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1

Yan Mei Wang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, part 2 ContinuingYan Mei Wang Yan Mei Wang Yan

2

A woman mathematician's journey Mei-Chi Shaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A woman mathematician's journey Mei-Chi Shaw Dedicated to the memory of my parents, Chiang Shaw and Lan-Fang Liu 1. The Village of Righteousness I was born in 1955 in Taipei, Taiwan. My parents were lost the civil war to communists. My father was in the retreating Nationalist Air Force. At birth, I

Shaw, Mei-Chi

3

Maximal acceleration or maximal accelerations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the arguments supporting the existence of a maximal acceleration for a massive particle and show that different values of this upper limit can be predicted in different physical situations.

A. Feoli

2002-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Meis named 2015 Goldwater Scholar | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergy Storage Energy Storage Advanced MaterialsMeis named

5

The Maximization Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Maximization Inventory Lai, L. (2010). Maximizingpp. 48–60 The Maximization Inventory Brandon M. Turner ? Hyepresent the Maximization Inventory, which consists of three

Turner, Brandon M.; Rim, Hye B.; Betz, Nancy E.; Nygren, Thomas E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

JULIA SETS AND WILD CANTOR SETS ALASTAIR FLETCHER AND JANG-MEI WU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JULIA SETS AND WILD CANTOR SETS ALASTAIR FLETCHER AND JANG-MEI WU Abstract. There exist uniformly quasiregular maps f : R3 R3 whose Julia sets are wild Cantor sets. 1. Introduction The most direct is not tame is called wild. The first example of a wild Cantor set was Antoine's necklace [1

Fletcher, Alastair

7

ESSAYWEDSTRIJD `VRIJHEID SPREEK JE AF' In aanloop naar de Nationale Viering van de Bevrijding op 5 mei 2013 in Utrecht organiseren het  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 mei 2013 in Utrecht organiseren het Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei, de afdeling Sociologie van de Universiteit Utrecht en het Algemeen Dagblad/Utrechts Nieuwsblad een essaywedstrijd over het jaarthema visie op vrijheid te geven. Het beste essay zal worden gepubliceerd in het Algemeen Dagblad/Utrechts

Utrecht, Universiteit

8

Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

Tereza Mendes; Attilio Cucchieri; Antonio Mihara

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system together with an OTS PID in practice, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

10

Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle, Alexander Romanovsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Error Recovery for a Boiler System with OTS PID Controller Tom Anderson, Mei Feng, Steve Riddle employing an OTS (Off-The-Shelf) item. The case study used a Simulink model of a steam boiler system, employing software models of the PID controller and the steam boiler system rather than conducting

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

11

Protein folding dynamics in lattice model with physical movement Sema Kachalo, Hsiao-Mei Lu and Jie Liang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein folding dynamics in lattice model with physical movement S¨ema Kachalo, Hsiao-Mei Lu analysis of the kinetic energy landscape. I. INTRODUCTION The dynamics of protein folding has been studied exten- sively [1, 3­5]; A remarkable empirical observation is that protein folding rates are well

Dai, Yang

12

A Measurement Study of GPU DVFS on Energy Conservation Xinxin Mei, Ling Sing Yung, Kaiyong Zhao, Xiaowen Chu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Measurement Study of GPU DVFS on Energy Conservation Xinxin Mei, Ling Sing Yung, Kaiyong Zhao}@comp.hkbu.edu.hk Abstract Energy conservation on computing systems has become an important research topic in recent years, there is a lack of study on the effectiveness of GPU DVFS on energy conservation. This paper presents a thorough

Chu, Xiaowen

13

Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu and Charles R. Dyer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring Air Pollution by Sniffing Social Media Shike Mei, Han Li, Jing Fan, Xiaojin Zhu issue of air pollution in China and elsewhere in the world is to monitor it. While more physical prediction performance of our approach. I. INTRODUCTION Air pollution is a significant issue in China

Dyer, Charles R.

14

Phenomenology of Maximal and Near-Maximal Lepton Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phenomenological consequences of maximal and near-maximal mixing of the electron neutrino with other ($x$=tau and/or muon) neutrinos. We describe the deviations from maximal mixing in terms of a parameter $\\epsilon\\equiv1-2\\sin^2\\theta_{ex}$ and quantify the present experimental status for $|\\epsilon|neutrinoless double beta decay.

M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Peña-Garay; Y. Nir; A. Yu. Smirnov

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Utility Maximization under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by several search and optimization problems over uncertain datasets, we study the stochastic versions of a broad class of combinatorial problems where either the existences or the weights of the elements in the input dataset are uncertain. The class of problems that we study includes shortest paths, minimum weight spanning trees, and minimum weight matchings over probabilistic graphs; top-k queries over probabilistic datasets; and other combinatorial problems like knapsack. By noticing that the expected value is inadequate in capturing different types of risk-averse or risk-prone behaviors, we consider a more general objective which is to maximize the expected utility of the solution for some given utility function. For weight uncertainty model, we show that we can obtain a polynomial time approximation algorithm with additive error eps for any eps>0, if there is a pseudopolynomial time algorithm for the exact version of the problem. Our result generalizes several prior works on stochastic shortest ...

Li, Jian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency Besides their energy security and environmental benefits,...

17

What to Maximize If You Must  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Maximize If You Must Aviad Heifetz Tel A v i v UniversityWhat to Maximize if You Must Aviad Heifetz^ Chris Shannon-''

Heifetz, Aviad; Shannon, Chris; Spiegel, Yossi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Distinguishability of maximally entangled states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In $2 \\otimes 2$, more than 2 orthogonal Bell states with single copy can never be discriminated with certainty if only local operations and classical communication (LOCC) are allowed. More than $d$ orthogonal maximally entangled states in $d \\otimed d$, which are in cannonical form, used by Bennett et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 (1993) 1895] can never be discriminated with certainty when a single copy of the states is provided. Interestingly we show that all orthogonal maximally entangled states, which are in cannonical form, can be discriminated with certainty if and only if two copies of each of the states are provided. The highly nontrivial problem of local discrimination of $d$ or less no. of pairwise orthogonal maximally entangled states in $d \\otimes d$ (in single copy case), which are in cannonical form, is also discussed.

Sibasish Ghosh; Guruprasad Kar; Anirban Roy; Debasis Sarkar

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 9 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Title 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs to the location of interest. The program supplies both the calculated EDE to the maximally exposed individual of the Long Island Lighting Company. For modeling the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI), all

20

Communiquer dans un monde de normes l 198 Boutaud J-J. (2005), La transparence, nouveau rgime visible , Transparence & communication, MEI, n 22, Paris, L'Harmattan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

visible », Transparence & communication, MEI, n° 22, Paris, L'Harmattan, pp. 1-7. Debord G. (1967), La communication, Paris, L'Harmattan, pp. 207-225. Introduction La communication proposée s'inscrit dans la

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Journal of Coastal Research 22 6 15651572 West Palm Beach, Florida November 2006 Hypereutrophication in Ngau Mei Hoi Bay, Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(6), 1565­1572. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Investigations into eutrophication of Ngau Mei at the bottom layer were observed. This typical phenomenon of eutrophication resulted from nutrient enrichment and both wild and cultured stocks of animals. A primary cause of red tides is believed to be eutrophication

Maine, University of

22

DE DOCENTENPRIJS EN DE PRIJS DOCENTTALENT VAN DE UNIVERSITEIT UTRECHT Het College van Bestuur heeft op 26 mei 1994 de "Docentenprijs van de Universiteit Utrecht"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DE DOCENTENPRIJS EN DE PRIJS DOCENTTALENT VAN DE UNIVERSITEIT UTRECHT Het College van Bestuur heeft op 26 mei 1994 de "Docentenprijs van de Universiteit Utrecht" ingesteld. Het doel is docenten van de Universiteit Utrecht te stimuleren en te waarderen vanwege hun verdiensten voor het universitaire

Utrecht, Universiteit

23

Is the beta phase maximal?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

indicates that 2|Vub / Vcb/ Vus| = (1-z) with z given by z = 0.19 +(-) 0.14. This fact implies that irrespective of the form of the quark Yukawa matrices, the measured value of the SM CP phase beta is approximately the maximum allowed by the measured absolute values of the CKM elements. This is beta = pi/6 - z/sqrt{3} for gamma = pi/3 + z/sqrt{3}, which implies alpha = pi/2. Alternatively, assuming that beta is exactly maximal and using the experimental measurement, sin(2beta) = 0.726+(-) 0.037, the phase gamma is predicted to be gamma = pi/2 - beta = 66.3 +(-) 1.7. The maximality of beta, if confirmed by the near-future experiments, may give us some clues as to the origin of CP violation.

Ferrandis, Javier; Ferrandis, Javier

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Elliptic Functions and Maximal Unitarity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scattering amplitudes at loop level can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent Feynman integrals. The integral coefficients are extracted from generalized unitarity cuts which define algebraic varieties. The topology of an algebraic variety characterizes the difficulty of applying maximal cuts. In this work, we analyze a novel class of integrals whose maximal cuts give rise to an algebraic variety with irrational irreducible components. As a phenomenologically relevant example we examine the two-loop planar double-box contribution with internal massive lines. We derive unique projectors for all four master integrals in terms of multivariate residues along with Weierstrass' elliptic functions. We also show how to generate the leading-topology part of otherwise infeasible integration-by-parts identities analytically from exact meromorphic differential forms.

Mads Sogaard; Yang Zhang

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

On Test Sets for Nonlinear Integer Maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Test Sets for Nonlinear. Integer Maximization. July 2007; revised February 2008. Jon Leea, Shmuel Onnb, Robert Weismantelc a IBM T.J. Watson Research

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Maximizing Stochastic Monotone Submodular Functions Arash Asadpour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Stochastic Monotone Submodular Functions Arash Asadpour Hamid Nazerzadeh Amin Saberi, saberi}@stanford.edu Microsoft Research, Cambridge, MA. hamidnz@microsoft.com 1 #12;For the above

Saberi, Amin

27

Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Microalgal Cultures, DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2010 Annual Progress Report Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures, DOE Hydrogen...

28

MAXIMAL CONDITIONAL EFFICIENCY SUCCESSIVE INTERFERENCE CANCELLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAXIMAL CONDITIONAL EFFICIENCY SUCCESSIVE INTERFERENCE CANCELLATION Ananya Sen Gupta, Andrew C that maximizes the asymp- totic conditional efficiency at each stage of successive de- tection is also derived Urbana, IL 61801, USA ABSTRACT Conditional asymptotic multi-user efficiency is introduced

Singer, Andrew C

29

Maximal rank of extremal marginal tracial states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States on coupled quantum system whose restrictions to each subsystems are normalized traces are called marginal tracial states. We investigate extremal marginal tracial states and maximal rank of such states. Diagonal marginal tracial states are also considered.

Hiromichi Ohno

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Brain MRI Classification using the Expectation Maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain MRI Classification using the Expectation Maximization made a brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) classification algorithm that uses a twostage applied to a set of normal brain MR images for further testing. We accomplished a working

Chen, Tsuhan

31

Maximizing expected utility over a knapsack constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expected utility knapsack problem is to pick a set of items whose values are ... variables so as to maximize the expected utility of the total value of the items ...

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maximizing the Productive Uses of Electricity to Increase the Impact of Rural Electrification Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Maximizing the...

33

Massive Nonplanar Two-Loop Maximal Unitarity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore maximal unitarity for nonplanar two-loop integrals with up to four massive external legs. In this framework, the amplitude is reduced to a basis of master integrals whose coefficients are extracted from maximal cuts. The hepta-cut of the nonplanar double box defines a nodal algebraic curve associated with a multiply pinched genus-3 Riemann surface. All possible configurations of external masses are covered by two distinct topological pictures in which the curve decomposes into either six or eight Riemann spheres. The procedure relies on consistency equations based on vanishing of integrals of total derivatives and Levi-Civita contractions. Our analysis indicates that these constraints are governed by the global structure of the maximal cut. Lastly, we present an algorithm for computing generalized cuts of massive integrals with higher powers of propagators based on the Bezoutian matrix method.

Mads Sogaard; Yang Zhang

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

A theory of metrics with maximal acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a geometric theory for spacetimes whose world lines associated with physical particles have an upper bound for the proper acceleration. After some fundamental remarks on the requirements that classical dynamics for point particles must hold good, the notion of generalized metric and a theory of maximal acceleration are introduced. A perturbative approach to metrics of maximal acceleration is discussed. Then several of their physical and kinematical properties are investigated. These include a discussion of the fundamental causal theory concepts and the introduction of the associated notions of Euclidean length and celerity function. Finally, we discuss the corresponding modification of the Einstein's mass-energy relation.

Ricardo Gallego Torromé

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Live Streaming with Gossip Maxime Monod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Live Streaming with Gossip Maxime Monod June 30, 2010 #12;Regular TV: everything HD Live streaming A source produces multimedia content n viewers (n large) broadcasting ... ... ... IP TV, Web TV, P2P TV environment ·HEAP Heterogeneous environment ·LiFT Presence of freeriders Live Streaming with Gossip 25 #12

Guerraoui, Rachid

36

Comparing maximal mean values on different scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When computing the average speed of a car over different time periods from given GPS data, it is conventional wisdom that the maximal average speed over all time intervals of fixed length decreases if the interval length increases. However, this intuition is wrong. We investigate this phenomenon and make rigorous in which sense this intuition is still true.

Thomas Havenith; Sebastian Scholtes

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

Information and Transformation at Swiss Re: Maximizing Economic Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2007 Swiss Re was striving to maximize economic value, a metric that would allow the company to assess its performance over time despite the volatility of the reinsurance industry. Maximizing economic value required ...

Beath, Cynthia M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Note On The Maximal Primes Gaps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This note presents a result on the maximal prime gap of the form p_(n+1) - p_n 0 is a constant, for any arbitrarily small real number e > 0, and all sufficiently large integer n > n_0. Equivalently, the result shows that any short interval [x, x + y], y => C(log x)^(1+e), contains prime numbers for all sufficiently large real numbers x => x_0 unconditionally. An application demonstrates that a prime p => x > 2 can be determined in deterministic polynomial time O(log(x)^8).

N. A. Carella

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Welfare and Profit Maximization with Production Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combinatorial Auctions are a central problem in Algorithmic Mechanism Design: pricing and allocating goods to buyers with complex preferences in order to maximize some desired objective (e.g., social welfare, revenue, or profit). The problem has been well-studied in the case of limited supply (one copy of each item), and in the case of digital goods (the seller can produce additional copies at no cost). Yet in the case of resources---oil, labor, computing cycles, etc.---neither of these abstractions is just right: additional supplies of these resources can be found, but at increasing difficulty (marginal cost) as resources are depleted. In this work, we initiate the study of the algorithmic mechanism design problem of combinatorial pricing under increasing marginal cost. The goal is to sell these goods to buyers with unknown and arbitrary combinatorial valuation functions to maximize either the social welfare, or the seller's profit; specifically we focus on the setting of \\emph{posted item prices} with buyer...

Blum, Avrim; Mansour, Yishay; Sharma, Ankit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Maximizing Photosynthetic Efficiencies and Hydrogen Production in Microalga Cultures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Maximizing Photosynthetic Efficiencies and Hydrogen Production in Microalga Cultures Juergen) is expected to increase the photon use efficiency of microalgae in mass culture as it would minimize

Polle, Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a new facility built to support scientific research that will enable cost-effective solutions to the U, and maximize the scientific benefit of that investment, the Performance Evaluation Management Plan (PEMP to maximize the benefit of the investment, and Target Outreach to cultivate new users and ultimately

42

Opportunistic Scheduling for utility maximization under QoS constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Opportunistic Scheduling for utility maximization under QoS constraints Neung-Hyung Lee, Jin. Our opportunistic scheduling aims at maximizing the utility which is usually expressed as a function of user throughput. In this paper we derive an off-line optimal scheduling policy by optimization theory

Bahk, Saewoong

43

Utility maximization in models with conditionally independent increments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility maximization in models with conditionally independent increments Jan Kallsen Johannes Muhle-Karbe Abstract We consider the problem of maximizing expected utility from terminal wealth in models for power utility under the assumption that the increments of the asset price are independent conditionally

Kallsen, Jan

44

A Utility Maximization Approach to Hedging in Incomplete Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Utility Maximization Approach to Hedging in Incomplete Markets Jan Kallsen Universität Freiburg i­ pected local utility. This concept is related to maximization of expected utility of con­ sumption but markets, local utility 1 Introduction Suppose you have sold contingent claims and you want to hedge

Kallsen, Jan

45

Power Utility Maximization in Constrained Exponential Lvy Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Utility Maximization in Constrained Exponential Lévy Models Marcel Nutz ETH Zurich. Abstract We study power utility maximization for exponential Lévy models with portfolio constraints, where utility is obtained from consumption and/or terminal wealth. For convex constraints, an explicit solution

Nutz, Marcel

46

Utility maximization in incomplete markets Campus de Beaulieu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility maximization in incomplete markets Ying Hu IRMAR Campus de Beaulieu Universit´e de Rennes 1@mathematik.hu-berlin.de October 15, 2004 Abstract We consider the problem of utility maximization for small traders on incom of the supermartingales. We separately treat the cases of exponential, power and logarithmic utility. 2000 AMS subject

Imkeller, Peter

47

A Utility Maximization Approach to Hedging in Incomplete Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Utility Maximization Approach to Hedging in Incomplete Markets Jan Kallsen Universität Freiburg i local utility. This concept is related to maximization of expected utility of con- sumption but markets, local utility 1 Introduction Suppose you have sold contingent claims and you want to hedge

Kallsen, Jan

48

GENERATION AND RANDOM GENERATION: FROM SIMPLE GROUPS TO MAXIMAL SUBGROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATION AND RANDOM GENERATION: FROM SIMPLE GROUPS TO MAXIMAL SUBGROUPS TIMOTHY C. BURNESS of generators for G. It is well known that d(G) = 2 for all (non-abelian) finite simple groups. We prove that d investigate the random generation of maximal subgroups of simple and almost simple groups. By applying

Burness, Tim

49

Beyond the Facade: Maxime Du Camp's Photographs of Egypt.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The photographs of Egypt from Maxime Du Camp’s photographic book Egypt, Nubie, Palestine et Syrie (1852) are at once a reminder of the West’s storied,… (more)

Izzo, Whitney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

On Profit-Maximizing Envy-free Pricing Venkatesan Guruswami  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fairness criterion requiring that consumers are maximally happy with the outcome they receive given of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Email: {venkat,karlin}@cs.washington.edu. Microsoft Research Silicon Valley

Kempe, David

51

Carnot Cycle at Finite Power: Attainability of Maximal Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We want to understand whether and to which extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power. To this end we generalize the Carnot cycle so that it is not restricted to slow processes. We show that for realistic (i.e. not purposefully-designed) engine-bath interactions, the work-optimal engine performing the generalized cycle close to the maximal efficiency has a long cycle time and hence vanishing power. This aspect is shown to relate to the theory of computational complexity. A physical manifestation of the same effect is the Levinthal's paradox in the protein folding problem. The resolution of this paradox for realistic proteins allows to construct engines that can extract at a finite power 40% of the maximally possible work reaching 90% of the maximal efficiency. For purposefully designed engine-bath interactions, the Carnot efficiency is achievable at a large power.

Armen E. Allahverdyan; Karen V. Hovhannisyan; Alexey V. Melkikh; Sasun G. Gevorkian

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

Donald Mei | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThree BiorefineriesCDSB-1003.PDF�Don't Let Your MoneyDonald

53

Maximizing the divergence from a hierarchical model of quantum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study many-party correlations quantified in terms of the Umegaki relative entropy (divergence) from a Gibbs family known as a hierarchical model. We derive these quantities from the maximum-entropy principle which was used earlier to define the closely related irreducible correlation. We point out differences between quantum states and probability vectors which exist in hierarchical models, in the divergence from a hierarchical model and in local maximizers of this divergence. The differences are, respectively, missing factorization, discontinuity and reduction of uncertainty. We discuss global maximizers of the mutual information of separable qubit states.

Stephan Weis; Andreas Knauf; Nihat Ay; Ming-Jing Zhao

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Leptonic CP violation: zero, maximal or between the two extremes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovery of the CP-violation in the lepton sector is one of the challenges of the particle physics. We search for possible principles, symmetries and phenomenological relations that can lead to particular values of the CP-violating Dirac phase, $\\delta$. In this connection we discuss two extreme cases: the zero phase, $\\delta = 0$, and the maximal CP-violation, $\\delta = \\pm \\pi/2$, and relate them to the peculiar pattern of the neutrino mixing. The maximal CP-violation can be related to the $\

Y. Farzan; A. Yu. Smirnov

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

March 2, 2011 Maxim Trudolyubov Foresees Change in Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2, 2011 Maxim Trudolyubov Foresees Change in Russia "The Russian state is an archaic, almost expressed optimism about Russia's future. He predicted that the efforts of what he called "the third, positive reform to Russia's failing institutions. "Russia desperately needs change," asserted Trudolyubov

Qian, Ning

56

Tits Alternative for Maximal Subgroups of GL n (D) #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tits Alternative for Maximal Subgroups of GL n (D) # M. Mahdavi­Hezavehi + mahdavih subgroup M of GL n (D) with n # 1, it is proved that either M contains a noncyclic free subgroup (D) the n�n matrix ring over D and SL n (D) the commutator subgroup of the multiplicative group GL n

57

Maximizing Vertical Air on a Quarter Pipe February 14, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Vertical Air on a Quarter Pipe February 14, 2011 Abstract The current record for maximum vertical air achieved by a snow- boarder on a half pipe is 24 feet and 11 inches. We wish to construct a number of moves. To optimize vertical air we suggest a quarter pipe were incoming velocity and therefore

Morrow, James A.

58

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Revenue Maximization with Quality Assurance for Composite Web Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revenue Maximization with Quality Assurance for Composite Web Services Dani¨el Worm, Miroslav Abstract--Service composition is one of the major approaches in service oriented architecture (SOA) based systems. Due to the inherent stochastic nature of services execution environment the issue of composite

van der Mei, Rob

60

EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative energy sources. BER has a long history of determining the biological and environmental impact of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to foster high-impact science for the benefit of BER's scienceEMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of the Quiet Wing PEMP Notable Outcomes Goal 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node Failures: Theory Member, IEEE Abstract--In distributed computing systems (DCSs) where server nodes can fail permanently with nonzero probability, the system performance can be assessed by means of the service reliability, defined

Hayat, Majeed M.

62

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach Wahid FAIDI LAMSIN, ENIT for a class of robust utility function introduced in Bordigoni, Matoussi et Schweizer (2005). Our method-investment strategy which is characterized as the unique solution of a forward-backward system. Key words : Utility

Di Girolami, Cristina

63

Utility maximization in incomplete markets # Campus de Beaulieu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility maximization in incomplete markets # Ying Hu IRMAR Campus de Beaulieu Universitâ??e de Rennes Germany muellerm@mathematik.hu­berlin.de October 15, 2004 Abstract We consider the problem of utility and logarithmic utility. 2000 AMS subject classifications: primary 60 H 10, 91 B 28; secondary 60 G 44, 91 B 70

Imkeller, Peter

64

Utility Maximization for Delay Constrained QoS in Wireless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility Maximization for Delay Constrained QoS in Wireless I-Hong Hou CSL and Department of CS of utility maxi- mization for clients with delay based QoS requirements in wireless networks. We adopt that the utility of a client is a function of the timely throughput it obtains. We treat the timely throughput

65

Welfare and Profit Maximization with Production Costs Anupam Gupta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

additional copies at no cost). Yet in the case of resources--oil, labor, computing cycles, etc). However, in the case of resources--whether oil or computing cycles or food or attention span Design: pricing and allocating goods to buyers with complex preferences in order to maximize some desired

Blum, Avrim

66

Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks Na Li, Lijun Chen different appliances including PHEVs and batteries and propose a demand response approach based on utility. The utility company can thus use dynamic pricing to coordinate demand responses to the benefit of the overall

Low, Steven H.

67

Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting Communication System general case of arbitrarily varying energy arrivals is considered, where neither the future energy arrival strategy that invests available energy uniformly over all remaining slots until the next energy arrival

Vaze, Rahul

68

Voting Almost Maximizes Social Welfare Despite Limited Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Procaccia Abstract In cooperative multiagent systems an alternative that maximizes the social welfare of the optimal alternative and the social welfare of the one that is ultimately elected. Procaccia, and Veto. Our results arguably provide a compelling reason for employing voting in cooperative multiagent

Caragiannis, Ioannis

69

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

70

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EMP Attachment 3 DOE-SC PNNL Site Dose Assessment Guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Dose Assessment Guidance (DAG) describes methods to use to determine the Maximally-Exposed Individual (MEI) location and to estimate dose impact to that individual under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). This guidance applies to public dose from radioactive material releases to the air from PNNL Site operations. This document is an attachment to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) and describes dose assessment guidance for radiological air emissions. The impact of radiological air emissions from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) PNNL Site is indicated by dose estimates to a maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). Reporting requirements associated with dose to members of the public from radiological air emissions are in 40 CFR Part 61.94, WAC 246-247-080, and DOE Order 458.1. The DOE Order and state standards for dose from radioactive air emissions are consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose standards in 40 CFR 61.92 (i.e., 10 mrem/yr to a MEI). Despite the fact that the current Contract Requirements Document (CRD) for the DOE-SC PNNL Site operations does not include the requirement to meet DOE CRD 458.1, paragraph 2.b, public dose limits, the DOE dose limits would be met when EPA limits are met.

Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Maximizing Cloud Providers Revenues via Energy Aware Allocation Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud providers, like Amazon, offer their data centers' computational and storage capacities for lease to paying customers. High electricity consumption, associated with running a data center, not only reflects on its carbon footprint, but also increases the costs of running the data center itself. This paper addresses the problem of maximizing the revenues of Cloud providers by trimming down their electricity costs. As a solution allocation policies which are based on the dynamic powering servers on and off are introduced and evaluated. The policies aim at satisfying the conflicting goals of maximizing the users' experience while minimizing the amount of consumed electricity. The results of numerical experiments and simulations are described, showing that the proposed scheme performs well under different traffic conditions.

Mazzucco, Michele; Deters, Ralph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Generation and Transmission Maximization Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: Energy ResourcesEnergyGeneral OrderMaximization

74

Spectrum of quenched twisted mass lattice QCD at maximal twist  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hadron masses are computed from quenched twisted mass lattice QCD for a degenerate doublet of up and down quarks with the twist angle set to {pi}/2, since this maximally-twisted theory is expected to be free of linear discretization errors. Two separate definitions of the twist angle are used, and the hadron masses for these two cases are compared. The flavor breaking, that can arise due to twisting, is discussed in the context of mass splittings within the {delta}(1232) multiplet.

Abdel-Rehim, Abdou M.; Lewis, Randy; Woloshyn, R.M. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, SK, S4S 0A2 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Power Control and Transmission Scheduling for Network Utility Maximization in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Control and Transmission Scheduling for Network Utility Maximization in Wireless Networks Min power control and transmis- sion scheduling problem in wireless networks with average power constraints. Index Terms--Network utility maximization, power control, transmission scheduling, column generation I

Sharma, Vinod

76

Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs Supervisory Committee Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management of Environmental Studies) Departmental Member For energy utilities faced with expanded jurisdictional energy

Victoria, University of

77

Amplification of maximally-path-entangled number states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the behavior of a non-Gaussian state like the maximally path-entangled number state commonly known as a N00N state under phase-insensitive amplification. We derive an analytical result for the density matrix of the N00N state for arbitrary gain of the amplifier. We consider cases of both symmetric and antisymmetric amplification of the two modes of the N00N state. We quantitatively evaluate the loss of entanglement by the amplifier in terms of the logarithmic negativity parameter. We find that N00N states are more robust than their Gaussian counterparts.

Agarwal, G. S.; Rai, Amit [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Chaturvedi, S. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Gribov ambiguities at the Landau -- maximal Abelian interpolating gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous work, we presented a new method to account for the Gribov ambiguities in non-Abelian gauge theories. The method consists on the introduction of an extra constraint which directly eliminates the infinitesimal Gribov copies without the usual geometric approach. Such strategy allows to treat gauges with non-hermitian Faddeev-Popov operator. In this work, we apply this method to a gauge which interpolates among the Landau and maximal Abelian gauges. The result is a local and power counting renormalizable action, free of infinitesimal Gribov copies. Moreover, the interpolating tree-level gluon propagator is derived.

A. D. Pereira Jr; R. F. Sobreiro

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid drop impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface an air bubble can be entrapped. Here we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: For large drop impact velocity and large droplets the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

Bouwhuis, Wilco; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quadratic BSDEs Driven by a Continuous Martin-gale and Application to Utility Maximization Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: these equations arise naturally in the utility maximization problem. There is a long list of papers dealingQuadratic BSDEs Driven by a Continuous Martin- gale and Application to Utility Maximization Problem Equations (BSDEs) in a continuous filtration which arise naturally in the problem of utility maximization

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

Social Group Utility Maximization Game with Applications in Mobile Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

social neighbors. Along a different line, network utility maximization has been extensively studiedSocial Group Utility Maximization Game with Applications in Mobile Social Networks Xiaowen Gong and Xu Chen and Junshan Zhang1 Abstract-- In this paper, we develop a social group utility maximization

Reisslein, Martin

83

Dual formulation of the utility maximization problem : the case of nonsmooth utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, finitely valued on the whole real line, we study the dual formulation of the utility maximization problemDual formulation of the utility maximization problem : the case of nonsmooth utility B. Bouchard the dual formulation of the utility maximization problem in incomplete markets when the utility function

Touzi, Nizar

84

Maximal Sensitive Dependence and the Optimal Path to Epidemic Extinction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extinction of an epidemic or a species is a rare event that occurs due to a large, rare stochastic fluctuation. Although the extinction process is dynamically unstable, it follows an optimal path that maximizes the probability of extinction. We show that the optimal path is also directly related to the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the underlying dynamical system in that the optimal path displays maximum sensitivity to initial conditions. We consider several stochastic epidemic models, and examine the extinction process in a dynamical systems framework. Using the dynamics of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents as a constructive tool, we demonstrate that the dynamical systems viewpoint of extinction evolves naturally toward the optimal path.

Forgoston, Eric; Shaw, Leah B; Schwartz, Ira B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An Expectation-Maximization Method for Calibrating Synchronous Machine Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accuracy of a power system dynamic model is essential to its secure and efficient operation. Lower confidence in model accuracy usually leads to conservative operation and lowers asset usage. To improve model accuracy, this paper proposes an expectation-maximization (EM) method to calibrate the synchronous machine model using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. First, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is applied to estimate the dynamic states using measurement data. Then, the parameters are calculated based on the estimated states using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The EM method iterates over the preceding two steps to improve estimation accuracy. The proposed EM method’s performance is evaluated using a single-machine infinite bus system and compared with a method where both state and parameters are estimated using an EKF method. Sensitivity studies of the parameter calibration using EM method are also presented to show the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of measurement noise and initial parameter uncertainty.

Meng, Da; Zhou, Ning; Lu, Shuai; Lin, Guang

2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Outdoor polymeric insulators long-term exposed to HVDC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field experience from outdoor polymeric insulators exposed to HVDC under natural contamination conditions is presented. This paper summarizes the peak leakage current statistics, the hydrophobicity and the surface material conditions studied by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The results show a strong interrelation between the surface conditions and the performance with respect to leakage currents. Moreover, the results show that the surface conditions and the performance of the insulators exposed to HVDC are rather similar to those of the insulators exposed to HVAC.

Soerqvist, T.; Vlastos, A.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A COUNTEREXAMPLE TO THE MAXIMALITY OF TORIC VARIETIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT. We present a counterexample to the conjecture of Bihan, Franz, McCrory, and van Hamel concerning the maximality of toric varieties. There exists a six dimensional projective toric variety X with the sum of the mod 2 Betti numbers of X(R) strictly less than the sum of the mod 2 Betti numbers of X(C). Let X = X(C) be a complex algebraic variety defined by equations with real coefficients. Complex conjugation ?: X ? X acts on X, and the fixed points X? are the real points of X, denoted X(R). It is of interest to try to understand the relationship between the topology of X(C) and that of X(R). If one looks at the mod 2 Betti numbers, the Smith-Thom inequality states bi(X(R)) ? ? bj(X(C)). i We say X is maximal or an M-variety when equality is achieved. Toric varieties are defined by equations with integral coefficients. See Fulton [Ful] for background on toric varieties. Thus, if X is a toric variety, we may consider X(R) the real points of X. In [Bih], Bihan et al. define a spectral sequence G r p,q that converges to the ordinary Z2 homology of X(R) when X is a projective toric variety. Here we use different notation and indexing. We write this spectral sequence as E r p,q, where G r p,q = E r p+q,?p. For each p and q we have (1) E 1 p,q ? = E 2 p,q j where E r p,q is the Z2 Leray-Serre spectral sequence for the moment map of X(C). The spectral sequence E r p,q converges to the ordinary Z2 homology of X(C). Bihan et al. conjecture that every toric variety is an M-variety. Their conjecture is based on (1), numerous examples, and the fact that every nonsingular toric variety is an M-variety. In this note, we present a counterexample to this conjecture. The author would like to thank Matthias Franz and Clint McCrory for ongoing discussions and emails. Theorem. There exists a six dimensional projective toric variety which is not an

Valerie Hower

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Universal Membrane Classification Scheme: Maximizing the Return on High Temperature PEM Membrane Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation on maximizing the return of high temperature PEM membrane research was given at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

89

Power Maximization in Wave-Energy Converters Using Sampled -Data Extremum Seeking /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Maximization in Wave-Energy Converters Using Sampled-design optimization of wave energy converters con- sistingN. Sahinkaya. A review of wave energy converter technology.

Chen, Tianjia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

On ProfitMaximizing Envyfree Pricing Venkatesan Guruswami # Jason D. Hartline + Anna R. Karlin # David Kempe #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fairness criterion requiring that consumers are maximally happy with the outcome they receive given Silicon Valley, Mountain View, CA 94043. Email: {hartline,mcsherry}@microsoft.com. # Computer Science

Bustamante, Fabián E.

91

Parton distributions based on a maximally consistent dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of data that enters a global QCD analysis can have a substantial impact on the resulting parton distributions and their predictions for collider observables. One of the main reasons for this has to do with the possible presence of inconsistencies, either internal within an experiment or external between different experiments. In order to assess the robustness of the global fit, different definitions of a conservative PDF set, that is, a PDF set based on a maximally consistent dataset, have been introduced. However, these approaches are typically affected by theory biases in the selection of the dataset. In this contribution, after a brief overview of recent NNPDF developments, we propose a new, fully objective, definition of a conservative PDF set, based on the Bayesian reweighting approach. Using the new NNPDF3.0 framework, we produce various conservative sets, which turn out to be mutually in agreement within the respective PDF uncertainties, as well as with the global fit. We explore some of their implications for LHC phenomenology, finding also good consistency with the global fit result. These results provide a non-trivial validation test of the new NNPDF3.0 fitting methodology, and indicate that possible inconsistencies in the fitted dataset do not affect substantially the global fit PDFs.

Juan Rojo

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Role of UCG in maximizing coal utilization: site specific study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is sponsoring a project to develop a planning scheme for improving the utilization of coal deposits. This prototype study, called Total Economic Coal Utilization (TECU), is being applied to specific coal reserves within the Centralia-Chehalis District of Washington State. A significant aspect of the study is to determine the potential role for in situ gasification in maximizing the energy recovery and use. The results obtained indicate that UCG could be used to realize a sizeable increase in the amount of energy that can be economically recovered from the District. Since UCG technology has not reached the commercialization stage, some significant assumptions had to be made for this study. These are that the in situ process will work reliably and that product gas cleanup will proceed without major problems. However, if these conditions are met, this assessment indicates that in situ coal gasification could increase the extractable energy from Washington's Centralia-Chehalis coal deposits by a substantial amount and that this additional energy could be accessed at reasonable cost.

Linn, J. K.; Love, S. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F AREA TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air and radon pathways analysis was conducted for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. Additionally, the dose to the MEI was estimated at a seepage outcrop located 1600 m from the facility. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

Dixon, K.; Phifer, M.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Carnot Cycle at Finite Power: Attainability of Maximal Efficiency Armen E. Allahverdyan,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not efficient, since they have to be powerful; e.g., the efficiency of Diesel engines amounts to 35Carnot Cycle at Finite Power: Attainability of Maximal Efficiency Armen E. Allahverdyan,1 Karen V and to what extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power

95

Maximizing Throughput of UAV-Relaying Networks with the Load-Carry-and-Deliver Paradigm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Throughput of UAV-Relaying Networks with the Load-Carry-and-Deliver Paradigm Chen Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to relay messages between two distant ground nodes. For delay-tolerant applications like latency-insensitive bulk data transfer, we seek to maximize throughput by having a UAV load

Kung, H. T.

96

The distribution of the maximal difference between Brownian bridge and its concave majorant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a representation of the maximal difference between a standard Brownian bridge and its concave majorant on the unit interval, from which we deduce expressions for the distribution and density functions and moments of this difference. This maximal difference has an application in nonparametric statistics where it arises in testing monotonicity of a density or regression curve.

Balabdaoui, Fadoua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Impact of Stochastic Noisy Feedback on Distributed Network Utility Maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of Stochastic Noisy Feedback on Distributed Network Utility Maximization Junshan Zhang of distributed network utility maximization (NUM) algorithms hinges heavily on information feedback through, that the iterates generated by distributed P-D algorithms converge with probability one to the optimal point, under

Reisslein, Martin

98

Maximizing the Life of a Lithium-Ion Cell by Optimization of Charging Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for lithium-ion batteries to maximize the energy storage. However, Methekar et al. did not deal with the useful cell life. Similar work has been done by Wang to maximize the efficiency of the battery charging been done to understand the capacity fade phenomena and predict the battery life.1-22 How- ever, only

99

A Social Group Utility Maximization Framework with Applications in Database Assisted Spectrum Access  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of maximizing the total network utility. Along a different line, game theory has found a wide varietyA Social Group Utility Maximization Framework with Applications in Database Assisted Spectrum, xgong9, lyang55, junshan.zhang}@asu.edu Abstract--In this paper, we develop a social group utility

Reisslein, Martin

100

Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding algorithm proposed by Christensen et al. in large correlated MISO broadcast channels. We propose a novel maximization. I. INTRODUCTION WE consider the multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel Laurent Gallo) maximization for a K-user Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) cognitive Interference Channel (IFC) with linear studied in a non-cognitive scenario for the MISO inter- ference channel (IFC) in [3], where a distributed

Gesbert, David

102

Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running head: CONCRETE PROSOCIAL GOALS MAXIMIZE HAPPINESS 1 Getting the Most out of Giving: Concretely Framing a Prosocial Goal Maximizes Happiness Melanie Rudda University of Houston Jennifer Aakerb Melcher Hall, Houston, TX 77204-6021; Email: mrrudd@bauer.uh.edu; Phone: 713.743.4572. #12;CONCRETE

Bogyo, Matthew

103

Energy-Exposed Instruction Set Architectures Krste Asanovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Exposed Instruction Set Architectures Krste Asanovi´c MIT Laboratory for Computer Science of these ISAs per- form many energy-consuming microarchitectural opera- tions during execution of each user instruction on a simple RISC pro- cessor only 1/50th of the total energy consumption is due to the adder

Asanovic, Krste

104

INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

Alvarez, Nadir

105

A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

Abergel, Rebecca

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab's Rebecca Abergel discusses "A pill to treat people exposed to radioactive materials" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas. Go here to watch the entire event with all 8 speakers:

Abergel, Rebecca

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Author's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the surface [18]. Hence the effect of lithium on plasma­wall interactions is expected to dependAuthor's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface S.S. Harilal a, *, J in fusion devices [1­5]. For example, wall conditioning with thin lithium layers gives rise to low hydrogen

Harilal, S. S.

108

Exposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton Submitted to the Department of ElectricalExposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton B Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial ful llment

109

Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 301316 Mortality patterns among industrial workers exposed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of industrial workers exposed to chloroprene (CD) and other substances, including vinyl chloride monomer (VC

Illinois at Chicago, University of

110

Proposal for study of $\\pi^{-}$ nucleur collisions in nuclear emulsion exposed in a pulsed magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for study of $\\pi^{-}$ nucleur collisions in nuclear emulsion exposed in a pulsed magnetic field

CERN. Geneva. SPS Experiments Committee

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Maximal Independent Sets In Graphs With At Most r Goh Chee Ying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximal Independent Sets In Graphs With At Most r Cycles Goh Chee Ying Department of Mathematics National University of Singapore Singapore goh chee ying@moe.edu.sg Koh Khee Meng Department of Mathematics

Sagan, Bruce

112

Maximizing nuclear power plant performance via mega-uprates and subsequent license renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this thesis is to develop a methodology to evaluate the engineering and economic implications of maximizing performance of the United States' commercial fleet of nuclear power plants. This methodology addresses ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sequence estimation in the presence of interference via the expectation-maximization algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we developed a method for obtaining near-optimal sequence estimates in the presence of interference for direct sequence spread spectrum communication using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. We assume binary phase shift...

Zhang, Quan G

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.

Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A profit maximization approach to modeling U.S. agricultural trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sectors--farm production and food processing. The profit maximization based trade models are estimated, and short and intermediate run elasticities are computed. Hypothesis tests indicate that the underlying assumptions implicit in this approach cannot...

Porras, Juan Jose

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Critical Cliques and Their Application to Influence Maximization in Online Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the influence propagation process in the online social network using our proposed model and experimentally compare our approach to the greedy algorithm proposed by Kempe, Kleinberg and Tardos. Our main contribution in the influence maximization research...

Pandey, Nikhil

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Title: Superimposed electrical stimulation comfortably improves the endurance of maximal voluntary contractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in two conditions of contraction (voluntary vs. voluntary + superimposed electrical stimulation). RESULTSTitle: Superimposed electrical stimulation comfortably improves the endurance of maximal voluntary contractions Short title: Electrical stimulation and MVC endurance Boisgontier MP*, Moineau B, Nougier V UJF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

Maximizing Hysteretic Losses in Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles via Model-Driven Synthesis and Materials Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article develops a set of design guidelines for maximizing heat dissipation characteristics of magnetic ferrite MFe[subscript 2]O[subscript 4] (M = Mn, Fe, Co) nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields. Using ...

Chen, Ritchie

119

Theory: Biological systems organize to maximize entropy production subject to information and biophysicochemical constraints.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory: Biological systems organize to maximize entropy production subject to information production. While organized structures decrease the entropy of the system, they are maintained by external selection produce biological systems that tend to follow a pathway of maximum entropy production

Vallino, Joseph J.

120

Application of geostatistical reservoir description for maximizing waterflood infill drilling recovery from La Cira Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the prospective ways to increase the oil production is to maximize the oil recovery from mature oil fields. In this study we apply an integrated approach that combines geostatistical reservoir description and reservoir simulation to evaluate...

Cubillos Gutierrez, Helber

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Techniques for Maximizing Efficiency of Solar Energy Harvesting Systems (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques for Maximizing Efficiency of Solar Energy Harvesting Systems (Invited Paper) Pai H requiring battery replacement. This paper ex- amines technical issues with solar energy harvesting. First power point tracking, energy harvest- ing, solar panel, photovoltaic cell, supercapacitor, ultracapac

Shinozuka, Masanobu

122

Achieving Queue-Length Stability Through Maximal Scheduling in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability region; however, these scheduling strategies also require centralized control. Although [5], [6Achieving Queue-Length Stability Through Maximal Scheduling in Wireless Networks Prasanna Chaporkar through distributed scheduling in wireless networks. We consider a simple, local information based

Sarkar, Saswati

123

Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

MEIS: Molecular Environmental & Interface Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3, BPA earnedinvitedMEDIAPeople

125

Shear Modulus of Cylindrical CFRP Tendons Exposed to Moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the degree 69 of molecular crosslinking in a resin matrix and consequently influences the chemical 70 stability and mechanical performance on the macroscale. The polymerisation of epoxy 71 groups is the result of three principal curing reactions. The first... against hydrolysis (chain scission) due to the 112 stability of the epoxy resin and carbon fibres when subjected to wet environments. 113 Nevertheless, hydrolysis has been observed in epoxy matrices exposed in distilled water at 114 high temperatures...

Toumpanaki, Eleni; Lees, Janet M.; Terrasi, Giovanni P.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a smelter exposed to zinc fumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A smelter exposed to zinc fumes reported severe recurrent episodes of cough, dyspnea and fever. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed a marked increase in lymphocytes count with predominance of CD8 T-lymphocytes. Presence of zinc in alveolar macrophages was assessed by analytic transmission electron microscopy. This is the first case of recurrent bronchoalveolitis related to zinc exposure in which the clinical picture and BAL results indicate a probable hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

Ameille, J.; Brechot, J.M.; Brochard, P.; Capron, F.; Dore, M.F. (Consultation de Pathologie Professionnelle, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches, (France))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Non-Convex Utility Maximization in Gaussian MISO Broadcast and Interference Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility (e.g., sum-rate) maximization for multiantenna broadcast and interference channels (with one antenna at the receivers) is known to be in general a non-convex problem, if one limits the scope to linear (beamforming) strategies at transmitter and receivers. In this paper, it is shown that, under some standard assumptions, most notably that the utility function is decreasing with the interference levels at the receivers, a global optimal solution can be found with reduced complexity via a suitably designed Branch-and-Bound method. Although infeasible for real-time implementation, this procedure enables a non-heuristic and systematic assessment of suboptimal techniques. A suboptimal strategy is then proposed that, when applied to sum-rate maximization, reduces to the well-known distributed pricing techniques. Finally, numerical results are provided that compare global optimal solutions with suboptimal (pricing) techniques for sum-rate maximization problems, leading to insight into issues such as the robus...

Rossi, M; Simeone, O; Haimovich, A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Longitudinal study of children exposed to sulfur oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a longitudinal comparison of the health of children exposed to markedly different concentrations of sulfur dioxide and moderately different concentrations of particulate sulfate. The four groups of subjects lived in two areas of one smelter town and in two other towns, one of which was also a smelter town. In the area of highest pollution, children were intermittently exposed to high SO/sub 2/ levels (peak three-hour average concentration exceeded 2,500 micrograms/m3) and moderate particulate SO/sub 4/= levels (average concentration was 10.1 micrograms/m3). When the children were grouped by the four gradients of pollution observed, the prevalence of cough (measured by questionnaire) correlated significantly with pollution levels (trend chi-square = 5.6, p = 0.02). No significant differences in the incidence of cough or other symptoms occurred among the groups of subjects over three years, and pulmonary function and lung function growth over the study were roughly equal among all the groups. These results suggest that intermittent elevations in SO/sub 2/ concentration, in the presence of moderate particulate SO/sub 4/= concentration, produced evidence of bronchial irritation in the subjects, but no chronic effect on lung function or lung function growth was detected.

Dodge, R.; Solomon, P.; Moyers, J.; Hayes, C.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution particle-exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exposed Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution particle-exposed Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and...

130

Teleportation is necessary for faithful quantum state transfer through noisy channels of maximal rank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum teleportation enables deterministic and faithful transmission of quantum states, provided a maximally entangled state is pre-shared between sender and receiver, and a one-way classical channel is available. Here, we prove that these resources are not only sufficient, but also necessary, for deterministically and faithfully sending quantum states through any fixed noisy channel of maximal rank, when a single use of the cannel is admitted. In other words, for this family of channels, there are no other protocols, based on different (and possibly cheaper) sets of resources, capable of replacing quantum teleportation.

Raffaele Romano; Peter van Loock

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees Ling Shi , Agostino Capponi , Karl H. Johansson and Richard M. Murray Abstract

Johansson, Karl Henrik

132

Minimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trees with multiple optimization objectives. A. Related Work A number of energy-aware broadcast] that the problem of finding a minimum-energy broadcast tree is NP-hard. Particularly in [2], they have shownMinimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa

Liang, Weifa

133

Maximizing Dexterous Workspace and Optimal Port Placement of a Multi-Arm Surgical Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Dexterous Workspace and Optimal Port Placement of a Multi-Arm Surgical Robot Zhi Li robot system having four articulated robotic arms in a spher- ical configuration, each holding remote sites. The current research effort aims to configure the link architecture of each robotic arm

Rosen, Jacob

134

Maximizing Lifetime in an Energy Constrained Wireless Sensor Array Using Team Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Lifetime in an Energy Constrained Wireless Sensor Array Using Team Optimization of Cooperating Systems Robert J. Marks II, Arindam K. Das, Mohamed El-Sharkawi Department of Electrical trees to do this. For a known node constellation, the maximum lifetime of a single tree is equal

Arabshahi, Payman

135

Author's personal copy Maximizing the solar to H2 energy conversion efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to thermochemical or electrolytic hydrogen production technologies [1­3]. However, solar to hydrogen energyAuthor's personal copy Maximizing the solar to H2 energy conversion efficiency of outdoor, Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin ­ Austin, TX 78712, USA b Mechanical

Pilon, Laurent

136

Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.

Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Stein, J.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Wind Farm Power Maximization Based On A Cooperative Static Game Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Farm Power Maximization Based On A Cooperative Static Game Approach Jinkyoo Parka, Soonduck efficiency of wind farms using cooperative control. The key factors in determining the power production and the loading for a wind turbine are the nacelle yaw and blade pitch angles. However, the nacelle and blade

Stanford University

138

Exact Computation of Maximally Dominating Faults and Its Application to -Detection Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact Computation of Maximally Dominating Faults and Its Application to -Detection Tests Ilia, IN 47907, USA Abstract £ -detection test sets for stuck-at faults have been shown to be useful in detecting an important role in controlling the increase in the size of an £ -detection test set as £ is increased

Polian, Ilia

139

Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption Canming: {jcm, yshi, thou, wjlou}@vt.edu Abstract Conserving network-wide energy consumption is becoming of wireless networks, the concern of energy consumption is becoming in- creasingly important for network

Hou, Y. Thomas

140

Optimum Charging Profile for Lithium-ion Batteries to Maximize Energy Storage and Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimum Charging Profile for Lithium-ion Batteries to Maximize Energy Storage and Utilization Ravi applications, the ability to recharge quickly and efficiently is a critical requirement for a storage battery The optimal profile of charging current for a lithium-ion battery is estimated using dynamic optimization

Subramanian, Venkat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A review of "La Rochefoucauld par quatre chemins. Les Maximes et leurs ambivalence" by Eric Turcat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

82 seventeenth-century news Eric Turcat. La Rochefoucauld par quatre chemins. Les Maximes et leurs ambivalence. Biblio 17, v. 206. Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 2013. 220 pp. ISBN 978-63-8233-6803-8. $65.91. Review by denis d. grélé, university...

Grele, Denis D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

On Throughput Maximization of Time Division Multiple Access with Energy Harvesting Users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 On Throughput Maximization of Time Division Multiple Access with Energy Harvesting Users Juan Liu a multiple access channel, where multiple users equipped with energy harvesting batteries com- municate assumed that the users' energy harvesting processes and storage status are known to all the users before

Dai, Huaiyu

143

Maximizing Health Care Enrollment through Seamless Coverage for Families in Transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Health Care Enrollment through Seamless Coverage for Families in Transition: Current is the first in a series discussing seamless health care insurance coverage for families lacking coverage due policymakers on how best to ensure seamless health coverage under the Affordable Care Act for individuals

Kammen, Daniel M.

144

REGULAR ARTICLE The Sunk-cost Effect as an Optimal Rate-maximizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULAR ARTICLE The Sunk-cost Effect as an Optimal Rate-maximizing Behavior Theodore P. Pavlic, but it also explains apparently irrational behaviors like the sunk-cost effect. When a forager is sure to foraging theoretic explanations of the sunk-cost effect (Arkes and Blumer 1985; Arkes and Ayton 1999

145

Short-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for energy recharge. Under the assumption of an increasing concave power-rate relationship, the short completion time of a given amount of data were found for an energy harvesting node under the assumptionShort-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes Kaya Tutuncuoglu

Yener, Aylin

146

Industrial Implementation of a Coordinator MPC for Maximizing Throughput at a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offshore fields. This set high demands, not only to the plant efficiency and its regularity, but alsoIndustrial Implementation of a Coordinator MPC for Maximizing Throughput at a Large-Scale Gas Plant°arstø gas plant is described. The "coordinator MPC" coordinates the flows through the network

Skogestad, Sigurd

147

Distributed Algorithms for Lifetime Maximization in Sensor Networks via Min-Max  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the network and edges between nodes within maximum transmission range. Although the problem can in principle.lastname@tkk.fi Abstract We consider the problem of static transmission-power assignment for lifetime maximization to forward the collected data, at what intervals, transmission power levels, etc. One important goal

Orponen, Pekka

148

Ordered Arrays of Dual-Diameter Nanopillars for Maximized Optical Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ordered Arrays of Dual-Diameter Nanopillars for Maximized Optical Absorption Zhiyong Fan,,,§ Rehan control to achieve the optimal absorption efficiency. Increasing the Ge materials filling ratio is shown a strong diameter dependency. To enhance the broad band optical absorption efficiency, a novel dual

Javey, Ali

149

NON-CONVEX UTILITY MAXIMIZATION IN GAUSSIAN MISO BROADCAST AND INTERFERENCE CHANNELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NON-CONVEX UTILITY MAXIMIZATION IN GAUSSIAN MISO BROADCAST AND INTERFERENCE CHANNELS M. Rossi, A. M- imization [1] or SINR balancing for the multiple-input single-output (MISO) BC [2], and thus solvable, MISO BC and IC WSRM with general convex power constraint. The proposed BB approach is based

Simeone, Osvaldo

150

BEAMFORMING MAXIMIZES THE MISO COMPOUND CAPACITY Ami Wiesel, Yonina C. Eldar and Shlomo Shamai (Shitz)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAMFORMING MAXIMIZES THE MISO COMPOUND CAPACITY Ami Wiesel, Yonina C. Eldar and Shlomo Shamai for exploiting this multiple in- put single output (MISO) channel are space time coding, and beamforming (BF]. The capacity achieving transmit technique in MISO chan- nels with additive Gaussian noise is signaling using

Eldar, Yonina

151

Maximal wild monodromy in unequal characteristic Claus Lehr and Michel Matignon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximal wild monodromy in unequal characteristic Claus Lehr and Michel Matignon June 2, 2006 over which C has a stable model. In particular we are interested in the wild part of this extension the techniques developed in that paper we study the wild finite monodromy extension, i.e. the extension

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES, and student body." From David Ward, "A Vision for the Future," p. 9. This document lists the human-resource goals and plans of the Office of Human Resources, the Equity and Diversity Resource Center

Sheridan, Jennifer

153

Revenue Maximization in Reservation-based Online Advertising Through Dynamic Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revenue Maximization in Reservation-based Online Advertising Through Dynamic Inventory Management inventory on content sites owned by publishers (e.g., CNN, amazon, etc.). Sales representatives, acting on behalf of publishers, sell inventory (impression) bundles of various types (text, video, multimedia, etc

Tomkins, Andrew

154

Linear maps preserving maximal deviation and the Jordan structure of quantum systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the algebraic approach to quantum theory, a quantum observable is given by an element of a Jordan algebra and a state of the system is modelled by a normalized positive functional on the underlying algebra. Maximal deviation of a quantum observable is the largest statistical deviation one can obtain in a particular state of the system. The main result of the paper shows that each linear bijective transformation between JBW algebras preserving maximal deviations is formed by a Jordan isomorphism or a minus Jordan isomorphism perturbed by a linear functional multiple of an identity. It shows that only one numerical statistical characteristic has the power to determine the Jordan algebraic structure completely. As a consequence, we obtain that only very special maps can preserve the diameter of the spectra of elements. Nonlinear maps preserving the pseudometric given by maximal deviation are also described. The results generalize hitherto known theorems on preservers of maximal deviation in the case of self-adjoint parts of von Neumann algebras proved by Molnar.

Hamhalter, Jan [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness of Management Practices and Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness tanks exchange coastal ballast water with mid-ocean seawater (referred to as "ballast water exchange of high-resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model ballast tank water flow and to predict EE

156

Periodic Finite-Type Shift Spaces Marie-Pierre Beal, Member, IEEE, Maxime Crochemore, Member, IEEE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic Finite-Type Shift Spaces Marie-Pierre B´eal, Member, IEEE, Maxime Crochemore, Member, IEEE are the c-charge con- strained codes over the bipolar alphabet {±1}. Here, the code M.-P. B´eal and M-mail: {beal,mac}@univ- mlv.fr). B. E. Moision was with the Mathematical Sciences Research Center, Lucent

Siegel, Paul H.

157

Fish exposed to BP oil spill 'swim slower' Study finds the speed of mahi-mahi exposed to BP's Gulf of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico oil spill has fallen 37pc The 87-day-long spill dumped an estimated 4.9m barrels of oil of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers said they used oil concentrations similar to those measuredFish exposed to BP oil spill 'swim slower' Study finds the speed of mahi-mahi exposed to BP's Gulf

Grosell, Martin

158

Maximally Random Jamming of Two-Dimensional One-Component and Binary Hard Disc Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report calculations of the density of maximally random jamming (aka random close packing) of one-component and binary hard disc fluids. The theoretical structure used provides a common framework for description of the hard disc liquid to hexatic, the liquid to hexagonal crystal and the liquid-to-maximally random jammed state transitions. Our analysis is based on locating a particular bifurcation of the solutions of the integral equation for the inhomogeneous single particle density at the transition between different spatial structures. The bifurcation of solutions we study is initiated from the dense metastable fluid, and we associate it with the limit of stability of the fluid, which we identify with the transition from the metastable fluid to a maximally random jammed state. For the one-component hard disc fluid the predicted packing fraction at which the metastable fluid to maximally random jammed state transition occurs is 0.84, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 0.84 \\pm 0.02. The corresponding analysis of the limit of stability of a binary hard disc fluid with specified disc diameter ratio and disc composition requires extra approximations in the representations of the direct correlation function, the equation of state, and the number of order parameters accounted for. Keeping only the order parameter identified with the largest peak in the structure factor of the highest density regular lattice with the same disc diameter ratio and disc composition as the binary fluid, the predicted density of maximally random jamming is found to be 0.84 to 0.87, depending on the equation of state used, and very weakly dependent on the ratio of disc diameters and the fluid composition, in agreement with both experimental data and computer simulation data.

Xinliang Xu; Stuart A. Rice

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Utility Maximization for Resolving Throughput/Reliability Trade-offs in an Unreliable Network with Multipath Routing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility Maximization for Resolving Throughput/Reliability Trade-offs in an Unreliable Network can be characterized by some utility function, the goal of balancing competing requirements for each user as well as across different users is to maximize the aggregate utility. The framework assumes

163

RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

Clark, E.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Generation of maximally entangled mixed states of two atoms via on-resonance asymmetric atom-cavity couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scheme for generating the maximally entangled mixed state of two atoms on-resonance asymmetrically coupled to a single mode optical cavity field is presented. The part frontier of both maximally entangled mixed states and maximal Bell violating mixed states can be approximately reached by the evolving reduced density matrix of two atoms if the ratio of coupling strengths of two atoms is appropriately controlled. It is also shown that exchange symmetry of global maximal concurrence is broken if and only if coupling strength ratio lies between $\\frac{\\sqrt{3}}{3}$ and $\\sqrt{3}$ for the case of one-particle excitation and asymmetric coupling, while this partial symmetry-breaking can not be verified by detecting maximal Bell violation.

Shang-Bin Li

2006-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Study of the zero modes of the Faddeev–Popov operator in the maximal Abelian gauge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the zero modes of the Faddeev–Popov operator in the maximal Abelian gauge is presented in the case of the gauge group SU(2) and for different Euclidean space–time dimensions. Explicit examples of classes of normalizable zero modes and corresponding gauge field configurations are constructed by taking into account two boundary conditions, namely: (i) the finite Euclidean Yang–Mills action, (ii) the finite Hilbert norm. -- Highlights: •We study the zero modes of the Faddeev–Popov operator in the maximal Abelian gauge. •For d=2 we obtain solutions with finite action but not finite Hilbert norm. •For d=3,4 we obtain solutions with finite action and finite Hilbert norm. •These results can be compared with those previously obtained in the Landau gauge.

Capri, M.A.L., E-mail: caprimarcio@gmail.com; Guimaraes, M.S., E-mail: msguimaraes@uerj.br; Lemes, V.E.R., E-mail: vitor@dft.if.uerj.br; Sorella, S.P., E-mail: sorella@uerj.br; Tedesco, D.G., E-mail: dgtedesco@uerj.br

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Control Strategies for Distributed Energy Resources to Maximize the Use of Wind Power in Rural Microgrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to design control strategies for distributed energy resources (DERs) to maximize the use of wind power in a rural microgrid. In such a system, it may be economical to harness wind power to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels for electricity production. In this work, we develop control strategies for DERs, including diesel generators, energy storage and demand response, to achieve high penetration of wind energy in a rural microgrid. Combinations of centralized (direct control) and decentralized (autonomous response) control strategies are investigated. Detailed dynamic models for a rural microgrid are built to conduct simulations. The system response to large disturbances and frequency regulation are tested. It is shown that optimal control coordination of DERs can be achieved to maintain system frequency while maximizing wind power usage and reducing the wear and tear on fossil fueled generators.

Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Samaan, Nader A.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Chunlian; Zhang, Yu

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO); Taylor, Roger W. (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On-demand maximally entangled states with a parity meter and continuous feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating on-demand maximally entangled states is one of the corner stones for quantum information processing. Parity measurements can serve to create Bell states and have been implemented via an electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer among others. However, the entanglement generation is necessarily harmed by measurement induced dephasing processes in one of the two parity subspace. In this work, we propose two different schemes of continuous feedback for a parity measurement. They enable us to avoid both the measurement-induced dephasing process and the experimentally unavoidable dephasing, e.g. due to fluctuations of the gate voltages controlling the initialization of the qubits. We show that we can generate maximally entangled steady states in both parity subspaces. Importantly, the measurement scheme we propose is valid for implementation of parity measurements with feedback loops in various solid-state environments.

Clemens Meyer zu Rheda; Géraldine Haack; Alessandro Romito

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Computing a Maximal Depth Point in the Plane Stefan Langerman # William Steiger +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], [7],[10],[11]. One of the more familiar ones was proposed by John Tukey [12], a natural extension to d > 1 of the notion in (1). Given a set S = {P 1 , . . . , Pn} of n points in R d , the Tukey depth is a point µ of maximal depth, and we write # # = #(S) for the Tukey depth of a median. For integer k > 0 let

Langerman, Stefan

171

Almost Maximal Lepton Mixing with Large T Violation in Neutrino Oscillations and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out two simple but instructive possibilities to construct the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices, from which the nearly bi-maximal neutrino mixing with large T violation can naturally emerge. The two lepton mixing scenarios are compatible very well with current experimental data on solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations, and one of them may lead to an observable T-violating asymmetry between \

Zhi-zhong Xing

2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

An investigation of the relationship between blood flow and maximal oxygen intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exercise physiolojists consider maximal oxygen intake as a good, if not the best, measure of cardiorespiratory fitness (38, 43). Lung ventilation, pulmonary diffusion, oxygen and carbon di oxide transport by the blood, cardiac function, vascular... kilogram of body weight is the meaningful value since it describes the maximum quantity of oxidative energy available for moving the body along the ground. For examining the performance of the cardiorespiratory system, the va'1ues should be expressed...

Riggs, Charles Elmer

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogue materials exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FIDELITY STUDIES OF INTERSTELLAR DUST ANALOGUE TRACKS... the Stardust Mission exposed aerogel collector panels for a total of about 200 days to the stream... of interstellar...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - acaricide exposed scabies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

With the exception of scabies and Ebola (Kalema-Zikusoka et... exposed to tourism (ecotourism, n 109) and research (research, n 71), and wild gorillas (n 24 Source:...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mice exposed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: E production. Adult offspring of mice that were exposed to both A. fumigatus and diesel exhaust particles... and arterial muscularization were detected among adult...

176

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE Life; accepted in final form 22 February 2000 Ortiz, Rudy M., and Charles E. Wade. Water balance in rats exposed

Ortiz, Rudy M.

178

LPSC XXXI Houston, March 2000 SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann 1,2 and C. Floss 1,3 , 1 Laboratory for Space Sciences, 2 Physics Department, 3@howdy.wustl.edu). Introduction: Aerogel is the medium of choice for the intact capture of small particles in space, because of their component materials [1, 2]. After space-exposed aerogel is returned to the laboratory, the first step

179

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann 1: Aerogel is the medium of choice for the intact capture of small particles in space, because it is capable materials [1, 2]. After space-exposed aerogel is returned to the laboratory, the first step of analysis

180

Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Abstract: Phase changes in high...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A multibiomarker approach in juvenile turbot, Scophthalmus maximus, exposed to contaminated sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multibiomarker approach in juvenile turbot, Scophthalmus maximus, exposed to contaminated in "Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 80 (2012) 45-53" DOI : 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2012.02.010 #12;Abstract Juvenile turbots were exposed in laboratory condition to a mixture of chemical contaminants associated with harbour

Boyer, Edmond

182

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

Hopkins, William A.

183

Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

Jarvholm, B. (Dept.of Occupational Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden); Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a weak measurement, the average output ?o? of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ?{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ?{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling ?, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but ?o? stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and ?, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification ?o? cannot exceed the initial uncertainty ?{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain ?o???{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

Di Lorenzo, Antonio, E-mail: dilorenzo.antonio@gmail.com

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Maximizing Multiprocessor Performance with the SUIF Compiler Mary W. Hall y Jennifer M. Anderson Saman P. Amarasinghe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Multiprocessor Performance with the SUIF Compiler Mary W. Hall y Jennifer M. Anderson and NSF. Jennifer Anderson is currently a researcher with Digital Equipment's Western Research Lab. 1 #12

Pratt, Vaughan

186

Topological BF models with maximal field spectra: Consistent self-interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking into account the recent developments in alternative descriptions of gravity via topological BF models, all consistent self-interactions of such theories with maximal field spectra in D=4,5,6 are analyzed in order to facilitate further generalizations to an arbitrary D. For convenience, the deformation of the solution to the master equation in the context of the BRST-antifield formalism is used as a general method of constructing consistent interacting gauge field theories. Also, commonly used hypotheses on quantum field theories on Minkowski space-times are employed.

Bizdadea, C.; Cioroianu, E. M.; Saliu, S. O.; Sararu, S. C.; Stanciu-Oprean, L. [Department of Physics, University of Craiova, 200585 Craiova (Romania)

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Maximal tripartite entanglement between singlet-triplet qubits in quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singlet-triplet states in double quantum dots are promising realizations of qubits, and capacitive coupling can be used to create entanglement between these qubits. We propose an entangling three-qubit gate of singlet-triplet qubits in a triangular setup. Our simulations using a realistic microscopic model show that a maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be generated as the qubits are evolved under exchange. Furthermore, our analysis for the gate operation can be used to extract the actual experimental pulse sequence needed to realize this.

Tuukka Hiltunen; Ari Harju

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

A comment on the construction of the maximal globally hyperbolic Cauchy development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under mild assumptions, we remove all traces of the axiom of choice from the construction of the maximal globally hyperbolic Cauchy development in general relativity. The construction relies on the notion of direct union manifolds, which we review. The construction given is very general: any physical theory with a suitable geometric representation (in particular all classical fields), and such that a strong notion of “local existence and uniqueness” of solutions for the corresponding initial value problem is available, is amenable to the same treatment.

Wong, Willie Wai-Yeung, E-mail: willie.wong@epfl.ch [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bring All People Together: Maximizing Diversity & Inclusion at Hallmark Cards, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and corporate Diversity & Inclusion roles to design an integrative solution that maximizes the impact of D&I on the marketplace. Background Story 1 Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) at Hallmark Over the past two decades, diversity councils and employee resource...Central.com: Diversity at Work, 2011 3. Strategy After research and commissioning a team of writers and designers to explore a more universal approach to faith and spirituality, a plan was put in place to create a program that would help guide product development...

Wimberly, Richard Buck

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available “unrestrained” organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Infrared scaling solutions beyond the Landau gauge: The maximally Abelian gauge and Abelian infrared dominance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional equations like exact renormalization group and Dyson-Schwinger equations have contributed to a better understanding of non-perturbative phenomena in quantum field theories in terms of the underlying Green functions. In Yang-Mills theory especially the Landau gauge has been used, as it is the most accessible gauge for these methods. The growing understanding obtained in this gauge allows to proceed to other gauges in order to obtain more information about the relation of different realizations of the confinement mechanism. In the maximally Abelian gauge first results are very encouraging as a variant of Abelian infrared dominance is found: The Abelian part of the gauge field propagator is enhanced at low momenta and thereby dominates the dynamics in the infrared. Its role is therefore similar to that of the ghost propagator in the Landau gauge, where one denotes the corresponding phenomenon as ghost dominance. Also the ambiguity of two different types of solutions (decoupling and scaling) exists in both gauges. Here we present how the two solutions are related in the maximally Abelian gauge. The intricacy of the system of functional equations in this gauge required the development of some new tools and methods as, for example, the automated derivation of the equations by the program DoFun. We also present results for linear covariant and ghost anti-ghost symmetric gauges.

Markus Q. Huber; Reinhard Alkofer; Kai Schwenzer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Renewable Energy, Nuclear Power and Galileo: Do Scientists Have a Duty to Expose Popular Misconceptions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OPINION Renewable Energy, Nuclear Power and Galileo: Do Scientists Have a Duty to Expose Popular misconception discussed below concerns the fallacy that renewable energy is rapidly supplanting conventional energy. Total non-hydro renewables today offset o

Hansen, James E.

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - abattoir workers exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energization or start-up of the equipment or release... and sign on the complex lockout permit before performing any work. Each worker who may be exposed... .stanford.edu...

194

Safety First Safety AlwaysSafety Last Using abrasive wheel equipment exposes you to many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety AlwaysSafety Last Using abrasive wheel equipment exposes you to many potential and strength and meet all manufacturer specifications. Abrasive Wheel Machinery and Tools Safety Tip #1

Minnesota, University of

195

Who is Exposed to Gas Prices? How Gasoline Prices Affect Automobile Manufacturers and Dealerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Who is Exposed to Gas Prices? How Gasoline Prices Affect Automobile Manufacturers and Dealerships Prices Affect Automobile Manufacturers and Dealerships Abstract Many consumers are keenly aware, by contrast, we investigate how gasoline prices affect the automobile industry: manufacturers and dealerships

Rothman, Daniel

196

Characterization of transient cavitation in gas sparged solutions exposed to megasonic field using cyclic voltammetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of transient cavitation in gas sparged solutions exposed to megasonic field using 2011 Keywords: Megasonic energy Transient cavitation Acoustic streaming Dissolved gases Microelectrode been a significant interest in understanding the phenomena of cavitation and acoustic streaming, which

Deymier, Pierre

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy steel exposed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the past year, creep tests were undertaken of 9Cr-1Mo-V steel samples exposed to prior creep for times from... UNDERSTANDING DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN FERRITIC STEELS Robert W....

198

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1988 through December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to disseminate information concerning the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to fallout radiation in 1954. This report discusses the medical care provided and the medical findings for the years 1988-1991. Details of the BRAVO thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published, and a 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association describing the acute medical effects in the exposed population remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Participation in the Marshall Islands Medical Program by the exposed Marshallese is voluntary. In the spring and fall of each year, medical surveillance is provided to exposed and unexposed cohorts. Examinations performed include: a cancer-related examination as defined by the American Society, an annual thyroid examination and thyroid function testing, serum prolactin testing looking for pituitary tumors, annual blood counts to include platelets, and evaluation for paraneoplastic evidence of neoplasms. This report details the medical program, medical findings, and thyroid surgery findings. Deaths (4 exposed and 10 nonexposed) that occurred during the reporting period are discussed. There is a mild but relatively consistent depression of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet concentrations in the blood of the exposed population. This depression appears to be of no clinical significance. Thyroid hypofunction, either clinical or biochemical, has been documented as a consequence of radiation exposure in 14 exposed individuals. Previously, one other exposed person was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma. During this reporting period, a thyroid nodule was identified in an individual who was in utero during the exposure. Upon pathologic review, the nodule was diagnosed as occult papillary carcinoma.

Howard, J.E.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.; Adams, W.H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Quantum Ratchets on Maximally Uniform States in Phase Space: Semiclassical Full-Chaos Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generic kind of quantum chaotic ratchet is introduced, based on initial states that are \\emph{uniform} in phase space with the \\emph{maximal possible} resolution of one Planck cell. Unlike a classical phase-space uniform density, such a state usually carries a \\emph{nonzero} ratchet current, even in \\emph{symmetric} systems. This quantum ratchet effect basically emerges from the generic asymmetry of the state quasicoordinates in the Planck cell. It is shown, on the basis of exact results, general arguments, and extensive numerical evidence, that in a semiclassical full-chaos regime the variance of the current over all the states is nearly proportional to the chaotic-diffusion rate and to the square of the scaled Planck constant. Experimental realizations are suggested.

Itzhack Dana

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers: The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps that the dimmers were historically designed to control, and how these differences can lead to complications when trying to dim LEDs. Compatibility between a specific LED source and a specific phase-cut dimmer is often unknown and difficult to assess, and ensuring compatibility adds complexity to the design, specification, bidding, and construction observation phases for new buildings and major remodel projects. To maximize project success, this report provides both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects, as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures.

Miller, Naomi J.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Maximizing the Value of Photovoltaic Installations on Schools in California: Choosing the Best Electricity Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schools in California often have a choice between multiple electricity rate options. For schools with photovoltaic (PV) installations, choosing the right rate is essential to maximize the value of PV generation. The rate option that minimizes a school?s electricity expenses often does not remain the most economical choice after the school installs a PV system. The complex interaction between PV generation, building load, and rate structure makes determining the best rate a challenging task. This report evaluates 22 rate structures across three of California?s largest electric utilities--Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)--in order to identify common rate structure attributes that are favorable to PV installations.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characterization of measurement uncertainties using the correlations between local outcomes obtained from maximally entangled pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint measurements of non-commuting observables are characterized by unavoidable measurement uncertainties that can be described in terms of the error statistics for input states with well-defined values for the target observables. However, a complete characterization of measurement errors must include the correlations between the errors of the two observables. Here, we show that these correlations appear in the experimentally observable measurement statistics obtained by performing the joint measurement on maximally entangled pairs. For two-level systems, the results indicate that quantum theory requires imaginary correlations between the measurement errors of X and Y since these correlations are represented by the operator product XY=iZ in the measurement operators. Our analysis thus reveals a directly observable consequence of non-commutativity in the statistics of quantum measurements.

Shota Kino; Taiki Nii; Holger F. Hofmann

2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

Look, Nicole [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McDermott, William J. [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States)] [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States); Bradley, Elizabeth [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)] [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A convex approximation approach to Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under outage constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers weighted sum rate maximization of multiuser multiple-input single-output interference channel (MISO-IFC) under outage constraints. The outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem is a nonconvex optimization problem and is difficult to solve. While it is possible to optimally deal with this problem in an exhaustive search manner by finding all the Pareto-optimal rate tuples in the (discretized) outage-constrained achievable rate region, this approach, however, suffers from a prohibitive computational complexity and is feasible only when the number of transmitter-receive pairs is small. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization based approximation method for efficiently handling the outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem. The proposed approximation method consists of solving a sequence of convex optimization problems, and thus can be efficiently implemented by interior-point methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method can yield near-optim...

Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

PER-NODE POWER MINIMAL MULTICAST TREES WHICH MAXIMIZE THE TIME-TO-FIRST-FAILURE IN ENERGY CONSTRAINED STATIC WIRELESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PER-NODE POWER MINIMAL MULTICAST TREES WHICH MAXIMIZE THE TIME-TO-FIRST-FAILURE IN ENERGY as the time till the first node in the network runs out of battery energy, and minimizing the total power in energy constrained static wireless networks. It is shown in [6] that simply optimizing the TTFF criterion

Arabshahi, Payman

208

Note on helicity balance of the Galerkin method for the 3D NavierStokes equations Maxim Olshanskii a,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 July 2009 Received in revised form 17 scheme. However, in contrast to the energy balance, the helicity balance does not hold in the usual wayNote on helicity balance of the Galerkin method for the 3D Navier­Stokes equations Maxim Olshanskii

Olshanskii, Maxim A.

209

Effective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben-efit of appropriate technologies in order to increase cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to help in the exploration process and to test the effectiveness of dif- ferent methods overEffective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben- efit of appropriate technologies in order of discovery. In other words, correct use of available tools can allow exploration programs to find more ore

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

210

A REMARK ON THE HOMOTOPY EQUIVALENCE Abstract. Being a maximal compact subgroup of SLn C, SUn is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REMARK ON THE HOMOTOPY EQUIVALENCE SUn SLn C JUAN SOUTO Abstract. Being a maximal compact subgroup of SLn C, SUn is a deformation retract of the former group. In this note we prove that, for sufficiently large n, there is no retraction of SLn C to SUn which preserves commutativity. 1. Introduction

Souto, Juan

211

Motorcycle Maximal Safe Speed in Cornering Situation H. Slimi and D. Ichalal and H. Arioui and S. Mammar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motorcycle Maximal Safe Speed in Cornering Situation H. Slimi and D. Ichalal and H. Arioui and S motorcycle speed in curves. The three main actors which are the vehicle, the driver and the infrastructure the last decade. However analysis of accident statistics shows that the number of death when a motorcycle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

306 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 25, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 Lifetime Maximization via Cooperative Nodes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locations and energy levels among distributed nodes. First, a lifetime maximization problem via cooperative is with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineer- ing and the Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA (email: kjrliu@eng.umd.edu). Z. Han is with the Department

Liu, K. J. Ray

213

Maximal energy that can be converted by a dielectric elastomer generator Soo Jin Adrian Koh,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generators have been designed to harvest energy from walking,5,6 ocean waves,7 wind, and combustion.8Maximal energy that can be converted by a dielectric elastomer generator Soo Jin Adrian Koh,1 2009 Mechanical energy can be converted to electrical energy by using a dielectric elastomer generator

Suo, Zhigang

214

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

Dennis H. LeMieux

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Research needs to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NIPER was contracted by the US Department of Energy Bartlesville (Okla.) Project Office (DOE/BPO) to identify research needs to increase production of the domestic oil resource, and K A Energy Consultants, Inc. was subcontracted to review EOR field projects. This report summarizes the findings of that investigation. Professional society and trade journals, DOE reports, dissertations, and patent literature were reviewed to determine the state-of-the-art of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and drilling technologies and the constraints to wider application of these technologies. The impacts of EOR on the environment and the constraints to the application of EOR due to environmental regulations were also reviewed. A review of well documented EOR field projects showed that in addition to the technical constraints, management factors also contributed to the lower-than-predicted oil recovery in some of the projects reviewed. DOE-sponsored projects were reviewed, and the achievements by these projects and the constraints which these projects were designed to overcome were also identified. Methods of technology transfer utilized by the DOE were reviewed, and several recommendations for future technology transfer were made. Finally, several research areas were identified and recommended to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource. 14 figs., 41 tabs.

Tham, M.K.; Burchfield, T.; Chung, Ting-Horng; Lorenz, P.; Bryant, R.; Sarathi, P.; Chang, Ming Ming; Jackson, S.; Tomutsa, L. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)); Dauben, D.L. (K and A Energy Consultants, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Finding the quantum thermoelectric with maximal efficiency and minimal entropy production at given power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nonlinear scattering theory for quantum systems with strong Seebeck and Peltier effects, and consider their use as heat-engines and refrigerators with finite power outputs. This article gives detailed derivations of the results summarized in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130601 (2014). It shows how to use the scattering theory to find (i) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum possible power output, and (ii) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum efficiency at given power output. The latter corresponds to a minimal entropy production at that power output. These quantities are of quantum origin since they depend on system size over electronic wavelength, and so have no analogue in classical thermodynamics. The maximal efficiency coincides with Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decreases with increasing power output. This gives a fundamental lower bound on entropy production, which means that reversibility (in the thermodynamic sense) is impossible for finite power output. The suppression of efficiency by (nonlinear) phonon and photon effects is addressed in detail; when these effects are strong, maximum efficiency coincides with maximum power. Finally, we show in particular limits (typically without magnetic fields) that relaxation within the quantum system does not allow the system to exceed the bounds derived for relaxation-free systems, however a general proof of this remains elusive.

Robert S. Whitney

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Non-Abelian black holes in D=5 maximal gauged supergravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate static non-Abelian black hole solutions of anti-de Sitter (AdS) Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton gravity, which is obtained as a consistent truncation of five-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. If the dilaton is (consistently) set to zero, the remaining equations of motion, with a spherically-symmetric ansatz, may be derived from a superpotential. The associated first-order equations admit an explicit solution supported by a non-Abelian SU(2) gauge potential, which has a logarithmically growing mass term. In an extremal limit the horizon geometry becomes AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 3}. If the dilaton is also excited, the equations of motion cannot easily be solved explicitly, but we obtain the asymptotic form of the more general non-Abelian black holes in this case. An alternative consistent truncation, in which the Yang-Mills fields are set to zero, also admits a description in terms of a superpotential. This allows us to construct explicit wormhole solutions (neutral spherically-symmetric domain walls). These solutions may be generalized to dimensions other than five.

Cvetic, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Lue, H. [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Division of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, China Institute for Advanced Study, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing, 100081 (China); Pope, C. N. [George and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Finding the quantum thermoelectric with maximal efficiency and minimal entropy production at given power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nonlinear scattering theory for quantum systems with strong Seebeck and Peltier effects, and consider their use as heat-engines and refrigerators with finite power outputs. This article gives detailed derivations of the results summarized in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130601 (2014). It shows how to use the scattering theory to find (i) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum possible power output, and (ii) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum efficiency at given power output. The latter corresponds to a minimal entropy production at that power output. These quantities are of quantum origin since they depend on system size over electronic wavelength, and so have no analogue in classical thermodynamics. The maximal efficiency coincides with Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decreases with increasing power output. This gives a fundamental lower bound on entropy production, which means that reversibility (in the thermodynamic sense) is impossible for finite power output. The suppression of efficiency by (nonlinear) phonon and photon effects is addressed in detail; when these effects are strong, maximum efficiency coincides with maximum power. Finally, we show in particular limits (typically without magnetic fields) that relaxation within the quantum system does not allow the system to exceed the bounds derived for relaxation-free systems, however, a general proof of this remains elusive.

Robert S. Whitney

2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent ofthe 10 mrem/yr standard.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

CURN, B.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

of a brownian ratchet. Thermal fluctuations of the flexible actin filaments expose the tip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a brownian ratchet. Thermal fluctuations of the flexible actin filaments expose the tip long enough for a new monomer to attach. Once the tip springs back, it ratchets the membrane forward by the length of one monomer. Brownian ratchets have found a life of their own in the physics literature

Ahissar, Ehud

227

Roots and fungi accelerate carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Roots and fungi accelerate carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2 of soil carbon (C) accu- mulation owing to microbial priming of `old' soil organic matter (SOM). However under elevated CO2 is sufficient in magnitude to offset increased belowground inputs. In addition, the C

Phillips, Richard P.

228

Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon to O3, atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing rapidly (Keeling et al., 1995 concentrations may offset the detrimental effects of increasing O3 (Allen, 1990). Some studies have shown that CO

229

FLUORESCENCE CHANGES IN PORPHYRIDIUM EXPOSED TO GREEN LIGHT OF DIFFERENT INTENSITY: A NEW EMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUORESCENCE CHANGES IN PORPHYRIDIUM EXPOSED TO GREEN LIGHT OF DIFFERENT INTENSITY: A NEW EMISSION supposed to require two light reactions for the transfer of one hydrogen atom from water to carbon dioxide the existence of this second trap. With increase in intensity of green light, I,, the differential fluorescence

Govindjee

230

Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl compounds in midge (Chironomus riparius) larvae exposed to sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to sediment Delphine Bertin1* , Benoît J.D. Ferrari1,4 , Pierre Labadie2 , Alexandre Sapin1 , Jeanne Garric1 exposed to sediments from a deposition2 sampled at a site along the Rhône River (France) downstream of an industrial site3 releasing various perfluorinated chemicals. This sediment is characterized by high4

231

Aging of HDPE Pipes Exposed to Diesel Lubricant Amelia H. U. Torres1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aging of HDPE Pipes Exposed to Diesel Lubricant Amelia H. U. Torres1 , José R. M. d'Almeida1 behavior of high-density polyethylene pipes by exposure to a diesel lubricant were investigated the analysis performed, physical aging was identified as the aging process occurring when the HDPE pipes came

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Wind Farms in Regions Exposed to Tropical Cyclones Niels-Erik Clausen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Farms in Regions Exposed to Tropical Cyclones Niels-Erik Clausen1 , niels Energy A/S, A.C. Meyers Vænge 9, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark, Phone +45 44 80 65 71 3 Tripod Wind 6001 Summary The present paper analyses the design basis of wind farms to be established in regions

233

The Caledonide Orogen in the Nordic countries is exposed in Norway, western Sweden, westernmost Fin-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Caledonide Orogen in the Nordic countries is exposed in Norway, western Sweden, westernmost Fin-age basement. In northernmost Norway, the NE-trending Caledonian thrust front trun- cates the NW and north- eastern Greenland; it continues northwards from northern Norway, across the Barents Shelf

Fossen, Haakon

234

Histopathological changes in ewe lambs exposed to prolonged diet on lucerne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short note Histopathological changes in ewe lambs exposed to prolonged diet on lucerne M Barberan J during nine months on lucerne as compared with 10 controls reared on ryegrass. These changes consisted. The mammary glands of lambs reared on lucerne were significantly heavier and showed secretory activity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Rapid degradation of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots exposed to gamma irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- grade their optical properties. In this paper, we report on the effects of gamma irradiationRapid degradation of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots exposed to gamma irradiation Nathan J. Withers of 137 Cs gamma irradiation on photoluminescent properties of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots

New Mexico, University of

236

HiRISE observations of new impact craters exposing Martian ground ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice rather than ice-cemented regolith. Although some clean ice may be produced by the impact processHiRISE observations of new impact craters exposing Martian ground ice Colin M. Dundas1 , Shane craters or clusters have been observed to excavate bright material inferred to be ice at mid

Byrne, Shane

237

Fish Embryos Exposed to Oil From BP Spill Develop Deformities, a Study Finds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24, 2014 Embryos of tuna and amberjack that were exposed to crude oil collected from the Deepwater of Mexico when the disaster occurred. An explosion and fire nearly four years ago spewed roughly 4.1 million and Australia, affirmed recent studies showing that components of crude oil deformed the embryos of herring

Grosell, Martin

238

Author's personal copy Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus Digestibility Forage quality Herbivore nutrition Phenolics Rabbits Southern Piedmont a b s t r a c t A mixture) in a digestibility experiment. Forages and feed refusals were analyzed for concentrations of total cell wall

Ditchkoff, Steve

239

Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate Mercuric Sulfides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate in the environment is partly controlled by the bioavailability of inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) to anaerobic matter to form chemical species that include organic-coated mercury sulfide nanoparticles as reaction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Swedish industry is exposed to increasingly fierce competition. We need improved condi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to medium sized companies as members. LiU is the largest contributor in this area in addition to basic edSwedish industry is exposed to increasingly fierce competition. We need improved condi- tions for robust domestic production. Effec- tive use of resources is necessary for sustain- able development. Li

Zhao, Yuxiao

242

Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin Lisa L. Cunningham, Alan exposure results in the apoptotic destruction of auditory and vestibular hair cells. This ototoxic hair, immunohistochemistry, and specific caspase inhibitors to determine which caspases are activated in the hair cells

Rubel, Edwin

243

CURRICULUM VITAE Nov. 2008 NAME: Albert Mei-chu Cheh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and repair) Sabbatical leaves 1987, 1993-94 and 2000-2001 - Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, NIDDK, NIH.M. Chang, eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 61-76 (1980). 7. Cheh, A.M.*, Skochdopole, J., Koski, P

Lansky, Joshua

244

Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources such as solar and wind energy, waves and tides have the advantages of having much higher power stronger energy conversion devices lower in capital cost than for other renewable technologies and creating more job opportunities. For these major benefits the marine energy can provide us with, a great

Lavaei, Javad

245

Mei-Wei Cheng CEO Siemens North East Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kong. He was a Corporate Vice President of General Electric Co. and Chairman and CEO of GE (China) Ltd President of Ford Motor Company. Cheng joined Ford in 1998 from General Electric Corporation where he

Lin, Xiaodong

246

HEURISTIC SEARCH IN DATA BASE SYSTEMS Ru-Mei Kung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

path search problems. An expert system can employ this extended DBMS to pro- vide unified management. On large data sets, a DBMS is a practical necessity; hence, expert systems for such data sets must act function from such application programs into the DBMS. Common function can This research was sponsored

California at Irvine, University of

247

MEI~ORAXKJM POR k'HE OFFICER IN CHARGE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS- ,.__.-. - ,...

248

31 mei 2011 dinsdag Vertrouwen in eigen komkommers;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Productschap Groente en Fruit becijfert de schade op enkele tientallen miljoenen euro's per week. De export nog naar vergistingsinstallaties om er tenminste nog biogas van te maken', zegt de woordvoerder

Utrecht, Universiteit

249

Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

Wahl, Linnea

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

ROKKAN, D.J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

Wahl, Linnea

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Proximal renal tubular injury in rats sub-chronically exposed to low fluoride concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride is usually found in groundwater at a very wide range of concentration between 0.5 and 25 ppm. At present, few studies have assessed the renal effects of fluoride at environmentally relevant concentrations. Furthermore, most of these studies have used insensitive and nonspecific biomarkers of kidney injury. The aim of this study was to use early and sensitive biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury after fluoride exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations. Recently weaned male Wistar rats were exposed to low (15 ppm) and high (50 ppm) fluoride concentrations in drinking water for a period of 40 days. At the end of the exposure period, kidney injury biomarkers were measured in urine and renal mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time RT-PCR. Our results showed that the urinary kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), clusterin (Clu), osteopontin (OPN) and heat shock protein 72 excretion rate significantly increased in the group exposed to the high fluoride concentration. Accordingly, fluoride exposure increased renal Kim-1, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels. Moreover, there was a significant dose-dependent increase in urinary ?-2-microglobulin and cystatin-C excretion rate. Additionally, a tendency towards a dose dependent increase of tubular damage in the histopathological light microscopy findings confirmed the preferential impact of fluoride on the tubular structure. All of these changes occurred at early stages in which, the renal function was not altered. In conclusion using early and sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury, we were able to found proximal tubular alterations in rats sub-chronically exposed to fluoride. - Highlights: • Exposure to low concentrations of fluoride induced proximal tubular injury • Increase in urinary Kim-1, Clu, OPN and Hsp72 in 50 ppm fluoride-exposed group • Increase in urinary B2M and CysC in 15 and 50 ppm fluoride-exposed groups • Fluoride exposure increased renal Kim, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels. • Fluoride increased kidney injury biomarkers at stages where eGFR was unaltered.

Cárdenas-González, Mariana C.; Del Razo, Luz M. [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan [Unidad de Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México, D. F., México (Mexico); Jacobo-Estrada, Tania [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); López-Bayghen, Esther [Departamento de Genética y Biología Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the 300 Area Process Sewer Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the cleanout of sections of the 300 Area PS. Approval of the NOC will allow the pressure washing of certain pipe sections, the sump in the TEDF lift station, and the cleaning of PS 16 of the 300 Area PS that contains low levels of radioactivity. Section 15.0 of this NOC discusses the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated emissions from these cleaning activities. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential TEDE to the MEI resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from cleanout of the 300 Area PS is 4.70 E-05 millirem (mrem) per year. This dose was derived by conservatively estimating the doses from both the pressure washing and the use of the Guzzler{trademark} for removal of the liquid/soil mixture, as described in Section 5.0. and adding these doses together.

MENARD, N.M.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

258

Search for Maximal Flavor Violating Scalars in Same-Charge Lepton Pairs in pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of maximal flavor violation (MxFV) in elementary particle physics may contain at least one new scalar SU(2) doublet field ?FV=(?[superscript 0],?[superscript +]) that couples the first and third generation quarks ...

Miles, Christopher J.

259

Generalization of the Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie optimization within the $\\{?\\}$-expansion and the Principle of Maximal Conformality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss generalizations of the BLM optimization procedure for renormalization group invariant quantities. In this respect, we discuss in detail the features and construction of the $\\{\\beta\\}$--expansion representation instead of the standard perturbative series with regards to the Adler $D$-function and Bjorken polarized sum rules obtained in order of ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s^4)$. Based on the $\\{\\beta\\}$--expansion we analyse different schemes of optimization, including the corrected Principle of Maximal Conformality, numerically illustrating their results. We suggest our scheme for the series optimization and apply it to both the above quantities.

A. L. Kataev; S. V. Mikhailov

2015-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Self-shielding of a plasma-exposed surface during extreme transient heat loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power deposition on a tungsten surface exposed to combined pulsed/continuous high power plasma is studied. A study of the correlation between the plasma parameters and the power deposition on the surface demonstrates the effect of particle recycling in the strongly coupled regime. Upon increasing the input power to the plasma source, the energy density to the target first increases then decreases. We suggest that the sudden outgassing of hydrogen particles from the target and their subsequent ionization causes this. This back-flow of neutrals impedes the power transfer to the target, providing a shielding of the metal surface from the intense plasma flux.

Zielinski, J. J.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Morgan, T. W.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schram, D. C. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number_sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

Ignatiev, A. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

Ignatiev, A [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Long-term mortality profile of heavily-exposed lead smelter workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Of 241 male smelter workers diagnosed as having lead poisoning during 1928 to 1959, 140 are known to have subsequently died. Their cause-of-death profile has been compared with that of 695 other male decedents (predominantly nonoffice production workers) from the same smelter and with that of the Australian male population. Age-standarized proportional mortality analysis shows a substantial excess in the numbers of deaths from chronic renal disease and cerebral hemorrhage, particularly prior to 1965. A moderate excess was also apparent for the other smelter workers. In recent years, these mortality excesses in lead-exposed workers have largely dissipated.

McMichael, A.J. (South Australian Health Commission, Adelaide); Johnson, H.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity

Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19 {+-} 39.36 vs. 241.52 {+-} 42.32 nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74 {+-} 17.37 vs. 134.28 {+-} 25.49 {mu}mol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1{sub 192}QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p > 0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p < 0.001). For PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p < 0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p < 0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1 gene, which might have an important role in the identification of individual risk factors in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Thakur, Sachin [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Presently at, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Banerjee, Basu Dev [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Pasha, Syed Tazeen [National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Rai, Arvind, E-mail: arvindrai.nicd@gmail.com [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Defects of a phosphosilicate glass exposed to the 193-nm radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induced absorption is measured in a hydrogen-unloaded phosphosilicate glass (PSG) in spectral ranges from 140 to 850 nm and from 1000 to 1700 nm before and after its exposure to the 193-nm radiation. It is shown that the induced-absorption bands in the range between 140 and 300 nm do not coincide with the bands observed earlier after exposing a PSG to X-rays. It is assumed that the photorefractive effect in the PSG is related to variations induced in the glass network rather than to defects responsible for the induced-absorption bands. (fiber and integrated optics)

Larionov, Yu V; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Aspects of glycine metabolism in juvenile white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus, L.) acutely exposed to hypersaline conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penaeus set1ferus. D1stribution of tr1t1um label (adminis- te ed a~sll-gtycfne and gh-p oline) hetwe the FAA and macromolecular pools of abdom1nal muscle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Penaeus set1ferus. Di str1but1on of C label (admin 1s... th1s an1mal is exposed to a hypersaline environment. Two meta- bol1c pathways by which the glycine levels might be increased have been investigated. The poss1b1lity that catabolism of a specif1c protein may contribute to the increased glyc1ne...

Koenig, Michael L

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Corrosion behavior of technetium waste forms exposed to various aqueous environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium is a long-lived beta emitter produced in high yields from uranium as a waste product in spent nuclear fuel and has a high degree of environmental mobility as pertechnetate. It has been proposed that Tc be immobilized into various metallic waste forms to prevent Tc mobility while producing a material that can withstand corrosion exposed to various aqueous medias to prevent the leachability of Tc to the environment over long periods of time. This study investigates the corrosion behavior of Tc and Tc alloyed with 316 stainless steel and Zr exposed to a variety of aqueous media. To date, there is little investigative work related to Tc corrosion behavior and less related to potential Tc containing waste forms. Results indicate that immobilizing Tc into stainless steel-zirconium alloys can be a promising technique to store Tc for long periods of time while reducing the need to separately store used nuclear fuel cladding. Initial results indicate that metallic Tc and its alloys actively corrode in all media. We present preliminary corrosion rates of 100% Tc, 10% Tc - 90% SS{sub 85%}Zr{sub 15%}, and 2% Tc - 98% SS{sub 85%}Zr{sub 15%} in varying concentrations of nitric acid and pH 10 NaOH using the resistance polarization method while observing the trend that higher concentrations of Tc alloyed to the sample tested lowers the corrosion rate of the proposed waste package.

Kolman, David Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mausolf, Edward [UNIV OF NEVADA; Czerwinski, Ken [UNIV OF NEVADA; Poineau, Frederic [UNIV OF NEVADA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cohort and case-control analyses of workers exposed to vinyl chloride: An update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mortality in a cohort of workers at a vinyl chloride polymerization plant has been updated, extending the period of observation in the original study from 1974 to 1986. Workers at this plant may have been exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and/or polyvinyl chloride dust, or may have had no exposure to either substance. Seventy-six percent of the work force worked in jobs with potential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. Among the total cohort, statistically significant excess risks were observed for liver, lung, and brain cancer. For the subcohort of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for liver cancer was 333 (90% confidence interval (CI) 202 to 521). However, there were no significant excesses of either brain (SMR = 145, 90% CI 78 to 249) or lung cancer (SMR = 115, 90% CI 96 to 141). To investigate dose response, nested case-control studies for liver, brain, and lung cancer were conducted among the total cohort (including the nonexposed). For these studies there were two exposure variables, cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer and cumulative dose of polyvinyl chloride dust. Cumulative dose was defined as the product of level and duration of exposure. The only significant association between disease risk and cumulative dose was for liver cancer and cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer. Further division of the liver cancers into angiosarcoma (n = 12) and other liver cancers (n = 7), based on review of death certificates and medical records, showed that the dose response existed only for angiosarcomas.

Wu, W.A.; Steenland, K.; Brown, D.; Wells, V.; Jones, J.; Schulte, P.; Halperin, W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Voltage/Pitch Control for Maximization and Regulation of Active/Reactive Powers in Wind Turbines with Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses the problem of controlling a variable-speed wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), modeled as an electromechanically-coupled nonlinear system with rotor voltages and blade pitch angle as its inputs, active and reactive powers as its outputs, and most of the aerodynamic and mechanical parameters as its uncertainties. Using a blend of linear and nonlinear control strategies (including feedback linearization, pole placement, uncertainty estimation, and gradient-based potential function minimization) as well as time-scale separation in the dynamics, we develop a controller that is capable of maximizing the active power in the Maximum Power Tracking (MPT) mode, regulating the active power in the Power Regulation (PR) mode, seamlessly switching between the two modes, and simultaneously adjusting the reactive power to achieve a desired power factor. The controller consists of four cascaded components, uses realistic feedback signals, and operates without knowledge of the C_p-...

Guo, Yi; Jiang, John N; Tang, Choon Yik; Ramakumar, Rama G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Formation of nanostructures at the glass-carbon surface exposed to laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technique for obtaining nanostructures in the field of high-power laser radiation at the surface of carbon materials is developed. A specific feature of this technique is the formation of liquid carbon inside the region of laser action in the sample exposed to radiation in air at a pressure of {approx}1 atm. Several types of nanostructures (quasi-domains and nanopeaks) are detected in the laser cavern and beyond the range of laser action. Mechanisms of formation of such structures are proposed. The formation of quasi-domains is related to crystallisation of the melt. The nanopeak groups are formed outside the laser action region during the deposition of hot vapours of the material escaping from this region. The dependences of the variation in morphological properties of the nanostructures on the duration of laser action and the radii of typical cavern zones on the laser radiation power are obtained. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

Abramov, D V; Gerke, M N; Kucherik, A O; Kutrovskaya, S V; Prokoshev, V G; Arakelyan, S M [Vladimir State University, Vladimir (Russian Federation)

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO{sub 2} at 650 C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Anderson, Mark [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Taylor, D [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Interactions of mobile helium clusters with surfaces and grain boundaries of plasma-exposed tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results of atomistic computations for the interactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}) with free surfaces and grain boundaries (GBs) in tungsten toward development of continuum drift-diffusion-reaction models for the dynamics of mobile helium clusters in plasma-exposed tungsten. Molecular-statics (MS) simulations based on reliable many-body interatomic potentials are carried out for He{sub n} (1???n???7) clusters near sinks to obtain the potential energy profiles of the He{sub n} clusters as a function of the clusters' center-of-mass distance from a sink. Sinks investigated include surfaces, GBs, and regions in the vicinity of junctions where GBs intersect free surfaces. Elastic interaction potentials based on elastic inclusion theory provide an excellent description of the MS results for the cluster-sink interactions. The key parameter in the elastic models is the sink segregation strength, which is found to increase with increasing cluster size. Such cluster-sink interactions are responsible for the migration of small helium clusters by drift and for helium segregation on surfaces and grain boundaries in tungsten. Such helium segregation on sinks is observed in large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of helium aggregation in model polycrystalline tungsten at 933?K upon helium implantation.

Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effect of taurine on chemoshock seizure thresholds in lead-exposed animals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high levels of taurine found in developing brain have led to postulates that taurine is involved in brain maturation. The authors have examined the effect of taurine on the chemoshock threshold of rats reared in the presence of the environmental toxin, lead. Within 24 h of giving birth, dams were placed on one of four regimens: Group P received 0.4% lead acetate in the drinking water; Group T received 3% taurine in drinking water; Group PT received both taurine and lead acetate; and Group C received distilled water. The pups were weaned at 21 days, but maintained on the same treatments. Pentylene tetrazole seizure thresholds were determined at 42 days. Thresholds in Group P were significantly depressed relative to Group C (56.0 mg/kg v 79.9 mg/kg). Taurine supplementation had no effect on threshold (T = 72.7 mg/kg). However, thresholds in Group PT were significantly higher than those of Group P (PT = 85.2 mg/kg). These data show that whereas taurine was without effect on the threshold of animals not stressed by exposure to lead, it had a protective effect on exposed animals. As human neonates are unable to synthesize taurine, the findings reinforce the concept of taurine being a conditionally essential nutrient in developing humans.

Huxtable, R.J.; Shindo, S.; Nakagawa, K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Static corrosion of construction materials exposed to superphosphoric acid made from various sources of phosphate rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion tests were performed with various construction materials, such as carbon steel, cast iron, stainless steels, nickel and nickel-based alloys, copper and its alloys, aluminum alloy, zirconium alloy, and tantalum, exposed to wet-process superphosphoric acids (approximately 70% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) from all the suppliers in the United States and to a technical-grade (55% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) acid made by the electric furnace process. The study was conducted in response to reports from pipe-reactor users of excessive corrosion by superphosphoric acids and electric furnace acid. Test temperatures were ambient (approximately 21{degrees}C or 70{degrees}F), 66{degrees}C (150{degrees}F), and 93{degrees}C (200{degrees}F). Test results showed that temperature was a significant factor in acid corrosivity. Electric furnace acid was more corrosive than the superphosphoric acids. Carbon steel, cast iron, and aluminum alloy were not resistant to either the superphosphoric acids or the electric furnace acid. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and nickel-molybdenum (Ni-Mo) based alloys and tantalum exhibited adequate corrosion resistance in the superphosphoric acids and the electric furnace acid. Stainless steels performed well in all test acids at all test temperatures with some exceptions in the electric furnace acid at 93{degrees}C. Zirconium alloy, copper and its alloys, pure nickel, and Monel 400 provided adequate corrosion resistance to all test acids at ambient temperature only.

Nguyen, D.T.; McDonald, C.L.; McGill, K.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Constructal multi-scale package of vertical channels with natural convection and maximal heat transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW STRUCTURES-scale structures in natural convection with the objective of maximizing the heat transfer density, or the heat transfer rate per unit of volume§ . The flow volume is filled with vertical equidistant heated blades

Kihm, IconKenneth David

282

Maximal Air Bubble Entrainment at Liquid-Drop Impact Wilco Bouwhuis, Roeland C. A. van der Veen, Tuan Tran, Diederik L. Keij, Koen G. Winkels, Ivo R. Peters,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximal Air Bubble Entrainment at Liquid-Drop Impact Wilco Bouwhuis, Roeland C. A. van der Veen the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize

Snoeijer, Jacco

283

Maximizing the system value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for private use is permitted without payment of royalty provided that (1) each reproduction is done without and abstract, but no other portions, of this paper may be copied or distributed royalty free without further

Melhem, Rami

284

The Theoryof Maximally Flat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSACTIONSON AUDIO AND ELECTROACOUSTICS, VOL. AU-20, NO. 3, AUGUST 1972 dynamic drag of the voice coil be made as flat as thedesigner'sconstraints permit. II. Theory Let the dc resistance of the voice coil, rl the mechanical re- sistance of the cone suspension, and SIthe suspension stiff- ness or spring

California at Berkeley, University of

285

Rank-maximal matchings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irving,R.W. Kavitha,T. Mehlhorn,K. Michail,D. Paluch,K. Proceedings of 15th Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms, New Orleans, January 2004. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Irving, R.W.

286

Rank-maximal matchings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irving,R.W. Michail,D. Mehlhorn,K. Paluch,K. Telikepalli,K. ACM Transactions on Algorithms vol. 2 no. 4 pp 491-499 ACM

Irving, R.W.

287

Maximal Privacy without Coherence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Privacy is a fundamental feature of quantum mechanics. A coherently transmitted quantum state is inherently private. Remarkably, coherent quantum communication is not a prerequisite for privacy: there are quantum channels ...

Leung, Debbie

288

EE Maximization Tool  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamics inE-print to

289

Batch Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High the cover: InvisibleBaskettBassi IBMu s

290

Batch Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High the cover: InvisibleBaskettBassi IBMu

291

The hematological response and survival of acutley irradiated rats previously exposed to continuous and fractionated, low intensity gamma irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been shown to be increased when the nice had been exposed previously to low radiation doses. After "conditioning" 100 mice with 144 r whole~body X- radiation 0XQR) par . week for- a tntsi of three oeehsx Cronkjte ot-M. . :~. i~seel ~m 40 daya later...

Hooper, John Anderson

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Heavy oil; Asphaltenes; Naphthenic acids; Wettability; Oil­waterContact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water RonaldoG.dosSantos a , Rahoma S. Mohamed a,F , Antonio C. Bannwart b , Watson Loh c

Loh, Watson

293

1. Coastal waters are often exposed to heavy metals (HM) introduced from point and diffusive sources. Chronic and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Coastal waters are often exposed to heavy metals (HM) introduced from point and diffusive higher than in sea water. Heavy metals concentration in seawater 4. Most of the dissolved heavy metals sources. Chronic and acute environmental criteria for water quality were developed (e.g. EPA) based

Einat, Aharonov

294

Liver antioxidant and plasmatic immune responses in juvenile1 golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) exposed to dispersed crude oil2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) exposed to dispersed crude oil2 3 Thomas Milinkovitch1* , Awa Ndiaye2 , Wilfried Sanchez2 , Stéphane Le ; CD : Chemically Dispersed oil ; D : Dispersant solution ; MD : Mechanically Dispersed oil; WSF application is an oil spill response technique. To evaluate the environmental31 cost of this operation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

295

2015 Young Leader Scholarship Program The MACA Young Leader Scholarship Program (MACA YLSP) is designed to expose future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(MACA YLSP) is designed to expose future agriculturalists to the crop protection industry and future will be top-potential collegiate sophomores or juniors with an educational focus on agriculture. Candidates will notify the 13 universities via their ag school's career services office via email announcing the program

Isaacs, Rufus

296

Systematic Approach to Compare the Inflammatory Response of Liver Cell Culture Systems Exposed to Silver, Copper, and Nickel Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the induced cytokine expression in a murine liver cell line (AML12). Here we also utilized another system, co-cultures of hepatocytes, Kupffer’s cells, and lymphocytes isolated from C57BL6 mice. Cells were exposed to the materials over dose-response (0.1mg...

Banerjee, Nivedita

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Mount Perkins block, northwestern Arizona: An exposed cross section of an evolving, preextensional to synextensional magmatic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,  Daniel L. Feuerbach, 1 Mark K. Reagan, 1 Rodney V. Metcalf, 2 Phil Gans, 3 and J. D. Walker 4 Abstract. The steeply tilted Mount Perkins block, northwestern Arizona, exposes a cross section of a magmatic system that evolved through the onset...

Faulds, James E.; Feuerbach, Daniel L.; Reagan, Mark K.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Gans, Phil; Walker, J. Douglas

1995-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

The effects of ethylenediurea and sodium erythorbate on photosynthetic function of ozone-exposed loblolly pine seedlings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-top chambers in east Texas for one growing season beginning in April 1994 while being exposed to either sub-ambient (CF), approximate ambient (NF), 1.5Y,, 2.OX, or 2.5X ambient ozone levels. Net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g), and chloroplast...

Kuehler, Eric Anthony

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Oxidation of 9CrODS Exposed to Supercritical Water J. Bischoff and A.T. Motta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plant designs envisioned for its high thermal efficiency and simplified core. One of the major materials issues for the development of this reactor is the corrosion resistance of the cladding and structural materials exposed to supercritical water at a temperature between 500ºC and 600º

Motta, Arthur T.

300

Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis.

Nielsen, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Xihai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, Robert J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brooks, Antone L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lovaglio, Jamie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Patton, Kristin M. [Battelle Toxicology Northwest, Richland, WA (United States); McComish, Stacey [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Tolmachev, Sergei Y. [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Morgan, William F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Expectation-maximization algorithms for learning a finite mixture of univariate survival time distributions from partially specified class values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterogeneity exists on a data set when samples from di#11;erent classes are merged into the data set. Finite mixture models can be used to represent a survival time distribution on heterogeneous patient group by the proportions of each class and by the survival time distribution within each class as well. The heterogeneous data set cannot be explicitly decomposed to homogeneous subgroups unless all the samples are precisely labeled by their origin classes; such impossibility of decomposition is a barrier to overcome for estimating #12;nite mixture models. The expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm has been used to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of #12;nite mixture models by soft-decomposition of heterogeneous samples without labels for a subset or the entire set of data. In medical surveillance databases we can find partially labeled data, that is, while not completely unlabeled there is only imprecise information about class values. In this study we propose new EM algorithms that take advantages of using such partial labels, and thus incorporate more information than traditional EM algorithms. We particularly propose four variants of the EM algorithm named EM-OCML, EM-PCML, EM-HCML and EM-CPCML, each of which assumes a specific mechanism of missing class values. We conducted a simulation study on exponential survival trees with five classes and showed that the advantages of incorporating substantial amount of partially labeled data can be highly signi#12;cant. We also showed model selection based on AIC values fairly works to select the best proposed algorithm on each specific data set. A case study on a real-world data set of gastric cancer provided by Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program showed a superiority of EM-CPCML to not only the other proposed EM algorithms but also conventional supervised, unsupervised and semi-supervised learning algorithms.

Lee, Youngrok [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Efficient quantum circuits for perfect and controlled teleportation of n-qubit non-maximally entangled states of generalized Bell-type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient and economical scheme is proposed for the perfect quantum teleportation of n-qubit non-maximally entangled state of generalized Bell-type. A Bell state is used as the quantum channel in the proposed scheme. It is also shown that the controlled teleportation of this n-qubit state can be achieved by using a GHZ state or a GHZ-like state as quantum channel. The proposed schemes are economical because for the perfect and controlled teleportation of n-qubit non-maximally entangled state of generalized Bell-type we only need a Bell state and a tripartite entangled state respectively. It is also established that there exists a family of 12 orthogonal tripartite GHZ-like states which can be used as quantum channel for controlled teleportation. The proposed protocols are critically compared with the existing protocols.

Anirban Pathak; Anindita Banerjee

2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Report of Project 1-M-54 on thirty service men exposed to residual radiation at Operation castle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 1954 report is part of the NTPR (Nuclear Test Personnel Review) Program. Following the detonation at Bikini Atoll, thirty service men who had been exposed to debris from the 1 March detonation were returned to Tripler Army Hospital at Honolulu where the Tripler facilities and professional staff could be used. The clinical observations on the thirty patients were completed by 15 May and the patients were discharged to duty on 17 May. Special emphasis was placed upon examination of the lens of the eyes so as to establish a firm base-line to aid in the evaluation.

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

For free samples & the latest literature: http://www.maxim-ic.com, or phone 1-800-998-8800. For small orders, phone 1-800-835-8769.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-800-998-8800. For small orders, phone 1-800-835-8769. MAX478/MAX479 17µA Max, Dual/Quad, Single-Supply, Precision Op Amps ________________________________________________________________ Maxim Integrated Products 1 1 2 3 4 8 7 6 5 V+ OUTB INB- INB+V- INA+ INA- OUTA MAX478 DIP/SO TOP VIEW 1 2 3 4 14 13 12 11 OUTD IND- IND+ V-V+ INA+ INA- OUTA MAX479 DIP/SO 5 6 7 10 9 8 INC+ INC- OUTCOUTB

Berns, Hans-Gerd

312

A STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO SILICA DUST FOR SIX MONTHS AT CONCENTRATIONS OF 0, 2, 10 OR 20 MG / M3.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objective of this study was to relate the results of a series of functional tests to the compositional and structural alterations in the rat lung induced by subchronic exposure to silica dust. Fischer-344 rats were exposed for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 6 months to either 0, 2, 10, or 20 mg SiO{sub 2}/m{sup 3}. The general appearance of the exposed rats was not different from that of the controls. Interestingly, female rats exposed to silica dust, at all tested concentrations, gained more weight than the controls. The lung weight and the lung-to-body weight ratio was greater in the male rats exposed to the highest concentration of silica dust.

KUTZMAN,R.S.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Integration of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a1 case study of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter2 Abstract3 The predictions of two source-to-dose models lead smelter. Both5 models were built up from several sub-models linked together and run using Monte

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

Banerjee, Mayukh; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Pritha [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata (India); Das, Jayanta K. [Department of Dermatology, West Bank Hospital, Howrah (India); Basu, Santanu [Department of General Medicine, Sri Aurobindo Seva Kendra, Kolkata (India); Sarkar, Ajoy K. [Peerless Hospital and B.K Roy Research Centre, Kolkata (India); States, J. Christopher, E-mail: jcstates@louisville.ed [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Center for Environmental Genomics and Integrative Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Giri, Ashok K., E-mail: akgiri15@yahoo.co [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

High-temperature-oxidation-induced ordered structure in Inconel 939 superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the integrated oxy-fuel combustion and turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO2 and O2. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation that results in the loss of the strengthening precipitates. In an earlier study of the oxidation of Inconel 939 Ni-based superalloy exposed to oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 hours, a high-temperature-oxidation-induced phase transformation in the sub-surface region was noticed and a two-phase region formed at the expense of strengthening ?' phase. While one of the two phases was identified as the Ni-matrix (? solid solution, face-center-cubic) phase, the other product phase remained unidentified. In this study, the crystal structure of the unknown phase and its orientation relationship with the parent Ni-matrix phase was investigated through electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that the crystal structure of the unknown phase could be modeled as a ternary derivative of the ordered ?-Ni3Ti phase (D024) structure with lattice parameters of a = 0.5092 nm and c = 0.8336 nm, ? = 90º, ? = 90º and ? = 120º.

Zhu, Jingxi; Wise, Adam; Nuhfer, Thomas; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Laughlin, David E.

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Examinations of Oxidation and Sulfidation of Grain Boundaries in Alloy 600 Exposed to Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution characterizations of intergranular attack in alloy 600 (Ni-17Cr-9Fe) exposed to 325 °C simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water have been conducted using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, NanoSIMS, analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The intergranular attack exhibited a two-stage microstructure that consisted of continuous corrosion/oxidation to a depth of ~200 nm from the surface followed by discrete Cr-rich sulfides to a further depth of ~500 nm. The continuous oxidation region contained primarily nanocrystalline MO-structure oxide particles and ended at Ni-rich, Cr-depleted grain boundaries with spaced CrS precipitates. Three-dimensional characterization of the sulfidized region using site-specific atom probe tomography revealed extraordinary grain boundary composition changes, including total depletion of Cr across a several nm wide dealloyed zone as a result of grain boundary migration.

Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Saxey, David W.; Kruska, Karen; Moore, K. L.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Cardiovascular changes in unanesthetized and ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 2. 8-GHz radiofrequency radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation, first while unanesthetized and then while anesthetized with ketamine (150 mg/kg.I.M.). Irradiation at a power density of 60 mW/cm2 (whole-body average specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) was conducted for sufficient duration to increase colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 degrees C. The time required for the temperature increase was significantly longer in the anesthetized state. During irradiation, heart rate increased significantly both with and without anesthesia, while mean arterial blood pressure increased only when the rats were unanesthetized. The heart rate increase in the anesthetized state contrasts with a lack of change in a previous study of Fischer rats. This difference between anesthetized Sprague-Dawley and Fischer rats should be considered when comparing cardiovascular data obtained from these two strains of rats.

Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R. (United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermo-mechanical study of bare 48Y UF6 containers exposed to the regulatory fire environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the regulatory agencies world-wide require that containers used for the transportation of natural UF6 and depleted UF6 must survive a fully-engulfing fire environment for 30 minutes as described in 10CFR71 and in TS-R-1. The primary objective of this project is to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of 48Y transportation cylinders when exposed to the regulatory hypothetical fire environment without the thermal protection that is currently used for shipments in those countries where required. Several studies have been performed in which UF6 cylinders have been analyzed to determine if the thermal protection currently used on UF6 cylinders of type 48Y is necessary for transport. However, none of them could clearly confirm neither the survival nor the failure of the 48Y cylinder when exposed to the regulatory fire environment without the additional thermal protection. A consortium of five companies that move UF6 is interested in determining if 48Y cylinders can be shipped without the thermal protection that is currently used. Sandia National Laboratories has outlined a comprehensive testing and analysis project to determine if these shipping cylinders are capable of withstanding the regulatory thermal environment without additional thermal protection. Sandia-developed coupled physics codes will be used for the analyses that are planned. A series of destructive and non-destructive tests will be performed to acquire the necessary material and behavior information to benchmark the models and to answer the question about the ability of these containers to survive the fire environment. Both the testing and the analysis phases of this project will consider the state of UF6 under thermal and pressure loads as well as the weakening of the steel container due to the thermal load. Experiments with UF6 are also planned to collect temperature- and pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of this material.

Ammerman, Douglas James; Lopez, Carlos; Morrow, Charles; Korbmacher, Tim (Urenco Enrichment Co. Ltd., Gronau, Germany); Charette, Marc-Andre (Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, ON, Canada)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ? Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ? Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ? Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ? Study subjects with arsenic-induced skin lesions show elevated plasma Big ET-1 levels. ? Arsenic-induced hypertension and skin lesions may be linked to plasma Big ET-1 levels.

Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Karim, Md. Rezaul [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mostaque [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh)] [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh); Haris, Parvez I. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)] [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan); Hossain, Khaled, E-mail: khossain69@yahoo.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The effect of thymosin on the survival of CBA/J mice exposed to lethal and acute doses of ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF THYMOSIN ON THE SURVIVAL OF CBA/J MICE EXPOSED TO LETHAL AND ACUTE DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION A Thesis ROGER LYNN HUCHTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Unrversrty in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Biophysrcs THE EFFECT OF THYMQSIN ON THE SURVIVAL OF CBA/J MICE EXPOSED TO LETHAL AND ACUTE DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION A Thesis by ROGER LYNN HUCHTQN Approved as to style and content by...

Huchton, Roger Lynn

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Multi-criteria analysis of the mechanism of degradation of Portland cement based mortars exposed to external sulphate attack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work aims to contribute to the design of durable concrete structures exposed to external sulphate attacks (ESA). Following a preliminary study aimed at designing a representative test, the present paper suggests a study on the effect of the water-to-cement (w/c) ratio and the cement composition in order to understand the degradation mechanisms. Length and mass measurements were registered continuously, leached calcium and hydroxide ions were also quantified. In parallel, scanning electron microscopy observations as well as X-ray microtomography were realised at different times to identify the formed products and the crack morphology. Test results provide information on the basic aspects of the degradation mechanism, such as the main role of leaching and diffusion in the sulphate attack process. The mortar composition with a low w/c ratio leads to a better resistance to sulphate attack because the microstructure is less permeable. Reducing the C{sub 3}A content results in a macro-cracking decrease but it does not prevent expansion, which suggests the contribution of other expansive products, such as gypsum, in damage due to ESA. The observation of the cracks network in the microstructure helps to understand the micro-mechanisms of the degradation process.

El-Hachem, R.; Roziere, E.; Grondin, F.; Loukili, A., E-mail: ahmed.loukili@ec-nantes.fr

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Discontinuous phase formation and selective attack of SiC materials exposed to low oxygen partial pressure environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three SiC materials were exposed to gas mixtures containing N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO at 1000-1300C, 1-740 torr for a few to 1000 h. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that CO is the predominant oxidizing species. A variety of corrosion processes were observed, including surface and internal pit formation, needle growth, grain boundary attack, and attack of impurities and surrounding material. In the case of a siliconized SiC, impurities such as Ca, Al, and Fe diffused rapidly through the Si matrix forming complex calcium aluminosilicates on the surface, leaving behind internal voids. Evaluation of the mechanical properties, including fractography, revealed a variety of degradative phenomena. Efforts to identify causes of pit formation suggested that the overall process was complex. Pits formed during attack of grain boundaries and regions containing transition metal impurities. Studies of single crystals showed preferential attack near impurities and crystalline defects, indicating that damaged crystals or certain crystal orientations in the polycrystalline materials are susceptible to attack. In addition, under some conditions where pit formation was observed, the strength of certain materials increased apparently due to flaw healing. It is suggested that flaws can heal in the absence of mechanical stress due to their high surface energy. However, second phases observed within partially healed surface cracks suggest impurities also contribute to the flaw healing processes.

Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tressler, R.E.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Exposed To Nitric Acid -Chloride Environments D.G. Kolman, D.K. Ford, D.P. Butt, and T.O. Nelson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Exposed To Nitric Acid - Chloride Environments D.G. Kolman, D.K. Ford, D.P. Butt, and T.O. Nelson Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory Los AlamosCl, and temperature on the general corrosion behavior of 304 stainless steel (SS), electrochemical studies were

329

Proceedings of the CADE17 ATP System Competition In order to stimulate ATP system development, and to expose ATP systems to interested researchers, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the CADE­17 ATP System Competition Abstract In order to stimulate ATP system development, and to expose ATP systems to interested researchers, the CADE­17 ATP System Competition (CASC­17) will be held on 17 June 2000. CASC­17 will evaluate the performance of sound, fully automatic, 1st order ATP

Sutcliffe, Geoff

330

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part of your work assignment. The University's Hazard Communication the hazard communication training you need? A combination of hazard communication training resources

Wilcock, William

331

The camp will expose students to local biodiversity and provide abundant immersive hands-on experiences with the plant and animal life found within the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The camp will expose students to local biodiversity and provide abundant immersive hands? If yes, fill out the application to be considered for a spot in a week-long camp studying biodiversity! The 2014 Richard P. Garmany Biodiversity Camp will be held July 7th -11th at the Environmental Sciences

Alpay, S. Pamir

332

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more components of the elastomers (by the solvent). This extraction of additives can negatively change the properties of the elastomer, leading to reduced performance and durability. For a seal application, some level of volume swell is acceptable, since the expansion will serve to maintain a seal. However, the acceptable level of swell is dependent on the particular application of the elastomer product. It is known that excessive swell can lead to unacceptable extrusion of the elastomer beyond the sealed interface, where it becomes susceptible to damage. Also, since high swell is indicative of high solubility, there is a heightened potential for fluid to seep through the seal and into the environment. Plastics, on the other hand, are used primarily in structural applications, such as solid components, including piping and fluid containment. Volume change, especially in a rigid system, will create internal stresses that may negatively affect performance. In order to better understand and predict the compatibility for a given polymer type and fuel composition, an analysis based on Hansen solubility theory was performed for each plastic and elastomer material. From this study, the solubility distance was calculated for each polymer material and test fuel combination. Using the calculated solubility distance, the ethanol concentration associated with peak swell and overall extent of swell can be predicted for each polymer. The bulk of the material discussion centers on the plastic materials, and their compatibility with Fuel C, CE25a, CE50a, and CE85a. The next section of this paper focuses on the elastomer compatibility with the higher ethanol concentrations with comparison to results obtained previously for the lower ethanol levels. The elastomers were identical to those used in the earlier study. Hansen solubility theory is also applied to the elastomers to provide added interpretation of the results. The final section summarizes the performance of the metal coupons.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Chemical analysis of HfO{sub 2}/Si (100) film systems exposed to NH{sub 3} thermal processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen incorporation in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films utilized as high-k gate dielectric layers in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors has been investigated. Thin HfO{sub 2} blanket films deposited by atomic layer deposition on either SiO{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} treated Si (100) substrates have been subjected to NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} anneal processing. Several high resolution techniques including electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectra, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been utilized to elucidate chemical composition and crystalline structure differences between samples annealed in NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} ambients as a function of temperature. Depth profiling of core level binding energy spectra has been obtained by using variable kinetic energy x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with tunable photon energy. An 'interface effect' characterized by a shift of the Si{sup 4+} feature to lower binding energy at the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface has been detected in the Si 1s spectra; however, no corresponding chemical state change has been observed in the Hf 4f spectra acquired over a broad range of electron take-off angles and surface sensitivities. The Si 2p spectra indicate Si-N bond formation beneath the HfO{sub 2} layer in the samples exposed to NH{sub 3} anneal. The NH{sub 3} anneal ambient is shown to produce a metastable Hf-N bond component corresponding to temperature driven dissociation kinetics. These findings are consistent with elemental profiles across the HfO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements. X-ray diffraction measurements on similarly treated films identify the structural changes resulting from N incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films.

Lysaght, Patrick S.; Barnett, Joel; Bersuker, Gennadi I.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Foran, Brendan; Tseng, Hsing-Huang; Jammy, Raj [Front End Process Division, SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Physical Characterization Laboratory, Advanced Technology Development Facility, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States); Front End Process Division, SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499 (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

The organization of F-actin and microtubules in growth cones exposed to a brain-derived collapsing factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In previous work we characterized a brain derived collapsing factor that induces the collapse of dorsal root ganglion growth cones in culture (Raper and Kapfhammer, 1990). To determine how the growth cone cytoskeleton is rearranged during collapse, we have compared the distributions of F-actin and microtubules in normal and partially collapsed growth cones. The relative concentration of F-actin as compared to all proteins can be measured in growth cones by ratioing the intensity of rhodamine-phalloidin staining of F-actin to the intensity of a general protein stain. The relative concentration of F-actin is decreased by about one half in growth cones exposed to collapsing factor for five minutes, a time at which they are just beginning to collapse. During this period the relative concentration of F-actin in the leading edges of growth cones decreases dramatically while the concentration of F-actin in the centers decreases little. These results suggest that collapse is associ-ated with a net loss of F-actin at the leading edge. The distributions of microtubules in normal and collapsing factor treated growth cones were examined with antibodies to tyrosinated and detyrosinated isoforms of a-tubulin. The tyrosinated form is found in newly polymerized microtubules while the detyrosinated form is not. The relative proximal-distal distributions of these isoforms are not altered during collapse, suggesting that rates of microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are not greatly affected by the presence of collapsing factor. An analysis of the distributions of microtubules before and after collapse suggests that microtubules are rearranged, but their polymerization state is unaffected during collapse. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the brain derived collapsing factor has little effect on microtubule polymerization or depolymerization. Instead it appears to induce a net loss of F-actin at the leading edge of the growth cone.

Jinhong Fan; S. Gary Mansfield; Tim Redmond; Phillip R. Gordon-weeks; Jonathan A. Raper

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

BioOne sees sustainable scholarly publishing as an inherently collaborative enterprise connecting authors, nonprofit publishers, academic institutions, research libraries, and research funders in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the common goal of maximizing access to critical research. Darwin's bark spider: giant prey in giant orb webs societies, associations, museums, institutions, and presses. Your use of this PDF, the BioOne Web site holder. #12;Darwin's bark spider: giant prey in giant orb webs (Caerostris darwini, Araneae: Araneidae

Agnarsson, Ingi

340

Quantum System Identification Maxim Raginsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density operators. We a1.w present a quantita- tive analysis (if the wow-case perfonnnncc of these s

Raginsky, Maxim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Opinion Maximization in Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global warming Wednesday, July 24, 13 #12;prevent global warming Wednesday, July 24, 13 #12;prevent global warming reduce military spending Wednesday, July 24, 13 #12;prevent global warming reduce military spending Wednesday, July 24, 13 #12;prevent global warming reduce military spending fight poverty Wednesday

Terzi, Evimaria

342

Is the beta phase maximal?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

55, 2935 (1985). [20] M. Battaglia and L. Gibbons, [arXiv:B 592, 1 (2004). [13] M. Battaglia et al. , [arXiv:hep-

Ferrandis, Javier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

SURVEILLANCEROOSTER TENTAMENS MEI/JUNI /JULI 2014 INVIGILATION SCHEDULE EXAMS MAY/JUNE /JULY 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cannella Dr. M.M. Bonsangue Databases 3-6-2014 10.00-13.00 B2 +B3 B. Karasneh + R. Carvalho Dr. M. Emmerich.00-13.00 B2 R. Cachucho Dr. M. Emmerich Logica ( Retake) 8-7-2014 10.00-13.00 B2 Cannella Dr. M.M. Bonsangue.00-13.00 Den Haag Dr. M. Emmerich/Abdel Dr. M. Emmerich Computersystemen en telematica 6-6-2014 14.00-17.00 Den

Emmerich, Michael

344

VIDEO SEMANTIC CONCEPT DETECTION VIA ASSOCIATIVE CLASSIFICATION Lin Lin, Mei-Ling Shyu, Guy Ravitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a framework that discovered three semantic con- cepts from news TV broadcast using traditional associative one is to use other evaluation criteria such as lift, cov- erage, leverage, and conviction [1

Chen, Shu-Ching

345

Vertical Concentric Tube Ground Couoled Heat Exchangers V. C. Mei and S. K. Fischer*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to extract heat from or reject heat to the environment. The majority of heat pumps use ambient air of the air. Ground water is a better heat source/sink for heat pump application (due to its superior thermal exchangers for use in heat-pump applications is described. The experimental apparatus consists

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

346

Periodiek der E.T.S.V. Scintilla Jaargang30|Nummer3|Mei2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-P-Project Stage Duitsland Minor TN CERN LaseLasergamen LED-bord Bitcoin Hoofdartikel Liquavista Reportage #12 anonieme betaalmethode die de hele wereldeconomie op zijn kop zet: Bitcoin. Ook het langverwachte tweede Pres Nieuws uit het vakgebied Onderwijs op de tocht Mid-P-Project `12 Bitcoin CERN: Groot speelgoed

347

Variational model for ionomeric polymermetal composite Ji-Huan Hea,b,*, Hong-Mei Liua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Republic of China c Division of Textiles, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University areas. When voltage is applied, the resulting electrostatic forces com- press a film in thickness

Pan, Ning

348

Registration-SSRL School 2007 on Hard X-ray Scattering: Techniques in MEIS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONews Media »WCI-IIIRegistrationMay

349

Caty Meis talks about SULI and Goldwater Scholarship | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium:and Technical Information Catalogue

350

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Novel and Cost Effective Approach to the Decommissioning and Decontamination of Legacy Glove Boxes - Minimizing TRU Waste and Maximizing LLW Waste - 13634  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process of decommissioning two gloveboxes at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that were employed for work with plutonium and other radioactive materials. The decommissioning process involved an initial phase of clearing tools and materials from the glove boxes and disconnecting them from the laboratory infrastructure. The removed materials, assessed as Transuranic (TRU) waste, were packaged into 55 gallon (200 litre) drums and prepared for ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad New Mexico. The boxes were then sampled to determine the radioactive contents by means of smears that were counted with alpha and beta detectors to determine the residual surface contamination, especially in terms of alpha particle emitters that are an indicator of TRU activity. Paint chip samples were also collected and sent for laboratory analysis in order to ascertain the radioactive contamination contributing to the TRU activity as a fixed contamination. The investigations predicted that it may be feasible to reduce the residual surface contamination and render the glovebox structure low level waste (LLW) for disposal. In order to reduce the TRU activity a comprehensive decontamination process was initiated using chemical compounds that are particularly effective for lifting and dissolving radionuclides that adhere to the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes. The result of the decontamination process was a reduction in the TRU surface activity on the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes by four orders of magnitude in terms of disintegrations per unit area (DPA). The next phase of the process involved a comprehensive assay of the gloveboxes using a combination of passive neutron and gamma ray scintillation detectors and a shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma ray detector. The HPGe detector was used to obtain gamma ray spectra for a variety of measurement positions within the glovebox. The spectra were used to determine the TRU content of the boxes by assessing the activity of Am-241 (59 keV) and Pu-241 (414 keV). Using the data generated it was possible for qualified subject matter experts (SME) to assess that the gloveboxes could be consigned for disposition as LLW and not as TRU. Once this determination was assessed and accepted the gloveboxes were prepared for final disposition to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) - formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This preparation involved fixing any remaining radioactive contamination within the gloveboxes by filling them with a foam compound, prior to transportation. Once the remaining contamination was fixed the gloveboxes were removed from the laboratory and prepared for transported by road to NNSS. This successful glovebox decontamination and decommissioning process illustrates the means by which TRU waste generation has been minimized, LLW generation has been maximized, and risk has been effectively managed. The process minimizes the volume of TRU waste and reduced the decommissioning time with significant cost savings as the result. (authors)

Pancake, Daniel; Rock, Cynthia M.; Creed, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A. [ANTECH Corporation 9050 Marshall Court, Westminster, CO, 80031 (United States)] [ANTECH Corporation 9050 Marshall Court, Westminster, CO, 80031 (United States); Norton, Christopher J.; Crosby, Daniel [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., 149 Emerald Street, Suite R, Keene, NH 03431 (United States)] [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., 149 Emerald Street, Suite R, Keene, NH 03431 (United States); Nachtman, Thomas J. [InstaCote, Inc., 160 C. Lavoy Road, Erie, MI, 48133 (United States)] [InstaCote, Inc., 160 C. Lavoy Road, Erie, MI, 48133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Color measurements on marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the Eastern United States. Volume I: Results of exposure 1984-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). One of the primary contributions of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been the measurement of tristimulus color change on samples exposed to the environment. Results from the first six years indicate a yellowing of the marble and a darkening of limestone on both the skyward and groundward surfaces of fresh and preexposed briquettes. The relationship between discoloration and exposure period appears to be linear. Discoloration rates as a function of a cumulative exposure time are almost constant for marble and slightly decreasing for limestone Dark spots on groundward surfaces were measured with tristimulus color equipment prior to chemical analysis to determine if a correlation exists between darkening (change in reflectance) and SO{sub 4} concentration. Taking exposure time into consideration, and assuming that the airborne concentration of dark particles, which cause darkening, is proportional to airborne SO{sub 2} concentration, one can establish a linear relationship between exposure time, darkening, and SO{sub 2} concentration. The program is continuing so that additional data can be obtained.

Reimann, K.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction (NOC) for Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants''. The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design. For the activities covered under this NOC, the unabated and abated TEDE to the hypothetical MEI is 1.67 E-03 and 8.34 E-01 millirem per year, respectively.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

SITE SPECIFIC REFERENCE PERSON PARAMETERS AND DERIVED CONCENTRATION STANDARDS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is twofold. The first is to develop a set of behavioral parameters for a reference person specific for the Savannah River Site (SRS) such that the parameters can be used to determine dose to members of the public in compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.” A reference person is a hypothetical, gender and age aggregation of human physical and physiological characteristics arrived at by international consensus for the purpose of standardizing radiation dose calculations. DOE O 458.1 states that compliance with the annual dose limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, for dose compliance, SRS has used the MEI concept, which uses adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. Beginning with the 2012 annual site environmental report, SRS will be using the representative person concept for dose compliance. The dose to a representative person will be based on 1) the SRS-specific reference person usage parameters at the 95th percentile of appropriate national or regional data, which are documented in this report, 2) the reference person (gender and age averaged) ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients provided in DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard (DOE-STD-1196-2011), and 3) the external dose coefficients provided in the DC_PAK3 toolbox. The second purpose of this report is to develop SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for all applicable food ingestion pathways, ground shine, and water submersion. The DCS is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in water, in air, or on the ground that results in a member of the public receiving 100 mrem (1 mSv) effective dose following continuous exposure for one year. In DOE-STD-1196-2011, DCSs were developed for the ingestion of water, inhalation of air and submersion in air pathways, only. These DCSs are required by DOE O 458.1 to be used at all DOE sites in the design and conduct of radiological environmental protection programs. In this report, DCSs for the following additional pathways were considered and documented: ingestion of meat, dairy, grains, produce (fruits and vegetables), seafood, submersion in water and ground shine. These additional DCSs were developed using the same methods as in DOE-STD-1196-2011 and will be used at SRS, where appropriate, as screening and reference values.

Jannik, T.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Risk assessment for organic micropollutants: U. S. point of view  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic research and monitoring of sludge utilization programs have identified specific pathways by which potentially toxic constituents of sewage sludge can reach and cause toxicity to livestock, humans, plants, soil biota, wildlife, etc. In the process of preparing a new regulation for land application of sewage sludge in the US, a pathway approach to risk assessment was undertaken. Two Pathways were found to comprise the greatest risk from persistent lipophilic organic compounds such as PCBs: (1) direct ingestion of sludge by children; and (2) adherence of sludge to forage/pasture crops from surface application of fluid sludge, followed by grazing and ingestion of sludge by livestock used as human food. Each pathway considers risk to Most Exposed Individuals (MEIs) who have high exposure to sludge. Because 1990 sewage sludges contain very low levels of PCBs, the estimated risk level to MEIs was less 0.0001, low sludge PCBs and low probability of simultaneously meeting all the constraints of the MEI indicate that MEIs are at less 0.0000001 lifetime risk. The authors conclude that quantitative risk assessment for potentially toxic constituents in sewage sludge can be meaningfully conducted because research has provided transfer coefficients from sludges and sludge-amended soils to plants and animals needed for many organic compounds.

Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Detonation-wave technique for on-load deposit removal from surfaces exposed to fouling; Part 1: Experimental investigation and development of the method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents a description and results of the experimental research, development, and full-scale testing of a new technique for cleaning gas-swept surfaces exposed to fouling, such as found in boilers, furnaces, heat exchangers, reactors, and gas ducts, by means of detonation waves. Part 1 describes the principles and reports on experimental investigations and optimization of the technique. Part 2 reports on several years of experience in applying the technique in full-scale operation in two large coal-fired boilers. Experiments involved detailed measurements of the pressure wave characteristics at a laboratory-scale model of a boiler furnace at a range of operating conditions and produced necessary information for optimum design and operation of the detonation wave generator. The investigation enabled a close insight into the detonation and shock wave generation, their behavior during propagation through the connecting ducts, and attenuation in the inner space of the model furnace. A good indication has also been obtained of the wave impact and effects on deposit-removal from different packages of tube bundles, which were placed in the model boiler in order to mimic boiler heating surfaces.

Hanjalic, K. (Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik); Smajevic, I. (Univ. of Sarajevo, Bosnia (Yugoslavia))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

Reimann, K.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Integration of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case study of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The predictions of two source-to-dose models are systematically evaluated with observed data collected in a village polluted by a currently operating secondary lead smelter. Both models were built up from several sub-models linked together and run using Monte-Carlo simulation, to calculate the distribution children's blood lead levels attributable to the emissions from the facility. The first model system is composed of the CalTOX model linked to a recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides the distribution of the media-specific lead concentrations (air, soil, fruit, vegetables and blood) in the whole area investigated. The second model consists of a statistical model to estimate the lead deposition on the ground, a modified version of the model HHRAP and the same recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides an estimate of the concentration of exposure of specific individuals living in the study area. The predictions of the first model system were improved in terms of accuracy and precision by performing a sensitivity analysis and using field data to correct the default value provided for the leaf wet density. However, in this case study, the first model system tends to overestimate the exposure due to exposed vegetables. The second model was tested for nine children with contrasting exposure conditions. It managed to capture the blood levels for eight of them. In the last case, the exposure of the child by pathways not considered in the model may explain the failure of the model. The interest of this integrated model is to provide outputs with lower variance than the first model system, but at the moment further tests are necessary to conclude about its accuracy.

Bonnard, R.; McKone, T.E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

Python, Francois [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland); Goebel, Carsten [Product Safety, Human Safety Assessment, Procter and Gamble Service GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Aeby, Pierre [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland)], E-mail: pierre_aeby@bluewin.ch

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Protein Folding Dynamics via Quantification of Kinematic Energy Landscape Sema Kachalo, Hsiao-Mei Lu, and Jie Liang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein Folding Dynamics via Quantification of Kinematic Energy Landscape Se¨ma Kachalo, Hsiao of protein folding has been studied ex- tensively [1,2]. A remarkable observation is that protein folding that protein folding rates are largely determined by the topology of their native structure [3]. Theoretical

Dai, Yang

365

Maximizing transfer opportunities in Bluetooth DTNs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

better than single radio case by several seconds. #12;11 / 18 Comparison in terms of energy and global in software · Fewer successful inquiries One could play with the time between inquiries (what is the optimal performance: multinode simulations Second antenna consumes power but reduces collisions of inquiries ! What

Barakat, Chadi

366

Maximal Reliability for Unit-weighted Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precisely measure scale reliability. In H. Yanai, A. Okada,A useful indicator of reliability? Personality & IndividualJ. M. F. (2000). Linking reliability and factor analysis:

Peter M. Bentler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Maximizing available spectrum for cognitive radios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voronoi regions of the transmission towers for TV channelthe KCNS transmission from Sutro tower. Assume channel 40 isprimary transmission if we are beyond that tower’s no-talk

Mishra, Shridhar Mubaraq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dynamic Network Utility Maximization with Delivery Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 30, 2007 ... We briefly describe a heuristic, based on model predictive control, ... In the most common case, the route of a flow will be a path, from a source ...

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method of making maximally dispersed heterogeneous catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a catalyst with monolayer or sub-monolayer metal by controlling the wetting characteristics on the support surface and increasing the adhesion between the catalytic metal and an oxide layer. There are two methods that have been demonstrated by experiment and supported by theory. In the first method, which is useful for noble metals as well as others, a negatively-charged species is introduced to the surface of a support in sub-ML coverage. The layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted because the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface is increased. This method can also be used to achieve nanoislands of metal upon sub-ML deposition. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface. Thus the negatively-charged species serve as anchors for the metal. In the second method, a chemical reaction that occurs when most metals are deposited on a fully hydroxylated oxide surface is used to create cationic metal species that bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. These are incorporated into the top layer of the substrate and bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. In this case, these oxidized metal atoms serve as the anchors. Here, as in the previous method, nanoislands of catalytic metal can be achieved to increase catalytic activity, or monolayers or bilayers of reactive metal can also be made.

Jennison, Dwight R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Defining Conditions for Maximizing Bioreduction of Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations between modifying electron donor and acceptor accessibility, the in-situ microbial community, and bioreduction of Uranium at the FRC and UMTRA research sites indicated that significant modifications in the rate, amount and by inference the potential stability of immobilized Uranium are feasible in these environments. The in-situ microbial community at these sites was assessed with a combination of lipid and real-time molecular techniques providing quantitative insights of effects of electron donor and manipulations. Increased (9mM in 2003 vs 3mM 2002) donor amendment at the Old Rifle site resulted in the stimulation of anaerobic conditions downgradient of the injection gallery. Biomass within the test plot increased relative to the control well at 17 feet. Q-PCR specific for IRB/SRB showed increased copy numbers within the test plot and was the highest at the injection gallery. Q-PCR specific for Geobacter sp. showed increased copy numbers within the test plot but further downgradient from the injection gallery than the SRB/IRB. DNA and Lipid analysis confirm changes in the microbial community structure due to donor addition. See also the PNNL (Long) and UMASS (Anderson) posters for more information about this site.

David C. White; Aaron D. Peacock; Yun-Juan Chang; Roland Geyer; Philip E. Long; Jonathan D. Istok; Amanda N.; R. Todd Anderson; Dora Ogles

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Live Streaming with Gossip Maxime Monod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 TV ordinaire: tout en HD Live streaming Une source produit du contenu multimédia (un flux) n clients (n large) broadcasting diffusion ... ... ... IP TV, Web TV, P2P TV, ... vs 192K requêtes/jour 78K que le premier #12;·Gossip++Environment contraint ·HEAPEnvironnement hétérogène ·LiFT

Guerraoui, Rachid

372

SUPPLY-SIDE OPTIMIZATION : MAXIMIZING ABSORPTIVE RATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Piglet walked home thoughtfully together in the golden evening, and for a long time they were silent The World of Pooh INTRODUCTION The complexities of feeding behavior extend far beyond the simple priorities source of the material and energy for this escalation in heterotrophs with digestive tracts is absorption

Jumars, Pete

373

THE MAXIMAL EXPECTED LIFETIME OF BROWNIAN MOTION ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pitman (Advanced Publishing Program), Boston, Mass.-London. [2] R. Ba˜nuelos, 2009 Four unknown constants. Oberwolfach Report 06, workshop on'Low ...

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Efficient Energy Maximization Using Smoothing Bogdan Savchynskyy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

{ ¤¤¤ ean{ u maxta1, . . . , anu ¤ logtea1{ ¤¤¤ ean{ u ¤ maxta1, . . . , anu log n UGi pq max µMpGiq d i pq, µ h max yYV d i pq, pyq h ^UGi p, q log ¸ yYV expp d i pq{, pyq h q UGi pq ¤ ^UGi p, q ¤ UGi pq log |YV | UGi pq |V|log |Y| £ f^UGi pq fvpyvq ¨ £° yYpc,yvq expp d ipq{, pyq h q ^UGi pipq, qq

Heermann, Dieter W.

375

Teleporting Noncommuting Qubits Require Maximal Entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very recently, it was shown by Ghosh, Kar, Roy and Sen (\\emph{Entanglement vs. Noncommutativity in Teleportation}, quant-ph/0010012) that if it is \\emph{a priori} known that the state to be teleported is from a commuting set of qubits, a separable channel is sufficient. We show that 1 ebit of entanglement is a necessary resource to teleport a qubit even when it is known to be one of two noncommuting states.

Sibasish Ghosh; Guruprasad Kar; Anirban Roy; Debasis Sarkar; Ujjwal Sen

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/g i3-glucosidase (Novozyme 188) and 5 FPU/g cellulase (Spezyme-CP) were added The flasks were then cultured in an incubated shaker (50 'C, 100 rpm, Amerex Instruments ' All enzyme loadings given as activity units per gram of dry biomass. Orbital...

Kaar, William Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Identifying Energy Systems that Maximize Cogeneration Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the method of Lagrange mult1pl1ers: 120 ESL-IE-88-09-24 Proceedings from the Tenth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 13-15, 1988 aV/akW, + ~at1/akW1 ~ 0 (4) aO p/HR p1 a01 /HR c1 (11 ) aV/ aO p 1 + ~1 at2/aOp1 o (5...Igure 5 Indicates t e incremental cogeneratIon power cost trends for dependent cogeneratIon systems. for these systems the maxlmum benef1ts are achleved at condlt1on (11). The process heat to power ratio 1s constant, and thus, sIte cogenerat1on...

Ahner, D. J.

378

Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Fixen, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Universal Membrane Classification Scheme: Maximizing the Return...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at high temperatures, allowing for conduction at high temperature-low RH, micronano-engineering approach - by designing physical structure of materials ( ie pores, or...

380

Iterative Estimation Maximization for Stochastic Linear Programs ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the performance of IEM from a column generation point of view ...... To generate the whole frontier, we add the following constraint to Model (M4).

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1. RELEVANCE / OBJECTIVE Maximizing Photosynthetic Efficiencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apply directly to green alga hydrogen- production, biomass accumulation, and carbon sequestration efforts. Other branches of the DOE (carbon sequestration ) benefited from this work (see 4A, Technology of the DOE, a large-scale, carbon sequestration pilot program with green algae. Mera Pharma is currently

382

Maximizing dose reductions with cardiac CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when heart rates are [60 bpm or when heart rate variabilitya heart rate dependent fashion as follows: 30–39 bpm, 175 mspadding; 40–49 bpm, 150 ms padding; 50– 59 bpm, 125 ms

Budoff, Matthew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Maximizing the Potential of Renewable Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG NorthMauro Gregorio

384

Sandia National Laboratories: maximize energy production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative timemaximize energy production

385

Sandia National Laboratories: maximizing device performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetime is the cumulative timemaximize energy

386

Welfare-Maximizing Correlated Equilibria using Kantorovich ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ria using Kantorovich polynomials and re-express it as a polynomial .... object called test function to give an equivalent redefinition of correlated equilibria.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Bicyclic graphs with maximal revised Szeged index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The revised Szeged index $Sz^*(G)$ is defined as $Sz^*(G)=\\sum_{e=uv \\in E}(n_u(e)+ n_0(e)/2)(n_v(e)+ n_0(e)/2),$ where $n_u(e)$ and $n_v(e)$ are, respectively, the number of vertices of $G$ lying closer to vertex $u$ than to vertex $v$ and the number of vertices of $G$ lying closer to vertex $v$ than to vertex $u$, and $n_0(e)$ is the number of vertices equidistant to $u$ and $v$. Hansen used the AutoGraphiX and made the following conjecture about the revised Szeged index for a connected bicyclic graph $G$ of order $n \\geq 6$:

Li, Xueliang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

Peterson, S

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Notice of construction for tank waste remediation system vadose zone characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of constriction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this initial start-up notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with vadose zone characterization within the Single-Shell Tank Farms located in the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. Vadose zone characterization activities include the drilling and sampling of soil from the surface to the depth of groundwater.

HILL, J.S.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-ER-311 catch tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description, attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing,'' states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 6 1, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(l) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided later.

HILL, J.S.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for installation and operation of a waste retrieval system and tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104 project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246 247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 07 for the installation and operation of one waste retrieval system in the 24 1 AP-102 Tank and one waste retrieval system in the 241 AP 104 Tank Pursuant to 40 CFR 61 09 (a)( 1) this application is also intended to provide anticipated initial start up notification Its is requested that EPA approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of the initial start up notification Project W 211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS) is scoped to install a waste retrieval system in the following double-shell tanks 241-AP 102-AP 104 AN 102, AN 103, AN-104, AN 105, AY 102 AZ 102 and SY-102 between now and the year 2011. Because of the extended installation schedules and unknowns about specific activities/designs at each tank, it was decided to submit NOCs as that information became available This NOC covers the installation and operation of a waste retrieval system in tanks 241 AP-102 and 241 AP 104 Generally this includes removal of existing equipment installation of new equipment and construction of new ancillary equipment and buildings Tanks 241 AP 102 and 241 AP 104 will provide waste feed for immobilization into a low activity waste (LAW) product (i.e. glass logs) The total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) from the construction activities is 0 045 millirem per year The unabated TEDE to the offsite ME1 from operation of the mixer pumps is 0 042 millirem per year.

DEXTER, M.L.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India)] [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Banerjee, Basu Dev, E-mail: banerjeebd@hotmail.com [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Rai, Arvind [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

SPECIAL ANALYSIS AIR PATHWAY MODELING OF E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Special Analysis (SA) was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). Their concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary might be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. In the process of developing a new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern, it became obvious that new and better atmospheric pathway disposal limits should be developed for each of the E-Area disposal facilities using the new ARM. The scope of the SA was therefore expanded to include the generation of these new limits. The initial work conducted in this SA was to develop a new ARM using the GoldSim{reg_sign} program (GTG, 2009). The model simulates the subsurface vapor diffusion of volatile radionuclides as they release from E-Area disposal facility waste zones and migrate to the land surface. In the process of this work, many new features, including several new physical and chemical transport mechanisms, were incorporated into the model. One of the most important improvements was to incorporate a mechanism to partition volatile contaminants across the water-air interface within the partially saturated pore space of the engineered and natural materials through which vapor phase transport occurs. A second mechanism that was equally important was to incorporate a maximum concentration of 1.9E-07 Ci/m{sup 3} of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the air-filled pores of cementitious materials. The ARM also combines the individual transport models constructed for each E-Area disposal facility into a single model, and was ultimately used to analyze the LFRG concern regarding the potential for atmospheric plume overlap at the SRS boundary during the IC period. To evaluate the plume overlap issue, a conservative approach was adopted whereby the MEI at the SRS boundary was exposed to the releases from all E-Area disposal facilities simultaneously. This is equivalent to a 100% overlap of all atmospheric plumes emanating from E-Area. Should the dose received from this level of atmospheric plume overlap still fall below the permissible exposure level of 10 mrem/yr, then the LFRG concern would be alleviated. The structuring of the ARM enables this evaluation to be easily performed. During the IC period, the peak of the 'total plume overlap dose' was computed to be 1.9E-05 mrem/yr, which is five orders of magnitude lower than the 10 mrem/yr PA performance objective for the atmospheric release pathway. The main conclusion of this study is that for atmospheric releases from the E-Area disposal facilities, plume overlap does not cause the total dose to the MEI at the SRS boundary during the IC to exceed the Performance Assessment (PA) performance objective. Additionally, the potential for plume overlap was assessed in the post-Institutional Control period. Atmospheric plume overlap is less likely to occur during this period but conceivably could occur if the prevailing wind direction shifted so as to pass directly over all EArea disposal facilities and transport airborne radionuclides to the MEI at the 100 m point of compliance (POC). This concern was also demonstrated of little concern, as the maximum plume overlap dose was found to be 1.45E+00 mrem/yr (or {approx}15% of the performance measure) during this period and under these unlikely conditions.

Hiergesell, R.; Taylor, G.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electronic states of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy band-lineup and the electronic structure of NO{sub 2}-exposed H-terminated diamond/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerface have been investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements. It is found that the energy band-lineup is stagger-type, so-called type-II, with its valence band discontinuity of as high as 3.9?eV and its conduction band discontinuity of 2.7?eV. The valence band maximum of the H-terminated diamond surface is positioned at Fermi level as a result of high-density hole accumulation on the diamond side. The XANES measurement has shown that the oxygen-derived interface state locates at about 1–3?eV above the Fermi level.

Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Imamura, Masaki [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Hirama, Kazuyuki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi 243-0198 (Japan); Kasu, Makoto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

One Packaging Technique of Exposed MEMS Sensors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D.C. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOEESS) through the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program and managed by Sandia...

397

One Packaging Technique of Exposed MEMS Sensors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Modeling and simulation of inverter - Inverter performance to investigate the device-level and system-level impart - Energy efficiency and heatsink size * Thermal management -...

398

Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Exterior Exposed Ductwork: Delivery Effectiveness and Efficiency*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature environments, such as on a roof during cooling conditions, the supply air can experience%(with a supply side effectiveness of 78% and return effectiveness of 92%). This is due to the losses of 89% (with a supply side effectiveness of 90% and return effectiveness of 99%), reducing the average

400

NREL: News Feature - Supercomputer Exposes Enzyme's Secrets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is also important for biomass conversion. To make an alternative fuel like cellulosic ethanol or drop-in hydrocarbon fuels, biomass is pretreated with acid, hot water, or some...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Optimism in Children Exposed to Child Maltreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors that predict optimism, the belief that positive things will happen in one's life, in youth who have experienced maltreatment were examined; specifically, positive family characteristics, life events, and social ...

Beals, Sarah Elizabeth

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation’s site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale “background levels” or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved “critical receptor” stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

Bechtel Nevada

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Experimental Measurement and Mathema2cal Modeling of Gramicidin-A Channel Ac2vity Undergraduates: Eva Mei Shouse, John Miller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of best fit · All cells in body are bounded by a membrane that contains ion channels. · These ion channels mediate the transport of ions into and out Gramicidin A (gA) to model ion transport through channels across a lipid bilayer

Mazzucato, Anna

404

On Tuning the Microarchitecture of an HPS Implementation of the VAX James E. Wilson, Steve Melvin, Michael Shebanow, Wen-mei Hwu, and Yale N. Patt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Tuning the Microarchitecture of an HPS Implementation of the VAX James E. Wilson, Steve Melvin into the use of HPS as a microarchitecture for the VAX. In this paper, we describe our first full simulation of the microVAX subset, and report the results of varying (i.e. tuning) certain important parameters. 1

Melvin, Stephen

405

Functional dissection of homeodomain transcription factors HoxA9 and Meis1 in myeloid leukemia : their epigenetic regulation and their downstream targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inhibitors for the downstream mediator proteins such as FLT3regulation and their downstream targets A dissertationthe leukemia-associated downstream target genes underlines

Wang, Gang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Pro le-Guided Automatic Inline Expansion for C Programs Pohua P. Chang, Scott A. Mahlke, William Y. Chen and Wen-mei W. Hwu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pro le-Guided Automatic Inline Expansion for C Programs Pohua P. Chang, Scott A. Mahlke, William Y study, Allen and Johnson identi ed inline expansion as an essential part of a vectorizing C compiler 5

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

407

Adaptive Cache Management for Energy-efficient GPU Computing Xuhao Chen, Li-Wen Chang, Christopher I. Rodrigues, Jie Lv, Zhiying Wang and Wen-Mei Hwu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Cache Management for Energy-efficient GPU Computing Xuhao Chen, Li-Wen Chang, Christopher hierarchy design, which limits system performance and energy-efficiency. The massive amount of memory throttling, respectively. Keywords-GPGPU; cache management; bypass; warp throt- tling I. INTRODUCTION Energy-efficiency

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

408

Virus Electrodes for Universal Biodetection Li-Mei C. Yang, Phillip Y. Tam, Benjamin J. Murray, Theresa M. McIntire, Cathie M. Overstreet,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-effect transistors,9 bead-based electrochemical immunoassay,10 electric DNA chips, 11 infection of different bacteria buffer solutions to be conducted for up to 6 h. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we demonstrate high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N > 10) for detection of binding and recognition in the resistive

Weiss, Gregory A.

409

1e PERIODE 2e PERIODE 3e PERIODE 4e PERIODE Zomer maand Sept Okt Nov Dec Jan Feb Mrt Apr Mei Juni Juli/Aug  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Contact: M.Bruggink@tudelft.nl Blackboard organization van SEC Je hebt je nog niet ingeschreven in de

410

Pro le-Assisted Instruction Scheduling William Y. Chen Scott A. Mahlke Nancy J. Warter Sadun Anik Wen-mei W. Hwu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information are studied: control- ow and memory-dependence. Pro le-assisted code scheduling techniques have scheduling to use control- ow and memory-dependence pro ling. In addition to explaining the usefulnessPro le-Assisted Instruction Scheduling William Y. Chen Scott A. Mahlke Nancy J. Warter Sadun Anik

Hwu, Wen-mei W.

411

Radioactive Air Emission Notice of Construction for (NOC) Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project W-460 Plutonium Stabilization and Handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 IO) lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments, and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide greater than 0.1 millirem year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) and commencement is needed within a short time. Therefore, this application also is intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application also constitutes EPA acceptance of this initial startup notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided later. This NOC covers the activities associated with the construction and operation activities involving stabilization and/or repackaging of plutonium in the 2736-ZB Building. An operations support trailer will be installed in the proximity of the 2736-ZB Building. A new exhaust stack will be built and operated at the 2736-ZB Building to handle the effluents associated with the operation of the stabilization and repackaging process. Figures provided are based on preliminary design.

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Notice of Construction for Tank Waste Remediation System Vadose Zone Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A,'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. The original NOC was submitted in May of 1999 as DOE/TU-99-34. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 millirem/year total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(axl), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this initial start-up notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with vadose zone characterization within the Single-Shell Tank Farms located in the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. Vadose zone characterization activities include the drilling and sampling of soil from the surface to the depth of groundwater. Boreholes that are drilled to groundwater will be extended into the aquifer a sufficient distance to enable a groundwater sample to be collected. Under extenuating circumstances it may be prudent to complete these characterization boreholes as groundwater monitoring wells.

HILL, J.S.

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Notice of Construction for Tank Waste Remediation System Vadose Zone Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions and Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. The original NOC was submitted in May of 1999 as DOm-99-34. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 milliredyear total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial start-up in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this initial start-up notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with vadose zone characterization within the Single-Shell Tank Farms located in the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. Vadose zone characterization activities include the drilling and sampling of soil from the surface to the depth of groundwater. Boreholes that are drilled to groundwater will be extended into the aquifer a sufficient distance to enable a groundwater sample to be collected. Under extenuating circumstances it may be prudent to complete these characterization boreholes as groundwater monitoring wells.

HILL, J.S.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Maximal Covering Location Problems on networks with regional ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Murray, A.T. and M.E. O'Kelly: Assessing representation error in point-based coverage ... Murray, A.T., M.E. O'Kelly and R.L. Church: Regional service coverage ...

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

415

Efficient buffer design algorithms for production line profit maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A production line is a manufacturing system where machines are connected in series and separated by buffers. The inclusion of buffers increases the average production rate of the line by limiting the propagation of ...

Shi, Chuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Optimization Online - On the complexity of maximizing the minimum ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 18, 2010 ... ... minimum total Shannon capacity of any mobile user in the system. ... Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences (Telecommunications ) ... Address: Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology, ...

Mikael Fallgren

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Leveraging Intelligent Vehicle Technologies to Maximize Fuel Economy (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancements in vehicle electronics, along with communication and sensing technologies, have led to a growing number of intelligent vehicle applications. Example systems include those for advanced driver information, route planning and prediction, driver assistance, and crash avoidance. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is exploring ways to leverage intelligent vehicle systems to achieve fuel savings. This presentation discusses several potential applications, such as providing intelligent feedback to drivers on specific ways to improve their driving efficiency, and using information about upcoming driving to optimize electrified vehicle control strategies for maximum energy efficiency and battery life. The talk also covers the potential of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and related technologies to deliver significant fuel savings in addition to providing safety and convenience benefits.

Gonder, J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE HOCHSCHILD COHOMOLOGY RING OF REGULAR MAXIMAL PRIMITIVE QUOTIENTS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-algebra A we mean just the ring HHo(A) = Ext oA Aopp(A, A) of self-extensions of A considered as an A k Aopp

Soergel, Wolfgang

419

How do we move forward? Maximize impact of available  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sustainable investment. #12;CIMS Objectives · Given the funding reality, advance cost effective strategies to regional & local priorities · Greater transparency and collaboration in MnDOT's investment planning for information exchanges and coordination · An opportunity to collaborate around lower cost, high benefit

Minnesota, University of

420

Maximizing Efficiency of Solar-Powered Systems by Load Matching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy. However, solar powered sys- tems must also consider the output level of the solar panel for power be counterproductive. Another problem that is of particular importance to solar pan- els is load matching. Solar panels is around 0.7­1.2, solar panels have a much larger Ri value as a function of the solar output and current

Shinozuka, Masanobu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Periodic Levinson-Durbin algorithm for entropy maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This result holds in the multivariate case as well. Lambert-Lacroix [13] gen- eralised this result to pc applications, Serpedin et al [17] for a comprehensive bibliography, and Hin- drayanto et al [9] for state space Preprint submitted to Computational Statistics & Data Analysis April 15, 2011 #12;entropy solution

422

Maximally concentrating optics for photovoltaic solar energy conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of a two-stage concentrator with a fresnel lens primary and a nonimaging dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary, has unique advantages for photovoltaic concentration. Some preliminary ray trace studies have shown that with planar lenses, an increase in angular acceptance for a given geometric concentration to about 2/3 of the maximum theoretical limit can be achieved. To demonstrate this, two preprototype concentrators, each having a geometric concentration of 248:1 for a 0.635cm (0.25 inch) diameter cell, have been designed, built, and tested. Measurements of the angular response show an acceptance of 8[degrees] (full angle) which is drastically better than the 1[degrees]--2[degrees] achievable without a secondary, and is in excellent agreement with the ray trace predictions. For these preprototypes, passive cooling was sufficient to prevent any thermal problems for both the cell and secondary. No problems associated with nouuniform cell illumination were found, as evidenced by the fill factor of 71%--73% measured under concentration. Initial measurements of the system electrical efficiency lie in the range 7.5%--9.9% for a variety of individual cells.

O'Gallagher, J.J.

1985-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Terrell L. Strayhorn, Ph.D. Maximizing First-Year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are over 25 Their lived realities, then, include: Family responsibilities Work schedules Competing demands (and priorities) Financial pressures Oftentimes, commuting to campus Serious "choices" due.e., retention, attainment) and other trends: - Consistent national survey data suggested that students were

Jones, Michelle

424

Adaptive Allocation of Independent Tasks to Maximize Throughput  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

well-known examples, which include SETI@home [18], Folding@home [21], data encryption/decryption [10

Hwang, Kai

425

Revenue Maximization Using Adaptive Resource Provisioning in Cloud Computing Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, Amazon EC2 offers three types of compute services (i.e., on-demand, spot and reserved

Buyya, Rajkumar

426

MILP formulations for the modularity density maximization problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 10, 2014 ... ?c ? C, ?h ? H ?c ? U?(1 ? bh,c) ? Ph,c ? ?c ? L?(1 ? bh,c) ... size of the Branch-and-Bound tree, as already observed in [17, 18, 19, 20].

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

People are experts when it comes to the work they do; unfortunately their expertise is not utilized as frequently as it could be. More opportunities need to be provided that allow people to participate in the design of their work including: accident investigations, job planning, and process improvements. Many employers use some form of job hazard analysis process to identify and document hazards and controls, but the front line worker is rarely involved. This presentation will show the core principles supporting employee involvement, provide examples where workers had brilliant ideas but no one listened, and provide examples where workers were given the opportunity to use their expertise to improve occupational safety. According to Abraham Maslow's Hierarch of Needs model, one essential human need is to be innovative and solve problems. Advances in brain science have proven, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the brain reward pathway is activated when people are recognized for their intellectual contributions. As people contribute their expertise to improve occupational safety more frequently they will feel a sense of gratification. In addition, safety professionals will have more time to spend on strategic planning of emerging occupational safety issues. One effect of the current global recession is that SH&E professionals are asked to do more with less. Therefore, to be successful it is essential that SH&E professionals incorporate worker expertise in job planning. This will be illustrated in the presentation through an example where a worker had the answer to a difficult decision on appropriate personal protective equipment for a job but no one asked the worker for his idea during the job planning phase. Fortunately the worker was eventually consulted and his recommendation for the appropriate personal protective equipment for the job was implemented before work began. The goal of this presentation is to expand the awareness and knowledge of SH&E professionals on the benefits and opportunities for leveraging brain science. This will include an overview of the components of the brain reward pathway and the biological mechanisms that make workers feel a sense of gratification when they contribute their ideas toward improving occupational safety. On-the-job examples where it is hypothesized that the brain reward pathway was activated in workers will be provided. Finally, the presentation will include a model illustrating the importance of empowering workers to participate in occupational safety programs. SH&E professionals can use this model to maintain a robust safety and health program with limited resources. The model will also help SH&E professionals prepare for challenges in the SH&E fields by showing them how to allocate more time for strategic planning of emerging issues. Many recent best selling business books such as Wikinomics, Crowdsourcing, and Sway, illustrate how the benefit of harnessing the collective knowledge of employees is a key to company success. Companies like Google and Pixar have mastered the ability to capture empFoyee knowledge in terms of technology. Why should occupational safety be any different? Workers know how to improve safety in their workplace. SH&E professionals can harness this collective safety knowledge just as top companies do with technology, and workers will feel grateful for contributing.

Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Runtime Support For Maximizing Performance on Multicore Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’86, pages 414–423,symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’10, pages 270–279,High-Performance Computer Architecture ( HPCA), Austin, TX,

Pusukuri, Kishore Kumar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Finite state automata resulting from temporal information maximization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2,3 and Nihat Ay3,4,5 1 Centre for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience University of Plymouth, Plymouth

Wennekers, Thomas

431

Quasi-Dense Reconstruction from Image Maxime LHUILLIER Long QUAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR Abstract. This paper proposes a quasi-dense reconstruction from un- calibrated sequence. The main innovation calibration or position information. Unfortunately, most modeling and visualization applications need dense

Quan, Long

432

Study of maximizing acoustic energy coupling to salt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem The knowledge of the geologic discontinuities in the salt which lie in front of a mining face is a great value for both economic and safety reasons. This knowledge can be obtained by core drilling... at the transducer/ coupling media and coupling media/salt boundaries can be considered as being separate and mutually independent. The coupling problem would then be treated by evaluating the normal incidence reflection coefficients at the transducer/ coupling...

Hwang, Yng-Jou

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bandwidth utilization maximization of scientific RF communication systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for more efficiently utilizing the frequency bandwidth allocated for data transmission is presented. Current space and range communication systems use modulation and coding schemes that transmit 0.5 to 1.0 bits per second per Hertz of radio frequency bandwidth. The goal in this LDRD project is to increase the bandwidth utilization by employing advanced digital communications techniques. This is done with little or no increase in the transmit power which is usually very limited on airborne systems. Teaming with New Mexico State University, an implementation of trellis coded modulation (TCM), a coding and modulation scheme pioneered by Ungerboeck, was developed for this application and simulated on a computer. TCM provides a means for reliably transmitting data while simultaneously increasing bandwidth efficiency. The penalty is increased receiver complexity. In particular, the trellis decoder requires high-speed, application-specific digital signal processing (DSP) chips. A system solution based on the QualComm Viterbi decoder and the Graychip DSP receiver chips is presented.

Rey, D. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ryan, W. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Ross, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A collision detection approach for maximizing the material utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 16, 2014 ... Figure 4: An example of a 2D bounding box tree for a given shape. bounding boxes ..... Ph.D. thesis, University of Kaiser- slautern (2013).

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Maximizing Crosstalk-Induced Slowdown During Path Delay Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in path delay for c5315 .................................................................... 57 Figure 11 Increase in path delay for c2670 .................................................................... 60 Figure 12 Increase in path delay for c... for critical paths considering single aggressor crosstalk effect with due consideration to the timing alignment and direction. This method has similar CPU efficiency to that of [17] and [18]. However, they did not take into account the possible impact...

Gope, Dibakar

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

Duty Cycle Analysis & Tools: Maximizing Vehicle Performance (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shows that the benefits of using hybrid vehicle trucks in fleets depends on the duty cycle, or how the vehicles will be driven (e.g., stop and go) over a particular route (e.g., urban or rural).

Walkowicz, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

Publications: Recurrence Relations Based on Minimization and Maximization (with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of approximating travelling salesman tours and minimum spanning trees, (with G. Das and M. Smid), Algorithmica and minimum spanning trees, 1996 (with G. Das and M. Smid), Proc. of FST & TCS, India, LNCS Springer Spanning Trees of Directed Graphs, (with H. Ramesh), to appear in Algorithmica. 1 #12; #15; EÃ?ciently

Prasad, Sanjiva

438

Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Testing Results DOE-HDBK-1084-95 SunShot Home About Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Soft Costs Technology to Market Success Stories Financial...

439

Maximizing the throughput of large ad hoc wireless networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi-input, single-output (MISO) protocol. During eachthe maximum throughput of the MISO protocol, in bits-meters/s/ Hz/node, is C MISO = (n ? 1) A log 2 1 + 2n P T ? h

Hua, Y; Huang, Y; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Minimization and Observability Maximization in Multi-Hop Wireless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wildfires, air, soil or river pollution, sound or vibration monitoring ...) or complex industrial processes consider the main environmental issue of monitoring air pollution. Some approaches have been proposed backgrounds on air pollution modelling and monitoring. Section 3 is dedicated to the formulation

Boyer, Edmond

442

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Besides their energy security and environmental benefits, many alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, and natural gas have unique chemical properties that offer advantages to drivers. These...

443

A MAXIMAL THEOREM FOR HOLOMORPHIC SEMIGROUPS by GORDON BLOWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New South Wales, NSW, 2052, Australia) [3 April 2004] Abstract Let X be a closed linear subspace of the Lebesgue space Lp (, µ) for some 1 invertible operator that is the generator norm f D(V ) = f Lp + V f Lp . For 0 power A such that D

Doust, Ian

444

A MAXIMAL THEOREM FOR HOLOMORPHIC SEMIGROUPS by GORDON BLOWERy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and IAN DOUSTx (School of Mathematics, The University of New South Wales, NSW, 2052, Austral* *ia of the Lebesgue space Lp( , ~) for some 1* * invertible operator}* * with the graph norm kfkD(V )= kfkLp + kV fkLp. For 0 power Affsuch

Doust, Ian

445

A MAXIMAL THEOREM FOR HOLOMORPHIC SEMIGROUPS by GORDON BLOWER +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New South Wales, NSW, 2052, Australia) [3 April 2004] Abstract Let X be a closed linear subspace of the Lebesgue space L p(# , µ) for some 1 invertible operator that is the generator a fractional power A # such that D(A # ) contains D(A), and A -# is bounded whenever A has bounded inverse; see

Doust, Ian

446

Dynamic programming applied to maximizing traffic flow in parallel systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of the problem The Triple-Route Model 33 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The control of traffic flow and congestion in freeway systems is a matter of increasing importance at a time when it. has become evident that it is impossible to construct... enough urban highway- to satisfy all of the traffic demand. It is necessary to seek ways to make more efficient u. e of existing freeways. Nattleworth (1, 2) and others (3, 4, 5, 6) have discussed various aspects of the control of freeway systems...

Anderson, Gerald Lee

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Biologically engineering nanostructures to maximize energy, electron, and ion transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human intellectual desire inspires recent research to expand to interdisciplinary areas across biology, chemistry, and physics. Interdisciplinary research in unexplored areas is challenging, but holds great promise to ...

Park, Heechul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

California: SunShot-Supported Technology Maximizes Taxpayer's...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

installation time in half, making it faster, easier, and cheaper for more Americans to go solar. Location San Rafael, California Partner Zep Solar EERE Investment 100,000 Clean...

449

Maximizing Combustion Efficiency Through Selection of Optimum CO Control Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increased emphasis on improved combustion control and the availability of accurate and reliable multi-parameter combustion instrumentation, an analytical technique is needed to supplant the previous incomplete assumptions and misleading...

McGowan, G. F.; Ketchum, R. L.

450

SEGMENTATION OF VERTEBRAE USING LEVEL SETS WITH EXPECTATION MAXIMIZATION ALGORITHM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Lab., Louisville, KY, 40299, USA 2 Image Analysis, Inc., 1380 Burkesville St., Columbia, KY, 42728, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose a robust level sets method to seg- ment vertebral bodies (VBs (EM) algorithm for the initialization and pa- rameter estimation. Validity was analyzed using ground

Louisville, University of

451

Spherical codes, maximal local packing density, and the golden ratio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The densest local packing (DLP) problem in d-dimensional Euclidean space Rd involves the placement of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter near an additional fixed unit-diameter sphere such that the greatest distance from the center of the fixed sphere to the centers of any of the N surrounding spheres is minimized. Solutions to the DLP problem are relevant to the realizability of pair correlation functions for packings of nonoverlapping spheres and might prove useful in improving upon the best known upper bounds on the maximum packing fraction of sphere packings in dimensions greater than three. The optimal spherical code problem in Rd involves the placement of the centers of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter onto the surface of a sphere of radius R such that R is minimized. It is proved that in any dimension, all solutions between unity and the golden ratio to the optimal spherical code problem for N spheres are also solutions to the corresponding DLP problem. It follows that for any packing of nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter, a spherical region of radius less than or equal to the golden ratio centered on an arbitrary sphere center cannot enclose a number of sphere centers greater than one more than the number that can be placed on the region's surface.

A. B. Hopkins; F. H. Stillinger; S. Torquato

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

452

EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and microfluidics. HRMAC will be the best, if not the only, capability in the world to characterize molecular

453

BRRR...5 Ways to Maximize Your Fireplace and Chimney Efficiency |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles » Alternative FuelNewsWashingtonAudits &

454

California: SunShot-Supported Technology Maximizes Taxpayer's Investment |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFAprilBudgetAbout5 Calendar YearAward |

455

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy Production,  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy SecondWellsWins R&D 100 Award |

456

Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy

457

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-ScaleofLabReportEnergy Ethanol can be|

458

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dryWashington'sResults | Department of Energy

459

On the generation of cutting planes which maximize the bound ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cutting plane generation in Mixed Integer Programming allowing for the simultaneous generation of k cuts which, when added to the current Linear Programming ...

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

Data Quality Maximization in Sensor Networks With a Mobile Sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

faster than the others [3]. Such unbal- anced energy consumption among sensors will compromise}@cs.anu.edu.au Tim Wark Autonomous Systems Laboratory CSIRO ICT Centre Brisbane, Australia Tim.Wark@csiro.au Abstract nodes, allocate them to gateways subject to gateway quotas, and devise an energy-efficient routing

Liang, Weifa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Exergy Optimized Wastewater Heat Recovery: Minimizing Losses and Maximizing Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat using a batch process with an insulated tank containing a heat exchanger. The analysis is based on statistical annual hot water usage profiles. The system shows that the exergy available in warm wastewater can be optimized with specific tank size...

Meggers, F.

462

Maximizing the value of education for university undergraduate research fellows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is understood that funding is necessary, however the debate rages over how much and irom whom. In order to test the magnitude of funding's effects, it is integral to not examine a state's total funds. This wouid be ineffective since a larger state would... variables rates using five multivariate linear regressions. Education Fundin The primary goal of this research was to examine school funding. Funding for schools is one of the most politically charged subjects when brought up for debate...

Tilley, Aaron Benjamin

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U to retrofit existing homes for energy savings. The largest retrofit program is the Federal Weatherization Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program, through contract 50009022

464

Low Temperature Combustion with Thermo-chemical Recuperation to Maximize  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term StorageDepartment of Energy and

465

EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of HRMAC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:DirectivesSAND2015-21271 7An Integratedcombination

466

RPSEA Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote:BEAMENV-39658RPSEA Final

467

Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems: A  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbus HTS1,GeologicNationalDevelopment onOak

468

Maximizing a class of submodular utility functions with constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 30, 2014 ... Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332. December ... We propose a family of inequalities for the convex hull of P by exploiting sub-.

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment at the Princeton...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be produced and vented to the environment during NCSX D-D operation. The annual effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical maximally exposed individual at the site boundary from...

470

A MAINTENANCE MODEL FOR COMPONENTS EXPOSED TO SEVERAL FAILURE MECHANISMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The preventive maintenance (PM) is performed periodically with some fixed period , but PM can also be performed describe the "goodness" of the maintenance crew; their ability to prevent failures by performing thorough is assumed to undergo preventive maintenance (PM), usually at fixed time periods > 0. In addition

Langseth, Helge

471

alcohol exposed pregnancies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and health practices in pregnancy.Depression Other diagnosed mental illness Substance Abuse Cigarettes Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Methamphetamine Non-use in pregnancydepression...

472

Arousing geographic awareness by exposing students to local global connections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . The Emerging Role of Geography. . American Students and Their Geographic Understanding. Curriculum's Role in Breaking the Geography Stereotype. Making Geography Relevant . . . Geography Provides a Global Perspective.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Learning About Place. The Student's Experience. . 5 6 11 12 14 15 17 Page METHODOLOGY. . 19 Curriculum. . . . . . . . Educational Goals. Instructional Plan. 22 22 23 RESULTS. . 37 Educational Results. . 37 DISCUSSION. Recommendations...

Benjamin, Jerry Lee

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

albino rats exposed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

474

Auditory Responses in Normal-Hearing, Noise-Exposed Ears  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................... 29 Influence of ABR Recording Electrode ......................................................................................... 31 ABR Wave V Amplitude... membrane electrode (Ferguson and Ferraro, 1989; Schwartz et al., 1994; Hall, 2007b; Gaddam and Ferraro, 2008). Variability is commonly seen in ABR response amplitude, even in normal-hearing ears (Schwartz et al., 1994). In light of the recent animal data...

Stamper, Greta

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

arabidopsis thaliana exposed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occurring variation is an important alternative resource for functional genetics and genomics research.; In a well-characterized collection of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we...

476

atlantic salmon exposed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species in the Bering Sea. We provide information on the size, age, and feeding of this fish and discuss the ecological implications of this occurrence. Salmo Salar In; Vol No;...

477

Introduction When exposed to high thermal loads, many endotherms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ungulates, is heterothermy, the storage of body heat during the day, under positive thermal load the fact that the gradient between Tb and Ta was larger and solar radiation was lower in winter-1429 Published by The Company of Biologists 2006 doi:10.1242/jeb.02151 Heterothermy of free-living Arabian sand

Williams, Jos. B.

478

Wave induced forces on a partially exposed circular cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyzed to give a dimensionless force which was related to the wave parameters H/L and d/L. Other methods of analysis were also used for the derivation of drag, inertia, and lift coefficients for use with various forms of the Norison Equation. RCKHOI... = Fluid Density A = Area of Hodel u = Horizontal Hater Particle Velocity x In a study conducted by Chakrabarti (9), the data presented by Shank and Herbich were analyzed by a different method, namely a closed form expression for the wave forces. Only...

Parker, Michael Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Characterization of Field Exposed Thin Film Modules: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test arrays of thin film modules have been deployed at the Solar Energy Centre near New Delhi, India since 2002-2003. Performances of these arrays were reported by O.S. Sastry [1]. This paper reports on NREL efforts to support SEC by performing detailed characterization of selected modules from the array. Modules were selected to demonstrate both average and worst case power loss over the 8 years of outdoor exposure. The modules characterized included CdTe, CIS and three different types of a-Si. All but one of the a-Si types were glass-glass construction. None of the modules had edge seals. Detailed results of these tests are presented along with our conclusions about the causes of the power loss for each technology.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Sastry, O. S.; Stokes, A.; Singh, Y. K.; Kumar, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

physics/0512181 Modelling dynamics of samples exposed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not only the sample but also the optical elements of the FEL beamline. Radiation damage by photons from December 2005 Abstract: We apply Boltzmann equations for modelling the radiation damage in samples. Rapid progress of radiation damage in these samples prevents an accurate determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mei maximally exposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phase iron respiration. Citation: White GF, Z Shi, L Shi, Z Wang, A Dohnalkova, MJ Marshall, JK Fredrickson, JM Zachara, JN Butt, D Richardson, and TA Clarke.2013."Rapid...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exposed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shuichi Nishikubo,1,2 Masaru Ohara,1 Masae Ikura,1 Katsuo Katayanagi,3... for modification 24 April 2006Accepted 12 September 2006 Clinical Actinobacillus...

483

Ion impact distribution over plasma exposed nanocone arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of an ordered array of nanocones on a conducting substrate immersed in the plasma on the transport of the plasma ions is investigated. The real conical shape of the cones is rigorously incorporated into the model. The movement of 10{sup 5} CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions in the plasma sheath modified by the nanocone array is simulated. The ions are driven by the electric fields produced by the sheath and the nanostructures. The surface charge density and the total charge on the nanotips with different aspect ratios are computed. The ion transport simulation provides important characteristics of the displacement and velocity of the ions. The relative ion distribution along the lateral surfaces of the carbon nanotips is computed as well. It is shown that a rigorous account of the realistic nanostructure shape leads to very different distribution of the ion fluxes on the nanostructured surfaces compared to the previously reported works. The ion flux distribution is a critical factor in the nucleation process on the substrate and determines the nanostructure growth patterns.

Mehrabian, S. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Qaemi, A. A. [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218 Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. | EMSL

485

EFIT EMPLOYEES MANAGE GLOBALLY | MAXIMIZE CONTROL | DRIVE SAVINGS | BENEFIT EMPLOYEES| | MANAGE GLOBALLY | MAXIMIZE CONTROL | DRIVE SAVINGS | BENEFIT EMPLOYEES | MANAGE GLOBALLY | REAL BUSINESS. REAL SOLUTIONS.SM CORPORATE SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Referral Travel Assistance · Passport/Visa Information, Customs Information, Weather Reports, Emergency, at no additional charge, simply by calling a toll free number. The Global Assist Hotline program's coordination SOLUTIONS.SM CORPORATE SERVICES EXPENSE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS Global Assist® Hotline When business travel

Huang, Jianyu

486

NooN CoNCert This performance is made possible in part by the generous support from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green, double bass and Chun Mei Wilson, piano Program Romanian Folk Dances Béla Bartók Joc Cu Bata (1881

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

487

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TFT Technology for AMOLED. ” AU Optronics Corp. , IMID. ICFSony, 52 Sharp, AU Optronics, Chi Mei Optoelectronics VAAdvanced Super View), AU Optronics (P-MVA: Premium multi-

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

THE WHITE MOUNTAIN POLARIMETER TELESCOPE AND AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2005; O'Dwyer et al. 2005; Donzelli 2006), and uses iden- tical aluminum coated carbon fiber reflectors gear.12 This table, as described in Mei

Timbie, Peter

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated yttrium oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

copper oxide," G. Srinivasan, Guo-mei Wu, and T. T. Srinivasan, J... frequencies in transition metal ion substituted yttrium barium copper oxide superconductors," G. Srinivasan......

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetone Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MEIAcetone mixture... that is produced when performing heavy mineral separations. Since water is immiscible in MEI, and since acetone... dissolves in water, adding water to the...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated yttrium tantalate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-thin lms of mixed yttrium, silicon, and oxygen, formed by oxidation of metal on clean and pre- treated... silicon. XPS and MEIS analyses indicate that oxidation of yttrium...

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles culicifacies sensu Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lato was an abundant horse feeder, but it was rarely... Valat site, Aedes caspius (Pallas), Aedes vexans (Meigen), Anopheles maculipennis Mei- gen sensu lato... , and to a...

493

Reservation Policies for Revenue Maximization from Secondary Spectrum Access in Cellular Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of network users who pay the license holder pre-defined fixed prices for unit time of use of the network the framework of dynamic programming to define a decision policy for pricing and/or admis- sion control based on user type and the state of the network [5, 6, 7, 8]. However, the choice of fixed prices in this work

Starobinski, David

494

Grout and Glass Performance Maximizing the Loading of ORNL Tank Sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization and solidification alternatives for radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as a mixed-waste alternative disposal technology.

Burgess, M.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.; Travis, J.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF CUSTOMER-SITED PV SYSTEMS USING STORAGE AND CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U.S. have become increasingly accustomed to a highly reliable source of electricity. As a result. Outage recovery: provide customers with an "outage- reactive" capability by supporting local critical

Perez, Richard R.

496

1580 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA, VOL. 9, NO. 8, DECEMBER 2007 On Maximizing Tree Bandwidth for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Measurement study based on Plan- etLab further confirms this. Our study shows that the knowledge of underlay. In this paper, we consider building a high-bandwidth overlay tree for steaming. A streaming video usually has a certain bi- trate. To ensure good streaming quality at a host, the incoming bandwidth of the host should

Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

497

TATIS DOMIN Questions Degrees Questions Again Examples D-Maximal Sets Classification Questions Yet Again  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work with Christo- pher Deninger published in [De-We1], [De-We2] and [De-We3]. We define a certain on the definitions and constructions in [De-We2], outlining the ideas rather than reproducing the formal proofs

Cholak, Peter

498

Orbits Complete Sets D-Maximal Sets Low Sets The computably enumerable sets: the tardy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: werner@math.uni-siegen.de 1 Introduction In the paper [De-We2] we de#12;ned isomorphisms of parallel over Q p . By [De-We2] we have a continuous, Galois-equivariant homomorphism (1) #11; : Pic 0 X=Q p (C bundles. Besides, we show that it is compatible with the theory for curves in [De-We2] via the Albanese

Cholak, Peter

499

Mathematical Analysis of a Novel Approach to Maximize Waste Recovery in a Life Support System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NASA has been evaluating closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Two process models were developed to evaluate novel approaches for waster recovery in a life support system. The first is a model INL co-electrolysis process combined with a methanol production process. The second is the INL co-electrolysis process combined with a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process. For both processes, the overall power increases as the syngas ratio, H2/CO, increases because more water is needed to produce more hydrogen at a set CO2 incoming flow rate. The power for the methanol cases is less than the PSA because heat is available from the methanol reactor to preheat the water and carbon dioxide entering the co-electrolysis process.

Michael G. McKellar; Rick A. Wood; Carl M. Stoots; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary analyses presented in this report are: Nevertheless, it is important to analyze best-on-market products, since data on truly max tech technologies are limited. (1) an analysis of the cross-cutting strategies most promising for reducing appliance and equipment energy use in the U.S.; (2) a macro-analysis of the U.S. energy-saving potential inherent in promising ultra-efficient appliance technologies; and (3) a product-level analysis of the energy-saving potential.

Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z