Sample records for megawatts year wind

  1. National Wind Technology Center Dynamic 5-Megawatt Dynamometer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Felker, Fort

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests. Its custom-designed dynamometers can test wind turbine systems from 1 kilowatt (kW) to 5 megawatts (MW). The NWTC's new dynamometer facility simulates operating field conditions to assess the reliability and performance of wind turbine prototypes and commercial machines, thereby reducing deployment time, failures, and maintenance or replacement costs. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, the 5-MW dynamometer will provide the ability to test wind turbine drivetrains and connect those drivetrains directly to the electricity grid or through a controllable grid interface (CGI). The CGI tests the low-voltage ride-through capability of a drivetrain as well as its response to faults and other abnormal grid conditions.

  2. National Wind Technology Center Dynamic 5-Megawatt Dynamometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, Fort

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests. Its custom-designed dynamometers can test wind turbine systems from 1 kilowatt (kW) to 5 megawatts (MW). The NWTC's new dynamometer facility simulates operating field conditions to assess the reliability and performance of wind turbine prototypes and commercial machines, thereby reducing deployment time, failures, and maintenance or replacement costs. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, the 5-MW dynamometer will provide the ability to test wind turbine drivetrains and connect those drivetrains directly to the electricity grid or through a controllable grid interface (CGI). The CGI tests the low-voltage ride-through capability of a drivetrain as well as its response to faults and other abnormal grid conditions.

  3. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

  4. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why offshore wind energy? Offshore wind turbines have theturbine will also uncover potential problems that exist with offshore wind energy.

  5. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1985. 23. Hau, E. Wind Turbines: Fundamentals, Technologies,for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines. Tech. no. NREL/CP-500-Full-scale Floating Wind Turbine." Statoil, 14 Oct. 2009.

  6. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines have the potential to generateuncover potential problems that exist with offshore windwind turbines in operation, this technology has the potential

  7. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  8. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

  9. Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

  10. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  11. New Report Highlights Trends in Offshore Wind with 14 Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the advanced stages of development- together representing nearly 4,900 megawatts (MW) of potential offshore wind energy capacity for the United States. Further, this year's report...

  12. Wind Farms through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Years 1975 Start Slow Stop Year Wind Farms Homes Powered Added Current Year 833 Wind Farms Online. Enough to Power 15 M Homes Data provided by the EIA. The number of...

  13. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  14. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

  15. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

  16. The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter #12;Design data Rated power 5,000kW Cut and most powerful wind turbines in the world. The 5M sets new standards for the economic viability similar to conventional power plants. This in turn puts high demands on the control and regulation system

  17. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  18. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  19. 2014 Year-End Wind Power Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind2 0

  20. LINE","COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PURCNAME","SALETYPE","MEGAWATT","ANNMXDEM","DE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. If youEIA-906Feet) Year JanCubic Feet)2,445 25,536Spencer

  1. LINE","COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PURCNAME","SALETYPE","MEGAWATT","ANNMXDEM","DE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. If youEIA-906Feet) Year JanCubic Feet)2,445

  2. Ris Energy Report 5 Wind 2 In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 5 Wind 2 6.1 Status In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself all these achievements, wind energy remains on the fringes of power generation. For people working ignorance and emo- tional opposition. Wind energy is far from having been proved to lay people, large

  3. Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

  4. Multi Megawatt Power System Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Harvego, Edwin Allan; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Seifert, Gary Dean; Sharpe, John Phillip; Verrill, Donald Alan; Watts, Kenneth Donald; Parks, Benjamin Travis

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Missions to the outer planets or to near-by planets requiring short times and/or increased payload carrying capability will benefit from nuclear power. A concept study was undertaken to evaluate options for a multi-megawatt power source for nuclear electric propulsion. The nominal electric power requirement was set at 15 MWe with an assumed mission profile of 120 days at full power, 60 days in hot standby, and another 120 days of full power, repeated several times for 7 years of service. Of the numerous options considered, two that appeared to have the greatest promise were a gas-cooled reactor based on the NERVA Derivative design, operating a closed cycle Brayton power conversion system; and a molten lithium-cooled reactor based on SP-100 technology, driving a boiling potassium Rankine power conversion system. This study examined the relative merits of these two systems, seeking to optimize the specific mass. Conclusions were that either concept appeared capable of approaching the specific mass goal of 3-5 kg/kWe estimated to be needed for this class of mission, though neither could be realized without substantial development in reactor fuels technology, thermal radiator mass efficiency, and power conversion and distribution electronics and systems capable of operating at high temperatures. Though the gas-Brayton systems showed an apparent advantage in specific mass, differences in the degree of conservatism inherent in the models used suggests expectations for the two approaches may be similar. Brayton systems eliminate the need to deal with two-phase flows in the microgravity environment of space.

  5. Wind Energy Permitting Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind facilities larger than 0.5 megawatts (MW) that begin construction after July 1, 2010, must obtain a permit from any county in which the facility is located. Facilities must also obtain...

  6. Market penetration of wind turbine concepts over the years Anca D. Hansen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market penetration of wind turbine concepts over the years Anca D. Hansen1 , Lars H. Hansen2 1 Risø wind turbine concepts over the years (1995-2005). A detailed overview is performed based on suppliers market data and concept evaluation for each individual wind turbine type sold by the suppliers

  7. Final Environmental Impact Report: North Brawley Ten Megawatt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final Environmental Impact Report: North Brawley Ten Megawatt Geothermal Demonstration Facility Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Final...

  8. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  9. Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

  10. Mass Megawatts Wind Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <Stevens Jump to:source History View

  11. 2005 Year End Wind Power Capacity for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  12. Wind Farm Growth Through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWasteWho Will BeWhy SOFCWilliamWind EnergyFarm

  13. Wind Farms through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWasteWho Will BeWhy SOFCWilliamWind

  14. Xcel Energy Wind and Biomass Generation Mandate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota law (Minn. Stat. § 216B.2423) requires Xcel Energy to build or contract for 225 megawatts (MW) of installed wind-energy capacity in the state by December 31, 1998, and to build or...

  15. EIS-0418: PrairieWinds Project, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve the interconnection request from PrairieWinds for their South Dakota PrairieWinds Project, a 151.5-megawatt (MW) nameplate capacity wind powered generation facility, including 101 General Electric 1.5-MW wind turbine generators, electrical collector lines, collector substation, transmission line, communications system, and wind turbine service access roads.

  16. Megawatts vs. Negawatts: how a little can do a lot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In some quarters there is increased emphasis on overall reduction of energy usage from customers. One indication of the growing significance of negawatts is apparent at PJM Interconnection, where customers are encouraged to bid negative load into the wholesale market in direct competition with megawatts. This negative load, while not large in absolute terms relative to the 164 GW size of the PJM market, is nevertheless critical in introducing an element of price elasticity into what would otherwise be a virtually inelastic demand.

  17. www.wasp.dk Long-term (1-20 years) prediction of wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 www.wasp.dk European Wind Atlas www.wasp.dk Geostrophic winds #12;5 www.wasp.dk Thermal winds www.wasp.dk Background · European Wind Atlas, Vol. II: Measurements and Modelling in Complex Terrain. Multi-partner EU). Exploring the limits of WAsP: the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program. Proc. 1996 European Union

  18. Wind and solar power electric generation to see strong growth over the next two years

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand expected2Wind and solar

  19. Fault Analysis at a Wind Power Plant for One Year of Observation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Mills, Z.; Foster, R.; Conto, J.; Ellis, A.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the fault characteristics observed at a wind power plant, and the behavior of the wind power plant under fault events.

  20. Lessons from Iowa : development of a 270 megawatt compressed air energy storage project in midwest Independent System Operator : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holst, Kent (Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency, Traer, IA); Huff, Georgianne; Schulte, Robert H. (Schulte Associates LLC, Northfield, MN); Critelli, Nicholas (Critelli Law Office PC, Des Moines, IA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iowa Stored Energy Park was an innovative, 270 Megawatt, $400 million compressed air energy storage (CAES) project proposed for in-service near Des Moines, Iowa, in 2015. After eight years in development the project was terminated because of site geological limitations. However, much was learned in the development process regarding what it takes to do a utility-scale, bulk energy storage facility and coordinate it with regional renewable wind energy resources in an Independent System Operator (ISO) marketplace. Lessons include the costs and long-term economics of a CAES facility compared to conventional natural gas-fired generation alternatives; market, legislative, and contract issues related to enabling energy storage in an ISO market; the importance of due diligence in project management; and community relations and marketing for siting of large energy projects. Although many of the lessons relate to CAES applications in particular, most of the lessons learned are independent of site location or geology, or even the particular energy storage technology involved.

  1. Robust 1550-nm single-frequency all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier for wind-turbine predictive control by wind lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    Oldenburg, Germany ABSTRACT Scaling of the power yield of offshore wind farms relies on the capacity powers [1]. To reach the ambitious and politically motivated aims of Multi-GW offshore wind farms belongs to this category. Clustered in wind farms, today's wind turbines produce Megawatt-level output

  2. The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems by testing a blade from one of Clipper Windpower's 2.5-megawatt wind turbines. Photo by DerekThe new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study of aeroelastic stability of very large VAWTs that used an enhanced version of the Offshore Wind Energy Simu-lation Toolkit for VAWTs. Multiple-megawatt VAWT design...

  4. Solar wind oscillations with a 1.3 year period John D. Richardson, Karolen I. Paularena, John W. Belcher, and Alan J. Lazaru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Solar wind oscillations with a 1.3 year period s C John D. Richardson, Karolen I. Paularena, John W Abstract. The IMP-8 and Voyager 2 spacecraft have ecently detected a very strong modulation in the solar. Introduction The Sun emits a continuous stream of ionized particles s d called the solar wind. This wind

  5. Best Practices in Literature Review for the 10 Year Extreme Wind...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at the DOE Pantex Site More Documents & Publications SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES Natural...

  6. Conversion Topology for Reducing Failure Rate and Life-Cycle Costs of High-Power Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipo, Thomas

    Drive Madison, WI 53706 #12;American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Conversion Topology;American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2 I. Introduction ARGE multi-megawatt wind turbines

  7. Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

  8. Modal Dynamics and Stability of Large Multi-megawatt Deepwater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and O&M, while maintaining or increasing energy production. A vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor configuration offers a potential transformative technology solution...

  9. Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region J methods on a redesigned modern Mega-Watt sized wind turbine, where the new design includes an increase of the blade in the vicinity of the wind turbine nacelle, to obtain an aerodynamically more efficient rotor

  10. Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications in 2012 for Megawatt+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications in 2012 for Megawatt+ Heatpumps within a technical, commercial and sustainable framework Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications Emerson Climate Technologies Core Offerings & Key Brands Residential Heating & Air Conditioning Commercial

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: deep-water multiple-megawatt VAWT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs). This analysis uses a 5 MW VAWT topside design envelope created by Sandia to compare floating platform options for each turbine in the...

  12. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

    -wind renewables. This legislation also requires the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop...

  13. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  14. EA-1800: DOE’s Proposed Financial Assistance to Illinois for the Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project, Lenox Township, Warren County, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided Federal funding to the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DCEO is seeking to provide $5 million of its SEP funds to Monarch Wind Power (MWP), who would use these funds for the design, permitting, and construction of 12, 1.6-megawatt wind turbines, for a combined generation capacity of 19.2 megawatts.

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  16. 1999 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  17. 2000 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  18. 2001 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  19. 2002 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  20. 2003 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  1. 2004 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  2. 2006 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  3. 2007 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  4. 2008 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  5. 2009 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  6. 2010 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  7. 2011 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  8. 2012 Year End Wind Power Capacity Map of the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducation PrintableWind

  9. EA-1884: Invenergy Interconnection for the Wray Wind Energy Project, Town of Wray, Yuma County, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Wray Wind Energy Project, for approximately 90 megawatts of wind generation, to Western’s existing Wray Substation in Yuma County, Colorado.

  10. DOE to Develop Multi-Megawatt Offshore Wind Turbine with General Electric |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustomIndoorVehiclesof

  11. DOE to Develop Multi-Megawatt Offshore Wind Turbine with General Electric |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |Production

  12. MARS15 study of the Energy Production Demonstrator Model for Megawatt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MARS15 study of the Energy Production Demonstrator Model for Megawatt proton beams in the 0.5 ­ 120 Targetry Workshop HPT5, Fermilab #12;Energy Production Demonstrator MARS15 Model · Solid targets · R= 60 cm · Energy Production/Materials Testing · LAQGSM/CEM generators were usedU-nat, 3 GeV, Energy deposition, Ge

  13. EA-1955: Campbell County Wind Project, Pollock, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect, via a proposed new substation, a proposed Dakota Plains Energy, LLC, 99-megawatt wind farm near Pollock, South Dakota, to Western’s existing transmission line at that location.

  14. EA-1909: South Table Wind Farm Project, Kimball County, Nebraska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed South Table Wind Project, which would generate approximately 60 megawatts from about 40 turbines, to Western’s existing Archer-Sidney 115-kV Transmission Line in Kimball County, Nebraska.

  15. EA-1955: Campbell County Wind Farm, Campbell County, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect, via a proposed new substation, a proposed Dakota Plains Energy, LLC, 99-megawatt wind farm near Pollock, South Dakota, to Western’s existing transmission line at that location.

  16. Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    were modeled using apparent fixity level, Randolph elastic continuum, and modified cone models. The offshore wind turbine structures were developed using a finite element formulation. A two-bladed 3.0 megawatt (MW) and a three-bladed 1.5 MW capacity...

  17. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  18. 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  20. Fourth Annual Progress Report on the Electrofluid Dynamic Wind Generator: Final Report for the Period 1 April 1979 - 31 August 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minardi, J. E.; Lawson, M. O.; Wattendorf, F. L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional wind energy systems are limited in wind turbine diameter by allowable rotor stresses at power levels of several megawatts. In contrast, the Electrofluid Dynamic (EFD) wind driven generator has no fundamental limits on cross sectional area. It is a direct energy conversion device which employs unipolar charged particles transported by the wind against a retarding voltage gradient to a high potential. As no moving parts are exposed to the wind, extremely large power units may be feasible.

  1. POST-CONSTRUCTION AVIAN AND BAT IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE WIND TURBINE IN LEWES, DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    POST-CONSTRUCTION AVIAN AND BAT IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE WIND TURBINE-831-1306 In May 2010, a Gamesa G90 2.0 megawatt wind turbine was erected in Lewes, DE through a collaborative Developments, Inc. The turbine was commissioned and began generating electricity in June 2010. The turbine has

  2. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  3. A Record Year for the American Wind Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA4, Fourthof DieselA Record Year

  4. BY DAVID CYRANOSKI hree years after a tsunami led to reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    energy by 2040. Two floating, 7-megawatt wind turbines, the world's largest, are scheduled to come online in the wake of the dis- aster, the current administration is ready to re-embrace the technology. Yet,Germany.Inside,about100research- erswillworkacrossareasincludingsolar,hydro- gen, wind and geothermal power. Deputy

  5. Technical and management support for the development of Small Wind Systems. Fiscal year 1980 annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status and achievements of a program for the development, testing, and commercialization of wind energy systems rated under 100 kilowatts are described. The organization structure and task definition used to promote the production, marketing, and acceptance of small systems are described, and the Work Breakdown Structure under which the program is organized is detailed. Reports are given which describe the status of contracts funded by the Federal Wind Energy Program and managed by the Rocky Flats Wind Systems Program. These project reports, sequenced according to the Department of Energy Work Breakdown Structure, name the principal investigators involved, and discuss achievements and progress made during Fiscal Year 1980. Of fourty-four projects, seven were completed during the Fiscal Year. The Work Breakdown Structure Index details the organization sequence.

  6. Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) for Offshore Wind - Mock-Up of ERES, Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) has been created to set priorities among the environmental risks from offshore wind development. This report follows the conceptual design for ERES and shows what the system would look like, using a web interface created as part of a Knowledge Management System (KMS) for offshore wind. The KMS, called Zephyrus, and ERES for offshore wind, will be populated and made operational in a later phase of the project.

  7. Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

  8. Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

  9. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis: Multi-Year Analysis Results and Recommendations. Consultant report prepared by the California Wind

  10. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  18. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  19. Research and educational activities at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Nuclear Engineering; 7102 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Reactor. Staff; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, five-megawatt, heavy water, research reactor during fiscal year 1968 has been prepared for administrative use at MIT ...

  20. EIS-0333: Maiden Wind Farm Project, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA’s proposed action to execute power purchase and interconnection agreements for the purpose of acquiring up to 50 average megawatts (aMW) (up to about 200 MW) of the project developer’s proposed Maiden Wind Farm.

  1. EIS-0462: Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project, Grant and Codington Counties, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve a grid interconnection request by NextEra Energy Resources for its proposed 150-megawatt (MW) Crowned Ridge Wind Energy Center Project with the Western Area Power Administration's existing Watertown Substation in Codington County, South Dakota.

  2. EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed 150 megawatt Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, in Hyde County, South Dakota, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s existing Fort Thompson Substation in Buffalo County, South Dakota.

  3. Evaluation of Wind Shear Patterns at Midwest Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Randall, G.; Malcolm, D.; Kelley, N.; Smith, B.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has included several wind energy facilities in the Midwestern United States. At several of these projects, a strong diurnal shear pattern has been observed. During the day, low and sometimes negative shear has been measured. During night hours, very high positive shear is frequently observed. These high nighttime shear values are of concern due to the potential for high stresses across the rotor. The resulting loads on turbine components could result in failures. Conversely, the effects of high nighttime wind shear could benefit wind generated energy production in the Midwest by providing a source of greater hub-height wind speeds, particularly for multi-megawatt turbines that utilize tall towers. This paper presents an overview of the observed wind shear at each of the Midwest TVP projects, focusing on diurnal patterns and the frequency of very high nighttime shear at the sites. Turbine fault incidence is examined to determine the presence or absence of a correlation to periods of high shear. Implications of shear-related failures are discussed for other Midwest projects that use megawatt-scale turbines. In addition, this paper discusses the importance of accurate shear estimates for project development.

  4. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine VerificationTurbine Global Market Study: Year Ending 2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy

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    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  10. EA-1611: Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared an EA in 2009 to assess the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Colorado Highlands Wind Project to Western’s transmission system. The EA analyzed a proposal for 60 wind turbine generators with a total output nameplate capacity of 90 megawatts (MW). Western prepared a supplemental EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed expansion of the project by 11 wind turbine generators that would add approximately 20 MW. Additional information is available on the Western Area Power Administration webpage for this project.

  11. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  13. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  14. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

  15. Presented at Solar World Congress, Beijing, September 18 22 2007 PARABOLOIDAL DISH SOLAR CONCENTRATORS FOR MULTI-MEGAWATT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA keith.lovegrove@anu.edu.au ABSTRACT Large scale solar thermal electric power generation CONCENTRATORS FOR MULTI-MEGAWATT POWER GENERATION Keith Lovegrove A Zawadski and J Coventy Department of Engineering, Wizard Power Pty Ltd Australian National University, Barry Drive Canberra ACT 0200 Canberra ACT

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43 YEAR

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144 YEAR

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 2013

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 201387

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558563

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR85573380 YEAR

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  8. Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

  9. 2009 WIND TURBINE IMPACT STUDY APPRAISAL GROUP ONE 9/9/2009 WIND TURBINE IMPACT STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fond Du; Lac Counties Wisconsin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of the impact that wind turbines have on residential property value. The wind turbines that are the focus of this study are the larger turbines being approximately 389ft tall and producing 1.0+ megawatts each, similar to the one pictured to the right. The study has been broken into three component parts, each looking at the value impact of the wind turbines from a different perspective. The three parts are: (1) a literature study, which reviews and summarizes what has been published on this matter found in the general media; (2) an opinion survey, which was given to area Realtors to learn their opinions on the impact of wind turbines in

  10. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISO Transmission Expansion Plan 2012 megawatt megawatt-hour North American Electric ReliabilityMISO), New York ISO (NYISO), ISO-New England (ISO-NE), California ISO (CAISO), Electric Reliability

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 201434

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43417

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  10. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  11. Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Each year, DOE EERE invests...

  12. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

  13. A Megawatt-level 28z GHz Heating System For The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Gary

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will operate at axial toroidal fields of < 1 T and plasma currents, Ip < 2 MA. The development of non-inductive (NI) plasmas is a major long-term research goal for NSTX-U. Time dependent numerical simulations of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating of low density NI start-up plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U predict a significant and rapid increase of the central electron temperature (Te(0)) before the plasma becomes overdense. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is planned for heating NI start-up plasmas in NSTX-U. In addition to EC heating of CHI start-up discharges, this system will be used for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) plasma start-up, and eventually for EBW heating and current drive during the Ip flattop.

  14. A Conceptual Multi-Megawatt System Based on a Tungsten CERMET Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. A conceptual reactor system to support Multi-Megawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion is investigated within this paper. The reactor system consists of a helium cooled Tungsten-UN fission core, surrounded by a beryllium neutron reflector and 13 B4C control drums coupled to a high temperature Brayton power conversion system. Excess heat is rejected via carbon reinforced heat pipe radiators and the gamma and neutron flux is attenuated via segmented shielding consisting of lithium hydride and tungsten layers. Turbine inlet temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1500 K are investigated for their effects on specific powers and net electrical outputs ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW. The reactor system is estimated to have a mass, which ranges from 15 Mt at 1 MWe and a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 K to 1200 Mt at 100 MWe and a turbine temperature of 1300 K. The reactor systems specific mass ranges from 32 kg/kWe at a turbine inlet temperature of 1300 K and a power of 1 MWe to 9.5 kg/kW at a turbine temperature of 1500 K and a power of 100 MWe.

  15. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Association (2009), American Wind Energy Asso-ciation annual wind industry report: Year ending 2008,2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  16. Perceived Socioeconomic Impacts of Wind Energy in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persons, Nicole D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power is a fast growing alternative energy source. Since 2000, wind energy capacity has increased 24 percent per year with Texas leading the U.S. in installed wind turbine capacity. Most socioeconomic research in wind energy has focused...

  17. Perceived Socioeconomic Impacts of Wind Energy in West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persons, Nicole D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power is a fast growing alternative energy source. Since 2000, wind energy capacity has increased 24 percent per year with Texas leading the U.S. in installed wind turbine capacity. Most socioeconomic research in wind energy has focused...

  18. EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, Chautauqua County, Irving, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to the Seneca Nation of Indians, to design, permit, and construct a 1.7-megawatt wind turbine on Tribal common lands in the Cattaraugus Territory, New York. The turbine would be located near Lucky Lane and Gil Lay Arena. An Environmental Assessment (EA) will be prepared by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  19. MIXED MODE DELAMINATION OF GLASS FIBER/POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................................................................................................1 DEMANDS FOR MEGAWATT WIND TURBINE BLADES ....................................................1 2

  20. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  1. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  2. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  3. EIS-0446: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to AES for the Proposed Daggett Ridge Wind Farm, San Bernardino County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management [BLM], Barstow Field Office) evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed 82.5-megawatt (MW) Daggett Ridge Wind Farm project on land managed by the BLM located 11 miles southwest of Barstow, California, and five miles southwest of Daggett, California. DOE, a cooperating agency, is considering the impacts of its proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to AES Wind Generation, Inc., to support the construction of the proposed wind project. This EIS has been cancelled.

  4. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  5. Wind Resource Assessment of Gujarat (India)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Purkayastha, A.; Parker, Z.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India is one of the largest wind energy markets in the world. In 1986 Gujarat was the first Indian state to install a wind power project. In February 2013, the installed wind capacity in Gujarat was 3,093 MW. Due to the uncertainty around existing wind energy assessments in India, this analysis uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the wind at current hub heights for one year to provide more precise estimates of wind resources in Gujarat. The WRF model allows for accurate simulations of winds near the surface and at heights important for wind energy purposes. While previous resource assessments published wind power density, we focus on average wind speeds, which can be converted to wind power densities by the user with methods of their choice. The wind resource estimates in this study show regions with average annual wind speeds of more than 8 m/s.

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kilowatt-hour Midwest Independent System Operator megawattPJM), Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), New Yorkin 2009. The Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) (net

  7. Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Moriarty, P. J.; Martinez, L. A.; Leonardi, S.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J. G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present results of a large-eddy simulation of the 48 multi-megawatt turbines composing the Lillgrund wind plant. Turbulent inflow wind is created by performing an atmospheric boundary layer precursor simulation and turbines are modeled using a rotating, variable-speed actuator line representation. The motivation for this work is that few others have done wind plant large-eddy simulations with a substantial number of turbines, and the methods for carrying out the simulations are varied. We wish to draw upon the strengths of the existing simulations and our growing atmospheric large-eddy simulation capability to create a sound methodology for performing this type of simulation. We have used the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox to create our solver.

  8. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis: Multi-Year Analysis Results and Recommendations. Consultant report prepared by the California Windanalysis of the AWEA project database. Cost, Performance and Pricing Trends Wind

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis: Multi-Year Analysis Results and Recommendations. Consultant report prepared by the California Windanalysis of the AWEA project database. Price, Cost, and Performance Trends Wind

  10. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  11. PARABOLOIDAL DISH SOLAR CONCENTRATORS FOR MULTI-MEGAWATT POWER GENERATION Keith Lovegrove , Tui Taumoefolau, Sawat Paitoonsurikarn, Piya Siangsukone, Greg Burgess, Andreas Luzzi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARABOLOIDAL DISH SOLAR CONCENTRATORS FOR MULTI-MEGAWATT POWER GENERATION Keith Lovegrove , Tui, Wie Joe and Geoff Major. Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA ph:+61 02 6125 8299 fax: +61 02 6125 0506 E-mail: keith

  12. Ris National Laboratory Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the wind power density 36 (Troen & Petersen, 1989). In screening for potential offshore wind 37farm sitesRisø National Laboratory Postprint Wind Energy Department Year 2006 Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2006_96.pdf Wind resource assessment from C-band SAR Merete Bruun Christiansen a, Wolfgang Koch b

  13. Ris National Laboratory Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Wind Energy Department Year 2007 Paper: www at the National Test Site for wind turbines at Høvsøre (Denmark) and at a 250 m high TV tower at Hamburg (Germany in predictions of the wind profile in the lowest few hundred metres of the atmosphere for use in wind energy

  14. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  15. Offshore Wind Project Surges Ahead in South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for Marine and Wetland Studies studies wind speed data from buoys, which have been measuring wind speed and direction for the past year.

  16. Mining Markov chain transition matrix from wind speed time series data Zhe Song a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    to wind energy industry in terms of wind turbine optimal control, wind energy dispatch/scheduling, wind in recent years and even more aggressive wind energy installations are envisioned in various economy & Bolinger, 2006). Rapid development of wind energy provides rich environments for wind energy related

  17. California's Electricity Supply and Demand Balance Over the Next Five Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Northwest over the past two years by about 8,000 megawatts. Natural gas prices have declined from the high the resources of the system. The Commission's 2003 Baseline Demand forecast assumes the following assumptions September October 1 CEC 2003 Baseline Demand Forecast (1-in-2 Weather)1, 2 3

  18. DOE Report Tracks Maturation of U.S. Wind Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 7. Installed Wind Project Costs Over Time Figure 8.on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performanceof a decline in wind project O&M costs in recent years.

  19. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  20. Use of synthetic aperture radar for offshore wind resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Iain Dickson

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK has an abundant offshore wind resource with offshore wind farming set to grow rapidly over the coming years. Optimisation of energy production is of the utmost importance and accurate estimates of wind speed distributions are critical...

  1. LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear of offshore wind farms in the coming years. In contrast with the situation over land, the knowledge turbine manufacturers and wind farm developers, although the offshore environment represents other

  2. Evaluation of the megawatt demand setter for load-follow operation of C-E's SYSTEM 80+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.I.; Scarola, K.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Megawatt Demand Setter (MDS) is a digital supervisory control system that automatically assures that the turbine load is consistent with plant operating limits for critical parameters. The MDS is designed to avert plant trips by limiting the load demand during load transients and by reducing the turbine load if plant operating limits are approached or violated. The MDS, devised and patented by Combustion Engineering, Inc., in the 1970s for automatic load dispatching, has been installed at two plants. Those plants have since been operated in a base-load capacity, however, and have not needed to implement the load-follow capabilities of the MDS. As the percentage of electricity generated by nuclear units increases, the need to implement such load-follow capabilities will also increase. Combustion Engineering intends to incorporate improved load-follow capability in its SYSTEM 80+ nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design. One aspect of this will be incorporation of the MDS in the design of the NUPLEX 80+ advanced control complex for system 80+. This paper presents an evaluation of two major design features of the MDS for load-follow operation based on simulation of SYSTEM 80+ plant responses.

  3. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the past year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with significant federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. This report examines key trends.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  5. Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  7. Wind Energy and Power System Operations: A Review of Wind Integration Studies to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCesaro, J.; Porter, K.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with wind integration and summarizes the findings of the wind integration studies conducted over the course of the past five years.

  8. Design and analysis of megawatt-class heat-pipe reactor concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, D.; Kapernick, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS C921, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in finding an alternative to diesel-powered systems at locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. One promising option is a 1- to 10-MW mobile reactor system, that could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term ({>=} 5 years) power in any environment. The reactor and required infrastructure could be transported to any location within one or a few standard transport containers. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than 'traditional' reactors that rely on pumped coolant through the core. This paper examines a heat pipe reactor that is fabricated and shipped as six identical core segments. Each core segment includes a heat-pipe-to-gas heat exchanger that is coupled to the condenser end of the heat pipes. The reference power conversion system is a CO{sub 2}-Brayton system. The segments by themselves are deeply subcritical during transport, and they would be locked into an operating configuration (with control inserted) at the final destination. Two design options are considered: a near-term option and an advanced option. The near-term option is a 5-MWt concept that uses uranium-dioxide fuel, a stainless-steel structure, and potassium as the heat-pipe working fluid. The advanced option is a 15-MWt concept that uses uranium-nitride fuel, a molybdenum/TZM structure, and sodium as the heat-pipe working fluid. The materials used in the advanced option allow for higher temperatures and power densities, and enhanced power throughput in the heat pipes. Higher powers can be obtained from both concepts by increasing the core size and the number of heat pipes. (authors)

  9. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kilowatt-hour Midwest Independent System Operator megawattPJM), Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), New YorkN/A (NSP) Midwest Independent System Operator N/A N/A (

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  11. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  12. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  13. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  14. Modal Dynamics and Stability of Large Multi-megawatt Deepwater Offshore Vertical-axis Wind Turbines: Initial Support Structure and Rotor Design Impact Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William Hirst Hirst Enterprises, Inc. P.O.Modal

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  16. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  17. megatons to megawatts

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. HirschOccurrencei-rapter |

  18. Megawatt Electrolysis Scale Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19, 2004MW Electrolysis Scale Up E

  19. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  20. Trailing Edge Noise Model Applied to Wind Turbine Airfoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In order to increase public acceptance of wind energy in the coming years, there is a strong need Bertagnolio Title: Trailing Edge Noise Model Applied to Wind Turbine Airfoils Department: Wind EnergyTrailing Edge Noise Model Applied to Wind Turbine Airfoils Franck Bertagnolio Risø-R-1633(EN) Risø

  1. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  2. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  5. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  6. Analysis of Wind Power Generation of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

    from Jul 2002 to Jan 2003 Degradation Analysis - On average, no degradation observed for nine wind farms analyzed over 4-year period. Application of Method 1 to New Site- Sweetwater I Wind Farm ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 3...&M University Page 10 Weather Data: NOAA- ABI 1999 and 2005 Hourly Wind Speed NOAA -ABI Hourly Wind Speed -1999 0 10 20 30 40 Jan-99 Feb-99 M ar-99 Apr-99 M ay-99 Jun-99 Jul-99 Aug-99 Sep-99 Oct-99 Nov-99 Dec-99 W in d Spe ed [m ph ] NOAA -ABI Hourly Wind...

  7. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  8. Wind energy systems: program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  9. Validation of Power Output for the WIND Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.; Clifton, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy integration studies require wind data sets of high quality with realistic representations of the variability, ramping characteristics, and forecast performance for current wind power plants. The Wind Integration National Data Set (WIND) Toolkit is meant to be an update for and expansion of the original data sets created for the weather years from 2004 through 2006 during the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and the Eastern Wind Integration Study. The WIND Toolkit expands these data sets to include the entire continental United States, increasing the total number of sites represented, and it includes the weather years from 2007 through 2012. In addition, the WIND Toolkit has a finer resolution for both the temporal and geographic dimensions. Three separate data sets will be created: a meteorological data set, a wind power data set, and a forecast data set. This report describes the validation of the wind power data set.

  10. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  11. Course Checksheet and Suggested Sequence Bachelor of Music, Wind or Percussion Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    Course Checksheet and Suggested Sequence Bachelor of Music, Wind or Percussion Instrument ISU music courses are offered one semester each year.) *Specific advanced theory and history courses (wind BM Perf Wind and Percussion 7/22/14 #12;

  12. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand in future years. Technology cost and performanceAssumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technology

  13. Wind climatology of Schiphol Andrew Stepek, Xueli Wang and Dirk Wolters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Wind climatology of Schiphol Andrew Stepek, Xueli Wang and Dirk Wolters De Bilt, May 2012 #12;2 Contents Summary 2 Introduction 3 Data 3 Hourly wind measurements 3 Yearly averages of wind speed measurements 4 Quality and sources of error 6 Method 7 Trends in wind speed 7 Definition of cross and tail wind

  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics An Experimental Study on the Performances of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    development of offshore wind farms, which will play more important role in the coming years, onshore wind farm. To realize this target, exploitation of areas with high wind potential such as deep offshore and mountainous must continue to contribute to the overall growth of wind energy. Before the wind farm is actually

  15. Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D. Department of Otolaryngology there happens to be a castle nearby). #12;Wind turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting MegaWatts(MW) Total Installed Change by year 3% of US Energy Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind

  16. 80 and 100 Meter Wind Energy Resource Potential for the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Flowers, L.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate information about the wind potential in each state is required for federal and state policy initiatives that will expand the use of wind energy in the United States. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and AWS Truewind have collaborated to produce the first comprehensive new state-level assessment of wind resource potential since 1993. The estimates are based on high-resolution maps of predicted mean annual wind speeds for the contiguous 48 states developed by AWS Truewind. These maps, at spatial resolution of 200 meters and heights of 60 to 100 meters, were created with a mesoscale-microscale modeling technique and adjusted to reduce errors through a bias-correction procedure involving data from more than 1,000 measurement masts. NREL used the capacity factor maps to estimate the wind energy potential capacity in megawatts for each state by capacity factor ranges. The purpose of this presentation is to (1) inform state and federal policy makers, regulators, developers, and other stakeholders on the availability of the new wind potential information that may influence development, (2) inform the audience of how the new information was derived, and (3) educate the audience on how the information should be interpreted in developing state and federal policy initiatives.

  17. 2006 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity. By comparison, since 2002 more than 1,500 MW of new wind capacity has been installed in Texas,936 megawatts of renewable capacity. However, only 242 megawatts of those renewable contracts represent new generating capacity over the next four years beyond what is already under contract. Chapter 2, "Midcourse

  18. Schrepel, Eric From: Jenkins, Kris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -fired generation in the plan. The LWVW also supports low-income aid for the cost of electricity and thus feels years. · Recommending 6,000 megawatts (2,000 average megawatts) of new wind energy. · Acknowledging that the plan should include an analysis of low-income weatherization needs, costs and benefits.l #12;Page 2

  19. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  20. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  1. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  2. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  3. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  4. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  5. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  6. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  10. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  11. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  12. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  13. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  14. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  15. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  16. Sunflower Wind Farm EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunflower Wind Farm EA Sunflower Wind Farm Draft EA (25mb pdf) Note: If you have problems downloading this file, pelase contact Lou Hanebury at (406) 255-2812 Sunflower Wind Farm...

  17. Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on all state tax credits, this credit may be claimed for tax year 2012 and subsequent tax years, for small wind turbines manufactured on or after July 1, 2012.'...

  18. Avian issues in wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyea, J. [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lot of concern among wind supporters, I know, about Audubon`s position on wind power. There is concern that this is the wrong time to be critical, and the wrong time to be putting any doubts in investors` minds, and the wrong time to provide an excuse for utilities to stop buying windpower. The long-term future of biodiversity, including bird diversity, depends on development of renewable energy, and that will mean some wind development in the right places and with the right types of systems. For both the long-time survival of the wind industry and for protection of bird populations, Audubon cannot be quiet on this issue. To avoid mistakes that can kill the industry in the long run, expenditures for wind/avian research have to be increased way beyond their present scope. We are going to need about $5 million dollars per year, if we are to (1) understand the biology and physics of bird-wind plant interactions, (2) if we are to understand relevant bird flightpaths, and (3) if we are to design a strategy to protect bird populations.

  19. Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

  20. innovati nWind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nWind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation For more than 20 years. Tackling Turbine Blade Inefficiencies In 1984, NREL researchers began investigating problems with wind turbine blade designs. Inefficiency was a significant barrier to lowering the cost of wind energy

  1. NREL Innovations Help Drive Wind Industry Transformation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For nearly 30 years, NREL has helped the wind turbine industry through design and research innovations. The comprehensive capabilities of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), ranging from specialized computer simulation tools to unique test facilities, has been used to design, develop, and deploy several generations of advanced wind energy technology.

  2. RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of survivor functions R(t) of drive-trains, after 1 year of operation, between Offshore Wind Turbine (OWT) vs of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS

  3. Preliminary Assumptions for Wind Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and incentives for renewable resources Federal Production Tax Credit (PTC) 2.3 cents/kWh over first 10 years of operation Investment Tax Credit (ITC) alternative 30% towards developer's income tax for qualifying solar, fuel cell and small wind (geothermal, CHP BETC ­ just Oregon (now expired) 5 #12

  4. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  5. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  6. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  7. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States. Specifically, Bluewater Wind and Delmarva PowerLLC Babcock & Brown Acquisition Bluewater Wind Good Energies

  9. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the top ten accompishments of the DOE Wind Energy Program during the past 30 years.

  11. Abstract--This paper proposes a stochastic wind power model based on an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    of one year from the Nysted offshore wind farm in Denmark. The proposed limited-ARIMA (LARIMA) model be applied to planning of future wind farms in the power system. However, both approaches entail wind speed measurements and an accurate wind farm model, which is usually unavailable. The accurate wind farm model

  12. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  13. Vertical axis wind turbine acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Charlie

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    change, there is a strong urge to move away from fossil fuel driven economies to a more sustainable energy supply with renewable power at its core. The UK has embodied its ambition for more green power generation in a series of legally binding obligations... in the UK over the last 12 years [Renewable UK, 2012b]. The UK has the best wind resource of any country in Europe [Renewable UK, 2012a, p.3] and, with the support of government subsidies, has seen rapid growth in the amount of installed wind generating...

  14. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  15. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  16. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  17. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  18. Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

  19. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  20. Development and installation of an advanced beam guidance system on Viking`s 2.4 megawatt EB furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motchenbacher, C.A.; Grosse, I.A. [Viking Metallurgical, Verdi, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Viking Metallurgical is a manufacturer of titanium alloy and superalloy seamless ring forgings for the aerospace industry. For more than 20 years Viking has used electron beam cold hearth melting to recover titanium alloy scrap and to produce commercially pure titanium ingot for direct forging. In the 1970`s Viking pioneered electron beam cold hearth melting and in 1983 added a two-gun, 2.4 MW furnace. As part of Vikings efforts to improve process control we have commissioned and installed a new electron beam guidance system. The system is capable of generating virtually unlimited EB patterns resulting in improved melt control.

  1. WIND TURBINE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING: A SHORT INVESTIGATION BASED ON SCADA DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .papatheou@sheffield.ac.uk ABSTRACT The use of offshore wind farms has been growing in recent years, as steadier and higher wind to complicate the construction of land wind farms, offshore locations, which can be found more easily near densely populated areas, can be seen as an attrac- tive choice. However, the cost of an offshore wind farm

  2. Forecasting of wind speed using wavelets analysis and cascade-correlation neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as sunlight, wind, rain or geothermal heat. Wind energy is actually one of the fastest-growing forms, that is why its wind energy market has been progressing steadily in recent years. While in 2000, there were only 30 MW of wind generating capacity in France, the total installed capacity at the end of 2007

  3. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  4. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  5. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  6. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  7. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a new vision for wind energy through 2050. Taking into account all facets of wind energy (land-based, offshore, distributed), the new Wind Vision Report defines the...

  8. Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Joint NEPA/SEPA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat County (Wash.)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CARES proposes to construct and operate the 25 megawatt Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 (Project) in the Columbia Hills area of Klickitat County, Washington known as Juniper Point. Wind is not a constant resource and based on the site wind measurement data, it is estimated that the Project would generate approximately 7 average annual MWs of electricity. BPA proposes to purchase the electricity generated by the Project. CARES would execute a contractual agreement with a wind developer, to install approximately 91 wind turbines and associated facilities to generate electricity. The Project`s construction and operation would include: install concrete pier foundations for each wind turbine; install 91 model AWT-26 wind turbines using 43 m high guyed tubular towers on the pier foundations; construct a new 115/24-kv substation; construct a 149 m{sup 2} steel operations and maintenance building; install 25 pad mount transformers along the turbine access roads; install 4.0 km of underground 24 kv power collection lines to collect power from individual turbines to the end of turbine strings; install 1.2 km of underground communication and transmission lines from each turbine to a pad mount transformer; install 5.6 km of 24 kv wood pole transmission lines to deliver electricity from the pad mount transformers to the Project substation; install 3.2 km of 115 kv wood pole transmission lines to deliver electricity from the Project substation to the Public Utility District No. 1 of Klickitat County(PUD)115 kv Goldendale line; interconnect with the BPA transmission system through the Goldendale line and Goldendale substation owned by the PUD; reconstruct, upgrade, and maintain 8.0 km of existing roads; construct and maintain 6.4 km of new graveled roads along the turbine strings and to individual turbines; and install meteorological towers guyed with rebar anchors on the Project site.

  9. Sandia Energy - Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Software Downloads Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Sandia Wind...

  10. A New Vision for United States Wind Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reports preliminary findings of the benefits, challenges, and realities that will face wind energy for the next 30+ years in this country. Text version. Five years after its...

  11. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Staff On March 24, 2011, in Wind Energy On November 10, 2010, in Wind Plant Opt. Rotor Innovation Materials, Reliability & Standards Siting & Barrier Mitigation...

  13. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  14. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  16. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power'sthe Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  1. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  9. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  11. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOE’s) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  12. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  13. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  14. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  15. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  16. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. In March 2011, NRG Bluewater Wind?s Delaware projectPurchaser Delmarva NRG Bluewater Wind (Delaware) Universitythe project, while NRG Bluewater would retain the remaining

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  19. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA March 26th 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June 1st 2004- May 31st 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions......................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions.......

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed D

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts March 24th to May 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Di

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts December, 2006 1st to February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts June 1, 2006 - August 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Di

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA March 2007 ­ May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA September ­ November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts September 1, 2006 - November 30, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions..................

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Sep 1st 2004 to Nov 30th 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA June ­ August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Lynn, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts September 1st to November 30th , 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts June 1st to August 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributi

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 ­ November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  6. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA March 1st , 2007 ­ May 31st , 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA April 14 ­ May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Dec 1st 2004 to Feb 28th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA June 1st 2006 to July 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI June 1, 2007 ­ August 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies show that wind energy integration costs are below $do not represent wind energy generation costs. This sectioncomponent of the overall cost of wind energy, but can vary

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not represent wind energy generation costs. Based on thisproduction-cost reduction value of wind energy, without anwith wind energy. Generally, these costs are associated with

  18. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribut

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  3. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity), with 17% of all potential wind energy generationthat roughly 17% of potential wind energy generation withinexample, roughly 1% of potential wind energy output in 2009

  4. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of the hurricane surface winds from NOAA and U.S. Air Force Weather Squadron aircraft flights. Further, results1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds

  5. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  6. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  7. Development of an Offshore Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Model by Using a Flexible Multibody Simulation (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergua, R.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern wind turbines are complex, highly-coupled systems. The dynamic interaction between various components is especially pronounced for multi-megawatt wind turbines. As a result, design process is generally split in several phases. First step consists of creating a global aero-elastic model that includes essential dynamics of structural components using the minimum-possible number of degrees of freedom (d.o.f.). The most important simplifications concern drivetrain and rotor-nacelle assembly (RNA). This approach has been shown valid for several wind turbine configurations. Nevertheless, with increasing size of wind turbines, any simplified design approach must be validated. The present work deals with the comparison and validation of the two modeling approaches for directdrive offshore wind turbines. ARNA/drivetrain model idealized as collection of lumped masses and springs is compared to a detailed Finite Element Method (FEM) based model. The comparison between models focuses on dynamic loads concerning drivetrain system. The comparison is performed in several operational conditions in order to explore the range of validity of the simplified model. Finally, the paper proposes a numerical-based workflow to assess the validity of simplified models of RNA/drivetrain in an aero-elastic global WT model.

  8. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  9. Bassett Mechanical Explores Mid-size Wind Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About five years ago, Wisconsin’s Bassett Mechanical began branching into renewable energy. The nearly 75-year-old company started producing components used to anchor the towers of wind turbines to their foundations.

  10. Wind Energy Stakeholder Outreach and Education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Lawrence; Craig Cox; Jodi Hamrick; DOE Contact - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Since August of 2001, Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc. (BL&A) has applied its outreach and support services to lead a highly effective work effort on behalf of Wind Powering America (WPA). In recent years, the company has generated informative brochures and posters, researched and created case studies, and provided technical support to key wind program managers. BL&A has also analyzed Lamar, Colorado’s 162MW wind project and developed a highly regarded 'wind supply chain' report and outreach presentation. BL&A’s efforts were then replicated to characterize similar supply chain presentations in New Mexico and Illinois. Note that during the period of this contract, the recipient met with members of the DOE Wind Program a number of times to obtain specific guidance on tasks that needed to be pursued on behalf of this grant. Thus, as the project developed over the course of 5 years, the recipient varied the tasks and emphasis on tasks to comply with the on-going and continuously developing requirements of the Wind Powering America Program. This report provides only a brief summary of activities to illustrate the recipient's work for advancing wind energy education and outreach from 2001 through the end of the contract period in 2006. It provides examples of how the recipient and DOE leveraged the available funding to provide educational and outreach work to a wide range of stakeholder communities.

  11. An overview: Challenges in wind technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R W; Hock, S M

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing innovative wind turbine components and advanced turbine configurations is a primary focus for wind technology researchers. In their rush to bring these new components and systems to the marketplace, designers and developers should consider the lessons learned in the wind farms over the past 10 years. Experience has shown that a disciplined design approach is required that realistically accounts for the turbulence-induced loads, unsteady stall loading, and fatigue effects. This paper reviews past experiences and compares current modelling capabilities with experimental measurements in order to identify some of the knowledge gaps that challenge designers of advanced components and systems. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Analysis of Wind Power Generation of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 1 ANALYSIS OF WIND POWER GENERATION OF TEXAS April 2007 Zi ?Betty? Liu, Ph.D., Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E., Kris Subbarao, Ph.D., P.E., Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Energy Systems Laboratory... from Jul 2002 to Jan 2003 Degradation Analysis - On average, no degradation observed for nine wind farms analyzed over 4-year period. Application of Method 1 to New Site- Sweetwater I Wind Farm ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 3...

  13. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  14. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  15. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  16. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  17. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  18. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  19. Airplane and the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airplane and the wind. An airplane starts from the point A and flies to B. The speed of the airplane with respect to the air is v (constant). There is also a wind of

  20. See the Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See the Wind Grades: 5-8 , 9-12 Topic: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  1. Wind JOC Conference - Wind Control Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Wind Control Changes JOC August 10, 2012 Presentation updated on July 30, 2012 at 11:00 AM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Wind Control Changes B O N...

  2. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar

  3. Interpolating wind speed normals from the sparse Dutch network to a high resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    , we had potential wind speed time series with 30 years of data (with at least 20 yearly and monthly by Verkaik (Verkaik, 2001). The method is a five-step procedure: 1 Use series of (potential) wind to calculate (potential) normals at measuring sites 2 Calculate wind speed normals at the top of the surface

  4. Kent County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

  5. Wind Webinar Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy.

  6. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  7. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge to wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service rate for wind energy

  8. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space constraints. Ohio: The Lake Erie Energy DevelopmentGreat Lakes Ohio Wind, and Great Lakes Wind Energy LLC. In

  10. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of larger balancing areas, the use of regional wind powerbalancing areas. The successful use of regional wind power

  11. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directly charging wind power projects for balancing servicesin smaller balancing areas. The successful use of wind power

  12. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  13. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  14. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  15. Wind Turbine Competition Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Wind Turbine Competition Introduction: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, SHPE at UTK, wishes to invite you to participate in our first `Wind Turbine' competition as part of Engineer's Week). You will be evaluated by how much power your wind turbine generates at the medium setting of our fan

  16. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons · Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? · Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  17. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  18. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exeter Associates; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Energetics Incorporated; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Darghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Seel, Joachim; Porter, Kevin; Buckley, Michael; Fink, Sari; Oteri, Frank; Raymond, Russell

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced a trying year in 2010, with a significant reduction in new builds compared to both 2008 and 2009. The delayed impact of the global financial crisis, relatively low natural gas and wholesale electricity prices, and slumping overall demand for energy countered the ongoing availability of existing federal and state incentives for wind energy deployment. The fact that these same drivers did not impact capacity additions in 2009 can be explained, in part, by the 'inertia' in capital-intensive infrastructure investments: 2009 capacity additions were largely determined by decisions made prior to the economy-wide financial crisis that was at its peak in late 2008 and early 2009, whereas decisions on 2010 capacity additions were often made at the height of the financial crisis. Cumulative wind power capacity still grew by a healthy 15% in 2010, however, and most expectations are for moderately higher wind power capacity additions in 2011 than witnessed in 2010, though those additions are also expected to remain below the 2009 high.

  20. Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Joint NEPA/SEPA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat County (Wash.)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the Columbia Wind Farm {number_sign}1 (Project) proposal for construction and operation of a 25 megawatt (MW) wind power project in the Columbia Hills area southeast of Goldendale in Klickitat County, Washington. The Project would be constructed on private land by Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) (the Applicant). An Environmental Impact Statement is required under both NEPA and SEPA guidelines and is issued under Section 102 (2) (C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) at 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq and under the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) as provided by RCW 43.21C.030 (2) (c). Bonneville Power Administration is the NEPA lead agency; Klickitat County is the nominal SEPA lead agency and CARES is the SEPA co-lead agency for this DEIS. The Project site is approximately 395 hectares (975 acres) in size. The Proposed Action would include approximately 91 model AWT-26 wind turbines. Under the No Action Alternative, the Project would not be constructed and existing grazing and agricultural activities on the site would continue.

  1. It's Time for a New Wind Vision (Text Version) | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Technologies Office, May 6, 2013. To the side is the cover of the 20% Wind Energy By 2030 report, with the picture of a wind turbine on it. Over the past few years,...

  2. Hydrodynamics and drive-train dynamics of a direct-drive floating wind turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Latha

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating wind turbines (FWTs) are considered a new lease of opportunity for sustaining growth from offshore wind energy. In recent years, several new concepts have emerged, with only a few making it to demonstration or ...

  3. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

  4. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  5. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  6. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  7. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  8. West Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff,Holt WindInformationWestWinds Wind

  9. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3.brainybetty.com 11 wind farm at ChangHwa Coastal Industrial Park 70m wind tower 70m 50m 30m 10m #12;1 2 3 4 5 1 (70M

  10. Saving Megawatts with Voltage Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, T.; Bell, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that had been installed at several electric utility distribution substations in the U.S. and Canada. These systems, being operated in Conservation Voltage Regulation mode, have provided significant energy conservation where they have been installed...

  11. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  12. OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY Richard Perez-shore wind and PV generation using the city of New York as a test case. While wind generation is not known one year's worth of hourly site & time-specific data including electrical demand PV and off-shore wind

  13. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  14. 1112 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 25, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2010 Short-Horizon Prediction of Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    (wind energy in particular) has grown sig- nificantly in the last years. As a relatively new industry, wind energy must address numerous questions, including providing accurate short-term prediction of wind of the generated power [1]. Long-term wind speed and power prediction is of interest to management of energy

  15. NLTE wind models for SMC stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiri Krticka

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study stellar wind properties of selected late O stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We calculate NLTE line-driven wind models for these stars and compare predicted wind parameters with observed values. We found satisfactory agreement between theoretical and observed terminal velocities. On the other hand, predicted and observed mass-loss rates are in a good agreement only for higher mass-loss rates. For mass-loss rates lower than approximately 10^{-7} M_sun / year we found large discrepancy between theoretical and observed values. We propose a new explanation of this effect based on dynamical decoupling of some atoms. Finally, we study the dependence of wind terminal velocities and mass-loss rates on metallicity.

  16. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  17. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy assessment and wind farm simulation in Triunfo- Pernambuco, Brazil,wind resources for electrical energy production. Wind resources as- sessment of Brazil

  18. Sandia Energy - Wind & Water Power Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind & Water Power Newsletter Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind & Water Power Newsletter Wind & Water Power NewsletterTara...

  19. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  20. Wind Tunnel Building - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Energy Systems Laboratory 1 A METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Kris Subbarao, Charles... on Sweetwater I Wind Farm Capacity Factor Analysis Application to All Wind Farms Uncertainty Analysis Emissions Reduction Summary Energy Systems Laboratory 3 SUMMARYEMISSIONS REDUCTION UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS APPLICATIONMETHODOLOGYINTRODUCTION Background...

  1. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  2. Wind Energy and Spatial Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    2/3/2011 1 Wind Energy and Spatial Technology Lori Pelech Why Wind Energy? A clean, renewable 2,600 tons of carbon emissions annually ­ The economy · Approximately 85,000 wind energy workers to Construct a Wind Farm... Geo-Spatial Components of Wind Farm Development Process Selecting a Project Site

  3. Proceedings Nordic Wind Power Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Possible Power for Wind Plant Control Power Fluctuations from Offshore Wind Farms; Model Validation System grounding of wind farm medium voltage cable grids Faults in the Collection Grid of Offshore systems of wind turbines and wind farms. NWPC presents the newest research results related to technical

  4. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    hub heights of 110 meters (m) (which are already in wide commercial deployment in Germany and other European countries), the technical potential for wind deployment is...

  5. Allegany County Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets requirements for industrial wind energy conversion systems. These requirements include minimum separation distances, setback requirements, electromagnetic interference analysis ...

  6. Talkin’ Bout Wind Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  7. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  8. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  9. wind_guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance to Accompany Non-Availability Waiver of the Recovery Act Buy American Provisions for 5kW and 50kW Wind Turbines

  10. Barstow Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  11. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  12. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the world. To stay competitive in this sector, the Energy Department invests in wind projects, both on land and offshore, to advance technology innovations, create job...

  13. Northern Wind Farm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities to accommodate the interconnection. The EA also includes a review of the potential environmental impacts of Northern Wind, LLC, constructing, operating, and...

  14. Annual market update 2010 2010 was a tough year for our industry, and although

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Annual market update 2010 Global Wind RepoRt #12;#12;2010 was a tough year for our industry mainly by the booming wind sectors in China and India, but also with strong growth in Latin America, where we believe we are on the cusp of the wind energy boom in that wind resource-rich region which we

  15. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  16. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    step toward issuing a 150 million loan guarantee to support the construction of the Cape Wind offshore wind project with a conditional commitment to Cape Wind Associates, LLC. The...

  17. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  18. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  19. Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine connection to grid is a real

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    by the year 2020 [2]. Wind turbines can operate either with a fixed speed or a variable speed. In the case and then as fluctuations in the electrical power on the grid. The variable-speed turbine operation offers several major acoustical [3]. Among variable speed constant-frequency wind turbines, the doubly fed induction generator

  20. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... variations in measured power vs base year power production in the OSP. Energy Systems Laboratory p. 4 Next, looked at hourly electricity produced vs NOAA wind data. Issue: too much scatter. Hourly Turbine Power vs. Wind Speed (On-site) 0 10 20 30...

  1. Comparison of Second Wind Triton Data with Meteorological Tower Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increased interest in remote sensing of wind information in recent years, it is important to determine the reliability and accuracy of new wind measurement technologies if they are to replace or supplement conventional tower-based measurements. In this study, we present the results of an analysis characterizing the measurement performance of a state-of-the-art SOund Detection And Ranging (sodar) device when compared to a high-quality tower measurement program. Second Wind Inc. (Somerville, MA, USA) provided NREL with more than six months of data from a measurement program conducted near an operating wind farm in western Texas.

  2. Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwright’s Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models’ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

  3. Kahuku Wind Power (First Wind) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The project employs the integration of Clipper LibertyTM wind turbine generators and a control system to more efficiently integrate wind power with the utility's power grid....

  4. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar will be attended by representatives in the financial sector, businesses, bankers, government and other nonprofit...

  5. WIND POWER PROGRAM WIND PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS U.S. Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    capturing more wind than ever before through the installation of innovative offshore wind turbines and systems in U.S. waters, the Atmosphere to Electrons initiative which...

  6. Public Acceptance of Wind: Foundational Study Near US Wind Facilities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Group * Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Public Acceptance of Wind Power Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory WindExchange Webinar June 17, 2015...

  7. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development...

  8. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations, for example,the decrease in new wind power plant construction. A GrowingRelative Economics of Wind Power Plants Installed in Recent

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009towers used in U.S. wind power plants increases from 80% in

  11. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

  12. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedused to estimate wind integration costs and the ability toColorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study. Denver,

  14. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. BeaconP. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to natural gas. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 1% windforward gas market. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 4.Market Report Wind Penetration (Capacity Basis) Arizona Public Service Avista Utilities California RPS Idaho Power Xcel-PSCo-2008 at 2006 Gas

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forward gas market. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report TheMarket Report Wind Penetration (Capacity Basis) Xcel-PSCo-2008 at 2006 Gasgas facilities run at even lower capacity factors. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies Market Report Wind Gas Coal Other Renewablethe forward gas market. 2011 Wind Technologies Market ReportMarket Report Nameplate Capacity (GW) Entered queue in 2011 Total in queue at end of 2011 Wind Natural Gas

  18. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 10 wind turbineswind energy became more challenging, orders for new turbines

  19. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. Beacon

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy from the bottom toover the cost and price of wind energy that it receives. Asweighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was $65/MWh (

  1. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices, though the economic value of wind energyenergy and climate policy initiatives. With wind turbine pricesprices reported here would be at least $20/MWh higher without the PTC), they do not represent wind energy

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was roughly $reduced near-term price expectations, wind energy?s primaryelectricity prices in 2009 pushed wind energy to the top of

  3. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,html David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Tradewhich new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 2009 (

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shows that 8.5% of potential wind energy generation withinin GWh (and as a % of potential wind generation) Electricreport also laid out a potential wind power deployment path

  5. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  6. VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatinderpal Singh

    Wind energy is currently the fastest-growing renewable source of energy in India; India is a key market for the wind industry, presenting substantial opportunities for both the international and domestic players. In India the research is carried out on wind energy utilization on big ways.There are still many unsolved challenges in expanding wind power, and there are numerous problems of interest to systems and control researchers. In this paper we study the pitch control mechanism of wind turbine. The pitch control system is one of the most widely used control techniques to regulate the output power of a wind turbine generator. The pitch angle is controlled to keep the generator power at rated power by reducing the angle of the blades. By regulating, the angle of stalling, fast torque changes from the wind will be reutilized. It also describes the design of the pitch controller and discusses the response of the pitch-controlled system to wind velocity variations. The pitch control system is found to have a large output power variation and a large settling time.

  7. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  8. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  9. Diablo Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs TypeWinds Wind Farm Jump to:

  10. Wind power manufacturing and supply chain summit USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Roger Ray

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of wind turbine component manufacturing represents a business opportunity in the wind energy industry. Modern wind turbines can provide large amounts of electricity, cleanly and reliably, at prices competitive with any other new electricity source. Over the next twenty years, the US market for wind power is expected to continue to grow, as is the domestic content of installed turbines, driving demand for American-made components. Between 2005 and 2009, components manufactured domestically grew eight-fold to reach 50 percent of the value of new wind turbines installed in the U.S. in 2009. While that growth is impressive, the industry expects domestic content to continue to grow, creating new opportunities for suppliers. In addition, ever-growing wind power markets around the world provide opportunities for new export markets.

  11. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  12. DAMAGE DETECTION IN A WIND TURBINE BLADE BASED ON TIME SERIES Simon Hoell, Piotr Omenzetter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE DETECTION IN A WIND TURBINE BLADE BASED ON TIME SERIES METHODS Simon Hoell, Piotr Omenzetter, the consequences are growing sizes of wind turbines (WTs) and erections in remote places, such as off in the past years, thus efficient energy harvesting becomes more important. For the sector of wind energy

  13. Stochastic Modeling of Multi-Area Wind Power Production Anthony Papavasiliou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Stochastic Modeling of Multi-Area Wind Power Production Anthony Papavasiliou CORE, UCL anthony of wind power production on power system operations over an entire year, it is necessary to account for the non-stationary (seasonal and diurnal) patterns of wind power production. This paper presents a multi

  14. Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Wind Power Forecasting: An International Comparison (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Miettinen, J.; Holttinen, H.; Gomez-Lozaro, E.; Cutululis, N.; Litong-Palima, M.; Sorensen, P.; Lovholm, A.; Berge, E.; Dobschinski, J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes the work to investigate the uncertainty in wind forecasting at different times of year and compare wind forecast errors in different power systems using large-scale wind power prediction data from six countries: the United States, Finland, Spain, Denmark, Norway, and Germany.

  15. Reconstruction of a wind turbine's endured load spectrum using a short-time load measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Reconstruction of a wind turbine's endured load spectrum using a short-time load measurement Abstract Wind turbines (WT) are normally designed for a service life (SL) of 20 years. In Germany, over safety. 1 Introduction A wind turbine (WT) is normally designed, tested and certified for a design life

  16. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR WIND IONS WITH THE TRIANA PLASMAG FARADAY CUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    of the solar wind all the time, data in a new energy per charge window can be taken as soon as the power supply for several instruments on various spacecraft (s/c). Instrument s/c stabilization tspec [s] Launch year WIND/SWE/FCRAPID MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR WIND IONS WITH THE TRIANA PLASMAG FARADAY CUP MATTHIAS R. AELLIG, ALAN

  17. www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Deep Water Offshore Wind Economic Production Cost WT Life Time : 20 Years Introduction Vast icing for offshore Wind Turbines ? · Wherever there is sea icing ! · Temperature bellow zero degree

  18. LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie By Teresa Dixon Murray in the United States, the Lake Erie Energy Development Corp. of Cleveland will launch an offshore wind, Democrat of Ohio, who has pushed for such alternative energy projects for years, said offshore wind could

  19. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables. Summary Report. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Baltazar, J.C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.L.; Oh, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the developed method for those wind farms in the ERCOT region. The total measured wind power generation in 2013 is 32,638,270 MWh/yr., which is 14.12% higher than what the same wind farms would have produced in 2008. Figure 1-3 shows the same comparison... but for the Ozone Season Period. The measured wind power generation in the OSP of 2013 is 57,622 MWh/day, which is 3.41% higher than the 2008 OSP baseline wind production. For the analysis of this year, the measured 2013 wind power generation is fairly higher...

  20. Candidate wind turbine generator site: annual data summary, January 1981-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized hourly meteorological data for 34 candidate and wind turbine generator sites for calendar year 1981 are presented. These data are collected for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, wind speed, direction, and distribution data are given in eight tables. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

  1. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  2. Steve Kropper WindPole Ventures, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cover 85% all wind 22 year license Ownership/control over data $15k capex per tower (new tower cost% margin. capex $15k per tower ($8k hardware + $7k labor) Annual revenue $20m from 580 towers 2.5 clients

  3. Wind power development -Status and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    countries together covering ap- prox. 80% of the growth in installed wind turbine capacity world wide years the global in- stalled capacity has increased almost threefold, from approx. 2.3 GW in 1991 has increased - in 1995 and 1996 global capacity has increased by approx. 1.3 GW annually or more than

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge for wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service that charges a higher rate for wind energy

  5. Wind Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Below is an industry calendar with meetings, conferences, and webinars of interest to the wind energy technology communities. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar 3:...

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forward gas market. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report 4.Market Report Entered queue in 2010 Total in queue at end of 2010 Nameplate Capacity (GW) Wind Natural Gas

  7. Wind Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of wind energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply wind energy within the Federal sector.

  8. Large Wind Property Tax Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, North Dakota established property tax reductions for commercial wind turbines constructed before 2011. Originally, the law reduced the taxable value of centrally-assessed* wind turbines...

  9. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power projects in the United States to date have been installed on land,on developing wind power projects on public lands. State

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power projects in the United States to date have been installed on land,of developing wind power projects on public lands. State

  11. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy`s Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, S M; Thresher, R W [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P R [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Local Option- Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy systems constructed in New York State. As...

  14. NREL: Wind Research - New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a three-year collaborative investigation with positive outlooks for U.S.-based offshore wind potential by 2030. September 4, 2014 The Energy Department has released the first...

  15. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  16. Department of Energy Awards $43 Million to Spur Offshore Wind Energy, Wind Program Newsletter, September 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EERE Wind Program Quarterly Newsletter - September 2011. In September, the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will award $43 million over the next five years to 41 projects across 20 states to speed technical innovations, lower costs, and shorten the timeline for deploying offshore wind energy systems. The projects will advance wind turbine design tools and hardware, improve information about U.S. offshore wind resources, and accelerate the deployment of offshore wind by reducing market barriers such as supply chain development, transmission and infrastructure. The projects announced in September focus on approaches to advancing offshore technology and removing market barriers to responsible offshore wind energy deployment. Funding is subject to Congressional appropriations.

  17. Ris National Laboratory DTU Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind speed, wind direction relative to the spinner and flow inclination angle. A wind tunnel concept anemometer is a wind measurement concept in which measurements of wind speed in the flow over a wind turbine on a modified 300kW wind turbine spinner, was mounted with three 1D sonic wind speed sensors. The flow around

  18. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential on Hong Kong islands - an analysis of wind power and wind turbine characteristics, Renewable Energy,

  19. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  20. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.