Sample records for melanesia micronesia polynesia

  1. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America...

  2. Locating Climate Insecurity: Where Are the Most Vulnerable Places...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America...

  3. REPRODUCTION OF THE VERMETID GASTROPOD DENDROPOMA MAXIMUM (SOWERBY, 1825) IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    POLYNESIA NICOLE E. PHILLIPS AND JEFFREY S. SHIMA Victoria University Coastal Ecology Laboratory (VUCEL) and School of Biological Sciences, PO Box 600, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140, New Zealand (Received 30 April 2009; accepted 25 August 2009) ABSTRACT Vermetidae are sessile molluscs

  4. Josh Morra, '04 Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    necks. It seems as though everywhere we went, a feast had been prepared. Unfortunately, because island of Kuttu, where we helped complete construction on a new church. #12;Overall, the trip was a great

  5. Federated States of Micronesia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°, -89.4742177° ShowRural Electric Assn (Iowa)

  6. Landesque capital as an alternative to food storage in Melanesia: irrigated taro terraces in New Georgia, Solomon Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayliss-Smith, Tim; Hviding, Edvard

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    from streams (Bayliss-Smith and Hviding 2012, 2014). By controlling the flow of water through pondfields high yields of taro can be achieved, enabling a large energy surplus to be accumulated in the form of a growing crop (Spriggs 1982, 1990; Kirch... , we chart its prehistoric rise and post-colonial fall, and we outline the factors that constrained its long-term expansion. Key words: landesque capital, New Georgia, Solomon Islands, taro, terraces, irrigation 2 Ways to achieve food...

  7. Annotated Checklist of the Aquatic snails of the Mariana Islands, Micronesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    Marine Laboratory University of Guam University of Guam Marine Laboratory Technical Report 147 March 2013 Ma'åse! #12;iv #12;v SUMMARY This report provides an annotated checklist of all the aquatic snails habitats. Guam's southern half is volcanic and laced with streams and a few sizable rivers, as well

  8. Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Duane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste into Resource Anaerobic biogas tank Anaerobic pondsor tanks can capture biogas resulting from the degradationprocess. Biogas is produced in many countries for cook-

  9. Community Structure, Ciculation and Seawater pH in a Coral Reef Ecosystem (Moorea, French Polynesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Olivier

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deep water, releasing calcium and carbonate ions back intoorganic matter and calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) from the reef

  10. Habitat Distribution and Comparison of Brittle Star (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) Arm Regeneration on Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinn, Sarah

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to stress and lack of water. The jetty (17° 29.110’ S,the rubble because of lack of water. Therefore, a majority

  11. Arthropod communities on decomposing fruit in agricultural and forested areas on Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starrs, Genoa Ione

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mellifica Hemiptera A Hemiptera B Hymenoptera A HymenopteraHomalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): A newA Diptera? Larva B Hemiptera? Larva C Larva D Dermaptera

  12. Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Duane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goreau, T. F. , N. I. Goreau, and T. J. Goreau. 1979. Coralsand Coral Reefs. Scienti?c American, 241:124- 3 UN System-www. ispf.pf 7 Moorea Coral Reef LTER website, accessed

  13. Community Structure, Ciculation and Seawater pH in a Coral Reef Ecosystem (Moorea, French Polynesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Olivier

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a mesocosm investigation. Coral Reefs 27:473-483. Kawahata,Suzuki, and K. Goto. 1997. Coral reef ecosystems as a sourceof surface waters. Coral Reefs 16:261-266. McNeil, B. I. and

  14. Substrata Preference in Foraminifera of Fouling Communities in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowlands, Myfanwy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weeks on submerged steel fouling tiles was also conducted.brushed galvanized steel tiles was constructed and placed inSite A, Fig 1). The tile grid rested on a 0.75x0.75x.01m 2

  15. Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et.  al 2011).   The agrochemicals and  untreated sewage mouths that carry agrochemicals, sewage, and  any other 

  16. CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et.  al 2011).   Agrochemicals and  untreated sewage mouths that carry  agrochemicals, sewage, and any other 

  17. Invasion of French Polynesia by the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): A New Threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): A New Threat to the South Pacific1 Julie Grandgirard,2,3 Mark S. Hoddle,4 George K

  18. Myriad Mirids: The spectacular radiation of Pseudoloxops (Hemiptera: Miridae) plant bugs in French Polynesia (and the kids that love them!)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balukjian, Bradley James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manurevana gen. nov. (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha). Zootaxa,Neue und wenig bekannte Hemiptera. Wiener Entomol. Zeitung,new species of Aretas (Hemiptera: Miridae) from the Society

  19. Comparison of Food Preference and Behavior of Two Waterstriders Halobates Hawaiiensis and Limnogonus Luctuosus (Hemiptera: Gerridae) in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Melissa K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  the  Gerrinae  (Hemiptera:  Gerridae).    Entomologica robustus  Barber  (Hemiptera:  Gerridae),  in  the Halobates  fijiensis  (Hemiptera:  Gerridae).    Zoological 

  20. Long-term implications of coral use in the construction of royal coastal marae on Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickard, Alexandria E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the structure of fish and coral communities at Tiahura Reef,Moorea. Coral Reefs 25: Chesher, R, and Faulkner, D.1979. Living Corals. Crown Publishers, Inc. , New York. Di

  1. Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lagoon  on  New  Caledonia.   Coral  Reef  Initiatives  for Predictive  Modeling  of  Coral  Disease  Distribution natural  disturbances  on  coral  assemblages  in  French 

  2. THE ASSOCIATION AND DIVERSIFICATION OF TRAPEZIA CRABS WITH THEIR OBLIGATE POCILLOPORA CORAL HOSTS IN MO’OREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ly, Vickie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trajectories, and resilience of coral assemblages on a SouthCentral Pacific reef. Coral Reefs. 28:775– Castro, P. 1996.symbiotic with reef corals. Bulletin of Marine Science. 58(

  3. A comparative study of Scleractinian coral diversity in Mo'orea, French Polynesia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title, Alexandra C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plot showing Scleractinian coral species at Temae asa proportion of total hard coral cover, ranked from mostthe structure of fish and coral communities at Tiahura Reef,

  4. CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive  Modeling  of  Coral  Disease  Distribution Baseline levels of coral disease  in  the  northwestern 2011.   Patterns  of  Coral  Disease  across  Hawaiian 

  5. Habitat selection, facilitation, and biotic settlement cues affect distribution and performance of coral recruits in French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Nichole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prob- ably because the coral grew away from or over the pre-increased dimensionality of the coral could have exposed thea contribution of the Moorea Coral Reef Long-term Ecological

  6. The Effects of Density on Intraspecific Aggression in the Fiddler Crab, Uca crassipes, on Mo'orea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Christine

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    01.8”). Sites 5 through 8 are mudflat and mangrove sites atby habitat type (mangrove/mudflat vs. stream/ditch) and thenbetween the traditional mudflat and mangrove habitats and

  7. Myriad Mirids: The spectacular radiation of Pseudoloxops (Hemiptera: Miridae) plant bugs in French Polynesia (and the kids that love them!)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balukjian, Bradley James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v. 2.16. Palaeontologia Electronica 4(1): 9 pp. Haszprunar,analysis. Paleontological Electronica, 4(1), 9. Institut de

  8. COMBATING THE PURPLE BOTANICAL PLAGUE: EVALUATION OF COLLETOTRICHUM GLOEOSPORIOIDES F. SP. MICONIAE FOR BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF MICONIA CALVESCENS IN MO’OREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Irene Y

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gloeosporioides, elevation, endophyte community, Mo’orea,occur upon contact: the endophyte fungus outcompeted theelevation gradient having 25 endophyte competition plates.

  9. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

  10. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and G.C. Williams. 1996. Coral Reef Animals of the Indo-antillarum Philippi on living coral. Oecologia 20: Bak,structure as a response of coral communities to global

  11. This article was downloaded by:[EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution] On: 27 December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    agent against Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in the Society Islands of French Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in the Society Islands of French Polynesia', Biocontrol Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in the Society Islands of French Polynesia JULIE GRANDGIRARD

  12. Distribution, habitat preference, competitive interactions and predation of French Polynesian Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Connor D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT PREFERENCE, COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONSfronds, I quantified the distribution of bryozoans in aorea, French Polynesia; distribution I NTRODUCTION Fouling

  13. Northern Mariana Islands - Territory Energy Profile Overview...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    islands of Pagan and Saipan - unique in Micronesia in having abundant geothermal energy potential, and CNMI has excellent resources for both wind and solar power. CNMI enacted a...

  14. Geothermal Technologies Office: Download GETEM, August 2012 Beta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Faeroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Great Britain Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala...

  15. Chemically stimulated behavior of the Hermit Crab Calcinus latens (Randall 1840) and the role of chemical signaling as a mode of sensory perception within the coral rubble habitat of Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesias, Ilysa S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dwellers (coelobites) beneath coral rubble in the Floridaand diversity of Conus on coral reefs. Oecologia. 60: (293-modes of Calcinus latens in the coral rubble microhabitat.

  16. Chemically stimulated behavior of the Hermit Crab Calcinus latens (Randall 1840) and the role of chemical signaling as a mode of sensory perception within the coral rubble habitat of Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesias, Ilysa S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    station via aerated plastic containers. Care at the Stationwere stored in individual plastic containers so as to aid instored in 2 Liter plastic containers with ample holes in the

  17. Master of International Public Affairs Degree Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    to be considered for admission. Prerequisites u One course in international or comparative politics u One course States of Micronesia u Congressional-Executive Commission on China u National Democratic Institute career, when I was on rotation at the national renewable energy lab. From there I worked in the wind

  18. I n f o r m a t i o n e n H a u s d r u c k e r e i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Montag bis 7 - 12 Uhr Donnerstag 13 - 16 Uhr Freitag 7 - 12 Uhr A1 #12;South Atlantic OceanSouth Pacific Ocean North Pacific Ocean North Atlantic Ocean Indian Ocean Arctic Ocean Arctic OceanArctic Ocean North Pacific Ocean United States of America U.S.A. Canada Mexico Brazil U. S. A. French Polynesia (Fr

  19. Are environmental conditions recorded by the organic matrices associated with precipitated calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites? P. GAUTRET 1 , R. DE WIT 2 , G. CAMOIN 3 AND S. GOLUBIC acid composition of organic matrices associated with calcium carbonate precipitates in microbialites Caledonia (Nouméa lagoon) and French Polynesia (Tikehau atoll). Calcium carbonate precipitation

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasion dynamics of the glassy-winged sharpshooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in French Polynesia Je´ro^me N. Petit Æ Mark S. Hoddle Æ Julie Grandgirard Æ George Homalodisca coagulata (Say)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), has recently emerged as a serious invasive pest. From Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Takiya et al. 2006)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) is native to the southeast USA

  1. Interview with Allan Hanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9 Allan Hanson Professor, Department of Anthropology University of Kansas USA 1. Why were you initially drawn to philosophical issues concerning technology? I began as a cultural anthropologist interested in Polynesia, first the small, remote island... provocative, and Foucault’s discussion of it as part of the disciplinary technology of power turned my interest to technol- ogy, broadly defined. In the margin next to Foucault’s question, “Who will write the history of the examination?”, my wife wrote “Allan...

  2. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992--April 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, S.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, S.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Reid, J.L.; Swift, J.H.; Talley, L.D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide concentration (TCO{sub 2}) and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in discrete water samples collected during three expeditions of the Research Vessel (R/V) Knorr in the South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the first cruise (WOCE Section P16A/P17A) began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on October 6, 1992, and returned to Papeete on November 25, 1992. The second cruise (WOCE Section P17E/P19S) began in Papeete on December 4, 1992, and finished in Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 22, 1993. The third expedition (WOCE Section P19C) started in Punta Arenas, on February 22 and finished in Panama City, Panama, on April 13, 1993. During the three expeditions, 422 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], as well as discrete measurements of salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, and pCO{sub 2} measured at 4 and 20 C. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

  3. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report: ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF POWER TAKE-OFF IN VIVACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simiao, Gustavo

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex Hydro Energy is commercializing a University of Michigan patented MHK device, the VIVACE converter (Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy). Unlike water turbines, it does not use propeller blades. Rather, river or ocean currents flow around cylinders causing them to move up and down in Flow Induced Motions (FIM). This kinetic energy of the cylinder is then converted to electricity. Importantly, the VIVACE converter is simpler in design and more cost effective than water turbines. This project accelerated the development of the VIVACE technology. Funding from the DOE enabled VHE to accelerate the development in three ways. One was to increase the efficiency of the hydrodynamics of the system. This aided in maximizing the power output for a wide range of water speeds. The second was to design, build, and test an efficient power take-off (PTO) that converted the most power from the VIVACE cylinders into electricity. This effort was necessary because of the nature of power generated using this technology. Although the PTO uses off-the-shelf components, it is specifically tuned to the specific water flow characteristics. The third way the development was accelerated was by testing the improved Beta 1B prototype over a longer period of time in a river. The greatest benefit from the longer open-water testing-period is a better understand of the power generation characteristics of the system as well as the maintenance lifespan of the device. Renewable energy generation is one of today’s most challenging global dilemmas. The energy crisis requires tapping into every source of energy and developing every technology that can generate energy at a competitive cost within the next 50 years. Development of VIVACE will bolster domestic energy security and mitigate global climate change. There are numerous commercial and military applications for a fully developed system, which could generate clean/renewable energy from small scale (1-5kW) to medium scale (500kW) to large scale (100MW). Applications span from small portable devices, to direct water pumping for irrigation, direct pumping for desalination, off-shore stations, idle ships, coastal naval bases, coastal communities, and utility companies. Large areas with no natural resources such as the Caribbean or the Polynesia, sparsely populated areas like Alaska, long slow flows like the Netherlands channels, areas that need desalinated water, need VIVACE as a reliable and environmentally compatible technology to generate MHK Power.