report covers passive mode measurements of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated graphite molds contained in 208 liter drums (waste code 300). The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from measurements using known plutonium sources and a surrogate graphite waste form drum. For actual graphite waste form conditions, a set of 50 cases covering a statistical sampling of the conditions exhibited in graphite wastes was compiled using a Latin hypercube statistical sampling approach.

  10. Preliminary investigations into the microcracking of PMR-15/graphite composites. I. Effect of cure temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.; Wells, J.K.; Hay, J.N.; Lind, D.; Owens, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    The thermosetting polyimide, PMR-15, is the leading matrix resin for high temperature polymer composites. The effect of cure temperature has been evaluated. PMR-15/graphite laminates have been prepared by curing at a range of temperatures. Mechanical and microcracking properties and thermooxidative stability of the laminates have been determined. Results indicated that low temperature cure (280-290 C) of PMR-15 is possible to produce composites of acceptable mechanical properties that show a significantly reduced tendency to microcrack. 19 references.

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  13. Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of

  14. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  15. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using gas jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellerman, Peter L; Thronson, Gregory D; Sun, Dawei

    2014-04-01

    In one embodiment, a sheet production apparatus comprises a vessel configured to hold a melt of a material. A cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt and is configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A first gas jet is configured to direct a gas toward an edge of the vessel. A sheet of a material is translated horizontally on a surface of the melt and the sheet is removed from the melt. The first gas jet may be directed at the meniscus and may stabilize this meniscus or increase local pressure within the meniscus.

  16. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  17. Polymer surfaces graphitization by low-energy He{sup +} ions irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geworski, A.; Lazareva, I.; Gieb, K.; Koval, Y.; Mller, P. [Department of Physics, Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    The electrical and optical properties of surfaces of polyimide and AZ5214e graphitized by low-energy (1?keV) He{sup +} irradiation at different polymer temperatures were investigated. The conductivity of the graphitized layers can be controlled with the irradiation temperature within a broad range and can reach values up to ?1000?S/cm. We show that the electrical transport in low-conducting samples is governed by thermally activated hopping, while the samples with a high conductivity show a typical semimetallic behavior. The transition from thermally activated to semimetallic conductance governed by the irradiation temperature could also be observed in optical measurements. The semimetallic samples show an unusually high for graphitic materials carrier concentration, which results in a high extinction coefficient in the visible light range. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the conductance of the semimetallic samples, we conclude that the scattering of charge carriers is dominated by Coulomb interactions and can be described by a weak localization model. The transition from a three to two dimensional transport mechanism at low temperatures consistently explains the change in the temperature dependence of the conductance by cooling, observed in experiments.

  18. The Treatment of Mixed Waste with GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finucane, K.G.; Campbell, B.E.

    2006-07-01

    AMEC's GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} has been used to treat diverse types of mixed low-level radioactive waste. ICV is effective in the treatment of mixed wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. The GeoMelt vitrification process destroys organic compounds and immobilizes metals and radionuclides in an extremely durable glass waste form. The process is flexible allowing for treatment of aqueous, oily, and solid mixed waste, including contaminated soil. In 2004, ICV was used to treat mixed radioactive waste sludge containing PCBs generated from a commercial cleanup project regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and to treat contaminated soil from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The Rocky Flats soil contained cadmium, PCBs, and depleted uranium. In 2005, AMEC completed a treatability demonstration of the ICV technology on Mock High Explosive from Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes results from these mixed waste treatment projects. (authors)

  19. Carbon or Graphite Foam Heating Element for Regulating Engine Fluids -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D Carbon Storage R&D Carbon dioxide storage in geologic formations includes oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline reservoirs. These are structures that have stored crude oil, natural gas, brine and CO2 over millions of years. The primary goal of our carbon storage research is to understand the behavior of CO2 when stored in geologic formations. For example, studies are being conducted to determine the extent to which the CO2 moves within the geologic formation,

  20. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  1. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. I. Inclusion of chain semiflexibility in the lattice cluster theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for the thermodynamics of polymer systems has recently been reformulated to treat strongly interacting self-assembling polymers composed of fully flexible linear telechelic chains [J. Dudowicz and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064902 (2012)]. Here, we further extend the LCT for linear telechelic polymer melts to include a description of chain semiflexibility, which is treated by introducing a bending energy penalty whenever a pair of consecutive bonds from a single chain lies along orthogonal directions. An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy is derived for the model of semiflexible linear telechelic polymer melts. The extension provides a theoretical tool for investigating the influence of chain stiffness on the thermodynamics of self-assembling telechelic polymers, and for further exploring the influence of self-assembly on glass formation in such systems.

  2. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  3. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  4. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  5. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  6. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  7. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  8. Method for harvesting single crystals from a peritectic melt

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todt, Volker R.; Sengupta, Suvankar; Shi, Donglu

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing single crystals. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals unmelted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid.

  9. Method for harvesting single crystals from a peritectic melt

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todt, V.R.; Sengupta, S.; Shi, D.

    1996-08-27

    A method of preparing single crystals is disclosed. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals unmelted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid. 2 figs.

  10. Method to decrease loss of aluminum and magnesium melts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hryn, John N.; Pellin, Michael J.; Calaway, Jr., Wallis F.; Moore, Jerry F.; Krumdick, Gregory K.

    2002-01-01

    A method to minimize oxidation of metal during melting processes is provided, the method comprising placing solid phase metal into a furnace environ-ment, transforming the solid-phase metal into molten metal phase having a molten metal surface, and creating a barrier between the surface and the environment. Also provided is a method for isolating the surface of molten metal from its environment, the method comprising confining the molten metal to a controlled atmos-phere, and imposing a floating substrate between the surface and the atmosphere.

  11. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, M.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Bingert, S.A.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-09-08

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process. 5 figs.

  12. Hydrostatic extrusion of Cu-Ag melt spun ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Mary Ann; Bingert, John F.; Bingert, Sherri A.; Thoma, Dan J.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing high-strength and high-conductance copper and silver materials comprising the steps of combining a predetermined ratio of the copper with the silver to produce a composite material, and melt spinning the composite material to produce a ribbon of copper and silver. The ribbon of copper and silver is heated in a hydrogen atmosphere, and thereafter die pressed into a slug. The slug then is placed into a high-purity copper vessel and the vessel is sealed with an electron beam. The vessel and slug then are extruded into wire form using a cold hydrostatic extrusion process.

  13. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2009-09-15

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  14. Core melt/coolant interactions: modelling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; McGlaun, J.M.; Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If there is not adequate cooling water in the core of a light-water reactor (LWR), the fission product decay heat would eventually cause the reactor fuel and cladding to melt. This could lead to slumping of the molten core materials into the lower plenum of the reactor vessel, possibly followed by failure of the vessel wall and pouring of the molten materials into the reactor cavity. When the molten core materials enter either region, there is a strong possibility of molten core contacting water. This paper focuses on analysis of recent FITS experiments, mechanistic and probabilistic model development, and the application of these models to reactor considerations.

  15. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inam, A. Brydson, R. Edmonds, D.V.

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  16. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua; Department of Computer and Mathematical Basic Teaching, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyan 110034

    2013-11-18

    ?-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown ?-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  17. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a super pressing state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  18. Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liaw, P. K.

    2013-07-15

    The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make CuAlNi shape-memory wires and NiNbSn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

  19. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes ofmore » materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.« less

  20. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  1. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  2. Drapery assembly including insulated drapery liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cukierski, Gwendolyn (Ithaca, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A drapery assembly is disclosed for covering a framed wall opening, the assembly including drapery panels hung on a horizontal traverse rod, the rod having a pair of master slides and means for displacing the master slides between open and closed positions. A pair of insulating liner panels are positioned behind the drapery, the remote side edges of the liner panels being connected with the side portions of the opening frame, and the adjacent side edges of the liner panels being connected with a pair of vertically arranged center support members adapted for sliding movement longitudinally of a horizontal track member secured to the upper horizontal portion of the opening frame. Pivotally arranged brackets connect the center support members with the master slides of the traverse rod whereby movement of the master slides to effect opening and closing of the drapery panels effects simultaneous opening and closing of the liner panels.

  3. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  4. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using elasticity and buoyancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kellerman, Peter L.; Sun, Dawei; Helenbrook, Brian; Harvey, David S.

    2014-07-01

    Embodiments related to sheet production are disclosed. A melt of a material is cooled to form a sheet of the material on the melt. The sheet is formed in a first region at a first sheet height. The sheet is translated to a second region such that it has a second sheet height higher than the first sheet height. The sheet is then separated from the melt. A seed wafer may be used to form the sheet.

  5. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology used in Additive Manufacturing (Conference) | SciTech Connect Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures

  6. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  7. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appy, David [Ames Laboratory; Lei, Huaping [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Tringides, Michael C [Ames Laboratory; Liu, Da-Jiang [Ames Laboratory; Evans, James W [Ames Laboratory; Thiel, Patricia A [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we review basic information about the interaction of transition metal atoms with the (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite, especially fundamental phenomena related to growth. Those phenomena involve adatom-surface bonding, diffusion, morphology of metal clusters, interactions with steps and sputter-induced defects, condensation, and desorption. General traits emerge which have not been summarized previously. Some of these features are rather surprising when compared with metal-on-metal adsorption and growth. Opportunities for future work are pointed out.

  8. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Todd A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Debra P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jurney, James D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freer, Jerry E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dougherty, Lisa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stout, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  9. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  10. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramírez, Rafael; Singh, Jayant K.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2014-11-28

    Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet

  11. Conceptual design of a high throughput electrorefining of a uranium by using graphite cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.H.; Kang, Y.H.; Hwang, S.C.; Park, S.B.; Shim, J.B.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, E.H.; Park, S.W.

    2007-07-01

    Conceptual designing of a high throughput electro-refiner was performed by using basic experimental data and a commercial computational fluid dynamic code, CFX. An electro-refiner concept equipped with a graphite cathode bundle was designed to recover a high purity uranium product continuously without a noble metal contamination. The performance of the process for a decontamination of a noble metal in a uranium product was evaluated as a function of the process parameters such as the rotation speeds of the stirrer and the anode basket. (authors)

  12. Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles Official Use Only Pre-decisional Draft R. A. Pierce K. M. Fox June 2014 SRNL-RP-2014-00464, Revision 0 SRNL-RP-2014-00464 Revision 0 -- Official Use Only -- ii DISCLAIMER This work was prepared under an agreement with and funded by the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government or its employees, nor any of its contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any express or implied: 1. warranty or assumes any legal liability

  13. Catalytic gasification of graphite or carbon. Quarterly report, January 1, 1986-March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, H.

    1986-03-01

    Steam gasification of five chars has been carried out in the presence of a mixture of potassium and nickel oxides as catalyst. The steady state rate of hydrogen production after 60 minutes at 620/sup 0/C is highest for a N. Dakota Husky lignite and is twice as high as the next char, Western Kentucky. The order is N. Dakota > W. Kentucky > Illinois number 6, low temp. > number 6, high temp. > Montana. All chars gasified at a rate at least one order of magnitude greater than graphite.

  14. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  15. Articles including thin film monolayers and multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    Articles of manufacture including: (a) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, and a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, (b) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, and a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, (c) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, and a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and (d) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and a second metal species attached to the multifunctional organic ligand, are provided, such articles useful in detecting the presence of a selected target species, as nonliear optical materials, or as scavengers for selected target species.

  16. Thermodynamic principles of the process of the effect of electromagnetic fields on a polymer melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miroshnichenko, V.F.; Semenyuk, N.I.

    1989-06-23

    The effect of electromagnetic fields on a polymer melt leads to an increase in the strength of polymers while magnetostatic field virtually does not have an effect on the immobile polymer melt. However, if relative motion of magnetic field and polymer melt occurs, then, according to the laws of electrodynamics, besides magnetic field in the polymer melt appears the electric field, which will interact with the macromolecules of polymer. As a result of this can be changed the structure of polymer melt, which will be fixed/recorded in proportion to cooling fusion/melt, which must immediately be reflected in the properties of solid polymer. Change in structure of polymer melt can be considered as peculiar phase transitions. Apparently, for the polymer melts besides the phase transformations of the first and second kind there are other, possibly, mixed phase transitions. We experimentally established presence of Delta T-effect in polymer melts, which is characteristic for phase second-order transformations. Therefore in this article we use theory of second-order phase transitions in application to the phenomena in question.

  17. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  18. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; GLASS; HEATING; KINETICS; MELTING; SIMULATION; THERMAL GRAVIMETRIC ANALYSIS; WASTES Word Cloud More Like This ...

  19. The re-evaluation of the AVR melt-wire experiment with specific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    strategies and simplifications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The re-evaluation of the AVR melt-wire experiment with specific focus on different modeling strategies ...

  20. Exploration of Melt Spinning as a Route to Large Volume Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Melt spinning combined with Spark Plasma Sintering provides a potential route to the mass production of Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials salvador.pdf (5.17 MB) More ...

  1. Surface layering and melting in an ionic liquid studied by resonant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hard X-ray reflectivity, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and infrared spectroscopy uncovered an intriguing melting mechanism for the layered region,...

  2. Evaluation of the three-phase, electric arc melting furnace for treatment of simulated, thermally oxidized radioactive and mixed wastes. Part 1: Design criteria and description of integrated waste treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.; Hartman, A.D.

    1995-06-01

    The US Bureau of Mines and the Department of Energy (DOE), through its contractor EG and G Idaho Inc., are collaborating on a multiyear research project to evaluate the applicability of three-phase, electric-arc furnace melting technology to vitrify materials simulating low-level radioactive and mixed wastes buried or stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and other DOE sites. The melter is sealed, 1-t (1.1-st), three-phase, 800-kV {center_dot} A electric arc melting furnace with 10.2-cm- (4-in-) diameter graphite electrodes, water-cooled roof and sidewalls, and four water-cooled feed tubes. A water-cooled copper fixture provides for continuous tapping of slag. An instrumented air pollution control system (APCS) with access ports for analysis and a feeder based on screw conveyors and a bucket elevator are dedicated to the facility. Test data are provided by an arc furnace analyzer and by sensors indicating feed rate; slag temperature; and temperature, pressure, and velocity in the APCS. These data are received by a data logger, digitized, and transmitted to a personal computer for storage and display. This unique waste treatment facility is available for public and private use on a cost-sharing basis.

  3. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Thornton C

    2014-03-31

    Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) is a balanced portfolio of R&D tasks that address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry. E-SMARRT was created to: • Improve important capabilities of castings • Reduce carbon footprint of the foundry industry • Develop new job opportunities in manufacturing • Significantly reduce metalcasting process energy consumption and includes R&D in the areas of: • Improvements in Melting Efficiency • Innovative Casting Processes for Yield Improvement/Revert Reduction • Instrumentation and Control Improvement • Material properties for Casting or Tooling Design Improvement The energy savings and process improvements developed under E-SMARRT have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the E-SMARRT partnership. The E-SMARRT team consisted of DOE’s Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical associations in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders’ Society of America; and SCRA Applied R&D, doing business as the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. This team provided collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,000 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, these new processes and technologies that enable energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements would have been slow to develop and had trouble obtaining a broad application. The E-SMARRT R&D tasks featured low-threshold energy efficiency improvements that are attractive to the domestic industry because they do not require major capital investment. The results of this portfolio of projects are significantly reducing metalcasting process energy consumption while improving the important capabilities of metalcastings. Through June

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Innovative Semi-Solid Metal (SSM) Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diran Apelian

    2012-08-15

    Semi-solid metal (SSM) processing has emerged as an attractive method for near-net-shape manufacturing due to the distinct advantages it holds over conventional near-net-shape forming technologies. These advantages include lower cycle time, increased die life, reduced porosity, reduced solidification shrinkage, improved mechanical properties, etc. SSM processing techniques can not only produce the complex dimensional details (e.g. thin-walled sections) associated with conventional high-pressure die castings, but also can produce high integrity castings currently attainable only with squeeze and low-pressure permanent mold casting processes. There are two primary semi-solid processing routes, (a) thixocasting and (b) rheocasting. In the thixocasting route, one starts from a non-dendritic solid precursor material that is specially prepared by a primary aluminum manufacturer, using continuous casting methods. Upon reheating this material into the mushy (a.k.a. "two-phase") zone, a thixotropic slurry is formed, which becomes the feed for the casting operation. In the rheocasting route (a.k.a. "slurry-on-demand" or "SoD"), one starts from the liquid state, and the thixotropic slurry is formed directly from the melt via careful thermal management of the system; the slurry is subsequently fed into the die cavity. Of these two routes, rheocasting is favored in that there is no premium added to the billet cost, and the scrap recycling issues are alleviated. The CRP (Trade Marked) is a process where the molten metal flows through a reactor prior to casting. The role of the reactor is to ensure that copious nucleation takes place and that the nuclei are well distributed throughout the system prior to entering the casting cavity. The CRP (Trade Marked) has been successfully applied in hyper-eutectic Al-Si alloys (i.e., 390 alloy) where two liquids of equal or different compositions and temperatures are mixed in the reactor and creating a SSM slurry. The process has been mostly

  5. CX-005040: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Induction Furnace Melting (Includes Graphite and Mold Prep)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/19/2011Location(s): Albany, OregonOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. Computer Simulations of Bottle Brushes: From Melts to Soft Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cao, Zhen; Sheiko, Sergei; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical calculations, we study dens bottle-brush systems in a melt and network State. Analysis. of our simulation results shows That bottle-brush macromolecules in melt behave as ideal chains with effective Kuhn length b(K). Simulations show that the bottle-brush-induced bending rigidity is due to an entropy decrease caused by redistribution of the side chains upon backbone bending The Kuhn length of the bottle:brushes increases with increasing the side-chain degree of polymerization n(sc) as b(K) proportional to n(sc)(0.46). This model of bottle brush macromolecules is extended to describe mechanical properties of bottle brush networksmore » in linear and nonlinear deformation regimes. In the linear deformation regime, the network shear modulus scales with the degree of polymerization of the side chains as G(0) proportional to (n(sc) + 1)(-1) as long as the ratio of the Kuhn length, b(K), to the size of the fully extended bottle-brush backbone between cross-links, R-max, is smaller than unity, b(K)/R-max << 1. Bottle-brush networks With b(K)/R-max proportional to 1 demonstrate behavior similar to that of networks Of semiflexible chains with G(0) proportional to n(sc)(-0.5). In the nonlinear network deformation regime, the deformation-dependent shear modulus is a universal function of the first strain invariant I-1 and bottle-brush backbone deformation ratio beta describing stretching ability of the bottle-brush backbone between cross-links.« less

  7. Neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes in NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Kane, Joshua; Butt, Darryl P.; Windes, William E.; Ubic, Rick

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the neutron-irradiation-induced effects on the microstructure of NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites. The high-temperature neutron irradiation at two different irradiation conditions was carried out at the Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NBG-18 samples were irradiated to 1.54 dpa and 6.78 dpa at 430 °C and 678 °C respectively. IG-110 samples were irradiated to 1.91 dpa and 6.70 dpa at 451 °C and 674 °C respectively. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to study the changes in different microstructural components such as filler particles, microcracks, binder and quinoline-insoluble (QI) particles. Significant changes have been observed in samples irradiated to about 6.7 dpa. The closing of pre-existing microcracks was observed in both the filler and the binder phases. The binder phase exhibited substantial densification with near complete elimination of the microcracks. The QI particles embedded in the binder phase exhibited a complete microstructural transformation from rosettes to highly crystalline solid spheres. The lattice images indicate the formation of edge dislocations as well as extended line defects bridging the adjacent basal planes. The positive climb of these dislocations has been identified as the main contributor to the irradiation-induced swelling of the graphite lattice.

  8. Preparations and characterizations of novel graphite-like materials and some high oxidation state fluorine chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Ciping

    1992-11-01

    Novel graphite-like materials, BC{sub x} (6>x{ge}3), have been prepared using BCl{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 6} at 800--1000C, and C{sub x}N (14>x{ge}5) have been synthesized using C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N and Cl{sub 2} at 680C--986C. Bulk and thin film characterization were used to study the structure and bonding in these solids. C{sub 8}K(NH{sub 3}){sub 1.1} was prepared by reacting C{sub 8}K with gaseous NH{sub 3}. The carbon sub-lattice is hexagonal: a = 2.47 {Angstrom}, c = 6.47 {Angstrom}. The smaller a parameter and lower conductivity are attributed to smaller electron transfer from K to the conduction band solvation of K by NH{sub 3}. A simplified liquid phase method for synthesizing Li-graphite intercalation compounds has been developed; synthesis of a lamellar mixed conductor, C{sub x}{sup +}Li{sub 2}N{sup {minus}}, has been attempted. Stability and conductivity of (BN){sub 3}SO{sub 3}F have been studied; it was shown to be metallic with a specific conductivity of 1.5 S{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1}. Its low conductivity is attributed to the low mobility of holes in BN sheets.

  9. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce the specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .

  10. Feasibility of monitoring the strength of HTGR core support graphite: Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.; Davis, T.J.; Thomas, M.T.

    1983-02-01

    Methods are being developed to monitor, in-situ, the strength changes of graphite core-support components in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The results reported herein pertain to the development of techniques for monitoring the core-support blocks; the PGX graphite used in these studies is the grade used for the core-support blocks of the Fort St. Vrain HTGR, and is coarser-grained than the grades used in our previous investigations. The through-transmission ultrasonic velocity technique, developed for monitoring strength of the core-support posts, is not suitable for use on the core-support blocks. Eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques have been shown to be capable of measuring the density-depth profile in oxidized PGX and, combined with a correlation of strength versus density, could yield an estimate of the strength-depth profile of in-service HTGR core support blocks. Correlations of strength versus density and other properties, and progress on the development of the eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques are reported.

  11. Measurement of the Melting Point Temperature of Several Lithium-Sodium-Beryllium Fluoride Salt (Flinabe) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.M; Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.J.; Tanaka, T.J; Ulrickson, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Troncosa, K.P.

    2005-04-15

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium fluorides studied for molten salt fission reactors, has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for fusion applications. The melting points of 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2} are 460 deg. C and 363 deg. C, but LiF-BeF{sub 2} is rather viscous and has less lithium for breeding. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing liquid for the first wall and blanket were investigated. Flinabe (a mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2} and NaF) was selected for a molten salt design because a melting temperature below 350 deg. C appeared possible and this provided an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a stainless steel crucible under vacuum. One had an apparent melting temperature of 305 deg. C. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, melting procedures and temperature curves for the melting and cooling are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible is reported in an accompanying paper.

  12. Thermomechanical response of a semicrystalline polymer in the vicinity of the melting by using microcantilever technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soccio, M.; Rueda, D. R.; Garca-Gutirrez, M. C.; Ezquerra, T. A.; Luongo, G.; Esteves, C.; Salvador-Matar, A.; Ahumada, O.; Lotti, N.; Munari, A.

    2014-06-23

    The melting transition of a model semicrystalline polymer has been detected by the microcantilever deflection as a function of temperature. Deflection measurements were done on arrays of 8-cantilevers spin coated with the semicrystalline polymer: poly (propylene azelate). The melting of the polymer has been corroborated by grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering experiments performed with synchrotron radiation over a single cantilever.

  13. Detection of melting by X-ray imaging at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2014-06-15

    The occurrence of partial melting at elevated pressure and temperature is documented in real time through measurement of volume strain induced by a fixed temperature change. Here we present the methodology for measuring volume strains to one part in 10{sup ?4} for mm{sup 3} sized samples in situ as a function of time during a step in temperature. By calibrating the system for sample thermal expansion at temperatures lower than the solidus, the onset of melting can be detected when the melting volume increase is of comparable size to the thermal expansion induced volume change. We illustrate this technique with a peridotite sample at 1.5 GPa during partial melting. The Re capsule is imaged with a CCD camera at 20 frames/s. Temperature steps of 100 K induce volume strains that triple with melting. The analysis relies on image comparison for strain determination and the thermal inertia of the sample is clearly seen in the time history of the volume strain. Coupled with a thermodynamic model of the melting, we infer that we identify melting with 2 vol.% melting.

  14. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  15. An FTIR Study of Hydrogen in Anorthosite and Associated Melt Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman,S.; Dyar, M.; Marinkovic, N.; Dunbar, N.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to document the presence of hydrogen, to estimate its concentration, and to document its oxygen speciation in anorthoclase crystals and associated melt inclusions from Mount Erebus, Antarctica. Synchrotron-generated infrared radiation, 100 to 1000 times brighter than globar-generated infrared radiation, permits rapid collection of maps that depict relative intensities of a chosen FTIR band across the mapped area. Spectra and/or compositional maps showing variations in water concentration were collected from anorthoclase megacrysts and melt inclusions in the megacrysts. Studies of anorthoclase megacrysts involved collection of spectra from three mutually perpendicular sections cut from the crystals. FTIR spectra of anorthoclase crystals are characterized by a broad absorption band at approximately 3200 cm{sup -1} in the mid-IR range. The universal mass absorption coefficient for mid-IR range feldspar spectra, established by Johnson and Rossman (2003), was used for quantitative estimates of water concentrations in the feldspar crystals based on integrated area under the 3200 cm{sup -1} band. Water concentration in the anorthoclase sample was approximately 126 ppm, with an overall error of approximately {+-}30%. FTIR spectra of melt inclusions are characterized by a broad asymmetric absorption band at {approx}3550 cm{sup -1} that was used to calculate total water concentration. The absence of a band at 1630 cm{sup -1} suggests that water in the melt inclusions occurs as OH{sup -} rather than as molecular H{sub 2}O. Absorption coefficients established by Mandeville et al. (2002) for H species in glass were used to calculate water concentrations in the melt inclusions. Melt inclusions in the Mt. Erebus anorthoclase have water concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 0.39 wt%, with an overall error of approximately {+-}15%. The ratio of water in anorthoclase crystals to water in the melt from which

  16. New time-line technique for station blackout core-melt analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutzke, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Florida Power Corporation (FPC) has developed a new method for analyzing station blackout (SBO) core-melt accidents. This method, created during the recent probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Crystal River Unit 3 (CR-3), originated from the need to analyze the interactions among the two-train emergency feedwater (EFW) system, station batteries, and diesel generators (DGs) following a loss of off-site power (LOSP) event. SBO core-melt sequences for CR-3 are unique since the time core-melt commences depends on which DG fails last. The purpose of this paper is to outline the new method of analysis of SBO core-melt accidents at CR-3. The significance of SBO core-melt accidents to total plant risk, along with the efficacy of various methods to reduce SBO risk, are also discussed.

  17. Near-critical phase explosion promoting breakdown plasma ignition during laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Seleznev, L. V.

    2010-07-15

    Removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure parameters were measured as a function of laser intensity I{sub peak} during nanosecond laser ablation of graphite. Surface vaporization of molten graphite at low intensities I{sub peak}<0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} was observed to transform into its near-critical phase explosion (intense homogeneous boiling) at the threshold intensity I{sub PE}approx =0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} in the form of a drastic, correlated rise of removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure magnitudes. Just above this threshold (I{sub peak}>=0.25 GW/cm{sup 2}), the explosive mass removal ended up with saturation of the removal rate, much slower increase of the air and recoil pressure magnitudes, and appearance of a visible surface plasma spark. In this regime, the measured far-field air shock pressure amplitude exhibits a sublinear dependence on laser intensity (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 4/9}), while the source plasma shock pressure demonstrates a sublinear trend (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), both indicating the subcritical character of the plasma. Against expectations, in this regime the plasma recoil pressure increases versus I{sub peak} superlinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 1.1}), rather than sublinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), with the mentioned difference related to the intensity-dependent initial spatial plasma dimensions within the laser waist on the graphite surface and to the plasma formation time during the heating laser pulse (overall, the pressure source effect). The strict coincidence of the phase explosion, providing high (kbar) hydrodynamic pressures of ablation products, and the ignition of ablative laser plasma in the carbon plume may indicate the ablative pressure-dependent character of the underlying optical breakdown at the high plume pressures, initiating the plasma formation. The experimental data evidence that the spatiotemporal extension of the plasma in the laser plume and ambient air during the heating laser

  18. Temperature programed desorption of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} from pure and graphite-covered Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermang, B.; Juel, M.; Raaen, S.

    2007-11-15

    Ethylene adsorption on Pt(111) at 95 K was studied by temperature programed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ethylene desorbs reversibly at 112 K and irreversibly at 255 and 280 K. It is generally accepted that annealing of ethylene adsorbed on Pt(111) to 300 K results in a dehydrogenation to ethylidyne through an ethylidene intermediate. This was observed by a hydrogen desorption peak at 300 K. Also, hydrogenation of the adsorbed ethylene was observed by a small ethane desorption peak at 300 K. Upon heating to 700 K, the ethylidyne species will further dehydrogenate to carbidic carbon species with hydrogen desorption peaks at 460 and 640 K. If the carbidic species is heated to higher temperatures (up to 1000 K), it will further dehydrogenate and form graphitic islands which will accumulate by Ostwald ripening in larger islands at the step edges of the surface. After annealing the sample to 1000 K, a statistically distributed 8x8 superstructure of these graphite islands is achieved, as interpreted from A pattern in the LEED data. The TPD results indicate that ethylene adsorption on Pt(111) results in the formation of graphitic islands upon heating to 1000 K, contrary to previous conjectures of formation of a full graphite monolayer.

  19. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, X. D. Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-05

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2–6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  20. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Hardwick, Laurence J.; Marcinek, Marek; Beer, Leanne; Kerr, John B.; Kostecki, Robert

    2008-03-03

    The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle, compared to fresh un-altered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on surface modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive SEI layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with M{sub w} on the order of 1600 g mol{sup -1} for the surface modified electrode with no evidence of elevated M{sub w} species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling maybe responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

  1. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  2. Vertical zone melt growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Nordquist, P.E.R.; Gorman, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A Vertical Zone Melt (VZM) technique has been applied to the single crystal growth of GaAs. A pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and a (100) oriented seed were used along with liquid encapsulation by boric oxide. In the case of GaAs, the ampoule was pressurized with either argon or argensic vapor from elemental arsenic at pressures ranging from 1 to 2 atmospheres. A molten zone length of 22 mm gave a growth interface which is nearly flat and resulted in routine single crystal growth. Temperature gradients of 4{degrees}C/cm. and 9{degrees}C/cm. have produced dislocation densities of <1000/cm{sup 2} and 2000-5000/cm{sup 2} respectively for 34 mm diameter crystals of GaAs. Post growth cooling rates for GaAs have been 35, 160 and 500{degrees}C/hr. The cooling rate has been found to affect the number and size of arsenic precipitates and the EL2 concentration in the GaAs crystal. The effects of these and other growth parameters on the crystalline perfection and electrical properties of the crystals will be discussed.

  3. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inverselymore » with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.« less

  4. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B.

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  5. Equilibration of long chain polymer melts in computer simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plimpton, Steven James; Kremer, Kurt; Grest, Gary Stephen; Auhl, Rolf; Everaers, Ralf

    2003-06-01

    Several methods for preparing well equilibrated melts of long chains polymers are studied. We show that the standard method in which one starts with an ensemble of chains with the correct end-to-end distance arranged randomly in the simulation cell and introduces the excluded volume rapidly, leads to deformation on short length scales. This deformation is strongest for long chains and relaxes only after the chains have moved their own size. Two methods are shown to overcome this local deformation of the chains. One method is to first pre-pack the Gaussian chains, which reduces the density fluctuations in the system, followed by a gradual introduction of the excluded volume. The second method is a double-bridging algorithm in which new bonds are formed across a pair of chains, creating two new chains each substantially different from the original. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods for a linear bead spring polymer model with both zero and nonzero bending stiffness, however the methods are applicable to more complex architectures such as branched and star polymer.

  6. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.

  7. Energetics of melts from thermal diffusion studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesher, C.E.

    1998-12-01

    Most processes in geology are a consequence at some level of the flow of energy or mass. Heat conduction and chemical diffusion are examples of two of these sorts of flows which are driven by temperature and chemical potential imbalances, respectively. In the general case these flows may be coupled so that, for instance, a temperature gradient may result in a flow of mass as well as heat. This effect in liquids was demonstrated by Soret (1879) and bears his name. In gases or solids the phenomenon is given the general name thermal diffusion. It was the purpose of this research program to examine the Soret effect in molten silicates under laboratory conditions. Results of these experiments are used to evaluate the form and quantitative values of many thermodynamic and kinetic properties of silicate melts over a range of temperature, pressure, and bulk composition. The author published a comprehensive review and synthesis with a microscopic theoretical explanation for the effect at low pressure in silicate liquids of geological interest. He conducted experimental investigations of molecular diffusion in the absence of a thermal gradient through experiments involving dissolution of solid silicates in molten silicate and interdiffusion of species between miscible silicate liquids. Collectively these results enable the author to construct a more comprehensive model of molecular diffusion in magmatic liquids. He has applied this model to problems of magma mixing and crustal assimilation.

  8. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  9. Particle production of a graphite target system for the intensity frontier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; McDonald, K. T.

    2015-05-03

    A solid graphite target system is considered for an intense muon and/or neutrino source in support of physics at the intensity frontier. We previously optimized the geometric parameters of the beam and target to maximize particle production at low energies by incoming protons with kinetic energy of 6.75 GeV and an rms geometric emittance of 5 mm-mrad using the MARS15(2014) code. In this study, we ran MARS15 with ROOT-based geometry and also considered a mercury-jet target as an upgrade option. The optimization was extended to focused proton beams with transverse emittances from 5 to 50 mm-mrad, showing that the particle production decreases slowly with increasing emittance. We also studied beam-dump configurations to suppress the rate of undesirable high-energy secondary particles in the beam.

  10. Relation between the overpotentials and structures of graphite fluoride electrode in nonaqueous lithium cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, N.; Hagiwara, R.; Nakajima, T.

    1984-09-01

    A study was made of the relation between the cathode overpotentials and structures of two kinds of graphite fluorides, (CF)n and (C2F)n in a nonaqueous lithium battery. The overpotential of (CF)n electrode decreased with increasing interlayer spacing and decreasing thickness of the crystallite along the C axis. However, it was found that the overpotential of (C2F)n electrode primarily depended on the amount of the defects which would be present in the form of polynuclear aromatic carbon rings in (C2F)n. The defects in (C2F)n would give the short circuiting paths for the transfer of a lithium ion in diffusion layer. The higher discharge potential of (C2F)n than that of (CF)n was mainly attributed to the effect of the defects contained in (C2F)n. 17 references.

  11. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  12. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: vr.optics1@gmail.com [Department of Laser Studies, School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, India. (India); Kottaisamy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultravioletvisible (UVvis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  13. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Zane L.; Benton, Samuel T.

    1988-01-01

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  14. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1988-11-22

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  15. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1987-07-08

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  16. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami Shariff, A. M. E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A. E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Faiz

    2014-10-24

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  17. Mass transfer during wall-rock alteration: An example from a quartz-graphite vein, Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, K.C.; Duke, E.F.; Papike, J.J. ); Laul, J.C. )

    1988-07-01

    Mass transfer and fluid-rock interaction have been evaluated along two sample traverses in low-sillimanite grade quartz-mica schist adjacent to a synmetamorphic quartz-graphite vein in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. In an {approximately}17 cm halo between apparently unaltered schist and the vein contact is an outer zone of cryptic alteration and three inner zones of visible alteration. The cryptic zone consists of the original prograde metamorphic mineral assemblage plus anomalously high amounts of tourmaline. The outermost visible zone contains abundant graphite. The second visible zone is defined by intensive bleaching of the schist. The innermost visible zone, immediately adjacent to the vein, is tourmaline + quartz + plagioclase + limonite + graphite. The vein is composed almost entirely of quartz, but also contains trace amounts of graphite. Mass balance calculations indicate that Al was essentially inert. The predominant chemical changes during wall-rock alteration were addition of B and C from the vein-forming fluid along with loss of K from the wall rocks, corresponding to precipitation of tourmaline and graphite, and the progressive destruction of microcline, biotite, and muscovite toward the vein. In addition, the elements V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, W, and Au were introduced into the country rock, whereas Si, Rb, Ba, and Cs were removed. Fluid-rock interaction modeling suggests that between one and four equivalent masses of fluid interacted chemically with the most altered mineral assemblages. In addition, greater than one equivalent mass of reactive fluid penetrated to distances of at least 5 cm from the vein contact.

  18. Dynamics and pattern selection at the crystal-melt interface. Progress report No. 4, March 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, H.Z.

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses: light scattering at the crystal-melt interface; morphological instability and pattern selection; and sidebranching.

  19. Investigation of platinum alloys for melting of inclusion free laser glass: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1986-02-28

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Pt alloys as crucible materials for melting LHG-8 phosphate laser glass. The tendency of forming metallic inclusions and ionic dissolution of alloy components in the glass is to be compared with that of pure Pt. Ionic Pt is introduced into the glass melt by direct dissolution of Pt at the crucible-melt interface and by vapor phase transport. It was felt that a Pt-alloy may behave sufficiently differently from Pt that a number of alloys should be studied. Pt inclusions may originate from Pt which reprecipitates from the glass melt on cooling or change in redox-conditions; from volatilized Pt which deposits in colder zones of the melting environment as crystallites which may drop back into the glass melt; and/or from Pt particles which are mechanically removed from the crucible and drop into the glass melt. Besides pure Pt, the following alloys have been tested: Pt//sup 10/Ir, Pt//sup 10/Rh, Pt//sup 5/Au, Pt-ZGS, Pt//sup 5/Au-ZGS, Pt//sup 10/Rh-ZGS.

  20. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

    2012-09-30

    lubricants and technical support. Experiments conducted with these lubricants demonstrated good protection of the substrate steel. Graphite and boron nitride used as benchmarks are capable of completely eliminating soldering and washout. However, because of cost and environmental considerations these materials are not widely used in industry. The best water-based die lubricants evaluated in this program were capable of providing similar protection from soldering and washout. In addition to improved part quality and higher production rates, improving die casting processes to preserve the life of the inserts will result in energy savings and a reduction in environmental wastes. Improving die life by means of optimized cooling line placement, baffles and bubblers in the die will allow for reduced die temperatures during processing, saving energy associated with production. The utilization of optimized die lubricants will also reduce heat requirements in addition to reducing waste associated with soldering and washout. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.1 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on commercial introduction in 2010, a market penetration of 70% by 2020 is 1.26 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.025 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  1. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, a finding in stark contrast to DAC data.

  2. Detailed Analysis of a Late-Phase Core-Melt Progression for the Evaluation of In-vessel Corium Retention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; R. J. Park; S. B. Kim; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung

    2006-12-01

    Detailed analyses of a late-phase melt progression in the advanced power reactor (APR)1400 were completed to identify the melt and the thermal-hydraulic states of the in-vessel materials in the reactor vessel lower plenum at the time of reactor vessel failure to evaluate the candidate strategies for an in-vessel corium retention (IVR). Initiating events considered included high-pressure transients of a total loss of feed water (LOFW) and a station blackout (SBO) and low-pressure transients of a 0.0009-m2 small, 0.0093-m2 medium, and 0.0465-m2 large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) without safety injection. Best-estimate simulations for these low-probability events with conservative accident progression assumptions that lead to reactor vessel failure were performed by using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressurizer surge line failed before the reactor vessel failure, which results in a rapid decrease of the in-vessel pressure and a delay of the reactor vessel failure time of ~40 min in the high-pressure sequences of the total LOFW and the SBO transients. In all the sequences, ~80 to 90% of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. The maximum value of the volumetric heat source in the corium pool was estimated as 1.9 to 3.7 MW/m3. The corium temperature was ~2800 to 3400 K at the time of reactor vessel failure. The highest volumetric heat source sequence is predicted for the 0.0465-m2 large-break LOCA without safety injection in the APR1400, because this sequence leads to an early reactor vessel failure.

  3. Melting of “non-magic” argon clusters and extrapolation to the bulk limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senn, Florian Wiebke, Jonas; Schumann, Ole; Gohr, Sebastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Pahl, Elke

    2014-01-28

    The melting of argon clusters Ar{sub N} is investigated by applying a parallel-tempering Monte Carlo algorithm for all cluster sizes in the range from 55 to 309 atoms. Extrapolation to the bulk gives a melting temperature of 85.9 K in good agreement with the previous value of 88.9 K using only Mackay icosahedral clusters for the extrapolation [E. Pahl, F. Calvo, L. Koči, and P. Schwerdtfeger, “Accurate melting temperatures for neon and argon from ab initio Monte Carlo simulations,” Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8207 (2008)]. Our results for argon demonstrate that for the extrapolation to the bulk one does not have to restrict to magic number cluster sizes in order to obtain good estimates for the bulk melting temperature. However, the extrapolation to the bulk remains a problem, especially for the systematic selection of suitable cluster sizes.

  4. The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

  5. Mathematical modeling of cold cap: Effect of bubbling on melting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-12-31

    The rate of melting is a primary concern in the vitrification of radioactive wastes because it directly influences the life cycle of nuclear waste cleanup efforts. To increase glass melting performance, experimental and industrial all-electric waste glass melters employ various melt-rate enhancement techniques, the most prominent being the application of bubblers submerged into molten glass. This study investigates various ways in which bubbling affects melting rate in a waste glass melter. Using the recently developed cold cap model, we suggest that forced convection of molten glass, which increases the cold cap bottom temperature, is the main factor. Other effects, such as stirring the feed into molten glass or reducing the insulating effect of foaming, also play a role.

  6. Migration of carbon in tempered martensitic steel during excimer laser melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Jervis, T.R.; Zocco, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    The migration of ion implanted {sup 13}C in tempered martensitic steel (nominal composition 1.05 wt. % C, 0.2 wt. % Si, and 0.3 wt. % Mn) during excimer laser melting was examined utilizing the resonance of the {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N reaction at Ep = 1747.6 keV. Depth concentration profiles after five and ten laser pulses of 1 J/cm{sup 2} revealed deviation from random walk diffusion in a homogeneous media. This was modelled by using the solubility controlled flow of carbon in iron-carbon melt. A diffusion length of 2{radical}D{tau} 34 {plus minus} 2 nm during a period {tau} of the melted phase was deduced. Significant amorphous to crystalline transformation occurred during the rapid self quenching following laser melting. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is demonstrating a technology that will eliminate melting and holding furnaces at the casting cell and move these operations to centralized and optimized off-site facilities.

  8. Melting in the Iron-Oxygen-Silicon System up to 85 GPa. (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Melting in the Iron-Oxygen-Silicon System up to 85 GPa. Citation Details ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  9. Melting in the Iron-Oxygen-Silicon System up to 85 GPa. (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Melting in the Iron-Oxygen-Silicon System ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  10. Analysis of impact melt and vapor production in CTH for planetary applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Quintana, S. N.; Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    2015-05-19

    This study explores impact melt and vapor generation for a variety of impact speeds and materials using the shock physics code CTH. The study first compares the results of two common methods of impact melt and vapor generation to demonstrate that both the peak pressure method and final temperature method are appropriate for high-speed impact models (speeds greater than 10 km/s). However, for low-speed impact models (speeds less than 10 km/s), only the final temperature method is consistent with laboratory analyses to yield melting and vaporization. Finally, a constitutive model for material strength is important for low-speed impacts because strengthmore » can cause an increase in melting and vaporization.« less

  11. Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho ...

  12. High Pressure Melting Curve of TIn (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Pressure Melting Curve of TIn Citation Details ... OSTI Identifier: 1124823 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-522418 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal ...

  13. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  14. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Zanner, Frank J.; Grose, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  15. New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and dangerous temperatures New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. November 20, 2015 Greenland ice loss. Greenland ice loss. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email "The model is based on idealized

  16. Ab Initio Investigation of the Melting Line of Nitrogen at High Pressure |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Investigation of the Melting Line of Nitrogen at High Pressure Authors: Donadio, D., Spanu, L., Duchemin, I., Gygi, F., Galli, G. Understanding the behavior of molecular systems under pressure is a fundamental problem in condensed-matter physics. In the case of nitrogen, the determination of the phase diagram and, in particular, of the melting line, are largely open problems. Two independent experiments have reported the presence of a maximum in the

  17. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  18. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giachetti, R.T. (Giachetti (Richard T.), Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs.

  19. Functionalization/passivation of porous graphitic carbon with di-tert-amylperoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, David S.; Gupta, Vipul; Olsen, Rebecca E.; Miller, Alex T.; Davis, Robert C.; Ess, Daniel; Zhu, Zihua; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R.

    2011-11-18

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) particles were functionalized/passivated in situ in packed beds at elevated temperature with neat di-tert-amylperoxide (DTAP) in a column oven. The performance of these particles for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was assayed before and after this chemistry with the following analytes: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, n-propyl benzene, n-butyl benzene, p-xylene, phenol, 4-methylphenol, phenetole, 3,5-xylenol, and anisole. After the first functionalization/passivation, the retention factors, k, of these compounds decreased by about 5% and the number of theoretical plates (N) increased by ca. 15%. These values of k then remained roughly constant after a second functionalization/ passivation but a further increase in N was noticed. In addition, after each of the reactions, the peak asymmetries decreased by ca. 15%, for a total of ca. 30%. The columns were then subjected twice to methanol at 100 C for 5 h at 1 mL/min. After these stability tests, the values of k remained roughly constant, the number of plates increased, which is favorable, and the asymmetries rose and then declined, where they remained below the initial values for the unfunctionalized columns. Functionalized and unfunctionalized particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and BET measurements, which showed no difference between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), where ToF-SIMS suggested some chemical differences between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials. In particular ToF-SIMS suggested that the expected five-carbon fragments from DTAP exist at higher concentrations on DTAP-functionalized PGC. First principle calculations on model graphitic surfaces suggest that the first addition of a DTAP radical to the surface proceeds in an approximately isothermal or slightly favorable fashion, but that subsequent DTAP

  20. Final Report: Use of Graphite Foam as a Thermal Performance Enhancement of Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, James William; Conklin, Jim

    2011-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's graphite foam has the potential to be used as a heat exchanger for the Army's Future Combat System Manned Ground Vehicle and thus has the potential to improve its thermal performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLOW3D was used to develop a new CFD model for the graphite foam to be used in the development of a proper heat exchanger. The program was calibrated by first measuring the properties of the solid foams and determining the parameters to be used in the CFD model. Then the model was used to predict within 5% error the performance of finned foam heat sinks. In addition, the f factors and j factors commonly used to predict pressure drop and heat transfer were calculated for both the solid and finned structures. There was some evidence that corrugating the foams would yield higher j/f ratios than state of the art heat exchangers, confirming previously measured data. Because the results show that the CFD model was validated, it is recommended that the funding for Phases 2 through 5 be approved for the design of both the finned heat exchanger using tubes and round fin structures and the solid foam design using corrugated foams. It was found that the new CFD model using FLOW3D can predict both solid foam heat transfer and finned foam heat transfer with the validated model parameters. In addition, it was found that the finned foam structures exhibited j/f ratios that indicate that significant heat transfer is occurring within the fin structures due to aerodynamically induced flow, which is not present in solid aluminum fin structures. It is possible that the foam surfaces can act as turbulators that increase heat transfer without affecting pressure drop, like the vortex generators seen in state of the art heat exchangers. These numbers indicate that the foam can be engineered into an excellent heat exchanger. It was also found that corrugating the solid foams would increase the j/f ratio dramatically, allowing the