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1

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

2

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

4

A Meteorological Experiment in the Melting Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program ...

J. Oerlemans; H. F. Vugts

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

Jackson, D.G. Jr.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world s oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g., soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared to the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream.

Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Scatena, Fred [University of Pennsylvania; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Blum, Alex [U. S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO; Schulz, M [University of Pennsylvania; Jimenez, M [University of Pennsylvania; White, Art [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport in the Vadose and Saturated Zones beneath Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to predict the migration of radionuclides from the disposal units at Material Disposal Area G through the vadose zone and into the main aquifer in support of a radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for the site. The calculations are performed with the finite element code, FEHM. The transport of nuclides through the vadose zone is computed using a three-dimensional model that describes the complex mesa top geology of the site. The model incorporates the positions and inventories of thirty-four disposal pits and four shaft fields located at Area G as well as those of proposed future pits and shafts. Only three nuclides, C-14, Tc-99, and I-129, proved to be of concern for the groundwater pathway over a 10,000-year period. The spatial and temporal flux of these three nuclides from the vadose zone is applied as a source term for the three-dimensional saturated zone model of the main aquifer that underlies the site. The movement of these nuclides in the aquifer to a downstream location is calculated, and aquifer concentrations are converted to doses. Doses related to aquifer concentrations are six or more orders of magnitude lower than allowable Department of Energy performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste sites. Numerical studies were used to better understand vadose-zone flow through the dry mesa-top environment at Area G. These studies helped define the final model used to model flow and transport through the vadose zone. The study of transient percolation indicates that a steady flow vadose-zone model is adequate for computing contaminant flux to the aquifer. The fracture flow studies and the investigation of the effect of basalt and pumice properties helped us define appropriate hydrologic properties for the modeling. Finally, the evaporation study helped to justify low infiltration rates.

Kay H. Birdsell; Kathleen M. Bower; Andrew V. Wolfsberg; Wendy E. Soll; Terry A. Cherry; Tade W. Orr

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G. [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Perched-Water Evaluation for the Deep Vadose Zone Beneath the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms Area of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located a few meters above the water table within the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms area. The perched water contains elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99. This perched-water zone is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. The study described in this report was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and 3) associated groundwater impact.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Beneath the Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beneath the Surface is a collection of seven individual literary nonfiction essays. Five of the essays are personal essays, and three come from the author's (more)

Dienes, Susanna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Melting Snowflakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many snowflakes in various melting stages were directly sampled at the, ground in almost the same way as described by Knight. From these observations the degrees of melting of snowflakes are classified into five stages. Breakup behavior of ...

Yasushi Fujiyoshi

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Melting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...iron. In recent years, great improvements in energy efficiency have been realized by constructing these pots from ceramic material and using either gas or electric immersion heaters to supply heat to the bath. If a central melting facility is used, liquid casting alloy is delivered either by ladle or by using...

14

Subduction Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subduction Zone Subduction Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Subduction Zone Dictionary.png Subduction Zone: A tectonic process in which one tectonic plate is forced beneath another and sinks into the mantle as the plates converge Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip A classic cartoon illustrating a typical simplified subduction zone. http://www.columbia.edu/~vjd1/subd_zone_basic.htm Subduction zones occur where one tectonic plate is pulled under another. Most often the subducting plate is oceanic crust and contains many hydrous minerals. As the oceanic plate subducts it dewaters into the mantle,

15

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mud eruptions, and red hot glows on the crater wall. Temporal variations in the geomagnetic field observed around the craters of Naka-dake also indicate that thermal...

16

Settling of Particles beneath Water Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considered here is the motion of small particles beneath irrotational water waves. The added mass and inertial forces are shown to be an important role in the mean transport of particles. To leading order, particles are transported with a mean ...

Ian Eames

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Temperature Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations Along Geotraverses Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Temperature Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations Along Geotraverses Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: 2D and 3D modeling of the geothermal field was carried out along seven extended geotraverses in the Barents Sea compiled on the basis of CMP profiling and results of deep drilling. Depths of the zone characterized by catagenetic transformation of organic matter were calculated for different areas of the sedimentary basin. The minimal depth is confined to the South Barents Basin with the highest hydrocarbon resource potential established by geological exploration. In 3D models, this area is distinguished by a

18

Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

Till, Christy B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Fingers of Heat Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface volcanic-hotspots1.jpg Why it Matters: A key mission for the Office of Basic Energy Science is related to new methods and techniques for geosciences imaging from the atomic scale to the kilometer scale. Geophysical imaging methods are needed to measure and monitor subsurface reservoirs for hydrocarbon production or for carbon dioxide storage resulting from large-scale carbon sequestration schemes. Key Challenges: Development of new approaches for regional and global seismic tomography using high-accuracy numerical schemes that treat wave propagation through complex 3D models of earth structure directly with spectral element methods. Accomplishments: A new, cutting-edge method for global seismic imaging that

20

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University;...

22

The effect of fluid acceleration on sediment transport in the surf zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surf zone is defined by highly non-linear, breaking waves that have very different acceleration signatures beneath their respective crests and troughs. The consequences of this dissimilarity on sediment transport is ...

Durham, William McKinney

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

24

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about...

25

Improved MK42 Melting Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Mark 42 melting model has been defined for establishing confinement protection limits (CPLs). This report describes the new melting model and its application in computing CPLs.

Tudor, A.A.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands May 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - As a complementary document to the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada issued in November 2008, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has now released a report that provides an initial estimate of the potential to store carbon dioxide (CO2) underneath millions of acres of Federal lands. The report, Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands, estimates and characterizes the storage potential that lies beneath some of the more than 400 million acres of Federal land available for lease.

27

Zone refining of plutonium metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

Blau, M.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dense Water Formation beneath a Time-Dependent Coastal Polynya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modeling studies of dense water formation beneath an idealized steady coastal polynya have provided simple analytical expressions for the maximum density anomaly achievable as a function of the polynya geometry and the imposed surface ...

David C. Chapman

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

PYROMETALLURGY AND MELTING PRACTICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental technique has been devised for studying the reaction kinetics of the ... The system investigated was similar to the lead blast furnace slag which is ... Characterization of the recovered metal demonstrates that the performance of ... problems associated with oxygen combustion in aluminum melting furnaces.

30

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone Sediments at the Hanford 300 collected beneath the former North Process Pond (NPP) in the 300 Area of the Hanford site (Washington the Hanford site in the state of Washington (U.S.). The 300 Area is one of many

31

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

32

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity (Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15_15 km) are reliably

33

Dorchester County- Renewable Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dorchester County zoning codes specifically permit solar arrays and small wind turbines in many zoning districts.

34

Geochemical Characterization Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank (SST) farms at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical information available for the vadose zone beneath the SST farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mantle transition zone beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary and its tectonic implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-velocity anomalies (HVAs). As schematically shown in Fig. 1, the shape and location of the HVAs associated

Niu, Fenglin

37

Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industrial sector increasingly relies on electric furnaces for nonferrous metal melting due to declining electricity cost, greater use of recycled secondary nonferrous materials, and tightened environmental regulations. This Nonferrous Metal Melting -- Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel perform a progressive analysis of electrotechnology applications in nonferrous metal melting systems. The kit is designed for utility personnel who have limited knowledge of the no...

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI;...

39

Superalloy Melting and Cleanliness Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

are achievable. The VAR solidification rate can be controlled by the melt rate with the large heat sink of the water cooled copper crucible producing a relatively.

40

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Student Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Zone Student Zone Homework Helpers All About Atoms - Learn about the parts of the atom! Virginia State Standards of Learning Practice Tests - Practice taking the SOL tests! Subjects currently include algebra, math, science and technology. Table of Elements - Basic physical and historical information about the elements! [Printable Version] Questions and Answers - Have a question? Need an answer? Check here first! Glossary of Science Terms - Definitions of some of the terms used on this site. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour - How do scientists explore inside atoms? Video Resources Frostbite Theater - Short science experiments using liquid nitrogen, static electricity and more! Physics Out Loud - Jefferson Lab scientists and other experts explain some of the common words and terms used in nuclear physics research.

42

Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Internal Structure Of Puna Ridge- Evolution Of The Submarine East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Multichannel seismic reflection, sonobuoy, gravity and magnetics data collected over the submarine length of the 75 km long Puna Ridge, Hawaii, resolve the internal structure of the active rift zone. Laterally continuous reflections are imaged deep beneath the axis of the East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea Volcano. We interpret these reflections as a layer of abyssal sediments lying beneath the volcanic edifice of Kilauea. Early

43

High gain photoconductive semiconductor switch having tailored doping profile zones  

SciTech Connect

A photoconductive semiconductor switch with tailored doping profile zones beneath and extending laterally from the electrical contacts to the device. The zones are of sufficient depth and lateral extent to isolate the contacts from damage caused by the high current filaments that are created in the device when it is turned on. The zones may be formed by etching depressions into the substrate, then conducting epitaxial regrowth in the depressions with material of the desired doping profile. They may be formed by surface epitaxy. They may also be formed by deep diffusion processes. The zones act to reduce the energy density at the contacts by suppressing collective impact ionization and formation of filaments near the contact and by reducing current intensity at the contact through enhanced current spreading within the zones.

Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Zutavern, Fred J (Albuquerque, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Edgewood, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Denison, Gary J. (Sandia Park, NM); Brown, Darwin J. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM); Hou, Hong Q. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NETL: News Release - A Climate Change Solution Beneath our Feet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2002 13, 2002 A Climate Change Solution Beneath Our Feet? Energy Department Joins AEP, Battelle to Study Deep Geologic Reservoirs for Greenhouse Gas Storage NEW HAVEN, WV - Deep beneath much of the United States lie rock formations containing waters far too salty for human consumption. Long overlooked, these brine-filled reservoirs are now attracting new interest as possible "storage sites" for greenhouse gases emitted from power plants. Graphic - Map of U.S. Saline Aquifers Deep saline formations underlie much of the United States including many areas where power plants are concentrated. [Click on map for larger image.] The U.S. Department of Energy has given the go-ahead to a research team headed by American Electric Power (AEP) and Battelle to begin studying

45

Zone refining of plutonium metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

49

Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

Han, Q.; Das, S.K. (Secat, Inc.)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

Elkins, Lynne J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Technology Zones (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Virginias 26 designated Technology Zones offer tax relief in the form of abatements, credits, deductions, deferrals, exemptions, or rebates. Local governments may designate technology zones to...

54

Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage of Captured Carbon Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands May 8, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1358 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

55

Electron Beam Melting: The New Directional Solidification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Electron Beam Melting:...

56

Observations of the mid-mantle discontinuity beneath Indonesia from S to P converted waveforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the mid-mantle discontinuity beneath Indonesia from S to P converted waveforms a coherent discontinuity structure beneath Indonesia. Analysis of data recorded by three regional arrays from Indonesia from S to P converted waveforms, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L04302, doi:10.1029/2005GL025106. 1

Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

57

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Earth Planets Space, 50, 965975, 1998 Determination of the absolute depths of the mantle transition zone discontinuities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-velocityanomalies(hereafterreferred to as HVAs) are found in the mantle transition zone depths beneath the eastern China. The HVAs, which extend that the real lateral scale of HVAs may be smaller. The HVAs are generally believed to be colder than within the cold interior of the HVAs. Therefore, a detailed topographic map of the `660-km' discontinuity

Niu, Fenglin

59

Intermittent upwelling of asthenosphere beneath the Gregory Rift, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

K-Ar dates and chemical compositions of basalts in the Gregory Rift, Kenya, demonstrate marked secular variation of lava chemistry. Two magmatic cycles characterized by incompatible element relative depletion are recognized; both occurring immediately after the peak of basaltic volcanism and coeval with both trachyte/phonolite volcanism and domal uplift of the region. These cycles may be attributed to increasing degree of partial melting of mantle source material in association with thinning of the lithosphere by thermal erosion through contact with hot upwelling asthenospheric mantle. Cyclic variation in asthenosphere upwelling may be considered an important controlling process in the evolution of the Gregory Rift.

Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki (Univ. of Tasmania (Australia) Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Kimura, Nobukazu (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Itaya, Tetsumaru (Okayama Univ. of Science (Japan)); Koyaguchi, Takehiro (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)); Suwa, Kanenori (Nagoya Univ. (Japan))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

MODIFIED ZONE METHOD CALCULATOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone Method is recommended for R-value calculations in steel stud walls by the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals ASHRAE 1997. The Modified Zone Method is similar to the...

62

Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job...

63

Reinvestment Zones (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reinvestment Zones a local economic development tool used by municipalities and counties throughout the state of Texas. These zones can be created for the purpose of granting local businesses ad...

64

ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Subtype A Subtype B Subtype C Climate Zone Number 1 Zone 1A Zone 1B NA Climate Zone Number 2 Zone 2A Zone 2B NA Climate Zone...

65

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles,

67

Surface Wave Propagation in Shallow Water beneath an Inhomogeneous Ice Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of flexuralgravity waves in a layer of shallow fluid beneath an ice cover with irregularities is investigated. The irregularities considered are the ice edges, cracks, areas of finely broken ice, and ice ridges. Even this ...

A. V. Marchenko; K. I. Voliak

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evolution of upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau from P-wave tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of the research presented in this thesis is to improve our understanding for the evolution of the upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau through high resolution P-wave tomography. The ...

Li, Chang, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of processing TiAl by additive manufacturing by using the selective electron beam melting (SEBM) provides a new approach to reach near

70

Mechanical Behavior of Melt Mixing Polypropylene Organoclay ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the effect of the nanocomposite dispersion and morphology, another nanocomposite was prepared by melt mixing of polypropylene and a modified...

71

Flux Lattice in Superconductors and Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our early data suggested that there was a melting transition to a "vortex liquid" in high temperature superconductors, but it's possible relation to the ...

72

Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrical resistivity of oxide melts is important for the design and operation of electric furnaces. The electrical properties of glass and slag...

73

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Two-zone countercurrent smelter system and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for continuously smelting iron ore by use of coal to yield molten iron or semi-steel is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of establishing a melt covered by slag; inducing the slag and the molten iron to flow countercurrently to one another, toward opposite ends of the smelter; maintaining iron oxide-reducing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the slag flows; maintaining carbon-oxidizing conditions in that zone of the smelter towards which the molten iron flows; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the slag from the reducing zone end of the smelter; continuously or semicontinuously tapping the molten iron from the oxidizing zone end of the smelter; and adding to both zones iron ore, coal, oxygen, and flux at addition rates sufficient to keep the molten iron in the reducing zone substantially saturated with carbon, maintain in the slag being tapped an FeO content of about 5 weight percent or less, and maintain in the molten iron being tapped a carbon content of about 0.5 to 5 weight percent. A slag dam preferably is included in the smelter, to impede the backflow of the slag from the reducing zone to the oxidizing zone. A metal bath dam with one or more flow-through portals also is preferably used, submerged below the slag dam, to impede the backflow of the hot metal. 8 figures.

Cox, J.H.; Fruehan, R.J.; Elliott, J.F.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

77

Renaissance Zones (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Renaissance Zones allow qualifying businesses and individuals to claim one or more tax incentives for purchasing, leasing, or making improvements to real property located in a North Dakota...

78

Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Schneider, Ken C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Seismic And Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, From Seismic And Gravity Data Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Two seismic refraction surveys were carried out in 1976 and 1977 on the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano as part of an exploratory program for geothermal resources. The short traverse seismic refraction survey of January 1976 delineated the upper surface structure of the east rift, revealing velocities of 2.5 km/s under the Kalapana line and 3.1 km/s under the Leilani line beneath a surface layer of low, but variable velocity. This survey was not successful in determining the depth of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Front Tracking Model of Simultaneous Melting and Solidification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This results in dynamic melting and solidification throughout the weld pool, which can be modelled using the authors' Front Tracking algorithm. Melting is...

82

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice, 1946 - Title Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement and Control of Temperatures in Smelting, Refining and. Melting Nonferrous Metals. By P. H. DIKE and M. J. BRADLEY .... I. Melting of Brass and...

83

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice, 1946 (Electronic Format)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Ferrous Melting Practice examines the melting of brass, bronze, copper alloys, nickel, magnesium, aluminum, lead, and tin. This title also has information

84

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Title Heat transfer in excimer laser melting of thin polysilicon layers Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

85

Molecular stretching in polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular stretching in polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow. Kell Mortensen Centre DTU, Lyngby, Denmark The molecular stretching of a polymer melt undergoing steady elongational

86

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of

87

Oxygen Permeable Solid/Melt Composite Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic Behavior of Silicon (?) in BaF2-CaF2 SiO2 Melts ... Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Uranium Chloride in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic.

88

Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equal interface energies with the matrix. The two shadedat 0.5 J/m 2 Ge-matrix interface energy. The melting plateauare the interface energies between the matrix and the liquid

Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Model of Pulsed Laser Melting 2.1 Experimental Systemto be Modeled 2.2 Laser Absorption . . . . . . . . . . .a prototypical 0.3 J/cm 2 laser ?uence PLM at 0.5 J/m 2 Ge-

Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement  

SciTech Connect

Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PIƒ ƒ ‚ ¢ƒ ‚ ‚ € ƒ ‚ ‚ ™ s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

RADIATION HAZARDS ENCOUNTERED IN ARC MELTING THORIUM  

SciTech Connect

A project to provide information on the hazards associated wlth arc melting of Th is described. A general airsampling analysis was made to determine the separation, concentration, and distribution of Th daughter (decay) products throughout arc melting, machining, and forging processes found in a handling facility. The value of well coordinated health physics program is stressed in connection with potential health hazards and personnel protection. Building, equipment, and exhaust ventilation requirements for such a facility are discussed, along wlth special handling methods. (auth)

Lowery, R.R.

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

Stone, M.E.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOEs most...

95

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

96

Keystone Opportunity Zones (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Keystone Opportunity Zones allows businesses located within designated areas to qualify for a tax exemption, deduction, credit, or abatement of state and local taxes such as sales and use tax,...

97

Queen Anne's County- Solar Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Queen Anne's County zoning code allows for ground mounted solar arrays in areas zoned as "open space," "agricultural," and "countryside" districts.

98

Modeling Tidal Current Profiles and Vertical Mixing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the warmest water masses beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf (FRIS) is dense, high salinity shelf water (HSSW) that flows into the sub-ice-shelf cavity from the ice front and occupies the lower portion of the water column. A one-dimensional ...

Keith Makinson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Adaptation of an Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model for the Study of Circulation beneath Ice Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the Antarctic coastline comprises large, floating ice shelves, beneath which waters from the open ocean circulate. The interaction of the seawater with the base of these ice shelves has a bearing both on the rate at which Antarctic Bottom ...

David M. Holland; Adrian Jenkins

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spatial variation of seismic b-values beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19 April 2006 Editor: S. King Abstract The frequency­magnitude distribution was spatially mapped]. Makushin has had several small steam and ash emissions since it's dis- covery. Little is known about the magma distribution in the crust beneath Makushin. The purpose of the study is to provide constraints

Gao, Stephen Shangxing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Distribution of magma beneath the Toba caldera complex, north Sumatra, Indonesia, constrained by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution of magma beneath the Toba caldera complex, north Sumatra, Indonesia, constrained and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia R. McCaffrey, D. A. Wark, and S. W. Roecker Department of Earth@rpi.edu) Fauzi and G. Ibrahim Meteorological and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia (fauzi@bmg.go.id) Sukhyar

McCaffrey, Robert

102

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leadking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situe mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment.

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and coastal zone management  

SciTech Connect

Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are expected to warm the earth several degrees in the next century by a mechanism known as the greenhouse effect. Such a warming could cause sea level to rise two to five feet by expanding ocean water, melting mountain glaciers, and perhaps eventually causing polar glaciers to melt and slide into the oceans. A rise in sea level of even three feet could cause substantial erosion of beaches and coastal wetlands, increased flooding, and intrusion of salt water into rivers, bays, and aquifer. Fortunately, many of the adverse consequences can be avoided by taking timely measures in anticipation of sea level rise. Nevertheless, many coastal zone managers are reluctant to take these measures until the prospect of sea level rise becomes more certain. This article examines the implications of future sea level rise and identifies anticipatory measures that may be appropriate today in spite of current uncertainties. 46 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Titus, J.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Silicon purification melting for photovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability of polysilicon feedstock has become a major issue for the photovoltaic (PV) industry in recent years. Most of the current polysilicon feedstock is derived from rejected material from the semiconductor industry. However, the reject material can become scarce and more expensive during periods of expansion in the integrated-circuit industry. Continued rapid expansion of the PV crystalline-silicon industry will eventually require a dedicated supply of polysilicon feedstock to produce solar cells at lower costs. The photovoltaic industry can accept a lower purity polysilicon feedstock (solar-grade) compared to the semiconductor industry. The purity requirements and potential production techniques for solar-grade polysilicon have been reviewed. One interesting process from previous research involves reactive gas blowing of the molten silicon charge. As an example, Dosaj et all reported a reduction of metal and boron impurities from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with 0{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2}. The same authors later reassessed their data and the literature, and concluded that Cl{sub 2}and 0{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2} gas blowing are only effective for removing Al, Ca, and Mg from the silicon melt. Researchers from Kawasaki Steel Corp. reported removal of B and C from silicon melts using reactive gas blowing with an 0{sub 2}/Ar plasma torch. Processes that purify the silicon melt are believed to be potentially much lower cost compared to present production methods that purify gas species.

VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; HO,PAULINE; GEE,JAMES M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

GOES Observation of a Rapidly Melting Snowband  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GOES observation of rapid dissipation of a 510 cm (24 inches) depth snowband over the central and upper Mississippi River valley on 15 April 1980 is presented. Differences in the local weather between the stations with and without melting snow ...

Carlyle H. Wash; Delain A. Edman; John Zapotocny

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A New Look at the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors derive a relationship between the vertical Doppler spectrum of the rain just below the radar bright band and that of the snow just above. It neglects vertical air motions and assumes that each snowflake simply melts to form a raindrop ...

Fiona J. Drummond; R. R. Rogers; S. A. Cohn; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; J. S. Wilson

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Accommodation Zone Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone: Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones

110

The Thermal Balance in the Melted Material Zone of the Electrical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

111

The Melting Layer: A Laboratory Investigation of Ice Particle Melt and Evaporation near 0C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting, freezing, and evaporation of individual and aggregates of snow crystals are simulated in the laboratory under controlled temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity. Crystals of selected habit are grown on a vertical filament and ...

R. G. Oraltay; J. Hallett

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Soil carbon dynamics beneath switchgrass as indicated by stable isotope analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface (0--40 cm) soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics were studied beneath four switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) field trails in the southeastern US. Soil organic carbon was partitioned into particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM). Most (75--90%) of the SOC at each study site was affiliated with MOM (<0.053 mm). Changes in stable carbon isotope ratios were used to derive carbon inputs to and losses from POM and MOM at each site. Inventories of existing SOC and new C{sub 4}-derived SOC beneath switchgrass decreased with increasing soil depth. Approximately 5 yr after establishment, 19 to 31% of the existing SOC inventories beneath switchgrass had been derived from new C{sub 4}-carbon inputs. Calculated turnover times of POM and MOM ranged from 2.4 to 4.3 yr and 26 to 40 yr, respectively. The turnover time of SOC in the POM fraction increased with decreasing mean annual temperature. A simple, two-compartment model was parameterized to predict the potential for soil carbon sequestration under switchgrass. An example calculation with the model indicated a measurable and verifiable recovery of soil carbon (=12% increase) on degraded lands through one decade of switchgrass production. The potential to sequester carbon through switchgrass cultivation will depend on initial soil carbon inventories, prevailing climate, soil types and site management.

Garten, C.T. Jr.; Wullschleger, S.D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Soil carbon dynamics beneath switchgrass as indicated by stable isotope analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface (0-40 cm) soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics were studied beneath four switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) field trials in the southeastern United States. Soil organic carbon was partitioned into particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM). Most (75-90%) of the SOC at each study site was affiliated with MOM (<0.053 mm). Changes in stable carbon isotope ratios were used to derive carbon inputs to and losses from POM and MOM at each site. Inventories of existing SOC and new C4-derived SOC beneath switchgrass decreased with increasing soil depth. Approximately 5 yr after establishment, 19 to 31% of the existing SOC inventories beneath switchgrass had been derived from new C{sub 4}-carbon inputs. Calculated turnover times of POM and MOM ranged from 2.4 to 4.3 yr and 26 to 40 yr, respectively. The turnover time of SOC in the POM fraction increased with decreasing mean annual temperature. A simple, two-compartment model was parameterized to predict the potential for soil carbon sequestration under switchgrass. An example calculation with the model indicated a measurable and verifiable recovery of soil carbon ({approx}12% increase) on degraded lands through one decade of switchgrass production. The potential to sequester carbon through switchgrass cultivation will depend on initial soil carbon inventories, prevailing climate, soil type, and site management.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Salinity and hydrodynamics of the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands from electrical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual hydrodynamic model in the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands is described in terms of safety distributions. Porewater safety is calculated from electrical measurements, including resistivity soundings, electric logs, and electromagnetic profiling. Electrical measurements support the primary, basin-wide groundwater flow model; however, the data also indicate secondary contributions from expulsion of fluids under geopressure along active growth faults and from original waters of deposition. Expulsion of water from growth faults has been described previously for deeper sections of the Pleistocene, but has not been reported for the Holocene or upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands. Porewater chemistry variations beneath the coastal wetlands are a consequence of the following (in order of importance): (1) environment of deposition; (2) a basin-wide, regional flow system; (3) expulsion from deep-seated growth faults; and (4) pore water extrusion due to compaction. Water chemistry in Holocene clays and muds is influenced primarily by the deposition environment In Pleistocene sands, the chemistry is a function of the other three factors.

McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Kuecher, G.J.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

Lance Prothro

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Zones to Climate Zones to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

117

Rift Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Zone Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rift Zone Dictionary.png Rift Zone: A divergent plate boundary within a continent Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip The Rio Grande Rift exemplifies rift zone tectonics - increased volcanic activity and the formation of graben structures (reference: science-art.com) Rift valleys occur at divergent plate boundaries, resulting in large graben structures and increased volcanism. The East African Rift is an example of a continental rift zone with increased volcanism, while the Atlantic's spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge is host to an enormous amount of geothermal

118

The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

119

Radiant zone heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Experimental studies of melting and crystallization processes in planetary interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting and crystallization processes on the Earth and Moon are explored in this thesis, and the topics of melt generation, transport, and crystallization are discussed in three distinct geologic environments: the Moon's ...

Krawczynski, Michael James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method and apparatus for drawing monocrystalline ribbon from a melt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for drawing a monocrystalline ribbon or web from a melt comprising utilizing a shaping die including at least two elements spaced one from the other each having a portion thereof located below the level of the melt and another portion located above the level of the melt a distance sufficient to form a raised meniscus of melt about the corresponding element.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Schwuttke, Guenter H. (Poughkeepsie, NY)

1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Process Mapping of Melt Pool Dimension Control in Electron Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Process Mapping of Melt...

123

Microstructure of Titanium Alloy Prepared by Selective Laser Melting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solidification in Additive Manufacturing. Presentation Title, Microstructure of Titanium Alloy Prepared by Selective Laser Melting in Vacuum.

124

Microwave Absorption Measurements of Melting Spherical and Nonspherical Hydrometeors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements were made of the absorption behavior of melting and freezing hydrometeors using resonant cavity perturbation techniques at a wavelength of 2.82 cm. Melting ice spheres with equivalent melted diameters between 1.15 and 2.00 mm exhibit ...

Robert John Hansman Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

126

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details...

127

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Core-melt source reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Abrupt grain boundary melting in ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of impurities on the grain boundary melting of ice is investigated through an extension of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, in which we include retarded potential effects in a calculation of the full frequency dependent van der Waals and Coulombic interactions within a grain boundary. At high dopant concentrations the classical solutal effect dominates the melting behavior. However, depending on the amount of impurity and the surface charge density, as temperature decreases, the attractive tail of the dispersion force interaction begins to compete effectively with the repulsive screened Coulomb interaction. This leads to a film-thickness/temperature curve that changes depending on the relative strengths of these interactions and exhibits a decrease in the film thickness with increasing impurity level. More striking is the fact that at very large film thicknesses, the repulsive Coulomb interaction can be effectively screened leading to an abrupt reduction to zero film thickness.

L. Benatov; J. S. Wettlaufer

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

Meihui Wang

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Liquid zone seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Climate Zone 5C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone...

133

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Breathing zone air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

MELTING AND FORMING OF SER FUEL RODS  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-one metal alloy reds were fabricated for the SNAP Experimental Reactor (SER), a compact nuclear power source. These rads were 1 in. in diameter by 10 in. long and consisted of an alloy containing 7 wt.% highly enriched uranium and 93 wt.% zinconium. Melting of the alloy was done by generally accepted consumable-arc meltiag techniques. Extrusion of alloy slugs into rods was carried out, unclad, at 850 deg F. Suitable controls were developed to insure uniformity of products and reproducibility of batches. The procedures developed for this application are considered adequate for future requirements. (auth)

Drennan, P.S.

1960-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Interfacial Transition Zone Bibliography Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Saito, M., and Kawamura, M., Effect of Fly Ash and Slag on the Interfacial Zone Between Cement and Aggregate , in ACI SP 114: Fly Ash, Silica ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

Hein, J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE Solar Decathlon: Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Comfort Zone Contest, teams design their houses to keep temperature and humidity steady, uniform, and comfortable. Full points are awarded for maintaining narrow...

139

Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evolution of shear-induced melting in dusty plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatiotemporal development of melting is studied experimentally in a 2D dusty plasma suspension. Starting with an ordered lattice, and then suddenly applying localized shear, a pair of counter-propagating flow regions develop. A transition between two melting stages is observed before a steady state is reached. Melting spreads with a front that propagates at the transverse sound speed. Unexpectedly, coherent longitudinal waves are excited in the flow region.

Yan Feng; J. Goree; Bin Liu

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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141

Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Surface Melting and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal and non-thermal ultra-fast laser induced surface melting and nanojoining of Ag nanoparticles and nanowires were investigated...

142

Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Transient Melt Pool Response in Wire Feed Electron Beam Direct ... Abstract Scope, Wire feed electron beam direct digital manufacturing...

143

Energy Efficient Operation of Secondary Aluminum Melting Furnaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2007 ... Energy Efficient Operation of Secondary Aluminum Melting Furnaces by P.E. King, J.J. Hatem, and B.M. Golchert...

144

Production and Handling Slide 21: Melting Points of Uranium and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Uranium and Uranium Compounds Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Melting Points of Uranium and Uranium...

145

The Present Status of Melting Technology for Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the section. The availability of such larger pieceweights in Alloy. 718 could quite. CONCLUSION. Over the long development of melting techniques for Alloy 718,.

146

Melting and Refining Technology of High-Temperature Steels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n outlook into the future position of the various melting and .... Inert Gas carburization. Continuous Casting. In Reactor Vessel: - Inert Gas a Arc Remelting (PAR).

147

The Effects of Withdrawal and Melt Overheating Histories on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roger C. Reed, Kenneth A. Green, Pierre Caron, Timothy P. Gabb, Michael G. Fahrmann, Eric ..... of physical or chemical properties of the melt, such as diffusive.

148

Crystal-melt interfacial Properties of HCP Metals by Molecular ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Crystal-melt interfacial properties were studied by molecular dynamics simulations using different MEAM and EAM interatomic potentials for Mg,...

149

A15: Relation between Melting and Hydrogen Desorption ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, we investigated the melting temperatures and hydrogen desorption properties of LiBH4-NaBH4 mixtures with various compositions,...

150

Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Wasteforms for an Advanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Wasteforms for an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Author(s), Kyle S Brinkman, Jake Amoroso, Kevin Fox,...

151

PDF PRIMER: Secondary Melting Processes for Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... Secondary melting of superalloy stock is required to improve chemical homogeneity and reduce levels of inclusions. This primer describes the...

152

The Melting of Ice in Cold Stratified Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the melting of ice in cold water vertically stratified with salt. The study extends previous investigations of ice melting in cold water at uniform salinity and in warm water with a salinity gradient. We find, in agreement with the ...

Herbert E. Huppert; Edward G. Josberger

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Study on the Gasification and Melting Characteristics of Electronic Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment) or electronic waste is an important issue in the whole world. Its gasification and melting characteristics were studied here. The experiments proved that over 50% of WEEE ... Keywords: WEEE, electronic waste, gasification, pyrolysis, melting

Wenlong Wang; Jing Sun; Chunyuan Ma; Yong Dong; Zhiqiang Wang; Xiren Xu; Zhanlong Song

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Climate Zone 1B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 1 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 1B is defined as Dry with...

155

Climate Zone 8B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 8 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 8B is defined as Subarctic...

156

Climate Zones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of annual precipitation and where one or both of the following occur: A 67°F (19.5°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 3,000 or more hours during the warmest 6 consecutive months of the year; or A 73°F (23°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 1,500 or more

157

Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Local Government StateProvincial Govt Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home...

158

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (5) Power Plants (0) Projects...

159

Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zone ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ..... 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 ...

160

Large-Scale Oceanographic Constraints on the Distribution of Melting and Freezing under Ice Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies suggest that ice shelves experience asymmetric melting and freezing. Topography may constrain oceanic circulation (and thus basal meltfreeze patterns) through its influence on the potential vorticity (PV) field. However, melting ...

Christopher M. Little; Anand Gnanadesikan; Robert Hallberg

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Climate Zones defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standards. Pages in category "ASHRAE Climate Zones" The following 30 pages are in this category, out of 30 total. C Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C C cont. Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Climate Zone Number 1 C cont. Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 8 Climate Zone Subtype A Climate Zone Subtype B Climate Zone Subtype C Retrieved from

164

Melting of Aluminum by Electricity: A Review of Operating Practice and Discussion of Cost Factors for Melting Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, about 10 million tons of aluminum ingot and various forms of scrap were melted to produce a variety of products. The majority of the aluminum was melted in oil or natural gas-fired furnaces. However, as old gas-fired furnaces are being replaced or capacity is being increased, consideration is being given to electric-fired furnaces to obtain more energy efficient melting and increased yield of product. The purpose of this report is to acquaint the reader with the various types of commercial elect...

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radar Observations and Simulation of the Melting Layer of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The melting layer in precipitation is physically modeled and compared with high resolution Doppler radar data. The model includes a new formulation of the dielectric properties and can handle all ice particles with densities ranging from pure ...

Wim Klaassen

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Stripe melting and quantum criticality in correlated metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study theoretically quantum melting transitions of stripe order in a metallic environment, and the associated reconstruction of the electronic Fermi surface. We show that such quantum phase transitions can be continuous ...

Mross, David Fabian

167

Modeling Forest Cover Influences on Snow Accumulation, Sublimation, and Melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive, physically based model of snow accumulation, redistribution, sublimation, and melt for open and forested catchments was assembled, based on algorithms derived from hydrological process research in Russia and Canada. The model was ...

A. N. Gelfan; J. W. Pomeroy; L. S. Kuchment

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the Estimation of Antarctic Iceberg Melt Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of Antarctic iceberg melt rates made from field observations, iceberg distribution statistics, laboratory experiments and theoretical studies give a wide range of values. Evaluation of the errors associated with each method allows for ...

Steve Neshyba; Edward G. Josberger

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Rhyolite magma degassing: an experimental study of melt vesiculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

quires studying the separation of gas from melt in high- ly viscous liquids ..... been measured as a function of temperature on a natural rhyolite sample ( cylindrical ..... In general, bubble loss at constant foam volume has two sources: ( a) coal-.

170

Apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO); Hurd, Jeffery L. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Structure of Glass-Forming Melts - Lanthanide in Borosilicates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past few years, we studied several complex Na2O-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass systems to answer key questions: effects of melt chemistry on solubility of lanthanide oxides; lanthanide solution behavior, and intermediate-range ordering in the melts. This paper summarizes our currently understanding on rare earth elements in borosilicate glasses, covering solution behavior, solubility limits, crystalization and phase separation.

Li, Hong; Li, Liyu; Qian, Morris; Strachan, Denis M.; Wang, Zheming

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method and apparatus for melt growth of crystalline semiconductor sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical method is presented for forming thin sheets of crystalline silicon suitable for use in a photovoltaic conversion cell by solidification from the liquid phase. Two spatially separated, generally coplanar filaments wettable by liquid silicon and joined together at the end by a bridge member are immersed in a silicon melt and then slowly withdrawn from the melt so that a silicon crystal is grown between the edge of the bridge and the filaments.

Ciszek, T.F.; Hurd, J.L.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

John Crepeau

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy  

SciTech Connect

The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: BY Tank Farm report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the contamination distributed in the vadoze zone sediment beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information about the vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the BY Tank Farm.

Kos, S.E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Blind Benchmark Calculations for Melt Spreading in the ECOSTAR Project  

SciTech Connect

The Project ECOSTAR (5. EC Framework Programme) on Ex-Vessel Core Melt Stabilisation Research is oriented towards the analysis and mitigation of severe accident sequences that could occur in the ex-vessel phase of a postulated core melt accident. Spreading of the corium melt on the available basement surface is an important process, which defines the initial conditions for concrete attack and for the efficiency of cooling in case of water contact, respectively. The transfer and spreading of the melt on the basement is one of the major issues in ECOSTAR. This is addressed here by a spreading code benchmark involving a large-scale spreading experiment that is used for the validation of the existing spreading codes. The corium melt is simulated by a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO and FeO with a sufficiently wide freezing interval. In the 3-dim benchmark test ECOKATS-1 170 litres of oxide melt are poured onto a 3 m by 4 m concrete surface with a low flow rate of about 2 l/s. From the results of an additional 2-dim channel experiment some basic rheological data (e.g. initial viscosity) are obtained in order to minimise the uncertainty in material properties of the melt. The participating spreading codes CORFLOW (Framatome ANP/FZK), LAVA (GRS), and THEMA (CEA) differ from each other by their focus of modelling and the assumptions made to simplify the relevant transport equations. In a first step both experiments (3-dim/2-dim) are calculated blindly by the participating codes. This serves for an overall assessment of the codes capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with rather unknown material properties. In a second step the 3-dim experiment ECOKATS-1 is recalculated by the codes with the more precise knowledge of the rheological behaviour of the oxide melt in the 2-dim experiment. This, in addition, serves for the validation of the codes' capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with well-known material properties. Based on the benchmark results and taking the specific validation process for each of the three codes applied into account, it is recommended that the spreading issue for reactor safety research be considered closed. (authors)

Spengler, C.; Allelein, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany); Foit, J.J.; Alsmeyer, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 36 40, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M. [CEA, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Artnik, J.; Fischer, M. [Framatome ANP, P.O. Box 32 20, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EVALUATION OF VADOSE ZONE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES TO IMMOBILIZE TECHNETIUM-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site End State Vision document (DOE/RL-2003-59) states: ''There should be an aggressive plan to develop technology for remediation of the contamination that could get to the groundwater (particularly the technetium [{sup 99}Tc])''. In addition, there is strong support from the public and regulatory agencies for the above statement, with emphasis on investigation of treatment alternatives. In July 2004, PNNL completed a preliminary evaluation of remediation technologies with respect to their effectiveness and implementability for immobilization of {sup 99}Tc beneath the BC Cribs in the 200 West Area (Truex, 2004). As a result of this evaluation, PNNL recommended treatability testing of in situ soil desiccation, because it has the least uncertainty of those technologies evaluated in July 2004 (Treatability Test Outline, September 30, 2004). In 2005, DOE-RL and Fluor Hanford convened an independent technical panel to review alternative remediation technologies, including desiccation, at a three-day workshop in Richland, Washington. The panel was composed of experts in vadose-zone transport, infiltration control, hydrology, geochemistry, environmental engineering, and geology. Their backgrounds include employment in academia, government laboratories, industry, and consulting. Their review, presented in this document, is based upon written reports from Hanford, oral presentations from Hanford staff, and each panel members' years of experience in their particular field of expertise. The purpose of this report is to document the panel's evaluation of various treatment alternatives with potential for minimizing contaminant migration in the deep vadose zone at the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The panel was tasked with assessing the most viable and practical approach and making recommendations for testing. The evaluation of vadose-zone treatment alternatives was conducted to be broadly applicable at a variety of locations at Hanford. However, because of limitations of time, the panel was asked to focus on one example, {sup 99}Tc contamination below the BC Cribs and Trenches. It is well recognized that conditions at BC Cribs and Trenches are not the same as those at other Hanford locations, but it was selected so that the panel could develop an understanding of site conditions at one location. The recommendations in this report are not intended to address the regulatory decision process for this site.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama) Alabama) Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs The Enterprise Zone Program provides certain tax incentives to corporations, partnerships and proprietorships that locate or expand within designated Enterprise Zones. In addition to state-level tax incentives, businesses may also receive local tax and non-tax incentives for locating or expanding within a designated Enterprise Zone. Section 5 of the Alabama Enterprise Zone Program offers the following tax incentives: Credit based

182

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 07/12/2006 State Michigan Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 100% abatement of Michigan Business Tax, state education tax, personal and real property taxes, and local income taxes Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation In 2006, Michigan enacted legislation allowing for the creation of Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones (RERZ). Renaissance zones -- renewable energy renaissance zones are just one type -- offer significant tax

183

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Louisiana Economic Development The Enterprise Zone Program is a jobs incentive program providing Louisiana income and franchise tax credits to businesses hiring at least 35% of net, new jobs from targeted groups. Enterprise Zones (EZs) are areas with high unemployment, low income, or a high percentage of residents receiving some

184

Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

J. Conca

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study melting of uranium dioxide (UO2) nanocrystals (NC) isolated in vacuum (i.e. non-periodic boundary conditions) using molecular dynamics (MD) in the approximation of pair potentials and rigid ions. We calculate the size dependence of the temperature and heat of melting, the density jump for crystals of cubic shape and volumes up to 1000 nm^3 (50000 particles). Linear and parabolic extrapolations of these dependences to macroscopic (infinite) size are considered, the parabolic is found to be better suited for the analysis of data on the temperature and the heat of melting. The closest to the modern experimental data estimates of the melting temperature of macrocrystals are obtained using the interaction potentials Goel-08 (2969K), Yakub-09 (3105K) and MOX-07 (3291K). The density jump at melting is well reproduced by Yakub-09 (8.66%) and MOX-07 (7.97%). The heat of fusion for all sets of the potentials considered is found to be underestimated by 50-75%, possibly because of the excluded he...

Boyarchenkov, A S; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program provides business tax credits to businesses that invest, develop, expand, and create jobs in identified Border-Cities Enterprise Zones. Companies may be...

187

Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grant (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grantprovides qualified zone investors with cash grants for industrial, commercial or mixed use property. The grant is equal to 20% of the excess...

188

Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption offers businesses located in such economic development zones a 100 percent sales tax exemption on the purchase of labor and materials to construct or remodel...

189

Investigation of the Effects of Solidification Rate and Melt Hydrogen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DRI Carburization in the Reduction and Transition Zones of a Shaft Furnace MIDREX Type Effect of Casting Speed on Temperature Difference between...

190

Internal zone growth method for producing metal oxide metal eutectic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for preparing a cermet comprises preparing a compact having about 85 to 95 percent theoretical density from a mixture of metal and metal oxide powders from a system containing a eutectic composition, and inductively heating the compact in a radiofrequency field to cause the formation of an internal molten zone. The metal oxide particles in the powder mixture are effectively sized relative to the metal particles to permit direct inductive heating of the compact by radiofrequency from room temperature. Surface melting is prevented by external cooling or by effectively sizing the particles in the powder mixture.

Clark, Grady W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holder, John D. (Knoxville, TN); Pasto, Arvid E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Melt processing of Bi--2212 superconductors using alumina  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Superconducting articles and a method of forming them, where the superconducting phase of an article is Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.y (Bi-2212). Alumina is combined with Bi-2212 powder or Bi-2212 precursor powder and, in order to form an intimate mixture, the mixture is melted and rapidly cooled to form a glassy solid. The glassy solid is comminuted and the resulting powder is combined with a carrier. An alternative to melting is to form the mixture of nanophase alumina and material having a particle size of less than about 10 microns. The powder, with the carrier, is melt processed to form a superconducting article.

Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

KRUGER AA; HRMA P

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for \\textit{in situ} mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facili\\-tated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment. We have previously shown that upon contact with simulated waste tank solutions, Hanford sediments change their mineralogical composition. Certain minerals, i.e., quartz, smectite, and kaolinite, are partially dissolved, and new mineral phases, i.e., the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite, are formed. We have characterized these mineral transformations and clarified the mineral transformation pathways. The new minerals were mainly in the colloidal size fraction (diameter less than 2 mum), had a negative surface charge, and were microporous, meaning they contained small pores. When Cs was present during the formation of the minerals, contaminants, like Cs, could be trapped inside the mineral structure. Transport experiments under water saturated and unsaturated conditions showed that the colloids were mobile in Hanford sediments. As the water saturation of the sediments decreased, the amount of colloids transported also decreased. The colloids had the ability to enhance the migration of the radionuclide Cs; however, Cs initially sorbed to colloids was desorbed during transport through uncontaminated Hanford sediments. The finding that Cs was stripped off the colloids during the transport through uncontaminated sediments implies that colloids will likely not be an effective carrier for Cs, unless the Cs is incorporated into the mineral structure of the colloids such that the radionuclide cannot desorb from the colloids. Nevertheless, it appears that the amount of Cs that can be transported by mobile colloids beneath Hanford waste tanks is limited. Colloids will not be able to move the bulk mass of Cs through the vadose zone at Hanford. Colloid stability studies indicate that Hanford sediment form stable colloidal suspensions when suspended in Hanford sediment pore waters. Colloid stability was assessed by determination of the critical coagulation concentration, i.e., the chemical electrolyte concentration at which colloidal suspensions flocculate and settle out (become unstable). Although in the stable mode, Hanford colloids will settle out of solution after extended periods of time (months to years). Given the low recharge rates at Hanford range, which from near 0 to more than 100 mm/year, and the long travel times for rainwater to reach the groundwater of more than 40 years, it appears that colloidal transport is unlikely to occur if colloids are initially to be suspended close to the soil surface by infiltrating rainwater. However, if preferential flow or transient flow occurs, then colloidal transport may become more important. The results of this project have also led to improvements of our fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions in porous media. We have found that colloid attachment to the liquid-gas interface is not that relevant and that colloids rather attached near the triple phase interface where air, water, and solid phases meet. We have also found that capillary forces are the most dominant forces governing

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy; Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for \\textit{in situ} mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facili\\-tated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment. We have previously shown that upon contact with simulated waste tank solutions, Hanford sediments change their mineralogical composition. Certain minerals, i.e., quartz, smectite, and kaolinite, are partially dissolved, and new mineral phases, i.e., the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite, are formed. We have characterized these mineral transformations and clarified the mineral transformation pathways. The new minerals were mainly in the colloidal size fraction (diameter less than 2 mum), had a negative surface charge, and were microporous, meaning they contained small pores. When Cs was present during the formation of the minerals, contaminants, like Cs, could be trapped inside the mineral structure. Transport experiments under water saturated and unsaturated conditions showed that the colloids were mobile in Hanford sediments. As the water saturation of the sediments decreased, the amount of colloids transported also decreased. The colloids had the ability to enhance the migration of the radionuclide Cs; however, Cs initially sorbed to colloids was desorbed during transport through uncontaminated Hanford sediments. The finding that Cs was stripped off the colloids during the transport through uncontaminated sediments implies that colloids will likely not be an effective carrier for Cs, unless the Cs is incorporated into the mineral structure of the colloids such that the radionuclide cannot desorb from the colloids. Nevertheless, it appears that the amount of Cs that can be transported by mobile colloids beneath Hanford waste tanks is limited. Colloids will not be able to move the bulk mass of Cs through the vadose zone at Hanford. Colloid stability studies indicate that Hanford sediment form stable colloidal suspensions when suspended in Hanford sediment pore waters. Colloid stability was assessed by determination of the critical coagulation concentration, i.e., the chemical electrolyte concentration at which colloidal suspensions flocculate and settle out (become unstable). Although in the stable mode, Hanford colloids will settle out of solution after extended periods of time (months to years). Given the low recharge rates at Hanford range, which from near 0 to more than 100 mm/year, and the long travel times for rainwater to reach the groundwater of more than 40 years, it appears that colloidal transport is unlikely to occur if colloids are initially to be suspended close to the soil surface by infiltrating rainwater. However, if preferential flow or transient flow occurs, then colloidal transport may become more important. The results of this project have also led to improvements of our fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions in porous media. We have found that colloid attachment to the liquid-gas interface is not that relevant and that colloids rather attached near the triple phase interface where air, water, and solid phases meet. We have also found that capillary forces are the most dominant forces governing

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy; Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Gulf of California Rift Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone...

196

Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

197

Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

198

Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

199

Benton County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

200

Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

202

Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

203

Benton County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

204

Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

205

Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

206

Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

207

Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

208

Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

209

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

210

Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

211

Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

212

Benton County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

213

Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

214

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype B + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A +

215

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 2 + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 +

216

Enterprise Zone Program (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia) Georgia) Enterprise Zone Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Enterprise Zone Personal Tax Incentives Property Tax Incentive Provider Georgia Department of Community Affairs The Enterprise Zone Program provides various tax incentives to businesses within designated underdeveloped zones in rural or urban areas. The State Enterprise Zone program intends to improve geographic areas within cities

217

Enterprise Zones (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zones (Iowa) Zones (Iowa) Enterprise Zones (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Enterprise Zone Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority The Enterprise Zones Program is an incentive for business expansion designed to stimulate development by targeting economically distressed areas in Iowa. Through state and local tax incentives, businesses and developers are encouraged to make new investments, and create or retain

218

Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Bauman, T.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Zoned heating and air conditioning system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a zoned heating and air conditioning system comprising: a central air handling system with an air heating means and an air cooling means and a blower connected to an air duct system; thermostats each have heating and cooling set points, respectively associated with and located in different zones of a building; dampers respectively associated with each building zone positioned in the air duct system. Each damper has an open position allowing air into the respective zone from the duct system and a closed position; relay means for connecting one thermostat to the air handling system upon a call for heating or cooling by one thermostat and disconnecting all other thermostats by connecting one thermostat's connections between the thermostat and air handling system. Only one thermostat is connected to the air handling system at a time and the relay means disconnects one thermostat from the air handling system after one thermostat is satisified; and damper actuating means for unlocking each damper in one building zone responsive actuated by a respective zone thermostat connected to the air handling system by the relay means. The damper actuates means including a damper solenoid for each damper located adjacent each damper and connected to a respective zone thermostat. It unlocks each damper in one building zone responsive to being actuated by the respective zone thermostat and unlocks the dampers in one building zone when one thermostat is actuated while preventing the dampers in another thermostat's building zone from unlocking.

Beachboard, S.A.

1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overview: Zoning for Small Wind Turbines  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Overview: Overview: Zoning for Small Wind Turbines Jim Green NREL ASES Small Wind Division Webinar January 17, 2008 2 Zoning Basics * Zoning is one form of land use law * Based on legal principle of "police power:" the power to regulate in order to promote the health, morals, safety, and general welfare of the community * Zoning authority originates from state laws called "zoning enabling legislation" - Standard Zoning Enabling Act, Dept. of Commerce, 1920s * Enabling legislation delegates land use authority to local jurisdictions, "Home Rule" - counties, parishes, boroughs, townships, municipalities, cities, villages, etc. 3 Zoning is Daunting * 3,034 counties (National Association of Counties) * 16,504 townships * 19,429 municipalities (National League of Cities)

222

Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Enterprise Zone Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development Enhanced Enterprise Zones aim at attracting new businesses or promoting an expansion of existing business in Missouri Enhanced Enterprise Zone. Tax credits will be an amount authorized by DED, based on the state economic benefit, supported by the number of new jobs, wages and new capital investment that the project will create. To qualify, individual business eligibility will be determined by the zone, based on creation of

223

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Innovative Semi-Solid Metal (SSM) Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-solid metal (SSM) processing has emerged as an attractive method for near-net-shape manufacturing due to the distinct advantages it holds over conventional near-net-shape forming technologies. These advantages include lower cycle time, increased die life, reduced porosity, reduced solidification shrinkage, improved mechanical properties, etc. SSM processing techniques can not only produce the complex dimensional details (e.g. thin-walled sections) associated with conventional high-pressure die castings, but also can produce high integrity castings currently attainable only with squeeze and low-pressure permanent mold casting processes. There are two primary semi-solid processing routes, (a) thixocasting and (b) rheocasting. In the thixocasting route, one starts from a non-dendritic solid precursor material that is specially prepared by a primary aluminum manufacturer, using continuous casting methods. Upon reheating this material into the mushy (a.k.a. "two-phase") zone, a thixotropic slurry is formed, which becomes the feed for the casting operation. In the rheocasting route (a.k.a. "slurry-on-demand" or "SoD"), one starts from the liquid state, and the thixotropic slurry is formed directly from the melt via careful thermal management of the system; the slurry is subsequently fed into the die cavity. Of these two routes, rheocasting is favored in that there is no premium added to the billet cost, and the scrap recycling issues are alleviated. The CRP (Trade Marked) is a process where the molten metal flows through a reactor prior to casting. The role of the reactor is to ensure that copious nucleation takes place and that the nuclei are well distributed throughout the system prior to entering the casting cavity. The CRP (Trade Marked) has been successfully applied in hyper-eutectic Al-Si alloys (i.e., 390 alloy) where two liquids of equal or different compositions and temperatures are mixed in the reactor and creating a SSM slurry. The process has been mostly used for hypo-eutectic Al-Si alloys (i.e., 356, 357, etc.) where a single melt passes through the reactor. In addition, the CRP (Trade Marked) was designed to be flexible for thixocasting or rheocasting applications as well as batch or continuous casting. Variable heat extraction rates can be obtained by controlling either the superheat of the melt, the temperature of the channel system, or the temperature of the reactor. This program had four main objectives all of which were focused on a mechanistic understanding of the process in order to be able to scale it up, to develop it into a robust process,and for SSM processing to be commercially used.

Diran Apelian

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Phase-field simulations of partial melts in geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diffuse interface description based on a multi-phase-field model for geological grain microstructures is introduced, especially useful in the treatment of partially molten structures. Each grain as well as different phases are represented by individual ... Keywords: Grain growth, Microstructure, Numerical modelling, Partial melt, Phase-field model

Frank Wendler; Jens K. Becker; Britta Nestler; Paul D. Bons; Nicolas P. Walte

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Melting Processes and Solidification in Alloys 718-625  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

much heat loss during teeming.4-6 .... dendritic network which is characteristic of this alloy, interdendritic flow of highly- segregated liquid can ..... F.J. Zanner et al., Observation of Melt rate as a Function of Arc Power, Met Trans. 15B, 1984)...

226

The Impact of Melting Ice on Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice melts when it is in contact with ocean waters that have temperatures above the in situ freezing point. The product is a mixture of meltwater and seawater having properties intermediate between those of the two components. Density is one of ...

Adrian Jenkins

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Decontamination of steel by melt refining: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported that a large amount of metal waste is produced annually by nuclear fuel processing and nuclear power plants. These metal wastes are contaminated with radioactive elements, such as uranium and plutonium. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain level. Because of high cost, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low level contaminated metals. It has been shown by some investigators that a melt refining technique can be used for the processing of the contaminated metal wastes. In this process, contaminated metal is melted wit a suitable flux. The radioactive elements are oxidized and transferred to a slag phase. In order to develop a commercial process it is important to have information on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Therefore, a literature search was carried out to evaluate the available information on the decontamination uranium and transuranic-contaminated plain steel, copper and stainless steel by melt a refining technique. Emphasis was given to the thermodynamics and kinetics of the removal. Data published in the literature indicate that it is possible to reduce the concentration of radioactive elements to a very low level by the melt refining method. 20 refs.

Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the magma beneath melt zones Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters were analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems. These were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1984)&oldid=510800"

229

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

230

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Past Climate Zones U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: climate zone map Return to Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS Return to CBECS Home Page Note:Map updated with corrections,...

231

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Climate Zone U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: climate zones map Note:Map updated with corrections, February 2012 Further Explanation on How Climate Zones are Defined...

232

Implementation Plan for the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Center  

SciTech Connect

The Long-Range Deep Vadose Zone Program Plan was published in October 2010. It summarized the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) state-of-knowledge about the contaminant remediation challenges facing the deep vadose zone (DVZ) beneath the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site and their approach to solving those challenges. Developing an implementation plan is the next step to address the knowledge and capabilities required to solve DVZ challenges when needed. This multi-year plan (FY-11 through FY-20) identifies the short to long-term research, management, and execution plans required to solve those problems facing the DVZ-Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The schedule supporting implementation overlies existing activities and milestones from Hanfords DOE-Environmental Management (EM) end-user projects. Success relies upon multi-project teams focused on coordinated subsurface projects undertaken across the DOE Complex combined with facilitated, problem-focused, research investments implemented through the DVZ-AFRC.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gephart, Roy E.; Triplett, Mark B.; Johnson, Timothy C.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Relationships between geochemistry and structure beneath a palaeo-spreading centre: a study of the mantle section in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mineral/melt partition coe¤cients are the same as those selected by Bedini and Bodinier [57]. Numbers This work has bene¢ted from discussions with R. Bedini, F. Boudier, G. Ceuleneer, C. Dupuy, Ph. Gouze and A

Demouchy, Sylvie

234

The Effect of Bubbles Released from a Melting Ice Wall on the Melt-Driven Convection in Salt Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The buoyancy created by the release of air bubbles from melting glacial ice walls results from both the upward drag of the bubbles and the density defect caused by the steady-state distribution of bubbles in the water. Calculations using typical ...

Edward G. Josberger

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final Report for "Experimental Petrology and Chemistry of Volatile-Bearing Silicate Melts"  

SciTech Connect

The goal of Part 1 was the definitive determination of the dependence of the diffusion coefficient for water (DH2O, defined as the diffusion coefficient of total water) in various compositions of silicate melts with respect to water content (CH2O). We measured profiles of CH2O in hydration and diffusion couple experiments by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. DH2O values were determined from the profiles using both direct calculations (Boltzmann-Matano methods) and models assuming specific relationships between DH2O and CH2O (including constant, proportional, and exponential relationships, and a simple speciation model assuming that water molecules are mobile (with constant diffusivity) and hydroxyl groups are immobile). As expected, the constant DH2O model was never the best fit to our diffusion profile data. In order to distinguish among the models with varying diffusion coefficients, all of which require increasing DH2O with increasing CH2O, we ran a series of experiments with small ranges of CH2O, so that we could assume that DH2O was constant. If either the proportional or speciation model holds, then DH2O = 0 at CH2O = 0, whereas the exponential model predicts a finite value for DH2O at CH2O = 0. Results for haplobasalt and haploandesite compositions are consistent with DH2O = exp(DH2O). We have confirmed this conclusion by looking at experiments with very low CH2O, in which we found a finite DH2O= 2-4E-10 m2/s. Using our data and results in the literature over a range of composition (including major elements and water), temperature, and pressure conditions, we defined a general relationship between water diffusivity and viscosity (???????????????·) of silicate liquids. This is an important result, since it allows the calculation of diffusivity for compositions for which there are no measurements. Part 2 is the study of the zonation of P and other elements in olivines: (1) Complex zoning patterns in P in olivines from terrestrial komatiites, basalts, andesites, and dacites and from an SNC (Martian) meteorite are decoupled from zoning in divalent cations. The P zoning patterns can be: (i) P-rich crystal cores with skeletal, hopper, or euhedral shapes; (ii) thin, widely spaced, concentric P-rich zones, especially near crystal rims, and other types of oscillatory zoning; (iii) structures suggesting resorption of P-rich zones and replacement by P-poor olivine; and (iv) sector zoning. Crystallization experiments on a Hawaiian basalt at constant cooling rates produced olivine with many comparable zoning features, demonstrating that they can form by crystal growth during simple cooling histories. Al and Cr zoning can be correlated with P zoning in experiments and in natural crystals. The development of oscillatory zoning in olivine from isothermal experiments or at a constant cooling rate from the liquidus indicates that such zoning in natural samples cannot necessarily be ascribed to changing magmatic conditions. (2) For Sc-doped bulk compositions, most Sc in the experimental olivines substitutes independent of P but up to half participates in a coupled substitution with P in a roughly 5:3 ratio. However results from our 1-atm experiments are consistent with a 1:1 relationship between trivalent cations and P, suggesting that the simple substitution P + M3+ + ???????¢??????????????? = Si + 2M2+ (where M2+ denotes Mg, Fe2+, Mn, Ca, and Ni; M3+ denotes Sc, Al, and Cr; and ???????¢??????????????? denotes a vacancy) is probably the dominant substitution mechanism in Sc- and P-bearing bulk compositions. In the absence of Sc, both molar Al-P and Cr-P plots

Edward M. Stolper

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Final Report for "Experimental Petrology and Chemistry of Volatile-Bearing Silicate Melts"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Part 1 was the definitive determination of the dependence of the diffusion coefficient for water (DH2O, defined as the diffusion coefficient of total water) in various compositions of silicate melts with respect to water content (CH2O). We measured profiles of CH2O in hydration and diffusion couple experiments by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. DH2O values were determined from the profiles using both direct calculations (Boltzmann-Matano methods) and models assuming specific relationships between DH2O and CH2O (including constant, proportional, and exponential relationships, and a simple speciation model assuming that water molecules are mobile (with constant diffusivity) and hydroxyl groups are immobile). As expected, the constant DH2O model was never the best fit to our diffusion profile data. In order to distinguish among the models with varying diffusion coefficients, all of which require increasing DH2O with increasing CH2O, we ran a series of experiments with small ranges of CH2O, so that we could assume that DH2O was constant. If either the proportional or speciation model holds, then DH2O = 0 at CH2O = 0, whereas the exponential model predicts a finite value for DH2O at CH2O = 0. Results for haplobasalt and haploandesite compositions are consistent with DH2O = exp(DH2O). We have confirmed this conclusion by looking at experiments with very low CH2O, in which we found a finite DH2O= 2-4E-10 m2/s. Using our data and results in the literature over a range of composition (including major elements and water), temperature, and pressure conditions, we defined a general relationship between water diffusivity and viscosity (???????????????·) of silicate liquids. This is an important result, since it allows the calculation of diffusivity for compositions for which there are no measurements. Part 2 is the study of the zonation of P and other elements in olivines: (1) Complex zoning patterns in P in olivines from terrestrial komatiites, basalts, andesites, and dacites and from an SNC (Martian) meteorite are decoupled from zoning in divalent cations. The P zoning patterns can be: (i) P-rich crystal cores with skeletal, hopper, or euhedral shapes; (ii) thin, widely spaced, concentric P-rich zones, especially near crystal rims, and other types of oscillatory zoning; (iii) structures suggesting resorption of P-rich zones and replacement by P-poor olivine; and (iv) sector zoning. Crystallization experiments on a Hawaiian basalt at constant cooling rates produced olivine with many comparable zoning features, demonstrating that they can form by crystal growth during simple cooling histories. Al and Cr zoning can be correlated with P zoning in experiments and in natural crystals. The development of oscillatory zoning in olivine from isothermal experiments or at a constant cooling rate from the liquidus indicates that such zoning in natural samples cannot necessarily be ascribed to changing magmatic conditions. (2) For Sc-doped bulk compositions, most Sc in the experimental olivines substitutes independent of P but up to half participates in a coupled substitution with P in a roughly 5:3 ratio. However results from our 1-atm experiments are consistent with a 1:1 relationship between trivalent cations and P, suggesting that the simple substitution P + M3+ + ???????¢??????????????? = Si + 2M2+ (where M2+ denotes Mg, Fe2+, Mn, Ca, and Ni; M3+ denotes Sc, Al, and Cr; and ???????¢??????????????? denotes a vacancy) is probably the dominant substitution mechanism in Sc- and P-bearing bulk compositions. In the absence of Sc, both molar Al-P and Cr-P plots

Edward M. Stolper

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO{sub 2} IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soil gas surveys have been carried out on the Colorado Plateau over areas with natural occurrences of CO{sub 2}. At Farnham Dome, Utah, and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona, proven CO{sub 2} reservoirs occur at 600-800 m depth, but no anomalous soil gas CO{sub 2} flux was detected. Background CO{sub 2} fluxes of up to about 5 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were common in arid, poorly vegetated areas, and fluxes up to about 20 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} were found at Springerville-St. Johns in heavily vegetated, wet ground adjacent to springs. These elevated fluxes are attributed to shallow root zone activity rather than to a deep upflow of CO{sub 2}. Localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} gas flux ({approx} 100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) were documented along the Little Grand Wash Fault Zone near Crystal Geyser, Utah and nearby in Ten Mile Graben, but those in Ten Mile Graben are not directly associated with the major faults. In both areas, features with a visible gas flux are present. Isotopic measurements on the CO{sub 2} gas confirm that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface at Farnham Dome and travertine deposits in the other areas suggests that there has been an outflow of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids in the past. 14C ages of pollen trapped in the travertine at Springerville-St. Johns record a period of CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere between 887 {+-} 35 and 3219 {+-} 30 years BP. No travertine deposits appear to be currently forming. At Springerville-St. Johns, Crystal Geyser and Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water. Movement of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwaters may be the dominant mechanism controlling the mobility of CO{sub 2} today. The very localized nature of the soil gas anomalies, evidence of large scale discharge of CO{sub 2} over a very short period of time and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} will present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2} leakage.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spatial and Temporal Transferability of a Distributed Energy-Balance Glacier Melt Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling melt from glaciers is crucial to assessing regional hydrology and eustatic sea level rise. The transferability of such models in space and time has been widely assumed but rarely tested. To investigate melt model transferability, a ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Gwenn E. Flowers

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled Surface Air Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer surface melting plays an important role in the evolution of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by ...

Jeremy G. Fyke; Lionel Carter; Andrew Mackintosh; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Effect of Melting Processes on the Development of a Tropical and a Midlatitude Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sensitivity tests are performed to assess the effect of melting processes on the development of a midlatitude continental squall line and a tropical oceanic squall line. It is found that melting processes play an important role in the ...

W-K. Tao; J. R. Scala; B. Ferrier; J. Simpson

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Melting Effect as a Factor in Precipitation-Type Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of atmospheric cooling due to melting precipitation is examined to evaluate its contribution to determining precipitation type. The melting effect is typically of second-order importance compared to other processes that influence ...

John S. Kain; Stephen M. Goss; Michael E. Baldwin

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Model of Intense Downdrafts Driven by the Melting and Evaporation of Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ono-dimensioral time-dependent model of a downdraft driven by the melting and evaporation of precipitation and precipitation loading is formulated. Equations for particle melting, particle evaporation, particle concentration, precipitation ...

R. C. Srivastava

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Displacement Transfer Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Displacement Transfer Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Displacement Transfer Zone Dictionary.png Displacement Transfer Zone: Displacement transfer zones facilitate the transfer of strain between normal and strike-slip faults. Intersections between strike-slip faults in the Walker Lane and N- to NNE-striking normal faults commonly host geothermal systems, focused along the normal faults proximal to their dilational intersections with nearby strike-slip faults. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault

244

Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone 5A Zone 5A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 5A is defined as Cool- Humid with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5A climate zones: Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Allen County, Indiana Allen County, Ohio Andrew County, Missouri Antelope County, Nebraska Appanoose County, Iowa Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Arthur County, Nebraska

245

Climate Zone 5B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 5B is defined as Dry with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5B climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Washington Apache County, Arizona Arapahoe County, Colorado Asotin County, Washington Baker County, Oregon Beaver County, Utah Benewah County, Idaho Bent County, Colorado Benton County, Washington Boulder County, Colorado Broomfield County, Colorado Canyon County, Idaho Carson City County, Nevada Cassia County, Idaho Catron County, New Mexico Chelan County, Washington Cheyenne County, Colorado

246

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

247

Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Texas Wide Open for Business The Enterprise Zone Program eligible projects to apply for state sales and use tax refunds on purchases of all taxable items purchased for use at qualified business sites related to the project or activity. The level and amount of refund is related to the capital investment and jobs created at the qualified business site. In addition, local communities must offer incentives to participants under the enterprise zone program, such as tax

248

Climate Zone 3B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 3B is defined as Dry with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3B climate zones: Andrews County, Texas Baylor County, Texas Borden County, Texas Brewster County, Texas Butte County, California Callahan County, Texas Chaves County, New Mexico Childress County, Texas Clark County, Nevada Cochise County, Arizona Coke County, Texas Coleman County, Texas Collingsworth County, Texas Colusa County, California Concho County, Texas Contra Costa County, California Cottle County, Texas Crane County, Texas Crockett County, Texas

249

Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Management Act Zone Management Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Zone Management Act Year 1972 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (CZMA; Pub.L. 92-583, 86 Stat. 1280, enacted October 27, 1972, 16 U.S.C. §§ 1451-1464, Chapter 33) is an Act of Congress passed in 1972 to encourage coastal states to develop and implement coastal zone management plans (CZMPs). This act was established as a United States National policy to preserve, protect, develop, and where possible, restore or enhance, the resources of the Nation's coastal zone for this and succeeding generations. References Wikipedia[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration[2] The U.S. Congress recognized the importance of meeting the challenge of

250

Climate Zone 2A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 2A is defined as Hot - Humid with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2A climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bastrop County, Texas

251

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blending and reaction conditions would be less than 10 centipoises, the effective viscosity of the melt/coal

Vermeulen, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. Efforts have focused on the Farnham Dome field, located in central Utah, the Springerville-St. Johns field in Arizona and New Mexico, and most recently, the Crystal Geyser-Salt Wash graben areas with their CO{sub 2}-charged geysers and springs in central Utah. At both the Springerville-St. Johns field and the central Utah CO{sub 2} spring area, there is evidence of extensive travertine deposits that document release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. At Farnham Dome, calcite debris fields appear to be remnants of vein calcite and an earlier period of fluid leakage. The main achievements during this quarter are (1): preparation for a soil gas flux survey in October at the Crystal Geyser --Little Grand Wash fault zone, and the Salt Wash graben; (2) submission of an abstract to the upcoming Measurement, Monitoring and Verification session at the Fall AGU meeting; (3) submission of an invited abstract to the Gordon Conference on Hydrocarbon Resources; and (4) receipt of initial radiocarbon dates of travertine from the Springerville-St Johns field. Analytical results and interpretations of both the travertine deposition and the soil gas surveys are still in progress, and will be included in future quarterly reports.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil CO{sub 2} flux surveys have been conducted over known CO{sub 2} reservoirs at Farnham Dome, Utah, Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben in Utah and Springerville-St. Johns, Arizona. No anomalous CO{sub 2} flux was detected at the Farnham Dome and Springerville-St. Johns. At Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben, localized areas of anomalously high CO{sub 2} flux ({approx}100 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) occur along a fault zone near visibly degassing features. Isotopic measurements on CO{sub 2} collected from nearby springs indicate that it originated at depth. Evidence of widespread vein calcite at the surface (Farnham Dome) and travertine deposits at the other two areas suggests that discharge of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids has occurred in the past. Despite the lack of evidence for significant present day leakage of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere at Springerville-St. Johns and Crystal Geyser-Ten Mile Graben, there are significant outflows of high-bicarbonate water in both areas suggesting continuous migration of CO{sub 2} in the aqueous phase from depth. The very localized nature of the CO{sub 2} flux anomalies, and the outflow of ground water containing dissolved CO{sub 2} present challenges for effective, long term monitoring of CO{sub 2} leakage.

R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

Enterprise Zone Incentives (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives (Florida) Incentives (Florida) Enterprise Zone Incentives (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Enterprise Zone Incentives encourage business growth within certain geographic areas targeted for economic revitalization. Businesses which create jobs within a designated zone are eligible for several tax incentives, including sales and use tax credit, tax refunds for machinery or equipment, sales tax refund for building materials, and a sales tax exemption for electrical energy

255

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This chapter sets streamside management zones as encompassing a strip at

256

Physical Basis for the Temperature-Based Melt-Index Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close relationship between air temperature measured at standard screen level and the rate of melt on snow and ice has been widely used to estimate the rate of melt. The parameterization of the melt rate using air temperature usually takes a ...

Atsumu Ohmura

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

An Integrated Method for Accurate Determination of Melting in High-Pressure Laser Heating Experiments  

SciTech Connect

We present an integrated approach for melting determination by monitoring several criteria simultaneously. In particular we combine x-ray diffraction observations with the detection of discontinuities in the optical properties by spectroradiometric measurements. This approach significantly increases the confidence of melt identification, especially with low-Z samples. We demonstrate the method with observations of melt in oxygen at 47 and 55 gigapascals.

Benedetti, L R; Antonangeli, D; Farber, D L; Mezouar, M

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

Quantifying the effects of small-scale heterogeneities on fl ow and transport in undisturbed cores from the Hanford formation. Vadose Zone J  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT more than 4 million liters of hazardous and radioactive Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has waste in the vadose zone. Relatively mobile radionuclides such as 99Tc, 129I, U, and 3 been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energys H have traveled further Hanford Reservation, Richland, WA. This paper focuses on quantify- than predicted by current models and have been deing hydrologic processes that control the fate and transport of contami- tected in the groundwater, which eventually flows to nants in the unsaturated sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. the Columbia River (Dirkes and Hanf, 1997; Hartman The experimental approach involved the use of field relevant, longterm unsaturated nonreactive transport experiments in undisturbed sediments from the Hanford Formation. Undisturbed sediment cores were collected from a laminated fine-grained sand unit within the Hanford Formation in both the vertical direction (flow cross bedding) and the horizontal direction (flow bedding parallel). Laboratory-scale saturated and unsaturated flow experiments were conducted using multiple nonreactive tracers to investigate hydrologic processes controlling

M. N. Pace; M. A. Mayes; P. M. Jardine; T. L. Mehlhorn; J. M. Zachara; B. N. Bjornstad

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

260

Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Trough Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was identified as the primary factor that accelerates dross formation specifically in the transition from two phases to three phase growth. Limiting magnesium oxidation on the surface of molten aluminum therefore becomes the key to minimizing melt loss, and technology was developed to prevent magnesium oxidation on the aluminum surface. This resulted in a lot of the work being focused on the control of Mg oxidation. Two potential molten metal covering agents that could inhibit dross formation during melting and holding consisting of boric acid and boron nitride were identified. The latter was discounted by industry as it resulted in Boron pick up by the melt beyond that allowed by specifications during plant trials. The understanding of the kinetics of dross formation by the industry partners helped them understand how temperature, alloy chemistry and furnace atmosphere (burner controls--e.g. excess air) effected dross formation. This enables them to introduce in their plant process changes that reduced unnecessary holding at high temperatures, control burner configurations, reduce door openings to avoid ingress of air and optimize charge mixes to ensure rapid melting and avoid excess oxidation.

Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

MAAP5 BWR Core Melt Progression Model Enhancement Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes proposed enhancements to the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) core melt progression model for BWRs. MAAP is an EPRI-owned and -licensed computer program that simulates the operation of light water and heavy water moderated nuclear power plants for both current and advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs. The Fukushima accidentthe first full-scale accident for a BWR designposes challenges to the current core model that must be addressed.The ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Melt processing of radioactive waste: A technical overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear operations have resulted in the accumulation of large quantities of contaminated metallic waste which are stored at various DOE, DOD, and commercial sites under the control of DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste will accumulate at an increasing rate as commercial nuclear reactors built in the 1950s reach the end of their projected lives, as existing nuclear powered ships become obsolete or unneeded, and as various weapons plants and fuel processing facilities, such as the gaseous diffusion plants, are dismantled, repaired, or modernized. For example, recent estimates of available Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex have suggested that as much as 700,000 tons of contaminated 304L stainless steel exist in the gaseous diffusion plants alone. Other high-value metals available in the DOE complex include copper, nickel, and zirconium. Melt processing for the decontamination of radioactive scrap metal has been the subject of much research. A major driving force for this research has been the possibility of reapplication of RSM, which is often very high-grade material containing large quantities of strategic elements. To date, several different single and multi-step melting processes have been proposed and evaluated for use as decontamination or recycling strategies. Each process offers a unique combination of strengths and weaknesses, and ultimately, no single melt processing scheme is optimum for all applications since processes must be evaluated based on the characteristics of the input feed stream and the desired output. This paper describes various melt decontamination processes and briefly reviews their application in developmental studies, full scale technical demonstrations, and industrial operations.

Schlienger, M.E.; Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: U Tank Farm Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides that are distributed in the vadose zone sediments beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources when possible, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information regarding vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. This information is presently limited to detection of gamma-emitting radionuclides from both natural and man-made sources. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank in a tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the U Tank Farm. Logging operations used high-purity germanium detection systems to acquire laboratory-quality assays of the gamma-emitting radionuclides in the sediments around and below the tanks. These assays were acquired in 59 boreholes that surround the U Tank Farm tanks. Logging of all boreholes was completed in December 1995, and the last Tank Summary Data Report for the U Tank Farm was issued in September 1996.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Prognostic Relationship for Entrainment Zone Thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thickness of the entrainment zone at the top of the atmospheric mixed layer is analyzed using measurements made with a ground-based lidar during the BLX83 and CIRCE field programs. When the entrainment-zone depth normalized by mixed-layer ...

Eric Nelson; Roland Stull; Edwin Eloranta

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climate Zone 7B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 7 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 7A is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7B climate zones: Clear Creek County, Colorado Grand County, Colorado Gunnison County, Colorado Hinsdale County, Colorado Jackson County, Colorado Lake County, Colorado Lincoln County, Wyoming Mineral County, Colorado Park County, Colorado Pitkin County, Colorado Rio Grande County, Colorado Routt County, Colorado San Juan County, Colorado Sublette County, Wyoming Summit County, Colorado Teton County, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_7B&oldid=2161

268

Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied Field Research Initiative Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. Challenge Many vadose zone environments within the DOE complex consist of complex stratified layers of unconsolidated and water-unsaturated sediments that are, in many places, con-

269

Climate Zone 6B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 6B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 6B is defined as Dry with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6B climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Archuleta County, Colorado Bannock County, Idaho Bear Lake County, Idaho Beaverhead County, Montana Big Horn County, Montana Big Horn County, Wyoming

270

Climate Zone 4C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 4C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 4C is defined as Mixed - Marine with IP Units 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units 2000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4C climate zones: Benton County, Oregon Clackamas County, Oregon Clallam County, Washington Clark County, Washington Clatsop County, Oregon Columbia County, Oregon Coos County, Oregon Cowlitz County, Washington Curry County, Oregon Douglas County, Oregon

271

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad tail arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt network. Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method to decrease loss of aluminum and magnesium melts  

SciTech Connect

A method to minimize oxidation of metal during melting processes is provided, the method comprising placing solid phase metal into a furnace environ-ment, transforming the solid-phase metal into molten metal phase having a molten metal surface, and creating a barrier between the surface and the environment. Also provided is a method for isolating the surface of molten metal from its environment, the method comprising confining the molten metal to a controlled atmos-phere, and imposing a floating substrate between the surface and the atmosphere.

Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Calaway, Jr., Wallis F. (Woodridge, IL); Moore, Jerry F. (Naperville, IL); Krumdick, Gregory K. (Crete, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Category:County Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Climate Zones County Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search This category contains county climate zone information in the United States of America. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "County Climate Zones" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 3,141 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

276

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

277

Climate Zone 4A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 4A is defined as Mixed - Humid with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4A climate zones: Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Kentucky Adams County, Ohio Alamance County, North Carolina Albemarle County, Virginia Alexander County, Illinois Alexander County, North Carolina Alexandria County, Virginia Allegany County, Maryland Alleghany County, Virginia Allen County, Kansas Allen County, Kentucky Amelia County, Virginia Amherst County, Virginia Anderson County, Kansas Anderson County, Kentucky

278

Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 4B is defined as Dry with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4B climate zones: Amador County, California Armstrong County, Texas Baca County, Colorado Bailey County, Texas Beaver County, Oklahoma Bernalillo County, New Mexico Briscoe County, Texas Calaveras County, California Carson County, Texas Castro County, Texas Cibola County, New Mexico Cimarron County, Oklahoma Cochran County, Texas Curry County, New Mexico Dallam County, Texas De Baca County, New Mexico Deaf Smith County, Texas

279

Climate Zone 6A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 6A is defined as Cold - Humid with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6A climate zones: Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Alcona County, Michigan Alger County, Michigan Allamakee County, Iowa Allegany County, New York Alpena County, Michigan Androscoggin County, Maine Anoka County, Minnesota Antrim County, Michigan Arenac County, Michigan Aurora County, South Dakota Barron County, Wisconsin Beadle County, South Dakota Belknap County, New Hampshire Bennington County, Vermont

280

Climate Zone 3C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 3C is defined as Warm - Marine with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3C climate zones: Alameda County, California Marin County, California Mendocino County, California Monterey County, California Napa County, California San Benito County, California San Francisco County, California San Luis Obispo County, California San Mateo County, California Santa Barbara County, California Santa Clara County, California Santa Cruz County, California Sonoma County, California Ventura County, California

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 3A is defined as Warm - Humid with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina Anson County, North Carolina Archer County, Texas Arkansas County, Arkansas Ashley County, Arkansas Atoka County, Oklahoma Attala County, Mississippi Autauga County, Alabama Baldwin County, Georgia

282

Observing Surf-Zone Dispersion with Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surf-zone dispersion is studied using drifter observations collected within about 200 m of the shoreline (at depths of less than about 5 m) on a beach with approximately alongshore uniform bathymetry and waves. There were about 70 individual ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen; R. T. Guza; W. E. Schmidt

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

284

Pine Tree Development Zones Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pine Tree Development Zones program offers eligible businesses the chance to reduce, and sometimes eliminate, state taxes for up to ten years. There is a statutory requirement of hiring a...

285

Climate Zone Number 8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Climate Zone Number 8 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE...

286

Climate Zone 1A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Climate Zone 1A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE...

287

Seismic imaging of the mantle transition zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we developed a generalized Radon transform of SS precursors for large-scale, high-resolution seismo-stratigraphy of the upper mantle transition zone. The generalized Radon transform (GRT) is based on the ...

Cao, Qin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 2B is defined as Dry with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2B climate zones: Bandera County, Texas Dimmit County, Texas Edwards County, Texas Frio County, Texas Imperial County, California Kinney County, Texas La Paz County, Arizona La Salle County, Texas Maricopa County, Arizona Maverick County, Texas Medina County, Texas Pima County, Arizona Pinal County, Arizona Real County, Texas Uvalde County, Texas Val Verde County, Texas Webb County, Texas Yuma County, Arizona Zapata County, Texas Zavala County, Texas Retrieved from

289

Definition: Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin, Western USA. In: Transactions. GRC Anual Meeting; 2011/10/23; San Diego, CA. Davis, CA: Geothermal Resources

290

Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will provide a focal point for integrating UPZ actions, including field cleanup activities, waste staging and handling, and post-cleanup monitoring and institutional controls.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Zone control system for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

A zone control system adapted to control temperatures in a building is described having a temperature modifying plant to modify the temperature of a heat exchange medium, circulator means to circulate the medium, and flow control means to regulate the flow of the medium. The system includes zone thermostats with one thermostat per controlled zone, and with each thermostat including temperature responsive means and heat anticipator means to modify the temperature of the temperature responsive means; at least one of the flow control means per controlled zone, and each of the flow control means being capable of energizing the circulator means when the flow control means operates to permit circulation of the heat exchange medium; each zone thermostat including on-off timer means having normally open switch means, and further including intermediate on timer means having normally open switch means; first zone control circuit means including a temperature responsive means of the first thermostat, a heat anticipator means of the first thermostat, and circuit means with normally closed switch means capable of energizing a first flow control means to an open position upon the first thermostat calling for operation of the temperature modifying plant. The timer means of the first thermostat is actuated by the first thermostat calling for operation of the temperature modifying plant; a first of the on-off timer means operating its switch means to an on state after a fixed time interval to latch the first flow control means into an open condition; a first of the intermediate on timer means operating its switch means to an on state after a second fixed time interval to energize the modifying plant and complete a circuit to a secondary anticipation heater of a second zone thermostat capable of adding heat to the second zone thermostat; and the first on-off timer means maintaining its switch means closed.

Nelson, L.W.

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

DEEP VADOSE ZONE TREATABILITY TEST PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sm_bullet} Treatability test plan published in 2008 {sm_bullet} Outlines technology treatability activities for evaluating application of in situ technologies and surface barriers to deep vadose zone contamination (technetium and uranium) {sm_bullet} Key elements - Desiccation testing - Testing of gas-delivered reactants for in situ treatment of uranium - Evaluating surface barrier application to deep vadose zone - Evaluating in situ grouting and soil flushing

GB CHRONISTER; MJ TRUEX

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel...

296

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (15)...

297

Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

298

Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

299

Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

300

Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

302

Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

303

Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

304

Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

305

Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

306

Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

307

Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

308

Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

309

Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

310

Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

311

Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

312

Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

313

Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

314

Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

315

Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alameda County,...

316

Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

317

Beaufort County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Facebook icon Twitter icon Beaufort County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beaufort County, North...

318

Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

319

Aitkin County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Aitkin County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aitkin County, Minnesota...

320

Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

322

Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

323

Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

324

Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

325

Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

326

Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

327

Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone&oldid342524" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

328

Pages that link to "Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:WhatLinksHereBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone" Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer...

329

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

330

Variation in sericite composition from fracture zones within...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

zones of the crystalline basement contain coarse-grained relict muscovite, whereas rock alteration near fracture zones at temperatures > 150C is characterized by abundant...

331

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration...

332

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal...

333

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

334

Micropatterning of a Bipolar Plate Using Direct Laser Melting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct laser melting (DLM) technology has been used to fabricate the micro-pattern of the bipolar plate in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). A suitable approach to enhance the performance of the bipolar plate has been performed to optimize the DLM process. To fabricate the micro pattern, a DLM process with 316L stainless steel powder has been used. For the melted height of 1 mm, the DLM process conditions were optimized such as; laser power of 200 W, scan rate of 36.62 mm/s and the 8-layer structures. To characterize the effect of material type, the bipolar plates of various types were analyzed. In case of the 316L stainless steel DLM patterning, a current density of 297 mA/cm{sup 2} was achieved but the case of the 316L stainless steel plate, 248 mA/cm{sup 2} current density that is lower than that of other materials was achieved. The overall cell performance of 316L stainless steel DLM patterning bipolar plate was better than that of the 316L stainless steel plate. This has significant advantages for the micropatterning using DLM process. The use of 316L stainless steel powder material as micro pattern material will reduce the machining cost as well as volume of the fuel cell stack.

Jang, Jeong-hwan; Joo, Byeong-don; Mun, Sung-min; Moona, Young-hoon [School of Mechanical Engineering/ Engineering Research Center for Net Shape and Die Manufacturing, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Picourt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent speciessurrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurationslid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several modelsnon-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybridwere explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

Ammon Williams

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Certain aspects of the melting, casting and welding of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two alloys under development for castings are IC221M, (nominal composition Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.4Mo-1.7Zr wt %), and IC396M (nominal composition Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-3Mo-0.85Zr wt %). These alloys can be melted and cast using the techniques normally used for Ni-based materials. Oxidation of the liquid alloys can be controlled by vacuum processing or inert gas cover during processing. The liquid alloys can react with silica and zircon sands during casting, but this can be controlled through the use of appropriate mold washes like carbon-based materials. Welding studies showed that these alloys are susceptible to solidification cracking in weld fusion zones; the cracks are generally associated with occurrence of Ni-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic in interdendritic regions of the weld. Amount of eutectic in the weld microstructures increases with Zr concentration in weld filler metal. Weld filler metal Zr concentrations of 3 wt % and higher prevented solidification cracking of weld deposits on the base casting alloys; This is consistent with accepted phenomonological theory of this process. A weld filler metal with a composition of Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-3.0Zr wt % was prepared and used to gas tungsten arc weld together 15-mm-thick plates of the IC221M alloy. This weldment was free of cracks. Weldment tensile specimens were machined from the plate and tested at 21, 800, and 900 C. Weldment yield strength at elevated temperatures was higher than room temperature and nearly comparable with that of the base IC221M alloy. Evaluation of the cast Ni{sub 3}Al alloys for furnace furniture, turbocharger rotors, and manufacturing tooling is also briefly discussed.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Remote Handling Devices for Disposition of Enriched Uranium Reactor Fuel Using Melt-Dilute Process  

SciTech Connect

Remote handling equipment is required to achieve the processing of highly radioactive, post reactor, fuel for the melt-dilute process, which will convert high enrichment uranium fuel elements into lower enrichment forms for subsequent disposal. The melt-dilute process combines highly radioactive enriched uranium fuel elements with deleted uranium and aluminum for inductive melting and inductive stirring steps that produce a stable aluminum/uranium ingot of low enrichment.

Heckendorn, F.M.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Study of the Effect of Electro-Slag Re-Melting Parameters on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

melting (VAR). The structural soundness of this intermediate ESR ingot directly affects its resistance against cracking due to thermal stress in the course of VAR...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coupled Macro-Micro Modeling of the Secondary Melting of Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

beam heating (EBBM), energy losses by radiation and conduction and latent ... correspondingly smaller on the smaller scales of pilot VAR and. EBBM melts.

342

Investigation of residual stresses in the laser melting of metal powders in additive layer manufacturing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Laser Melting (LM) is an Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) process used to produce three-dimensional parts from metal powders by fusing the material in a layerby- (more)

Roberts, Ibiye Aseibichin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservation Policy in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting Ice and Tangled Nets: Litigation and Conservationare heavily dependent on sea ice for their survival, both asvulnerable to the receding sea ice boundaries predicted to

Shaffer, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Skin Effect of Hf-Rich Melts and Some Aspects in its Usage for Hf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAGE FOR Hf-CONTAINING. CAST NICKEL- ... of advanced gas turbines. ... were polished by metallo- graphy and then melted by tungsten inert gas(TIG).

345

063 Synthesis and Characterization of New Lead-Free Low Melt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

063 Synthesis and Characterization of New Lead-Free Low Melt Sealing Glasses ... Powders by Using a Solution Combustion Synthesis in an Air Atmosphere.

346

Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt-Blowing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Multiphysics CFD Modeling of a Free Falling Jet during Melt- Blowing Slag Fiberization ... A Micro-Macro Model of a PEM Fuel Cell System.

347

Petrology and geochemistry of samples from bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5, U12g-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworked zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain.

Connolly, J.R.; Keil, K.; Mansker, W.L.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Lowy, R.; Fortney, D.R.; Lappin, A.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Questions and Answers - What's the melting point of steel?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,<br>would your body instantly crystallize? Previous Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is a material with a freezing point above 0 degrees Celsius?) What is a material with a freezingpoint above 0 degrees Celsius? What's the melting point of steel? That depends on the alloy of steel you are talking about. The term alloy is almost always used incorrectly these days, especially amongst bicyclists. They use the term to mean aluminum. What the term alloy really means is a mixture of metals, any kind of metals. Almost all metal used today is a mixture and therefore an alloy. Most steel has other metals added to tune its properties, like strength,

349

Transport of Bottom Water in the Romanche Fracture Zone and the Chain Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two moored arrays deployed in the Romanche Fracture Zone and Chain Fracture Zone in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean provide two-year-long time series of current and temperature in the Lower North Atlantic Deep Water and the Antarctic Bottom Water. ...

Herl Mercier; Kevin G. Speer

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Earthquake Patterns in Diverse Tectonic Zones of the Globe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast ridge. * western Aleutians orogen: (4) Trench. * geographic name like Aleutian; instead, each zone has a

Kagan, Y. Y.; Bird, P.; Jackson, D. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Zoned electrical heater arranged in spaced relationship from particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Oklahoma Department of Commerce Opportunity and Enterprise Zones provide enhanced financial incentives for businesses located in such zones aimed at stimulating economic expansion in rural and disadvantaged communities Opportunity Zones are those census

353

Definition: Displacement Transfer Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Displacement Transfer Zone Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Displacement Transfer Zone Displacement transfer zones facilitate the transfer of strain between normal and strike-slip faults. Intersections between strike-slip faults in the Walker Lane and N- to NNE-striking normal faults commonly host geothermal systems, focused along the normal faults proximal to their dilational intersections with nearby strike-slip faults.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal

354

Dynamic melt rate control on a Laboratory scale VAR furnace without load cell feedback  

SciTech Connect

Based on a linearized version of an accurate, low order, dynamic melt rate model, a feedback melt rate controller was designed and tested on a small VAR furnace at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Model based control was necessary because the furnace is not equipped with a working load cell transducer. The model was incorporated into a process filter that produces estimates of electrode thermal boundary layer, electrode gap, electrode position and electrode mass. Estimated values for the thermal boundary layer and electrode gap were used for feedback. The input commands were melting current and electrode drive speed. A test melt was performed wherein a 0.127 m diameter 304SS electrode was melted into 0.165 m diameter ingot at a nominal melt rate of 27 g/s. Toward the end of the test, a melt rate step up to 32 g/s was commanded. The controller initiated a nonlinear current ramp to produce the commanded step. Electrode position data were analyzed and the results used to determine that the actual melt rate profile followed the commanded profile relatively well.

Beaman, Joseph J.; Melgaard, d; Shelmidine, G. J. (Gregory J.); Tubesing, P. K. (Philip K.); Aikin, R. M. (Robert M.); Williamson, R. L. (Rodney L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Application of Dual-Polarization Radar Melting-Layer Detection Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A polarimetric melting-layer detection algorithm developed for an S-band radar has been modified for use by the King City C-band radar in southern Ontario, Canada. The technique ingests radar scan volume data to determine the melting-layer top ...

S. Boodoo; D. Hudak; N. Donaldson; M. Leduc

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anisotropic free energy of the Lennard-Jones crystal-melt interface James R. Morris Metal; accepted 22 May 2003 We have calculated the free energy of the crystal-melt interface for the Lennard are in good agreement with previous calculations of the free energies, based upon simulations used

Song, Xueyu

357

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Simplified IceOcean Coupled Model for the Antarctic Ice Melt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Antarctic Ocean, sea ice melts mostly by warming of the ocean mixed layer through heat input (mainly solar radiation) in open water areas. A simplified iceupper ocean coupled model is proposed in which sea ice melts only by the ocean heat ...

Kay I. Ohshima; Sohey Nihashi

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Numerical simulation of melting in two-dimensional cavity using adaptive grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical simulation of melting of chemically pure material in two-dimensional square cavity. A single-domain model is used which does not require interface tracking and allows the use of a fixed grid in order to solve governing ... Keywords: adaptive moving grid, grid generation, melting

Jure Mencinger

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Melting curve and Hugoniot of molybdenum up to 400 GPa by ab initio simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the high pressure melting curve from static compression experiments. Our calculated P(V ) and T(P) Hugoniot on new ab initio calculations of Tm(P) for Mo, and on the P(V ) and T(P) relations on the Hugoniot. We it to calculate melting curves. In such calculations, no empirical model is used to describe the interactions

Alfè, Dario

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Heat Transfer Analysis of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Based on Snow Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of Wuhan district weather conditions of January 5, 2010, heat transfer mechanism of Beijing-Zhuhai Expressway Hubei section of asphalt concrete pavement based on snow melting is analyzed and the model of heat transmission is established. ... Keywords: asphalt concrete pavement, ground-source heat, pump, deicing and snow melting, heat flux

Yan-ping Tu; Jie Li; Chang-sheng Guan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dacite Melt at the Puna Geothermal Venture Wellfield, Big Island of Hawaii Abstract During the drilling of injection well KS-13 in 2005 at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) well field, on the island of Hawaii, a 75-meter interval of diorite containing brown glass inclusions was penetrated at a depth of 2415 m. At a depth of 2488 m a melt of dacitic composition was encountered. The melt flowed up the well bore and was repeatedly re-drilled over a depth interval of 8 m, producing several kilograms of clear, colorless vitric cuttings at the surface. The dacitic glass cuttings have a perlitic texture, a silica content of 67 wgt.%, are enriched in alkalis and nearly

363

Mixing in the Romanche Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Romanche Fracture Zone is a major gap in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at the equator, which is deep enough to allow significant eastward flows of Antarctic Bottom Water from the Brazil Basin to the Sierra Leone and Guinea Abyssal Plains. While ...

Bruno Ferron; Herl Mercier; Kevin Speer; Ann Gargett; Kurt Polzin

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Origin of the South Pacific Convergence Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of the presence of South America and Australia to the existence and orientation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) during January is explored using the ECMWF T21 model. Each of the continents is removed from the model and ...

George N. Kiladis; Hans von Storch; Harryvan Loon

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A GPS-Tracked Surf Zone Drifter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drifter designed to measure surf zone circulation has been developed and field tested. Drifter positions accurate to within a few meters are estimated in real time at 0.1 Hz using the global positioning system (GPS) and a shore-to-drifter radio ...

W. E. Schmidt; B. T. Woodward; K. S. Millikan; R. T. Guza; B. Raubenheimer; Steve Elgar

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

FREE ZONE Rb-276 Chiller Monitoring Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulations prohibiting the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have spurred the development of alternative refrigerants with similar thermodynamic properties and operating characteristics for use in large chiller systems. This study evaluates refrigerant FREE ZONE RB-276, a "drop in" replacement for R-12, which has been out of production since January 1, 1996.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

370

The IMPROVE-1 Storm of 12 February 2001. Part IV: Precipitation Enhancement across the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous model simulations indicate that in stratiform precipitation, the precipitation rate can increase by 7% in the melting layer through direct condensation onto melting snow and the resultant cooled rain. In the present study, a model ...

Christopher P. Woods; John D. Locatelli; Mark T. Stoelinga

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hybrid Dynamic Density Functional Theory for Polymer Melts and Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a high-speed and accurate hybrid dynamic density functional theory for the computer simulations of the phase separation processes of polymer melts and blends. The proposed theory is a combination of the dynamic self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type theory with the random phase approximation (GRPA). The SCF theory is known to be accurate in evaluating the free energy of the polymer systems in both weak and strong segregation regions although it has a disadvantage of the requirement of a considerable amount of computational cost. On the other hand, the GRPA theory has an advantage of much smaller amount of required computational cost than the SCF theory while its applicability is limited to the weak segregation region. To make the accuracy of the SCF theory and the high-performance of the GRPA theory compatible, we adjust the chemical potential of the GRPA theory by using the SCF theory every constant time steps in the dynamic simulations. The performance of the GRPA and the hybrid theories is tested by using several systems composed of an A/B homopolymer, an AB diblock copolymer, or an ABC triblock copolymer. Using the hybrid theory, we succeeded in reproducing the metastable complex phase-separated domain structures of an ABC triblock copolymer observed by experiments.

Takashi Honda; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Preferential orientation of Te precipitates in melt-grown CZT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium zinc telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe or CZT) has proved to be a useful material for semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers and other electro-optic devices. It is often grown Te-rich to optimize its electrical characteristics, but this off-stoichiometric growth leads to the formation of semimetallic Te precipitates in the semiconducting host crystal. These precipitates can impair device performance and their formation needs to be inhibited, if possible, during growth. Characterization of melt-grown CZT has shown that Te precipitates are often faceted. In this study, characterization of several particles of different shapes revealed that most of the Te precipitates were preferentially oriented with the {101}CZT||{-12-10}Te . A secondary orientation relationship was also observed as {11-1}CZT||{01-11}Te for one of the {111}CZT family of planes. One of the particles exhibited {110}CZT||{01-10}Te and {001}CZT||{0001}Te . Precipitates were often found on {111}CZT twin boundaries and, in these cases, it was possible to assign specific orientations with respect to the twin plane. The expected orientation of the {0001}-plane of Te aligned with the {111}-plane of CZT was not observed even though a good lattice match is predicted in ab initio models. Observations of strained and polycrystalline Te precipitates are also discussed with relevance to the ab initio model and to impacts on electronic properties.

Henager, Charles H.; Edwards, Danny J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Bliss, Mary; Jaffe, John E.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melt streams in water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (i) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (ii) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (iii) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plenum, (iv) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (v) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (vi) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through {minus}6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics.

Spencer, B.W.; Wang, K.; Blomquist, C.A.; McUmber, L.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schneider, J.P. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Melting of low-level radioactive non-ferrous metal for release  

SciTech Connect

Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH has gained lots of experience from melting ferrous metals for recycling in the nuclear cycle as well as for release to general reuse. Due to the fact that the world market prices for non-ferrous metals like copper, aluminium or lead raised up in the past and will remain on a high level, recycling of low-level contaminated or activated metallic residues from nuclear decommissioning becomes more important. Based on the established technology for melting of ferrous metals in a medium frequency induction furnace, different melt treatment procedures for each kind of non-ferrous metals were developed and successfully commercially converted. Beside different procedures also different melting techniques such as crucibles, gas burners, ladles etc. are used. Approximately 340 Mg of aluminium, a large part of it with a uranium contamination, have been molten successfully and have met the release criteria of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. The experience in copper and brass melting is based on a total mass of 200 Mg. Lead melting in a special ladle by using a gas heater results in a total of 420 Mg which could be released. The main goal of melting of non-ferrous metals is release for industrial reuse after treatment. Especially for lead, a cooperation with a German lead manufacturer also for recycling of non releasable lead is being planned. (authors)

Quade, Ulrich; Kluth, Thomas; Kreh, Rainer [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 2. Densification by inductoslag melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inductoslag melting process was developed to densify Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls. It is a cold crucible process that uses induction heating, a segmented water-cooled copper crucible, and a calcium fluoride flux. Metal and flux are fed into the furnace through the crucible, located at the top of the furnace, and the finished ingot is withdrawn from the bottom of the furnace. Melting rates of 40 to 50 kg/h are achieved, using 100 to 110 kW at an average energy use of 2.5 kWh/kg. The quality of ingots produced from factory supplied cladding tubing is sufficient to satisfy nuclear grade standards. An ingot of Zircaloy-4, made from melted cladding tubing that had been autoclaved to near reactor exposure and then descaled by the hydrogen fluoride decontamination process prior to Inductoslag melting, did not meet nuclear grade standards because the hydrogen, nitrogen, and hardness levels were too high. Melting development work is described that could possibly be used to test the capability of the Inductoslag process to satisfactorily melt a variety and mix of materials from LWR reprocessing, decontamination, and storage options. Results of experiments are also presented that could be used to improve remote operation of the melting process.

Nelson, R.G.; Montgomery, D.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The melting layer: The radar bright band is dark for lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the melting layer were made with radar and lidar, during light rain. At the height at which a weather radar sees a bright band, the backscatter from the lidar has a minimum. Sometimes this minimum is more than 20 dB deep relative to the rain underneath. In this paper the measurements will be analysed in detail. Five mechanisms that can contribute to this effect are discussed: 1. Refractive index change during melting; 2. Aggregation and breakup; 3. Structural collapse of the melting snowflake; 4. Enhanced vertical backscatter of water droplets; 5. The orientation and shape of the melting crystals. Keywords: radar, cloud radar, lidar, melting layer, orientation of crystals. 1. Introduction In the Netherlands stratiform rain is mainly produced by the melting of ice particles into rain droplets. Normally this happens in a well-defined layer, just below the zero degree level. This melting layer is characterised by high radar reflections, the so-called bright band. This b...

V. K. C. Venema; H. W. J. Russchenberg; A van Lammeren; A. Apituley; L.P. Ligthart; Royal Netherl; S Meteorological Organisation

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew Houk, and Xueyu Song*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal

Song, Xueyu

379

Oil price, mean reversion and zone readjustments  

SciTech Connect

Observing OPEC`s short-term price-output ceiling behavior during the late 1980s and 1990s, one can conclude that it attempts to stabilize the market price within a range of its announced target price by controlling the output ceiling. If the price moves within four to five dollars below the target price, it usually reduces the output ceiling and assigns new quotas to its member countries to keep the price close to the target price. In reality, OPEC established a band for the market price positioned round the target price by basically choosing suitable upper and lower limits for the output or, at least in soft markets, it places tolerance zone below the target price in order to restrict the discrepancy between the market price and the target price. The lower limit is particularly needed because it sets a price floor and ensures that the market price stays above the significantly lower marginal cost of oil production. If the limits of these zones are backed by a perfectly credible intervention policy, they can generate an expectations process that should turn the market prices around even before any intervention takes place. While OPEC in some sense observes the target zones for its prices, those zones are neither well defined nor vigorously defended. It can not always or may not be willing to maintain the price within the limits of the desired zone by cutting the output ceiling; it must sometimes readjust the target price and output ceiling, and thus create a new target zone to reflect the market`s new fundamentals. This is particularly true now because OPEC is losing market share to the other oil producers and is contemplating to shift the current band. Actual readjustments in the target price can be so large, as in 1980 and 1985, that the newmarket price must jump as well. They can occur when both the market price is near the limits of the band as well as when it is inside the band but still further away from those limits.

Hammoudeh, S. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Problem of Vain Energy Consumption in a VAV Air Conditioning System Shared By an Inner Zone and Exterior Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In northern China, there are a large number of space buildings divided in inner zone and exterior zone based on usage requirements. The exterior zone needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer, while the inner zone needs to be cooled both in winter and summer. Taking a practical project as example, this paper analyzes the energy consumption of a VAV air conditioning system that is shared by inner zone and exterior zone. The paper also points out the serious problem of useless energy consumption for this kind of system.

Wenji, G.; Ling, C.; Dongdong, L.; Mei, S.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

382

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

383

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanfords vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNLs Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Ohio Enterprise Zone program (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zone program (Ohio) Zone program (Ohio) The Ohio Enterprise Zone program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Enterprise Zone Property Tax Incentive Provider Ohio Development Services Agency The Ohio Enterprise Zone program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county governments that provides real and personal property tax exemptions to businesses making investments in Ohio. In order to use the Enterprise Zone program, communities petition to the Ohio Department of Development for certification of a geographical zone with a contiguous boundary. Once a zone is certified, communities may enter

386

Virginia Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant (Virginia) Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant (Virginia) Virginia Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $500 per position Program Info State Virginia Program Type Enterprise Zone Grant Program Provider Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development The Virginia Enterprise Zone Job Creation Grant provides cash grants to businesses located in Enterprise zones that create permanent new jobs over a four-job threshold. State incentives are available to businesses and zone investors who create jobs and invest in real property within the boundaries of enterprise zones. The positions must pay at least 175 percent of the

387

Beckham County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBeckham...

388

Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAdamsC...

389

Adams County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAdamsC...

390

Appomattox County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAppomat...

391

Amite County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAmiteC...

392

Amador County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAmador...

393

Allegany County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAllegan...

394

Alleghany County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAllegha...

395

Arkansas County, Arkansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleArkansa...

396

Antelope County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAntelop...

397

Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAcadia...

398

Incentive zoning and environmental quality in Boston's Fenway neighborhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A density bonus, also called incentive zoning, is a conditional liberalization of zoning regulations, allowing a real estate development to exceed as-of-right density limits in exchange for the in-kind provision or purchase ...

DeFlorio, Joshua (Joshua C.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Narrow Clear Zone Over Florida and the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A narrow cloud-free zone of large longitudinal extent was observed in visible and infrared satellite imagery on 21 September 1978. An attempt to explain the zone in terms of subsidence induced by a transverse frontal circulation is presented.

Andrew J. Negri; K. Robert Morris

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Buffer Zones Around Protected Areas: A Brief Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998). Environmental and social impact report the Bahamasclearly focused on the social impacts of buffer zones and

Martino, Diego

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

403

Form-based zoning : what place is this code?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Form-based zoning is a relatively recent innovation in zoning reform. Many cities in the U.S. have adopted form-based codes in lieu of or as a supplement to conventional zoning and many more are in the process of studying ...

Mehta, Shilpa, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Zoning for Distributed Wind Power - Breaking Down Barriers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zoning regulations for the use of small wind turbines vary from state to state and from one local jurisdiction to the next. This paper examines the zoning experiences of small wind turbine owners, options for local actions, and examples of state and federal limited preemption of local zoning authority as a means of promoting the implementation of new technologies.

Green, J.; Sagrillo, M.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, State University of Surabaya, Surabaya (Indonesia) and Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Surabaya (Indonesia); Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Surabaya (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Charge Melting & Polaron Collapse in LA1.2SR1.8MN207 Recent studies carried out on the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team's beamline I-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source provide new insights into charge melting and polaron collapse. X-ray and neutron scattering measurements directly demonstrate the existence of polarons in the paramagnetic phase of optimally doped colossal magnetoresistive oxides. The polarons exhibit short-range correlations that grow with decreasing temperature, but disappear abruptly at the ferromagnetic transition because of the sudden charge delocalization. The "melting" of the charge ordering as we cool through TC occurs with the collapse of the quasistatic polaron scattering, and provides important new

407

Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking August 13, 2010 - 6:32pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department's Hanford Site in Washington used Recovery Act funds to safely take down the K East Reactor's 175-foot-high exhaust stack near the Columbia River. The demolition was a crucial step toward dismantling the external footprint of the reactor and clears the way for additional work to clean up the area. Watch footage of the blast above or find more information at http://www.hanford.gov Normally, we think of things melting (or changing from a solid to a liquid)

408

Radar Reflectivity-Ice Water Content Relationships for Use above the Melting Level in Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression equations linking radar reflectivity (Ze) and ice water content (IWC) were calculated from airborne radar and particle image data that were collected above the melting level in two hurricanes. The Ze ? IWC equation from the stratiform ...

Robert A. Black

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Seismic and gravitational studies of melting in the mantle's thermal boundary layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents three studies which apply geophysical tools to the task of better understanding mantle melting phenomena at the upper and lower boundaries of the mantle. The first study uses seafloor bathymetry and ...

Van Ark, Emily M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Identification of the Melting Layer through Dual-Polarization Radar Measurements at Vertical Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Features of the melting layer of precipitation such as height and thickness are important in many meteorological applications. Doppler radar observations with a vertically pointing antenna have often been used in order to derive these features ...

Luca Baldini; Eugenio Gorgucci

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Local Advection of Momentum, Heat, and Moisture during the Melt of Patchy Snow Covers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical atmospheric boundary layer model, based on higher-order turbulence closure assumptions, is developed and used to simulate the local advection of momentum, heat, and moisture during the melt of patchy snow covers over a 10-km ...

Glen E. Liston

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Model Representation of Freezing and Melting Precipitation: Implications for Winter Weather Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During episodes of sustained moderate or heavy precipitation in conjunction with near-freezing temperatures and weak horizontal temperature advection, the latent heat released (absorbed) by the freezing (melting) of falling precipitation may ...

Gary M. Lackmann; Kermit Keeter; Laurence G. Lee; Michael B. Ek

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Melting of Snow Cover in a Tropical Mountain Environment in Bolivia: Processes and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine the physical processes involved in the melting and disappearance of transient snow cover in nonglacierized tropical areas, the CROCUS snow model, interactions between SoilBiosphereAtmosphere (ISBA) land surface model, and coupled ...

Yves Lejeune; Ludovic Bouilloud; Pierre Etchevers; Patrick Wagnon; Pierre Chevallier; Jean-Emmanuel Sicart; Eric Martin; Florence Habets

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Size and shape dependence on melting temperature of gallium nitride nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the ...

Paneerselvam Antoniammal; Dakshanamoorthy Arivuoli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A Mathematical Model of the Ocean Boundary Layer under Drifting Melting ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of the ocean boundary layer under drifting melting ice is formulated, verified, and applied. The model is based on the conservation equations for heat, salt, and momentum and uses turbulence models to achieve closure. Novel ...

U. Svensson; A. Omstedt

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Increased Runoff from Melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet: A Response to Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors attribute significantly increased Greenland summer warmth and Greenland Ice Sheet melt and runoff since 1990 to global warming. Southern Greenland coastal and Northern Hemisphere summer temperatures were uncorrelated between the 1960s ...

Edward Hanna; Philippe Huybrechts; Konrad Steffen; John Cappelen; Russell Huff; Christopher Shuman; Tristram Irvine-Fynn; Stephen Wise; Michael Griffiths

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analysis of ZR Relations Based on LDR Signatures within the Melting Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inclusion of polarimetric measurements for the quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by weather radars as well as space- and airborne radars is considered most promising now-a-days. Because the melting layer region is usually marked by ...

Stefan Kowalewski; Gerhard Peters

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

419

Baraga County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baraga County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baraga County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

420

Berrien County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berrien County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berrien County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Barbour County, Alabama ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barbour County, Alabama ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barbour County, Alabama ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

422

Banner County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Banner County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Banner County, Nebraska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

423

Amelia County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amelia County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Amelia County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

424

Andrew County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Andrew County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Andrew County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

425

Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

426

Baldwin County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baldwin County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baldwin County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

427

Alpena County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alpena County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alpena County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

428

Alcona County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alcona County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alcona County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

429

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a California Hot Climate Zone. California Energyin a California Hot Climate Zone Peng Xu & Rongxin Yin,conditions (California Climate Zones 24). However, this

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Armstrong County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Armstrong County, Texas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

431

Atchison County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atchison County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Atchison County, Kansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

432

Addison County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Addison County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Addison County, Vermont ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

433

Antrim County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Antrim County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Antrim County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

434

Anoka County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anoka County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anoka County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

435

Alachua County, Florida ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alachua County, Florida ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alachua County, Florida ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

436

Barton County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barton County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barton County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

437

Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

438

NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geophysical study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the central Rio Grande rift and adjacent Great Plains and Colorado Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the national hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a regional deep magnetotelluric (MT) survey of Arizona and New Mexico was performed. The main objective of the MT project was to produce a regional geoelectric contour map of the pervasive deep electrical conductor within the crust and/or upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau, Basin and Range Province, and Rio Grande rift. Three MT profiles cross the Jemez lineament. Preliminary one-dimensional analysis of the data suggest the lineament is associated with anomalously high electrical conductivity very shallow in the crust. An MT/audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) study of a 161 km/sup 2/ HDR prospect was performed on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Two-dimensional gravity modeling of a 700-km gravity profile at 34/sup 0/30'N latitude was used to study the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. Several models of each of three consecutive layers were produced using all available geologic and geophysical constraints. Two short-wavelength anomalies along the gravity profile were analyzed using linear optimization techniques.

Ander, M.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Job Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) Initiative (Minnesota) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) Initiative (Minnesota) Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) Initiative (Minnesota) Job Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) Initiative (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Minnesota's Job Opportunity Building Zones (JOBZ) Initiative state and local tax incentives to qualified companies that expand or relocate in targeted areas outside the Twin Cities metropolitan area. There are ten job zones with opportunities for manufacturing, value-added, or high-wage service businesses in over 300 communities. Qualifying businesses may be eligible for corporate franchise tax exemptions, income tax exemptions for

442

Solar access protection, energy policy and the zoning process  

SciTech Connect

It is suggested that existing zoning structures can be easily adapted to the role of solar access protection. The modification of conventional zoning, accomplished with newer land-use concepts, such as transferable development rights, will help to overcome its inherent weaknesses of lack of flexibility and potential inequity. When state and federal energy policies are considered in their proper perspective by zoning agencies, existing zoning structures can be implemented in a way that avoids any barriers to solar collector installations. In this way, the zoning process will be an extremely valuable aid to the encouragement, promotion, and protection of solar power installations, contributing directly toward the conservation of energy resources

Hirsen, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

444

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Walker-Lane Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern

445

Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program (Pennsylvania) Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program (Pennsylvania) Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Schools Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Department of Community and Economic Development The Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit Program provides tax credits to companies less than eight years old who operate within designated innovation zones. A total pool of $25 million in tax credits is available each year to businesses within these zones. A business can claim a tax credit up to 50% of the increase in gross revenues attributable to

446

Climate Zone Subtype A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subtype A Subtype A Jump to: navigation, search Moist (A) definition-Locations that are not marine and not dry. The following places are categorized as subtype A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Acadia Parish, Louisiana Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Kentucky Adair County, Missouri Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Mississippi Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Ohio Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Aiken County, South Carolina Aitkin County, Minnesota Alachua County, Florida Alamance County, North Carolina Albany County, New York Albemarle County, Virginia Alcona County, Michigan Alcorn County, Mississippi

447

Benton County, Arkansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Arkansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

448

Allen County, Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allen County, Indiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

449

Benton County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

450

Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

451

Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 5...

452

Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

453

Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

454

Allen County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allen County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

455

Benton County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Iowa ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number...

456

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Vadose Zone Pore Fluids at Hanford, Washington: Vadose Zone

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 5...

458

Benewah County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benewah County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169...

459

Bannock County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bannock County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169...

460

Bear Lake County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bear Lake County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The odd-even effect of the melting temperature of polymer film on finite lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To find a quantitative understanding on the odd-even effect of melting finite polymer film, we proposed an equation for computing the melting temperature. For a dimer film covering a constant rectangular area but with different width, the melting temperature for odd number of width is always larger than that for even number of width. There is no experiment for melting two dimensional film so far. The existed experimental data of melting three dimensional powder reported the opposite phenomena. We computed the entropy growth rate of two dimensional confined dimer film on finite rectangle and torus. The entropy of two dimensional long belt with an even number of width is always larger than the entropy for an odd number of width. When the length of the rectangle goes to infinity, the speed of entropy growth shows a linear dependence on the width. This linear relationship originates from the constant melting temperature in thermal dynamic limit. Fusing two small rectangles with odd number of length into one big rectangle gains more entropy than fusing two small rectangles with even number of length. Fusing two small toruses with even number of length into one big torus reduces entropy. While fusing two small toruses with odd number of length increases the entropy. The entropy difference between covering a torus and covering a rectangle decays to zero when the lattice size becomes infinite. The correlation function between two topologically distinguishable loops on torus also demonstrate odd-even effect. We expect an experiment of melting two dimensional film to test this theory.

Tieyan Si

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 99, NO. B1, PAGES 577-588, JANUARY 10, 1994 On the electrical nature of the axial melt zone at 13 N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Streamline models can be advantageous in two ways. First, the stream- line simulator can serve streamlines are straight lines and the distance is measured in units of t. The coordinate transformation by simply integrating the contributions of individual stream- lines reaching the producer [Datta

Constable, Steve

464

ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

Rucker, G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Impact of the Source of Alkali on Sludge Batch 3 Melt Rate (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) melt rate tests in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) have indicated that improvements in melt rate can be achieved through an increase in the total alkali of the melter feed. Higher alkali can be attained by the use of an ''underwashed'' sludge, a high alkali frit, or a combination of the two. Although the general trend between melt rate and total alkali (in particular Na{sub 2}O content) has been demonstrated, the question of ''does the source of alkali (SOA) matter?'' still exists. Therefore the purpose of this set of tests was to determine if the source of alkali (frit versus sludge) can impact melt rate. The general test concept was to transition from a Na{sub 2}O-rich frit to a Na{sub 2}O-deficient frit while compensating the Na{sub 2}O content in the sludge to maintain the same overall Na{sub 2}O content in the melter feed. Specifically, the strategy was to vary the amount of alkali in frits and in the sludge batch 3 (SB3) sludge simulant (midpoint or baseline feed was SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading) so that the resultant feeds had the same final glass composition when vitrified. A set of SOA feeds using frits ranging from 0 to 16 weight % Na{sub 2}O (in 4% increments) was first tested in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) to determine if indeed there was an impact. The dry-fed MRF tests indicated that if the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge (16% Na{sub 2}O feed) or the frit (the 0% Na{sub 2}O feed), then melt rate was negatively impacted when compared to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed currently being processed at DWPF. The MRF melt rates for the 4 and 12% SOA feeds were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 (8% SOA) feed. Due to this finding, a smaller subset of SOA feeds that could be processed in the DWPF (4 and 12% SOA feeds) was then tested in the Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF). The results from a previous SMRF test with SB3/Frit 418 (Smith et al. 2004) were used as the SMRF melt rate of the baseline feed. The SOA SMRF test results agreed with those of the MRF tests for these two feeds as the melt rates were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed. In other words, the source of alkali was close enough to the baseline feed as to not negatively impact melt rate. Based on these results, there appears to be an acceptable range of the source of alkali that results in the highest melt rate for a particular sludge batch. If, however, the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge or the frit, then melt rate will be lower. Although SB3 simulant sludge and Frit 418 were used for these tests, it was not the intent of these tests to determine an optimum source of alkali range for SB3. Rather, the findings of these tests should be used to help in the decision process for future sludge batch washing and/or blending strategies. The results, however, do confirm that the current processing of SB3 is being performed in the proper source of alkali range. Because all of this testing was performed on small-scale equipment with slurried, non-radioactive simulant, the exact impact of the source of alkali with SB3 in the DWPF melter could not be fully evaluated.

Smith, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

DOEs Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Decontamination of metals by melt refinings/slagging: An annotated bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--500 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging: First year progress report  

SciTech Connect

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult. The problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technologies for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of pilot scale melting demonstrations (100-500 lbs) to be conducted at selected commercial facilities. This program will identify methods that can be used to recycle stainless steel RSM which will be used to fabricate high and low level waste canisters for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility. This report summarizes the results of an extensive literature review and the first year`s progress on slag design, small-scale melt refining of surrogate-containing stainless steel (presently only a three month effort), and pilot-scale preparation of surrogate master ingots.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs  

SciTech Connect

The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

472

Microsoft PowerPoint - srnl_24x36vert Nov2010 EM tech exchange melt rate model choi.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) Enhancement of DWPF Melt Rate Model (WP 4.2.3) A.S. Choi, D. H. Miller, Engineering Process Development D. M. Immel, Imaging and Radiation Systems Free energy output is re-arranged into various functional groups based on literature data on aluminoborosilicate glass structural units Methodology: Objective: Develop a predictive tool for the impact of feed chemistry on relative melt rate of HLW glasses. Input Semi-empirical 4-Stage DWPF Cold Cap Model Output Phase Equilibria & Speciation of Melt, Intermediate Condensed Phases, Calcine Gases and Their Free Energies Feed Chemistry NIST Free Energy Database for Complex Liquids Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) Experiments Derive an empirical correlation of relative melt rates using free energy functional groups. X-Ray Imaging &

473

City of Los Angeles - Zoning Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zoning Code Zoning Code City of Los Angeles - Zoning Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Provider Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Chapter I of Los Angeles' Municipal Code, Height of Building or Structures, provides an exemption for solar energy devices, or similar structures. They may be erected above the height limit specified in the district in which the property is located. In all zones, solar devices may exceed the roof surface by 3 feet even if the roof surface is at or above the allowable building height limit. In all zones except R1 and more restrictive zones,

474

City of Austin - Zoning Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Austin - Zoning Code City of Austin - Zoning Code City of Austin - Zoning Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Other Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy The Zoning Code (Chapter 25-2) of the Austin City Code provides a height limitation exemption for solar installations. Solar installations may exceed the zoning district height limit by 15% or the amount necessary to comply with a federal or state regulation, whichever is greater. The Zoning Code also allows for preservation plan in historic districts to incorporate sustainability measures such as solar technologies and other energy

475

Small Wind Innovation Zone and Model Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Wind Innovation Zone and Model Ordinance Small Wind Innovation Zone and Model Ordinance Small Wind Innovation Zone and Model Ordinance < Back Eligibility Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Iowa Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Iowa League of Cities In May 2009, the Iowa legislature created the Small Wind Innovation Zone Program, which allows any city, county, or other political subdivision to create small wind innovation zones that promote small wind production. In order to qualify for the designation, the city must adopt the Small Wind Innovation Zone Model Ordinance and also establish an expedited approval process for small wind energy systems. System owners must also enter into a

476

Maryland Enterprise Zone Tax Credits (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maryland Enterprise Zone Tax Credits (Maryland) Maryland Enterprise Zone Tax Credits (Maryland) Maryland Enterprise Zone Tax Credits (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development Businesses locating in a Maryland Enterprise Zone may be eligible for income tax and real property tax credits in return for job creation and investments. Businesses located in one of two focus areas are also be eligible for personal property tax credits. There are two forms of Enterprise Zone Tax Credits: (1) Ten-year credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property improvements. The credit is

477

Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (37) Power Plants (15) Projects (10) Techniques (30) Map: {{{Name}}} The northern Walker Lane (NWL) is a structurally complex zone of transition between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate and the Basin and Range Province. It is a major right-lateral shear zone which has been defined on both physiographic and geologic grounds Evidence from seismic and geologic studies together indicate that this 100 km wide zone is actively deforming and accommodates 20% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Block modeling of crustal deformation of the northern Walker Lane and Basin and Range from GPS velocities[1]

478

Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Commerce The Oklahoma Local Development and Enterprise Zone Incentive Leverage Act provides funding for local units of government to match local tax revenue dedicated to support a project located in an enterprise zone. No more than

479

Climate Zone Number 6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 is defined as 6 is defined as Cold - Humid(6A) with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 Dry(6B) with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6 climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alcona County, Michigan Alger County, Michigan Allamakee County, Iowa Allegany County, New York Alpena County, Michigan Alpine County, California Androscoggin County, Maine Anoka County, Minnesota Antrim County, Michigan Archuleta County, Colorado Arenac County, Michigan Aurora County, South Dakota Bannock County, Idaho Barron County, Wisconsin Beadle County, South Dakota

480

Climate Zone Subtype B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search Dry (B) definition-Locations meeting the following criteria: not marine and P < 0.44 × (T - 19.5) [I-P units] P < 2.0 × (T + 7) [SI units] where P = annual precipitation in inches (cm) and T = annual mean temperature in °F (°C). The following places are categorized as subtype B climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Idaho Adams County, Washington Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Amador County, California Andrews County, Texas Apache County, Arizona Arapahoe County, Colorado Archuleta County, Colorado Armstrong County, Texas Asotin County, Washington Baca County, Colorado Bailey County, Texas Baker County, Oregon Bandera County, Texas Bannock County, Idaho

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "melt zones beneath" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Near-field/altered-zone models report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

Hardin, E. L., LLNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect

This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

S. KELLER

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

483

Inflatable Evergreen Polar Zone Dome (EPZD) Settlements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustaining human life at the Earth antipodal Polar Regions is very difficult especially during Winter when water-freezing air temperature, blizzards and whiteouts make normal human existence dangerous. To counter these environmental stresses, we offer the innovative artificial Evergreen Polar Zone Dome (EPZD), an inflated half-hemisphere with interiors continuously providing a Mediterranean Sea-like climate. The Evergreen EPZD structural theory is developed, substantiated by key computations that show it is possible for current building technology to construct and heat large enclosed volumes inexpensively. Specifically, a satisfactory result is reached by using sunlight reflectors and a special double thin film, which concentrates all available solar energy inside the EPZD while, at the same time markedly decreasing the heat loss to exterior Polar Region air. Someday a similar, but remarkably more technological, EPZD design may be employed at proposed Moon and Mars settlements. Key words: artificial hemisphere, inflatable film building, Polar Region homes, solar energy concentrator.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

484

Climate Zone Subtype C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C C Jump to: navigation, search Marine (C) definition-Locations meeting all four criteria: 1. Mean temperature of coldest month between 27°F (-3°C) and 65°F (18°C) 2. Warmest month mean < 72°F (22°C) 3. At least four months with mean temperatures over 50°F (10°C) 4. Dry season in summer. The month with the heaviest precipitation in the cold season has at least three times as much precipitation as the month with the least precipitation in the rest of the year. The cold season is October through March in the Northern Hemisphere and April through September in the Southern Hemisphere. The following places are categorized as subtype C climate zones: Alameda County, California Benton County, Oregon Clackamas County, Oregon Clallam County, Washington Clark County, Washington

485

Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 is defined as 2 is defined as Hot - Humid(2A) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 Dry(2B) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2 climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bandera County, Texas Bastrop County, Texas Bay County, Florida Beauregard Parish, Louisiana Bee County, Texas

486

Mixing materials within zone boundaries using shape overlays  

SciTech Connect

Shape overlays provide a means of statically imposing a physical region containing specified material properties onto a zoned mesh. In the most general case, material interface boundaries are unrelated to mesh zone boundaries, causing zones to contain a mixture of materials, and the mesh itself is not uniform in physical space. We develop and apply an algorithm for shape overlays on nonorthogonal, nonuniform meshes in two dimensions. Examples of shape generation in a multiblock uid dynamics code are shown.

Grandy, J.

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

487

Experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water (ZREX): Hydrogen generation and chemical augmentation of energetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the first data series of experiments on interactions between zirconium-containing melt and water are described. These experiments involved dropping 1-kg batches of pure zirconium or zirconium-zirconium dioxide mixture melt into a column of water. A total of nine tests were conducted, including four with pure zirconium melt and five with Zr-ZrO{sub 2} mixture melt. Explosions took place only in those tests which were externally triggered. While the extent of zirconium oxidation in the triggered experiments was quite extensive, the estimated explosion energetics were found to be very small compared to the combined thermal and chemical energy available.

Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

Krupa, J.F.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

490

Method for melting glass by measurement of non-bridging oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making better quality molten glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a "non-bridging oxygen" term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, Carol M. (3922 Wood Valley Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Mandatory Shoreland Zoning Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Shoreland Zoning Act (Maine) Mandatory Shoreland Zoning Act (Maine) Mandatory Shoreland Zoning Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Mandatory Shoreline Zoning Act functions as a directive for

492

Statewide Empire Zone Program (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statewide Empire Zone Program (New York) Statewide Empire Zone Program (New York) Statewide Empire Zone Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Loan Program Provider New York Business Development Corporation Business that do not meet the requirements for standard financing, but are in need of capital, may qualify for NYBDC's Statewide Empire Zone