Sample records for megawat thours mwh

  1. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets Jump to: navigation,

  2. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets Jump to:

  3. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets Jump

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrWoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets JumpInformation

  5. Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEI Community Cost Per MwH for

  6. QER- Comment of MWH Global

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Was looking at the calendar and curious when the “Final Meeting” is in DC for the QER? http://energy.gov/epsa/initiatives/quadrennial-energy-review-qer Thanks,

  7. Property:Ind sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation,ProjectStartDate JumpAuth3LinkTechMin Jump to:4-County Electric

  8. Property:Oth sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation,ProjectStartDateProperty EditResultsUtility Jump to:OthC

  9. Property:Com sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation, search This is a propertyconsCom

  10. Property:Res sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This property is set byisPropertycustomers.

  11. Property:Tot sales (mwh) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This property isType" Showing 25Users

  12. Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of...

  13. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, searchEnergy

  14. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtColg | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation,

  15. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation,Information

  16. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to:

  17. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrNaturalGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to:Information

  18. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to:InformationEnergy

  19. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrOther | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump

  20. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrPellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters JumpInformation

  1. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters JumpInformationInformation

  2. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTownGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters

  3. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrWoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrintersInformation

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrintersInformationEnergy Information

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrLogs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrintersInformationEnergy

  6. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrNaturalGas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrintersInformationEnergyInformation

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrOil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group

  8. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for3

  9. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors

  10. Dear Speaker -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1. Comparison of OECD Industrial Electricity Prices 2008 2012 USA 68MWh 66MWh Germany 130MWh 148MWh Japan 115MWh 194MWh France 104MWh 116MWh Source: OECD...

  11. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard ErrorsNumber of

  12. "YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMR METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMR METERS","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMI METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMI METERS","RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","COMMERCIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TOTAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa.

  13. "YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMR METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMR METERS","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMI METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMI METERS","RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","COMMERCIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TOTAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa.2,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power

  14. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass, Biogas, Landfill gas, Sewage gas, Geothermal)€/MWh; Sewage and landfill gas: 45-60 €/MWh; Wind OnshoreMWh; Landfill-, Sewage- & Landfill gas: 64.5-74.4 €/MWh; PV:

  15. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x 200 MWh Cost 30 x 200 MWh LOAD Settlement 200 MWh - 200 MWh 0 in any scenario, so load is not impacted. 8,000 - 6,000 2,000 GEN Note: Profit on the bilateral is not...

  16. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading",,,,,"Number AMI- Advanced Metering Infrastructure",,,,,"Energy Served - AMI (MWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal"1" "Shell1. Average

  17. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and 0.282 MWh of coal generation. Estimates from the IVand 0.308 MWh of coal generation is offset by each MWh offour of the models (coal generation, gas generation, ‘other’

  18. Revealing the Hidden Value that the Federal Investment Tax Credit and Treasury Cash Grant Provide To Community Wind Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in terms of 20-year levelized LCOE) for both the StrategicITC Loss Loss Results: Strategic Flip LCOE Delta ($/MWh) ($/Results: Cooperative LLC LCOE Delta ($/MWh) ($/MWh) Total

  19. A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A reactor and associated power plant designed to produce 1.05 Mwh and 3.535 Mwh of steam for heating purposes are described. The total thermal output of the reactor is 10 Mwh....

  20. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    81 Residential Sales (MWh) 647 Residential Consumers 290 Commercial Revenue(Thousand ) 168.985 Commercial Sales (MWh) 2306 Commercial Consumers 81 Industrial Revenue (Thousand )...

  1. "YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND...

  2. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Revenue(Thousand ) 5629 Residential Sales (MWh) 49312 Residential Consumers 35980 Commercial Revenue(Thousand ) 2031 Commercial Sales (MWh) 15395 Commercial Consumers...

  3. Quantification of Energy and Emissions Saved in Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /PCA) PUC-SB5 (MWh/PCA) Wind-ERCOT (MWh/PCA) SECO (MWh/PCA) SEER13-Single Family (MWh/County) SEER13- Multifamily (MWh/County) INTEGRATED NOx SAVINGS: Process Flow Diagram of the NOx Emissions Reduction Calcs. p. 85 Energy Systems Laboratory © 2011... Laboratory © 2011 • Texas Emission Reduction Plan (TERP) – Emissions reductions in Texas counties – Energy efficiency codes support and training LEGISLATURE DIRECTED RESEARCH p. 13 Energy Systems Laboratory © 2011 Legislation passed to reduce energy...

  4. A Follow-up Study on the Persistence of Savings from the Retrocommissioning of Ten Buildings on a University Campus: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Toole, C.

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ) / yr Saving (%) 2002 Use (MMBtu) (MWh) / yr Saving (%) 2000 Use (MMBtu) (MWh) / yr Saving (%) Use (MMBtu) (MWh) / yr Saving (%) Use (MMBtu) (MWh) / yr Saving (%) Use (MMBtu) (MWh) / yr Saving (%) 1999 Blocker Eller O&M G... persisted to a high degree, with a few notable exceptions. The chilled water and hot water savings for the Blocker Building have degraded substantially to less than half the 1997 savings, though electricity savings increased by 4%. The Eller O...

  5. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading",,,,,"Number AMI- Advanced Metering Infrastructure",,,,,"Non AMR/AMI Meters",,,,,"Total Numbers of Meters",,,,,"Energy Served - AMI (MWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal"1" "Shell1.

  6. "Utility Characteristics",,,,,,"Number AMR- Automated Meter Reading",,,,,"Number AMI- Advanced Metering Infrastructure",,,,,"Non AMR/AMI Meters1",,,,,"Total Numbers of Meters",,,,,"Energy Served - AMI (MWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal"1"

  7. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidy 14 for lead acid batteries is given and this bringsMWh) adopoted lead acid batteries (MWh) adopted PV (MW)thermal lead acid absorption solar photo- storage batteries

  8. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs is important. Lead-acid batteries on the other hand,with HX (MW) adopted lead acid batteries (MWh) adopted solarwith HX (MW) adopted lead acid batteries (MWh) adopted solar

  9. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average CO2 emissions factor for U.S. electricity generationEmission Factors (generated electricity) NOx, lb/MWh I 0.100 I SO2, lb/MWh CO2,

  10. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojda, Nicholas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levelized capital cost of $74.6/MWh for “Advanced Coal” plants according to EnergyLevelized capital cost of $74.6/MWh for “Advanced Coal” plants according to Energy

  11. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A2-48318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wh kilowatt-hour LED light emitting diode MECO Maui Electric Company MWh megawatt-hour NAECA National

  12. A Methodology for Calculating Integrated NOx Emissions Reductions From Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs Across State Agencies in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.

    included: ? TEES/ESL, ? PUC, ? SECO, ? ERCOT/Wind ? Energy Systems Laboratory 2007 p. 5 ESL-Single Family (MWh/County) ESL-Multifamily (MWh/County) ESL-Commercial Buildings (MWh/County) Federal Buildings (MWh/County) Furnace Pilot Light...), Alfred Reyes (TCEQ), Akin Olubiyi (TCEQ), Warren Lasher (ERCOT), Dan Woodfin (ERCOT), and David Hitchcock (HARC), Art Diem (USEPA) , and Julie Rosenberg (USEPA). Acknowledgements ? Energy Systems Laboratory 2007 p. 3 41 Counties in Texas designated...

  13. Value of Demand Response Theoretical thoughts Klaus Skytte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /MWh consumer surplus CP MWhqload MB #12;Determination of load profile MWh/h qt load Timet #12 Companies Private households #12;Determination of load each hour /MWh CP MWhqload MB #12;Consumer surplus the welfare losses in each period. The load-serving entity might determine the consumer price (CP

  14. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average achieved an electricity savings of 40.4 MWh/pump/year with an investment costaverage electricity savings achieved was about 5.5 MWh/year/motor with an average investment costaverage electricity savings of 32.8 MWh/fan/year. The investment cost

  15. Comparative Study of Availability on Energy/Environment Commissioning Using Existing HVAC Simulation Programs for a Model Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niwa, H.; Nakahara, N.; Okumiya, M.; Suganaga, M.; Tanaka, H.; Pan, S.; Watanabe, T.; Zheng, M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MJ/a/?)( 191MJ/a/?) ??(primary energy total)?OA intake volume is set constant in spite of VAV7MWh/a31MWh/a38MWh/a1,589GJ/a( 25GJ/a)( 112GJ/a)( 137GJ/a)(per total floor area)?( 31W/?)?( 33W/?)?( 64W/?)( 8MJ/a/?)( 34MJ/a/?)( 41MJ.../a)( 115GJ/a)( 209GJ/a)(per total floor area)?Energy consumption in April, May and October was deducted except ff ?( 77W/?)?( 91W/?)( 168W/?)( 28MJ/a/?)( 35MJ/a/?)( 63MJ/a/?) 538MJ/a/?81MWh/a102MWh/a182MWh/a(secondaru energy tota l 0.55?VAV supply...

  16. Simulation-assisted evaluation of potential energy savings: Application to an administrative building in France 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randaxhe, F.; Bertagnolio, S.; Lemort, V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSUMPTION 17 MWh kWh/m? Total per year 3172 166 25 Oct 2012 RETROFIT OPTIONS SIMULATION (1) ? Implementation of energy efficient schedule, fresh air rate and new setpoint for air handling units and fan coils into the BMS: ? New indoor setpoint (occ... that only 28% of the annual energy consumption comes from the working period. These observations lead to various energy savings scenarios. Table 3: 2009 Electricty consumption period disaggregation according to SIMAUDIT model % MWh Primary Energy [MWh...

  17. 0 5 10 15 20 Radial build

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .500e+08 Pa Costs: Cost of electricity = 212.85 $/MWh Constructed cost = 7476.00 M$ Total capex = 8597

  18. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 1889 Total Consumers 417 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  19. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 89442.402 Total Consumers 30374 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  20. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 93116.915 Total Consumers 30297 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  1. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 90111.278 Total Consumers 30445 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  2. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 27165 Total Consumers 15955 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  3. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 97102 Total Consumers 44394 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  4. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 18050 Total Consumers 15886 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  5. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 30637 Total Consumers 15914 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  6. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 77157 Total Consumers 43869 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  7. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 1777 Total Consumers 417 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  8. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 69154 Total Consumers 43876 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  9. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 77543 Total Consumers 44730 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  10. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 89735.352 Total Consumers 30544 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  11. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 107731.895 Total Consumers 30210 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  12. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 23039 Total Consumers 15910 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  13. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 92113 Total Consumers 44586 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  14. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 89390.873 Total Consumers 30381 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  15. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 95905.285 Total Consumers 30205 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  16. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 64724 Total Consumers 44708 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  17. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 19019 Total Consumers 15891 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  18. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 1656 Total Consumers 417 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  19. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 1588 Total Consumers 416 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  20. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 27724.952 Total Consumers 15949 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  1. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 110168.666 Total Consumers 30225 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  2. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 26729 Total Consumers 15898 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  3. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 723681 Total Consumers 388107 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  4. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 97302.646 Total Consumers 30310 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  5. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 635952 Total Consumers 375832 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  6. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 27020.525 Total Consumers 15945 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  7. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 2604 Total Consumers 416 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  8. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 87721 Total Consumers 43779 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  9. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 1786 Total Consumers 416 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  10. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 106052.325 Total Consumers 30249 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  11. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 88236 Total Consumers 44787 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  12. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 458221 Total Consumers 378624 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  13. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 28400 Total Consumers 15946 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  14. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 73805 Total Consumers 44830 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  15. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 86664.25 Total Consumers 30409 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  16. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 103478.845 Total Consumers 30233 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  17. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 93756 Total Consumers 43814 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  18. Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 2434 Total Consumers 416 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  19. Anchorage Municipal Light and Power (Alaska) EIA Revenue and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MWh) 90071.242 Total Consumers 30468 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  20. Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sales (MWh) 28597 Total Consumers 15902 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 1 Previous | Next...

  1. Forecasting Prices andForecasting Prices and Congestion forCongestion for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    80 100 120 140 160 180 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Hours Price($/MWh) ANN/ARMA Actual Price ANN 0

  2. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 2003 2008 2013 2018 2023 2028 Price($MWh) Historical Draft 022209 Final CO2

  3. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost of electricity (“LCOE”) generated by the turbine, basedEnergy (right scale) COD: LCOE (2010 $/MWh) Capacity Factorcase, the benefit (lower LCOE) outweighs the incremental

  4. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forecasted Spot Energy Prices in MWH - Updated 4272015 Week Beginning Four Corners Four Corners Rockies Rockies Southwest Southwest On Peak Off Peak On Peak Off Peak On Peak...

  5. 2011_12NTSA_signed.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy schedule will be determined using the estimated MWh owed calculated from the Energy Value Account balance and the expected weekly average price. Schedules will be the...

  6. Modeling of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Interactions with a Sustainable Community Grid in the Azores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in additional PV and battery storage. Keywords: Distributedelectrical stationary battery storage with the main goal ofof 1.3MWh of stationary battery storage 7 . This highly

  7. Commercial and Industrial Base Intermittent Resource Management Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant variation in wind generator output. The day-to-of $20/MWh allows wind generators to keep on producing and

  8. Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J; Grant, Laura E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    small changes in electricity consumption. Table 8: Thethe DST change in electricity consumption of 166,217 MWh/DST effects on electricity consumption in the United States

  9. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Intergrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 13,354,918 MWh/year (3,723 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 36,079 MWh/day, which would be a 1,503 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD... period (9.89 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 15,391,293 MWh/year (4,296 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings will be 41,691 MWh/day, which would be a...

  10. Statistical mechanics problem sheet 3 1. Does an ideal gas satisfy the third law of thermodynamics? Explain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettmann, Carl

    ? Explain. 2. Give a rough estimate of the amount of molten salt required to store 10MWh of heat energy from

  11. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Cooper

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooper" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Callaway

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Callaway" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  14. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Waterford 3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Waterford 3" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  15. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  18. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Fermi

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fermi" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  20. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Beaver Valley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Seabrook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Seabrook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  3. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Donald C Cook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Donald C Cook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Joseph M Farley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. Virginia Nuclear Profile - North Anna

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Anna" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

  7. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  8. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  9. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  11. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  12. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  14. California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  15. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  17. Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Texas Project" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  19. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  2. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

  3. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Sequoyah

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sequoyah" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - PPL Susquehanna

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PPL Susquehanna" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  6. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Florida Nuclear Profile - St Lucie

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    St Lucie" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Limerick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Limerick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  11. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Catawba

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Catawba" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Surry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Surry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  14. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Duane Arnold Energy Center

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Duane Arnold Energy Center" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  15. Illinois Nuclear Profile - LaSalle Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LaSalle Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  16. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Clinton Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Clinton Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Vermont Yankee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Yankee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  19. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  20. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Palo Verde

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Palo Verde" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - H B Robinson

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    H B Robinson" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  3. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  4. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Comanche Peak" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit...

  6. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Davis Besse

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Davis Besse" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  9. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  10. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Brunswick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Brunswick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  15. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

  16. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  18. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  19. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Harris

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Harris" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  20. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - McGuire

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    McGuire" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  3. New York Nuclear Profile - James A Fitzpatrick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    James A Fitzpatrick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Kewaunee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kewaunee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - V C Summer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    V C Summer" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  8. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Perry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Perry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  10. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Edwin I Hatch

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Edwin I Hatch" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Peach Bottom

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peach Bottom" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Palisades

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Palisades" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactive power), about two percent of PJM’s total market turnover and costing $1.17 per MWH of electricity

  14. Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich Manager, Resource Planning & Power Supply Other #12;Conservation Avoided Cost Calculations For 1 MW Measure With Flat Delivery Item $/MWh Energy

  15. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices per TGC (in size of 1MWh) of: offshore wind 90 €, on-shore wind 50€, hydro: 50€, solar energy:

  16. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEM O&M PJM POU PPA PTC PUC REC RFI RPSoperations and maintenance PJM Interconnection publiclyMidwest, Mountain, Texas, PJM Interconnection, Northwest,

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEM O&M PJM POU PPA PTC PUC REC RFI RPSoperations and maintenance PJM Interconnection publiclyis planned for the Midwest, PJM Interconnection, Texas,

  18. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the form of a 12 MWh battery bank manufactured by NGK. InNGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery bank had been proposed for

  19. A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the form of a 12 MWh battery bank manufactured by NGK. InNGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery bank had been proposed for

  20. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ASME  Figure 8. Sensitivity of project returns to powerpower sales price of $98.4/MWh, the net present value (NPV) Copyright © 2009 by ASME 

  1. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  2. future science group 133ISSN 1758-300410.4155/CMT.12.11 2012 Future Science Ltd Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a ubiquitous byprod-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    captured and stored underground, these plants could lead to carbon negative credits, as 66% of the carbon/MWh and is $285/MWh with amine-based post-combustion capture technology. The cost of CO2 capture to achieve carbon negative footprints [2,7]. In fact, Kaplan et al. estimate that in the USA the potential

  3. Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, A.; Hasanabadi, A.; Abdorrazaghi, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing in Iran. Results of the study showed that spinning plant electricity intensity varies between 3.6 MWh/tonne yarn and 6.6 MWh/tonne yarn, while fuel intensity ranges between 6.7 MBtu/tonne yarn and 11.7 MBtu/tonne yarn. In weaving plants...

  4. Superconductive Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) System Studies for Electrical Utility at Wisconsin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boom, R. W.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Abdelsalem, M. K.; Huang, X.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the axial structure is approximately E; and the cost of refrigeration is a constant plus an E^2/3 term. Costs scale approximately from E^0.58 (low E) to E^0.71 (100 - 3000 MWh) to E ^0.78 (3000 to 10,000 MWh). The cost of the ac-dc conversion system is about...

  5. Information Gathering Session Gillian Charles & Ken Dragoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and associated technologies. ­ Hydropower upgrades, new hydropower projects 3 Purpose Develop a hydro supply curve to determine the hydropower development potential in the NW region ­ Council's Seventh Power Plan-effectiveness Quantity-MWh Price - $/MWh 4 #12;3/27/2012 3 Hydro Assessment: 1980's National Hydropower Survey Hydro Site

  6. Implications of near-term coal power plant retirement for SO2 and NOX, and life cycle GHG emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    prices of electricity production Plant type Unit Price Nuclear ($/MWh) 16.51 Wind ($/MWh) 201 Hydro Top SO2 100 430 95 440 100 430 Top NOX 105 350 100 380 105 345 Small, inefficient 125 410 125 405 125) Manitoba Hydro Manitoba Hydro Undertaking # 57 http://www.pub.gov.mb.ca/exhibits/mh-83.pdf. (5) Sotkiewicz

  7. UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy 10,000 Trials Cumulative Chart 9,901 Displayed Mean $98.4/MWh Figure 3: Cumulative probability of levelized annual cost Energy 10,000 Trials Cumulative Chart 9,927 Displayed Mean $100/MWh Figure 4: Cumulative probability of levelized annual cost 

  8. PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, C.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    usable energy of 14.2 million Btu per year, giving an annualMWh/year or 83.6 million Btu/year. Because the evaporativeper unit of 5.02 million Btu or natural gas of 1.5 MWh of

  9. Electricity transactions across international borders, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the electricity exchanges between the United States and Mexico and Canada during calendar year 1984. The construction, operation and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential permit. These permits have been granted by DOE since its formation in 1977. During 1984, the US imported 42,219,259 MWh of electric energy at a cost of $1,070,046,345. Of this total, 42,034,392 MWh were imported from Canada and the remainder (184,867 MWh) were received from Mexico. During this same period, US exports of electric energy totaled 2,558,293 MWh with gross revenues of $21,795,733. Of this, 2,479,487 MWh representing $21,115,413 in revenues were delivered to Canada, and 78,806 MWh representing $680,320 in revenues were delivered to Mexico. On a net basis, the US was an importer of 39,660,966 MWh of electric energy. These 1984 values constitute an increase of 9.2% in gross imports and a decrease of 23.3% in gross exports compared to 1983 levels.

  10. Electricity transactions across international borders, 1985. [With Mexico, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the electricity exchange between the United States and Mexico and Canada during Calendar Year 1985. The construction, opration and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential permit which has been granted by DOE. During 1985, the US imported 45,900,563 MWh of electric energy at a cost of $1,041,908,785. Of this total, 45,659,944 MWh were imported from Canada and the remainder (240,619 MWh) were received from Mexico. During this same period, US exports of electric energy totaled 4,964,930 MWh with gross revenues of $25,215,549. Of this, 4,812,537 MWh representing $22,068,665 in revenues were delivered to Canada, and 152,393 MWh representing $3,146,884 in revenues were delivered to Mexico. On a net basis, the US was an importer of 40,935,633 MWh of electric energy. These 1985 values constitute an increase of 8.1% in gross imports and an increase of 94.1% in gross exports compared to 1984 levels.

  11. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume II - Technical Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University System Figure 1: OSD NOx Emissions Reduction Projections through 2020 (Base Year 2008) In 2012, (Table 1) the total integrated annual savings from all programs is 16,413,917 MWh/year. The integrated annual electricity savings... from all the different programs is: ? Savings from code-compliant residential and commercial construction is 498,883 MWh/year (3.0% of the total electricity savings), ? Savings from the PUC’s Senate Bill 7 program is 1,831,318 MWh/year (11...

  12. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated Nox Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Zilbershtein, G.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Clardige, D.; Parker, P.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this purpose. In 2012, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings is 16,413,917 MWh/year (4,609 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings is 44,366 MWh/day, which would be a 1,849 MW average hourly... load reduction during the OSD period (12.35 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the integrated total electricity savings from all programs are: ? Annual electricity savings will be 17,661,268 MWh/year (4,959 tons-NOx/year) and ? OSD electricity savings...

  13. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . According to the developed models, the total MWh savings in the base year 1999 for the wind farms within the ERCOT region are 6,919,352 MWh and 15,269 MWh/day in the Ozone Season Period. The total NOx emissions reductions across all the counties amount... amounts of degradation could be observed in the measured power from Texas wind farms. Currently, the TCEQ uses a very conservative 5% degradation per year for the power output from a wind farm when making future projections from existing wind farms...

  14. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, Larry; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; McKelvey, Kathy; Montgomery, Cynthia; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Liu, Zi; Gilman, Don; Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose. In 2008, the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 20,380,240 MWh/year (12, 727 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs... is 48,602 MWh/day, which would be a 2,025 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (31.38 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the total cumulative annual electricity savings from will be 32,736,151 MWh/year (20,395 tons-NOx/year). The total...

  15. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar, J. C.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.; Liu, Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    specially prepared for this purpose. In 2009, the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 25,585,081 MWh/year (15,327 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings from all programs is 70,442 MWh/day, which would... be a 2,935 MW average hourly load reduction during the OSD period (40.72 tons-NOx/day). By 2013, the total cumulative annual electricity savings from will be 31,979,929 MWh/year (19,314 tons-NOx/year). The total cumulative OSD electricity savings...

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Cam Stuart, Jackie Baum, Michael Uifalusi, Ramin Hamidizadeh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implications of growing a biofuel crop at the farm, understanding the carbon footprint and green energy offset. The estimated green energy output annually is 62.5MWh which equates to 225GJ. By planting Miscanthus hedgerows

  17. FUPWG Fall Meeting 2014 GSA Staus Update

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bureau County, IL *Planned COD: December 2014 or 2015 *Site Control: 17,000 acres *Wind Resource Assessment: 7.4 ms *Annual Production Estimate: 350,000 - 725,000 MWh ...

  18. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was employed in biomass cost, electricity sale price and O&Mwas employed in biomass cost, electricity sale price and O&MElectricity sale price 54 $/MWh Biomass delivery cost, $/

  19. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

  20. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

  1. Comments of the American Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and wind power development. Assuming a conservative 35MWh value for curtailed wholesale energy would put a value of over 100 million on the wind energy that was curtailed...

  2. Pollution and the price of power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewees, D.N. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Economics

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyses the un-priced environmental harm caused by generating electricity from fossil fuels in the ECAR control region south of the Great Lakes in 2004 and again in 2015 when the recent Clean Air Interstate Rule will have its full effect. Using existing damage values, we estimate wholesale electricity under-pricing for coal-fired plants at about $40 per MWh in 2004, almost as much again as the $45/MWh actual price. Averaging across all fuels, the price of electricity was more than $30/MWh too low. The under-pricing will still be $18/MWh for coal plants and $15 for all generation sources in 2015, a decade after CAIR was adopted. Recognizing this environmental price now could reduce pollution levels, increase energy conservation and lead to wiser choices of new generation technology.

  3. A Threshold Autoregressive Model for Wholesale Electricity Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Threshold Autoregressive Model for Wholesale Electricity Prices B. Ricky Rambharat Carnegie of wholesale electricity soared to an unprecedented $7,500 per megawatt-hour (MwH) (see FERC, 1998). Models

  4. accident hydrologic analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SFHS) is a non information, contact: - Neil JohnsonMWH - Jayantha ObeysekeraSFWMD - Mike SukopFIU - Chris PetersCH2M HILL Sukop, Mike 291 HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT,...

  5. active layer hydrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SFHS) is a non information, contact: - Neil JohnsonMWH - Jayantha ObeysekeraSFWMD - Mike SukopFIU - Chris PetersCH2M HILL Sukop, Mike 199 Eco-hydrological controls on...

  6. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    useful if it displaces coal generation in Canada, than if itbeyond discarding all coal generation and the current RPS2,000(coal/trash/wood))*fuel BTU]/ net generation MWh. For

  7. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and PerformanceTransmission ($/kW-wind) Unit Cost (Capacity-weighted) Windof Transmission ($/MWh- wind) Unit Cost (Capacity-weighted)

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Conditions and Energy Purchases: * SEPA purchased 9.2 million in replacement energy in FY 2011 * Average rate was 66.25 per MWH * SEPA purchased 7.6 million in replacement...

  9. Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning January 1, 2012 the Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program allows NB Power to purchase renewable energy generated by its largest customers at a rate of $95/MWh. This...

  10. Electricity Transmission Congestion Costs: A Review of Recent Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operator ISO-NE Independent System Operator - New England LMP Locational marginal price MW Megawatt MWh price FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FTR Fixed transmission right ISO Independent system

  11. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Callaway Unit 1","1,190","8,996",100.0,"Union...

  12. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"Syste...

  13. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Seabrook Unit 1","1,247","10,910",100.0,"NextEr...

  14. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  15. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Solar Variability and Forecasting Jan Kleissl, Chi Chow, Matt Lave, Patrick Mathiesen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Forecasting Benefits Use of state-of-art wind and solar forecasts reduces WECC operating costs by up to 14/MWh of wind and solar generation). WECC operating costs could be reduced by an additional $500 million

  17. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hourly Net Generation by Fuel (MWh) Fossil Fuel Unit SummaryThe combustion of fossil fuels in the electricity sector isand SO 2 emitted by fossil fuel generators in the region.

  18. O`ahu Grid Study: Validation of Grid Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16, 2007 5 2-2 Comparison of the annual energy production (MWh), by unit type, between the historical 2007 HECO energy production and the GE MAPSTM model simulation 6 2-3 Comparison of the fuel consumption

  19. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculator 1) Fixed Levelized Cost $/kWyr 2) Full LCOE $/MWh (with energy production and variable costs, annualized payment (like a mortgage payment) ­ Levelized Cost. When divided by annual energy production

  20. NC GreenPower Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: NC GreenPower issued an RFP in December 2013, seeking up to 20,000 MWh of renewable energy credits (RECs) through a purchase with either a one or two year term. Green power is defined...

  1. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy from the bottom toover the cost and price of wind energy that it receives. Asweighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was $65/MWh (

  2. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices, though the economic value of wind energyenergy and climate policy initiatives. With wind turbine pricesprices reported here would be at least $20/MWh higher without the PTC), they do not represent wind energy

  3. First Edition Geologic Storage Formation Classification: Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    domestic energy resource and the primary source of baseload power generation in the United States, generating 1,986 million megawatt hours (MWh) in 2008. At the 2008 rate of...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Customer Sector Average RevenuesSales (kWh) Retail Sales (1000s MWh) End-use sector January 2015 Change from January 2014 January 2015 Change from January 2014 Year to...

  5. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LSE MISO M-RETS MSW MW MWh PJM POU PRC PSC PUC PV REC RPSelectric service provider PJM Generation Attributes Trackingwaste megawatt megawatt-hour PJM Interconnection publicly

  6. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    machine with an average investment cost of about US$180 perMWh/year/ring frame. The investment cost of this measure wasmotor replaced and the investment cost was around US$1950

  7. SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................11 Table 2: Levelized System Costs ($2006/MWh) .................................................12CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT ADDENDUM STAFFDRAFTREPORT JULY 2007 CEC-200

  8. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high cost of power from solar photovoltaic (PV) panels hassolar panels can be more closely synchronized with system demand, but at a costcost of the solar PV installation is equivalent to purchasing each MWh over the life of the panels

  9. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)wind penetration within the state, based on energy production (31% based on capacity), would cost

  10. Exploration of Resource and Transmission Expansion Decisions in the Western Renewable Energy Zone Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of$10/MWh for wind Average Energy Price Integration Costs Hightargets. The bus-bar cost of wind energy, in contrast, is a

  11. Fact Sheet: Wind Firming EnergyFarm (October 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Primus Power is deploying a 25 MW/75 MWh EnergyFarm in California's Central Valley, comprising an array of 20 kW EnergyCell flow batteries combined with off-the-shelf components and power...

  12. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    34 Figure 15. CO2 Emissions from ACWH and Competing28 Table 10. CO2 Emissions from Production and RefiningCarbon Price ($/Ton CO2) Emissions (Ton CO2/MWh) Costs

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel  (tonne CO2/TJ)Improvements and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the

  14. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModel Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel (

  15. The Implementation of California AB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accurate accounting of CO2 emissions, at least from in-plants (> 75 MW) with CO2 emissions > 1500 lbs/MWh Load-with extremely low CO2 emissions. Over the entire western

  16. Calculation of Integrated Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs across State Agencies in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Baltazar, J. C.; Kim, H.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Zilbershtein, G.; Ellis, S.; Parker, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    counties through 2011 were obtained from the SECO. The integrated savings also include MWh and NOx emissions savings from the currently installed green power generation (wind) capacity in west Texas for 2001 through 2011. Projections through 2012... was assumed for PUC programs, SECO, and SEER 13 entries. Figure 1 shows the overall information flow that was used to calculate the NOx emissions savings from the annual and OSD electricity savings (MWh) from all programs. For the Laboratory?s single...

  17. Current State of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation highlights the status of the voluntary green power market in 2012. The voluntary green power market totaled more than 48 million MWh in 2012, with about 1.9 million customers participating. The supply continues to be dominated by wind, though solar is increasing its share of utility green pricing programs. Prices for voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs) increased to above $1/MWh.

  18. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up to 2.

  19. Benefits of Commisioning New & Existing Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meline, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Case Study #1 Government Building | McAllen, TX | Constructed in 2008 Case Study #1 Case Study #1 | MWH and KW used Case Study #1 | Energy Use Case Study #1 | Energy Star Rank Case Study #1 | RTU Outside air temperature = 88 degrees. Mixed... heating and cooling. Case Study #1 Case Study #1 Case Study #1 Case Study #2 Government Building | Florida | Constructed in 2008 Case Study #2 | Actual vs. Calculated Utility Bill Case Study #2 | MWH and kW used Case Study #2 | Energy Use...

  20. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables. Summary Report. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Baltazar, J.C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.L.; Oh, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the developed method for those wind farms in the ERCOT region. The total measured wind power generation in 2013 is 32,638,270 MWh/yr., which is 14.12% higher than what the same wind farms would have produced in 2008. Figure 1-3 shows the same comparison... but for the Ozone Season Period. The measured wind power generation in the OSP of 2013 is 57,622 MWh/day, which is 3.41% higher than the 2008 OSP baseline wind production. For the analysis of this year, the measured 2013 wind power generation is fairly higher...

  1. Improving Operational Strategies of an Institutional Building in Kuwait 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ragom, F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and lab/office equipment. The base consumption of the building was found to be 800 MWh per month. This amount was being consumed regularly throughout the year, and it represented the minimum consumption of the winter months. By inspecting the building... consumption of the side lamps assuming an average lamp rating of 60W and that they are used 5 days a week for 7.5 hours per day will be 11 MWh/year. To change the employees habits with regards to utilization of lighting system, the third strategy...

  2. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewable 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Bahman, Yazdani; Claridge, David; Mao, Chunliu; Sandeep, Kota

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation in 2008 using the developed method for those wind farms in the ERCOT region. The total measured wind power generation in 2011 is 27,970,096 MWh/yr., which is 1.98% less than what the same wind farms would have produced in 2008. Figure 1-3 shows... the same comparison but for the Ozone Season Period. The measured wind power generation in the OSP of 2011 is 57,928 MWh/day, which is 15.65% higher than the 2008 OSP baseline wind production. Especially for wind farms named BUFF_GAP_UNIT2 and SWEETWN3...

  3. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekaran, Vivek; Turner, Dan; Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Gilman, Don; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Liu, Zi; Haberl, Jeff S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region. The total measured wind power generation in 2007 is 8,752,498 MWh, which is 17% less than what the same wind farms would have produced in 1999. Figure 1-2 shows the same comparison but Page August 2009 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...&M University System 5 for the Ozone Season Period. The measured wind power generation in the OSP of 2007 is 20,094 MWh/day, which is 25% lower than the estimated 1999 OSD wind production. This report also includes an uncertainty analysis...

  4. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. II - Technical Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the following results were determined for energy-code compliant new residential single- and multi-family construction in non-attainment and affected counties built in 2004: ? The annual savings in 2005 amounted to 348,794 megawatt hours (MWh... would have been 1,799 MWh/day and 1,210 million Btu (MBtu) of natural gas, resulting in peak-OSD NOx emissions reductions of 1.26 tons (2007 eGRID). ? Beginning in 2005, the Laboratory worked with the TCEQ to integrate NOx emissions reductions (i...

  5. Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. I – Summary ReportAnnual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Sept. 2003 to Aug. 2004 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmad, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Bryant, J.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -family construction in both non-attainment and affected counties built in 2004: ? The annual savings in 2004 amounted to 233,806 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity and 667,945 million Btus of natural gas. The resultant annual NOx reductions were 346 tons.... ? On the peak day (August 19, 1999, baseline in the historical air quality model), the savings would have been 1,317 MWh/day and 1,148 million Btus of natural gas, resulting in peak-day NOx emissions reductions of 1.89 tons. ? Cumulative NOx reductions...

  6. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables: Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Claridge, D.; Do, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The total measured wind power generation in 2010 is 23,962,433 MWh/yr., which is 5% less than what the same wind farms would have produced in 2008. Figure 1-2 shows the same comparison but for the Ozone Season Period. The measured wind power generation... in the OSP of 2010 is 53,189MWh/day, which is 16.93% higher than the 2008 OSD baseline wind production. Page July 2012 Energy Systems Laboratory, The Texas A&M University System 5 This report also includes an uncertainty analysis...

  7. Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. III – AppendixAnnual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Sept. 2003 to Aug. 2004 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.; Ahmad, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Bryant, J.; Degelman, L. O.; Turner, W. D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the following results were determined for energy-code compliant new residential single and multi-family construction in both non-attainment and affected counties built in 2004. ? The annual savings in 2004 amounted to 233,806 megawatt hours (MWh...) of electricity and 667,945 million Btus of natural gas. The resultant annual NOx reductions were 346 tons. ? On the peak day (August 19, 1999, baseline in the historical air quality model), the savings would have been 1,317 MWh/day and 1,148 million Btus...

  8. Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer,K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 18-20 40 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 Baseline (lb/MWh) 2030 Goal (lb/MWh) lb /M W h 111(d) - Comparison of Region 6 State Baselines and 2030 Targets Arkansas New Mexico Louisiana Oklahoma Texas 47% 42% 43% 42% 44% ESL-KT-14..., by 2030, this rule would help reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector by approximately 30% from 2005 levels. • Also by 2030, reduce by over 25% pollutants that contribute to the soot and smog that make people sick. • These reductions will lead...

  9. Rethinking CCS Strategies for Technology Development in Times of Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    received increased attention due to the positive value that EOR storage puts on CO2. Second, the EPA has change and a reliance on CO2-emitting fossil fuels for a majority of the world's energy supply have proposed a 1000 lbs CO2/MWh emission standard that would require new coal plants to install CCS. Using

  10. Blackouts: des vrits qui drangent Prof. Damien Ernst Universit de Lige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    sur les 385 MW de la TGV de Vilvoorde (partie turbine à gaz de la centrale). 100 MW de charge sont un coût inférieur aux centrales au gaz (prix du combustible en 2014 pour 1 MWh d'électricité produite au charbon : ± 25 contre ± 50 quand le gaz est utilisé). § Des marchés qui ne rémunèrent pas la

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy sales = all revenues, and MWh forecast is correct And for OTEC for 2011 Power Sales at a percent.27 times price of power #12;The 2011 OTEC cost of power was $19,832,000 A 3% loss in power sales would

  12. 812 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 2, MAY 2007 Security-Constrained Resource Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    in an economic fashion that ensures the installed gen- erating capacity would adequately meet the projected. Capacity of existing unit of GENCO . Capacity of candidate unit of GENCO . Capacity of line . , Step size at subperiod in year . Operating costs of unit of GENCO at subperiod in year ($/ MWh). Dispatched capacity

  13. Energy Analysis, Baselining and Modeling of Prairie View A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Eggebrecht, J.; Carlson, K. A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the available data found that electricity savings in the J.B. Coleman Library for June - September, 1998 were 298 MWh, or 38% of the baseline consumption during these months. Extrapolation of these savings to a full year leads would...

  14. A Threshold Autoregressive Model for Wholesale Electricity Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Threshold Autoregressive Model for Wholesale Electricity Prices B. Ricky Rambharat, Department the price of wholesale electricity soared to an unprecedented level of $7,500 per MwH (see [14-order threshold autoregressive model (TAR(1)) for wholesale electricity prices. (For discussion of TAR models, see

  15. Summary Description of BEF's Green Tag Product1 February 22, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity annually, would create no air pollution. An average fossil fuel conventional, polluting power plants with the output from a new, non-polluting renewable power plant, 7 tons of NOx, and varying amounts of CO, mercury, particulates and other pollutants. The green tags

  16. A techno-economic analysis and optimization of Li-ion batteries for light-duty passenger vehicle electrification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    September 2014 Keywords: Electric vehicle Lithium-ion battery Battery design Production cost Electrode in addressing oil dependency, global warming, and air pollution in the United States. We investigate the role for minimum cost. Economies of scale are reached quickly at ~200e300 MWh annual production. Small-pack PHEV

  17. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Emissions by Generation Type (lbs CO2 per MWh of Power) Coal-fired generation · Conventional (existing PNW or Price $10/ $40/ tonne tonne Coal-fired generation · Conventional (existing PNW fleet) $10.33 $41 Committee October 9, 2012 Whitefish, MT #12;CO2 Content by Fuel (lbs CO2 per MMBtu of Fuel) Coal

  18. High Level Indicators of Progress on the Pacific NW Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act's Power Plan Goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Regional vs. national information would be useful, as suggested in the "considered but not proposed" section of the Indicator Issue Paper. · Regional CO2 intensity per MWh Energy Efficiency · Total System (BPA) to establish a measure that tracks the total system costs reduced due to investments in energy

  19. Workshop Energia e Fonti Rinnovabili Lucio Andreani, Dip. Fisica "A. Volta" Universit di Pavia, 15/06/2011 1 Dipartimento di Fisica "Alessandro Volta",

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the reference scenario (Mtoe) IEA World Energy Outlook, 2008 (n.b. 1 Toe=11.63 MWh) #12;Workshop Energia e Fonti.082130Wind 5.5659Geothermal World*All data in TWh *IEA World Energy Outlook, 2008/06/2011 7 Consumo mondiale di energia primaria fossil fuels: 80.9% World primary energy demand

  20. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Summary of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model Paul Denholm Marissa Hummon November 2012 NREL/PR6A2057376 #12;2 Motivation · Implement CSP with thermal energy storage (TES release loss: 7% of released energy Storage: 6 hrs 1.2 GWh Start-up loss 40 MWh Summary of analyzed system

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and replacements of existing power plants, aggressive development of renewable resources both to meet RPS the AURORAxmp Electric Market Model by EPISy 2. Produces an hourly wholesale power price ($/MWh) across the WECC Washington Phil Rockefeller Washington January, 7 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Steven Simmons

  2. ENERGY COMMITTEE ENERGY TALKING POINTS (ETP) SERIES Revision (or Issued): > 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #: ENERGY-WATER NEXUS: WILL WATER DETERMINE OUR ENERGY FUTURE? INTRODUCTION In a world with limited natural resources and growing energy needs, the energy sector is competing with other sectors of the world study by River Network "The Carbon Footprint of Water", 13% of U.S. energy consumption (521 million MWh

  3. Battery-Powered Digital CMOS Massoud Pedram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    (submarines) Stationary batteries 250 Wh~5 MWh Emergency power supplies, local energy storage, remote relay1 Page 1 USC Low Power CAD Massoud Pedram Battery-Powered Digital CMOS Design Massoud Pedram Power CAD Massoud Pedram Motivation Extending the battery service life of battery-powered micro

  4. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with hydro generation. In 2012, around 49,600 MWh of non-hydro generation, including wind generation by displacement would be split roughly 50/50 between power customers and wind generators · Now termed In the spring of 2012 BPA displaced approximately 70 MW-months (about 50,000 MW-hrs) of wind generation 2012

  5. Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity consumption in kW hours (695,000 x 0.2636) x 8,760)/4,066 = 394,699 "... currently estimated Programme Background (page) This target would power the average Welsh household electricity consumption, rated at 2 MW, produces an average of 4.6 million units (4,618 MWh) of electricity each year, which

  6. Impacts of Optimized Cold & Hot Deck Reset Schedules on Dual Duct VAV Systems - Application and Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Abbas, M.; Veteto, B.; Claridge, D. E.; Bruner, H.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduced the chilled water energy consumption by 7,571 MMBtu/yr (18%) and 303 MWh/yr (18%) for the fan power. The estimated heating energy savings are 2,327 MMBtu/yr. The estimated annual cost savings are $75,040/yr. This paper presents the building and AHU...

  7. Energy Analysis, Baselining and Modeling of Prairie View A&M University 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Eggebrecht, J.; Carlson, K. A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the available data found that electricity savings in the J.B. Coleman Library for June - September, 1998 were 298 MWh, or 38% of the baseline consumption during these months. Extrapolation of these savings to a full year leads would...

  8. Procedure to Calculate NOx Reductions Using the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (E-Grid) Spreadsheet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Verdict, M.; Turner, W. D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Generation Resource Integrated Database (E-GRID) is presented. This procedure is proposed for calculating county-wide NOx reductions in pounds per MWh for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy projects (EE/RE) implemented in each Power Control Area (PCA...

  9. Evaluating Utility System Operations Using APLUS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pethe, S.; Singh, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure turbine was a prohibitive $270/MWh. The 600 psig boiler and extraction turbine were found to be large enough to meet all the steam and power requirements of the plant. This required that a new 600 HP motor be bought to drive the paper machine...

  10. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Preliminary Report: Integrated NOx Emissions Savings from EE/RE Programs Statewide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Gilman, D.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    for 2007 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) eGRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose. In 2007 the cumulative total annual electricity savings from all programs is 12,591,561 MWh/yr (8,326 tons...

  11. Estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diem, Art; Mulholland, Denise; Yarbrough, James; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Im, Piljae; Haberl, Jeff

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    avoided emission rate is approximately 0.51 pounds (lb) of NOx reduced per MWh of electricity savings. While House Bill 3693 is an Act related to energy and does not target emissions levels, the energy efficiency improvements would achieve air pollution...

  12. Developing a Motor Management Policy at BASF 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zickefoose, B.; Theising, T. R.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the company. BASF draws a 240MW electrical power load. Accepting that 70% (industry standards range from 63 to 75% for BASF's businesses) of this load was consumed by rotating equipment and assuming an average cost of$401MWh at 8400 hours of annual operation...

  13. Anlisis retrospectivo en Chile; por qu estamos donde estamos...?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    crítica del desarrollo de infraestructura eléctrica · Sufrimos efectos de energía cara, sucia e 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 US$/MWhGWh Pasada Embalse Eólica Carbón Gas GNL Otros Diesel Costo* 27 Nueva Zelanda 28 Noruega 29 Estados Unidos 30 Korea** 31 Precio energía industrial

  14. Solar Photovoltaic Capacity F t P f d P li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/19/2013 1 Solar Photovoltaic ­ Capacity F t P f d P li Generating Resources Advisory Committee Advisor Model (SAM), version 2013.1.15 Technology: Solar PV (PVWatts system model)Technology: Solar PV (MWh) (First year output, each year thereafter degrades 0.5%) 6 #12;6/19/2013 4 Shape of PNW Solar PV

  15. ARRA Proposed Award: The Moderate Income Sustainable Technology (MIST) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prime Contractor: CRHMFA Homebuyers Fund Sub Contractors: None Partnering Clean Energy,955,631 Retrofit Target: 2,463 Single Family Homes Projected Energy Savings: 11,276.82 MWh annually Projected Workforce Development Program(s): The California Workforce Investment Board (CWIB), local Workforce

  16. 2006/3/13 IVIGIVIG --Instituto Virtual Internacional de MudanInstituto Virtual Internacional de Mudanas Globaisas Globais Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco I, Sala 129 CEP: 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro RJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SOLID WASTESMUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES HUMID ORGANIC FRACTION FOOD WASTE. DRY ORGANIC FRACTION PAPER, WOOD USINAVERDE POWER UPGRADE. PART 3 ADAPTATION OF NATURAL GAS BOILER TO BURN MSW. PART 4 COGENERATION AT FOOD/TON FOOD WASTE 1.400 KCAL/KG 1.63 MWH/TON 30% CONVERTED TO ELECTRICITY 1 TON PLASTIC = R$ 593

  17. An Equilibrium Pricing Model for Weather Derivatives in a Multi-commodity Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    . There- fore, energy companies face two types of risk, price risk in the spot market and 1 Manuscript weather changes will affect energy demand and sudden de- mand increases result in spot price spikes-day ice storm in February 2003 electricity prices spiked to $990/MWh causing a retail energy provider

  18. Landmark Center P.O. Box 15677

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    are less than 2% those of coal combustion per MWh), their benefits can be approximated by the health impact with only the most cursory consideration of the health impacts of the generation proposals. We urge: "In developing the IRP, DP&L may consider the economic and environmental value of ... (ii) resources

  19. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 MWH/yr) #12;2 3 Project Performance: ·Annual & monthly energy production and capacity factor Wind energy production values are expected to vary from year-to-year. Maximum 15-Minute Standard Total on 135 MW installed capacity Judith Gap Wind Energy Production Summary 6 0:00 4:00 8:00 12:00 16:00 20

  20. Senior Research Specialist Poul Erik Morthorst Ris National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Conventional Power Plants Generation costs 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Coal Natural gas Wind Power - coastal site to Conventional Power Plants Generation costs plus CO2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Coal Natural gas Wind Power Wind Power - inland site /MWh Basic #12;Generation costs 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Coal Natural gas Wind

  1. Discussion Of Scenario ResultsDiscussion Of Scenario Results Michael Schilmoeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At 84% capacity factor, the Council's Carbon Footprint Paper estimates regional coal plant carbon (Btu/kWh) tons CO2/MWh RPM & Genesys (%) Council's Carbon Footprint paper Boardman 601.0 84% 504 Committee Web Conference Thursday, May 28, 2009 #12;2 ScenariosScenarios Base case Suspend Carbon Policy

  2. First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    ­ boils down to economics. Water drives technology and price of energy." "Looking to move to dry or hybridFirst Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability University of California, Santa Barbara John R,000 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Year gal/MWh Trend in U.S. Thermoelectric Power Water Withdrawal

  3. Californiahasdevel-opedaninnovative,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -$30 EconomicRankingScore($/MWh) EnvironmentalScore 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 MedianValues This chartElectricity CoordinatingCouncil undertheWestern RenewableEnergy ZoneInitiative. Innovation in Finance, Technology & Policy plan that minimizes environmental impacts and economic costs and supports California's 33 percent

  4. EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicate significant regional difference for the cost impacts and the CO2 emissions. Battery charging during the day may have twice the cost impacts than charging during the night. The CO2 emissions impacts emission intensity (ton CO2/MWh), while in others regions with significant clean generation (hydro

  5. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBON EMISSION RATES IN US: (lbs of CO2 per megawatt hour of electricity produced) 1,500 lbs/MWh 2, Energy CO2 Emissions by State, http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/state_energyco2inv Footprint Report ­ E-tag / tracking CO2 through supply chain · Impact of Global Warming on Hydro/ Salmon

  6. NW Investor Owned Utility Perspective: Climate Policy and the WCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /MWh ID OR WA Electricity CO2 Emissions Carbon Emissions by Generation Carbon Emissions by Consumption #12 I -- 126 MW Boardman Carbon Capture Pilot Project Pipe CO2 emission stream into algae tanks DispatchPrice NetRevenue Market Price Sets Price NetRevenue NetRevenue CO2 Price Impacts Electric Market

  7. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the emissions from the "net system mix", or electricity available for export, to be 1,014 lbs. CO2/MWh in 2006's electricity imports. We recognize the critical importance of tracking emissions related to the production electric industry emissions profile and to develop an accurate tracking or reporting mechanism

  8. date 04/2009 Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fibres #12;date 04/2009 Waste Incineration Plant at Munich North ­ Using Combined Heat and Power production of electrical power · 792,351 MWh production of heat for district heating · 238,000 t reductiondate 04/2009 Waste Management In The City Of Munich #12;date 04/2009 Waste Management Corporation

  9. Primer on Conservation Potential Assessment MethodologyAssessment Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product Turnovergy Total Resource Cost Discount Rate Cost of Saved Energy Levelized Cost Technical 200 A Levelized Cost (2006$/MWH) CostCost 7 Steps in Building Supply Curves 1. Identify-Opportunity Conservation Retrofit Conservation Conservation Measure or Practice Conservation Program Federal Energy

  10. Engi 9614: Renewable Energy and Resource Conservation, Assignment #2, Nov. 28th "Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    temperatures 6. About 2% and 9% 7. They are 61% lower 8. IEA estimates onshore wind energy will cost $90 MWh-1% of the energy from the plant will be required for the CCS operations. 14. It is a plant for which the full costsEngi 9614: Renewable Energy and Resource Conservation, Assignment #2, Nov. 28th 2013

  11. COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation development @ 5.5%. b) 100% debt financing. c) Financing term is 30 years. d) Minimum debt.9 M per year plus 10 cents per MWh, including IT. d) Activities include scheduling coordination Geothermal, Solid Fuel Biomass, Land Fill Gas Biomass, and Concentrating Solar Power. b) The cost

  12. Conservation Focus and Executive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - $78 to $239 per MWh ­ Constrained by RPS requirements ­ Limited alternatives in early years of plan geothermal, combined-cycle and simple- cycle turbines #12;Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portfolio and Conservation Council Electricity Rates · In all futures electricity rates are expected to increase (roughly 30

  13. Copyright 2014 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission from: CERTS Microgrid Demonstration With Large-Scale Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diesel generators. Adding a 2-MW, 4-MWh storage system, a fast static switch, and a power factor cor-Scale Energy Storage and Renewable Generation Eduardo Alegria, Member, IEEE; Tim Brown, Member, IEEE; Erin and Renewable Generation Eduardo Alegria, Member, IEEE, Tim Brown, Member, IEEE, Erin Minear, Member, IEEE

  14. D A R G A N M . W . F R I E R S O N D E P A R T M E N T O F A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    ensure that the wind is blowing somewhere Solar power tends to be complementary to wind in midlatitudes ! Turbines ­ 127 ! Power output ­ 229 MW at peak capacity; 642,000 MWh annual output (est.), enough to meet? (probably not if placed away from "migration zones)" Requires large area" Cons" #12;Solar Power #12;Solar

  15. Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Long Island Solar Farm #12;Project Overview The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a 32-megawatt. Project Developer/Owner/Operator: Long Island Solar Farm, LLC (BP Solar & MetLife) Purchaser of Power and construct arrays ~ 2 years of output (88,000 MWh equivalent) Long Island Solar Farm #12;Other Pollutants

  16. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $70/MWh. While energy storage technologies have existed for decades, fast-ramping grid-level storage efficiency all would improve the value of an energy storage technology and each has cost implications FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF Doctor of Philosophy TITLE Energy Storage on the Grid

  17. Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array SyStem SpecificationS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array SyStem SpecificationS System size: 750 kW (DC, estimated) Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaics, ground mounted Annual output: 1,200 MWh Location: Top of South Table Mountain; NREL Campus; Golden, Colorado Start of operation: Spring 2008 financial terms System

  18. Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has 210 CCCT CT Colstrip 3/4 #12;6/5/2013 2 Avista CO2 Emissions Forecast Rising emissions overall 2030 2031 2032 2033 #12;6/5/2013 4 WECC CO2 Emissions Forecast CO2 Prices

  19. Small Modular Reactor: First of a Kind (FOAK) and Nth of a Kind (NOAK) Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren M. Boldon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) refer to any reactor design in which the electricity generated is less than 300 MWe. Often medium sized reactors with power less than 700 MWe are also grouped into this category. Internationally, the development of a variety of designs for SMRs is booming with many designs approaching maturity and even in or nearing the licensing stage. It is for this reason that a generalized yet comprehensive economic model for first of a kind (FOAK) through nth of a kind (NOAK) SMRs based upon rated power, plant configuration, and the fiscal environment was developed. In the model, a particular project’s feasibility is assessed with regards to market conditions and by commonly utilized capital budgeting techniques, such as the net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), Payback, and more importantly, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for comparison to other energy production technologies. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of changing debt, equity, interest rate, and conditions on the LCOE. The economic model is primarily applied to the near future water cooled SMR designs in the United States. Other gas cooled and liquid metal cooled SMR designs have been briefly outlined in terms of how the economic model would change. FOAK and NOAK SMR costs were determined for a site containing seven 180 MWe water cooled SMRs and compared to a site containing one 1260 MWe reactor. With an equal share of debt and equity and a 10% cost of debt and equity, the LCOE was determined to be $79 $84/MWh and $80/MWh for the SMR and large reactor sites, respectively. With a cost of equity of 15%, the SMR LCOE increased substantially to $103 $109/MWh. Finally, an increase in the equity share to 70% at the 15% cost of equity resulted in an even higher LCOE, demonstrating the large variation in results due to financial and market factors. The NPV and IRR both decreased with increasing LCOE. Unless the price of electricity increases along with the LCOE, the projects may become unprofitable. This is the case at the LCOE of $103 $109/MW, in which the NPV became negative. The IRR increased with increasing electricity price. Three cases, electric only base, storage—compressed air energy storage or pumped hydro, and hydrogen production, were performed incorporating SMRs into a nuclear wind natural gas hybrid energy system for the New York West Central region. The operational costs for three cases were calculated as $27/MWh, $25/MWh, and $28/MWh, respectively. A 3% increase in profits was demonstrated for the storage case over the electric only base case.

  20. Preparing for a Successful Energy Audit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 SES Sustainable Energy Solutions, L.L.C. Site “X” Incremental Cost Summary (based on price forecasts, for use in developing energy economics) Electricity 45.88 $/MWh... Gas 5,822,981.00@ 87.5% of CH4 to steam = Water 519,000.00 Effluent 1,330,000.00 Nitrogen 658,938.00 12,317,919.00 Incremental Energy Prices Units Qty $/Unit Electricity MWh 51,093 78.03 Natural Gas M BTU 989,480 5.88 Water k gal 272,797 1.90 Effluent...

  1. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  2. Conservation Draft 6Draft 6thth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Opportunity Penetration Rates 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018Updated Achievable Potential 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200>200 Levelized Cost (2006$/MWh

  3. Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 9 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 10 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 WIND PROJECTS IN TEXAS Completed, Announced, and Retired Wind Projects in Texas, as of December 2011 p. 11 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Laboratory ? 2012 p. 24 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 25 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 NOx REDUCTIONS FROM WIND POWER New 2010 Annual eGrid for NOx Emissions West Zone North Zone Houston Zone South Zone Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs...

  4. Masontown-Uniontown folio, Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Marius R. (Marius Robinson), 1858-1940.

    1902-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .184 238.914 TST 9.204 22.055 63.511 137.205 243.122 TA 9.107 24.282 62.599 139.977 238.833 40 Table 11: EENS Variations for Different Parameter ? EENS [MWh] ? 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 IIM 1095.567 3431.206 9531.999 22659.550 46315.685 TST 1132...

  5. Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

  6. ORNL Neutron Sciences Annual Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Ian S [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Counce, Deborah Melinda [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual report of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate for calendar year 2007. It describes the neutron science facilities, current developments, and future plans; highlights of the year's activities and scientific research; and information on the user program. It also contains information about education and outreach activities and about the organization and staff. The Neutron Sciences Directorate is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The main highlights of 2007 were highly successful operation and instrument commissioning at both facilities. At HFIR, the year began with the reactor in shutdown mode and work on the new cold source progressing as planned. The restart on May 16, with the cold source operating, was a significant achievement. Furthermore, measurements of the cold source showed that the performance exceeded expectations, making it one of the world's most brilliant sources of cold neutrons. HFIR finished the year having completed five run cycles and 5,880 MWd of operation. At SNS, the year began with 20 kW of beam power on target; and thanks to a highly motivated staff, we reached a record-breaking power level of 183 kW by the end of the year. Integrated beam power delivered to the target was 160 MWh. Although this is a substantial accomplishment, the next year will bring the challenge of increasing the integrated beam power delivered to 887 MWh as we chart our path toward 5,350 MWh by 2011.

  7. Procedure to Calculate NOx Reductions Using the Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (E-Grid) Spreadsheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Verdict, M.; Turner, W. D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Renewable Energy projects (EE/RE) implemented in each Power Control Area (PCA) in the ERCOT region E-GRID is a comprehensive database of environmental attributes of electric power systems. E-GRID is based on available plant-specific data for all U... in Figure 9 that three counties (i.e., Ward, McLennan, and Mitchell) rise significantly in NOx reductions during peak days when compared to annual NOx reductions (Figure 5). Table 1. EPA's EGRID table: County-wide NOx Reductions in pounds per MWh for EE/RE...

  8. Cheaper, Cleaner, Cooler Ways to Meet our Needs for New Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric • CHP 7 Ways to Reduce CO 2 U.S. Electricity Generation by Fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours) 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2020 2030 Petroleum Renewables Coal Natural Gas Nuclear Annual Energy Outlook 2007 History Projections... • Municipally owned utilities above 500,000 MWh should administer energy savings incentive programs • Electric Cooperatives shall consider implementing energy efficiency programs to reduce annual growth in demand • Requires state funded entities to set a...

  9. International Solar Centre, Berlin - A Comprehensive Energy Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisch, M. N.; Himmler, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % of the cooling demand is covered by a seasonal heat storage underneath the building which is combined with a heat pump and a concrete core heating and cooling system. Photovoltaic panels with an area of 500 m² and an electric peak power of 55 kW will produce... on the temperature field of the surrounding ground. Photovoltaic panels with an area of 500 m² and an estimated peak electric power of 55 kW will produce around 46 MWh per annum. A small fuel cell will demonstrate the possibilities of future domestic energy...

  10. A Review of the Monitoring of Market Power The Possible Roles of TSOs in Monitoring for Market Power Issues in Congested Transmission Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Paul; Green, Richard J; Neuhoff, Karsten; Newbery, David

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    over the spot or forward cost of fuel used (either gas or coal respectively) in plant of standardised thermal efficiency. In classifying the various methods of detecting market power a useful distinction is between techniques that are applied ex... , and the extra production costs of inefficient dispatch will almost surely be considerably greater than this. For example, changing the merit order to cause a switch in a marginal plant of 1000 MW running 5000 hours per year that costs 2 euros/MWh more, amounts...

  11. Air Conditioning Cold/Heat Source Analysis of the Inclusion of the Monetary Values of Environmental Damage Based on the LCA Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Z.; Duanmu, L.; Shu, H.; Zhu, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the cost of reduc- ing the emission of CO2 will be $80 per ton [9]. Ac- cording to Clean Development Mechanism in China, the price of CO2 is about 33-50yuan/ton. Recently the study on how carbon tax influences China?s Economic Growth has been done..., the weight- ing factor of solid waste is 0.25yuan/kg. 3.6 Monetary Values of Coal and Electricity?s Envi- ronment Impact The functional units of standard coal and elec- tricity are per ton and per MWh. According to ta- ble3-7, table8 illustrates monetary...

  12. Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996) ? Annual statewide electricity savings ($/yr) = MWh savings/yr x annual average electricity price ($/kWh)1 1U.S. DOE EIA (2011) Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC Code in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 9... Methodology (1/4) Building?Level Analysis ? Calculated ?per?house? energy savings and peak demand reductions ? ESL simulation model based on the DOE?2.1e of a single?family residence ? Two options by the type of heating fuel ? Electric/gas house...

  13. Helping to Relieve Grid Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    • TECO manages load by; • Utilizing Thermal Storage and Steam Turbine Chillers • CHP is dispatched based on Real Time Price of Power at the “strike price” - spot price for gas and CHP efficiency • On average CHP is utilized 1,600 hours per year... Lessons Learned Operations After Completion • Operational Performance ? Time Frame: July 2011 – September 2011 ? CHP Run Hours: 967 ? Power Produced by CHP: 40,442 MWh ? Steam Produced by CHP: 123,224 k/lbs ? Emission Reduction (CO2): 25,007 tons...

  14. ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard as a Vehicle to Sustainable Energy Management at 3M Company 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hejnar, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green House Gas (GHG) emissions by 6M lbs CO2e per year ?Reduces annual energy spend by 30% ?Reduces plant COGS by 0.8% ?Reduces purchase of electricity by 15,000 MWh per year Technology: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) ESL-IE-15-06-09 Proceedings... not requiring compressed air like electric blowers, mixers etc. ? Reduce air leaks – most plants leak at 20-30% ? HVAC ? Conditioning of air is very expensive - $3 per CFM per year ? Air balance studies to reduce exhaust and makeup air ? Re...

  15. Trigen Dispersed Energy Services for the Mid-Sized Industrial and Commercial Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntire, M. E.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quality improvements, the 1996 MCU represents a 30% to -W% price reduction versus other 3 MW plants. (Figure 8.) ?ti';,= 'J! EJ'Jdfidt'j ;J:; ,J rU/Jf;ij'J/J fJ! }}'=,Jt'Ji/J:( '-;'J!JY~f:ti'Jf):JJ 3'Jjj"=1{ Ejfj'.,,?;:tlJ~J:::: 1';% $/MWh Gas$3....00/MMBtu Return on Assets 15% ? -~.. , . MMBtu/hr Figure 8. Price of Electricity as a FWlction of Heat Sink Recent competitive pressures have driven the cost per kilowatt of large combined cycle plants down to 121 ESL-IE-97-04-20 Proceedings...

  16. Evaluation on Energy Performance of Heating Plant System Installed Energy Saving Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Y.; Akashi, Y.; Kuwahara, Y.; Baba, Y.; Iribe, M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Production Area [GJ (MBtu)] Electric Consumption [MWh (MBtu)] Refrigerating Machines Pumps, Fans 2002 COP[-] Turbo Screw Iced-thermalSystem WholeSystem Figure3. Relation Between Cooling Water Temperature and the COP of Refrigerating machine and System 0 2 4... Production Area (North) Production Area (South) Water Treatment Plant 21Cells Unit (14.1MW) Turbo Refrigerating Machines (1.4MW, 2units/ 4.2MW,6units) Screw Refrigerating Machines (0.8MW, 2units) Iced-thermal Storage Tank (28.5GJ, 2units) HEX for Additional...

  17. Evaluating Utility System Operations Using APLUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pethe, S.; Singh, R.

    cost analysis in APLUS was used to identify the high cost areas in operating the steam system. This analysis highlighted that the cost of power from the 200 psig steam driven back pressure turbine was a prohibitive $270/MWh. The 600 psig boiler... and extraction turbine were found to be large enough to meet all the steam and power requirements of the plant. This required that a new 600 HP motor be bought to drive the paper machine currently driven by the back pressure turbine. Shifting the load...

  18. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPellets

  19. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar GroupInformation SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrPelletsInformation

  20. Total Eolica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEI Community Cost Per MwH

  1. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  2. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdani, Ramin, E-mail: ryazdani@sbcglobal.net [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Augenstein, Don, E-mail: iemdon@aol.com [Institute for Environmental Management, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94306 (United States); Kayhanian, Masoud, E-mail: mdkayhanian@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tchobanoglous, George, E-mail: gtchobanoglous@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

  3. TIDD PFBC Demonstration Project. Second quarterly report, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major activities during this period include: (1) The unit operated for 1529 hours on coal, bringing the grand total for coal fire through the end of the quarter to 7847 hours. (2) During the quarter, the Tidd Plant set a new record for its longest continuous run on coal; 1079 hours, surpassing its previous record of 740 hours set in June-July of 1992. (3) The unit availability for the first half of 1994 was 54.7%. (4) There were four gas turbine starts, eight bed preheater starts, and six operating periods on coal. (5) During this quarter, total gross generation was 71,115 MWH, the peak unit output for one hour was 59 MWH, and the coal consumption was 35,696 tons. (6) Fifteen performance tests have been conducted since the start of the fourth year of operation. Eleven of the tests were conducted during the record run during May and June. (7) Agreements were finalized with the DOE, Ohio Coal Development Office, and technology vendors for funding of the fourth year of operation of the plant.

  4. TIDD PFBC Demonstration Project: Third quarterly technical progress report 1992, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the 22nd Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant. This report covers the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. The unit was operated for a total of 903 hours (including gas turbine air prewarming). There were 9 gas turbine starts, 11 preheating starts, and 8 operating periods with coal fire. The peak gross output of 59 MWH was achieved for the period of 1600 to 1700 hours on September 23, 1992. The longest coal fire was 422 hourb beginning at 1349 hours on August 9, 1992. Total gross generation was 32,418 MWH, and coal consumption was 15,846 tons. Testing was completed on the gas turbine blade resonance frequency problem. The report showed that a resonant frequency problem existing at high LPT speeds and at a mostly closed guide vane position. An operating curve was developed by ABBC to avoid the points of blade resonance. Monitoring of solid, liquid and gaseous waste streams, as detailed in the operations phase monitoring requirements in the EMP, were performed throughout the quarter.

  5. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 4. System planning studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potomac Electric Power Company and Acres American Incorporated have been performing a three year DOE/EPRI/PEPCO sponsored program for preliminary design of water compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) and Underground Pumped Hydroelectric (UPH) power plants. This report presents both the costs of the CAES and UPH plant designs which were developed, and the results of economic evaluations performed for the PEPCO system. The PEPCO system planning analysis was performed in parallel stages with plant design development. Analyses performed early in the project indicated a requirement for 1000 MW/10,000 MWH of energy storage on a daily operating schedule, with economic installation in two segments of 500 MW in 1990 and 1997. The analysis was updated eighteen months later near the end of the project to reflect the impact of new growth projections and revised plant costs. The revised results indicated economic installations for either UPH or CAES of approximately 675 MW/6750 MWH on a daily cycle, installed in blocks of approximately 225 MW in 1990, 1993 and 1995. Significant savings in revenue requirements and oil fuel over the combustion turbine alternative were identified for both CAES and UPH.

  6. NOx Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning(R) Measures for the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.

    Total NOx Reductions (lbs/day) Total NOx Reductions (Tons/day) TOT EQ ELECTRICITY (MWh) (Electricity and Chilled water) 4,761 7,278.7 3.6393 24.2 36.7 0.0184 HOT WATER (MCF) 8,358 1,170.2 0.5851 41.0 5.7 0.0029 Total 8,448.9 4.2244 42.5 0....0212 NOTES: 1) Assuming 7% for T&D losses and a Discount factor of 25%. Corresponding factors to integrated savings presented to the TCEQ. 2) A factor of 0.140 lb of NOx/MCF of Natural Gas (Controlled - Low NOx burners 140 A...

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  8. A Locational Analysis of Generation Benefits on Long Island, NewYork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Juan; Cohen, Jesse; Edwards, Jennifer; Marnay, Chris

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in April of 2004, nine sites owned by Verizon began to participate in the Long Island Real Time Purchasing Pilot Project (LIRTP) as retail choice customers. LIRTP was designed to minimize electricity costs for retail customers who own on-site distributed generation (DG) units in the near-term, and to stabilize overall electricity costs in the long-term. The nine Verizon buildings have two types of DG units: gas turbines with an estimated generation cost of $156/MWh, and diesel units with an estimated cost of $120/MWh. Due to total site emission limits, the operable hours of the DG units are limited. To estimate the economic value of running on-site DG units, an analysis of the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) Locational Based Marginal Price (LBMP) data for Long Island was conducted, mainly covering the summer months from 2000 to 2004. Distributions of LBMP, relationship between LBMP and load, and estimates of profitable operating hours for the units were all analyzed. Since Long Island is a diverse and highly congested area, LBMP varies greatly. Looking at the data statistically offers a zone-wide viewpoint, while using spatial analysis shows the LBMP intrazonal differentiation. LBMP is currently used by NYISO for pricing in the 11 NY control zones. Because geographic information systems (GIS) visualize the distribution of a phenomenon over space, it clarifies where load and generation nodes are located, and where load reduction would be most valuable. This study is based on the assumption that the control zone areas do not fully represent the diversity of pricing, and that intrazonal pricing can be analyzed to determine where and when electricity conservation or injection into the network is most valuable.

  9. Demontration of Integrated Optimization Software at the Baldwin Energy Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rob James; John McDermott; Sanjay Patnaik; Steve Piche`

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project encompassed the design, development, and demonstration of integrated online optimization systems at Dynegy Midwest Generation's Baldwin Energy Complex (BEC) located in Baldwin, Illinois. The overall project objective was to improve coal-based generation's emission profile, efficiency, maintenance requirements and plant asset life in order to enhance the long-term viability of the United States abundant coal resources. Five separate but integrated optimization products were developed, addressing combustion, sootblowing, SCR operations, overall unit thermal performance, and plant-wide availability optimization. Optimization results are inherently unit-specific and cannot be known for a particular generating unit in advance. However, NeuCo believed that the following were reasonable targets for the completed, integrated set of products: Furnace NOx reduction improvement by 5%, Heat rate improvement by 1.5%, Increase of annual Available MWh by 1.5%, Commensurate reductions in greenhouse gases, mercury, and particulates; and Commensurate increases in profitability from lower costs, improved reliability, and greater commercial availability. The goal during Phase I was to establish each system and demonstrate their integration in unified plant optimization. Efforts during Phase I focused on: (1) developing, deploying, integrating, and testing prototypes for each of the five products; (2) identifying and addressing issues required for the products to integrate with plant operations; and (3) systematically collecting and assimilating feedback to improve subsequent product releases. As described in the Phase II continuation application NeuCo successfully achieved the goal for Phase I. The goal of Phase II was to improve upon the products installed and tested in Phase I and to quantify the benefits of the integrated system. As this report documents, NeuCo has also successfully achieved the goal for Phase II. The overall results of the project, compared with the project goals, are: (1) NOx Reduction: The 5% target for NOx reduction was exceeded with average CEMS and SCR Inlet (furnace) NOx reduction of between 12% and 14%. (2) Heat Rate Improvement: The optimization systems delivered an average heat rate improvement of between 0.67% and 0.7%. This falls short of the 1.5% heat rate improvement target largely because Cyclone Stability (availability) and CEMS and SCR Inlet NOx were prioritized over heat rate in the event they needed to be traded-off with one another. A different prioritization of objectives could have driven a different balance, thereby meeting the target of 1.5% improvement. There were also several factors that could have been masking greater heat rate improvements such as the decrease in fuel density over the course of the project and the impact of actions taken as a result of advice provided by the optimizers that are difficult to quantify. (3) Increased Annual Available MWh: Although difficult to measure precisely, the target of increasing available MWh's by 1.5% was met by providing prioritized alerts and knowledge-based diagnostics for a wide array of plant equipment and process anomalies; helping the plant to move from high sulfur, high Btu Illinois coal to PRB and run that fuel at low stoichiometries without derates; and improved management of cyclone flame quality as well as improved vigilance with respect to cyclone conditions which avoided some degree of temporary de-rate due to cyclone slag build up. (4) Commensurate Reductions in Greenhouse Gases, Mercury, and Particulates: Reductions in all three of these indices can be associated directly with the optimization leverage observed in the heat rate and NOx reductions. (5) Commensurate Increases in Profitability from Lower Costs, Improved Reliability, and Greater Commercial Availability: Commensurate improvements in costs, reliability and availability resulted from the previously described benefits. Also playing a role were the sustained operation of the cyclones while using more available, less expensive but off-design fuel; more effective catal

  10. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

  11. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

  12. David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

  13. Testing and modeling of a solar thermophotovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, K.W. [McDonnell Douglas, 5301 Bolsa Ave, Huntington Bch., California 92647 (United States); Chubb, D.L.; Wilt, D.M. [NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) power system has attractive attributes for both space and terrestrial applications. This paper presents the results of testing by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) over the last year with components furnished by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). The testing has included a large scale solar TPV testbed system and small scale laboratory STPV simulator using a small furnace. The testing apparatus, instrumentation, and operation are discussed, including a description of the emitters and photovoltaic devices that have been tested. Over 50 on-sun tests have been conducted with the testbed system. It has accumulated over 300 hours of on-sun time, and 1.5 MWh of thermal energy incident on the receiver material while temperatures and I-V measurements were taken. A summary of the resulting test data is presented that shows the measured performance at temperatures up to 1220{degree}C. The receiver materials and PV cells have endured the high temperature operation with no major problems. The results of this investigation support MDA belief that STPV is a viable power system for both space and terrestrial power applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  15. A Green Prison: The Santa Rita Jail Campus Microgrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A large microgrid project is nearing completion at Alameda County’s twenty-two-year-old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources (DER) including an eight-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a five-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and considerable efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion adds a 2 MW-4 MWh Li-ion battery, a static disconnect switch, and various controls upgrades. During grid blackouts, or when conditions favor it, the Jail can now disconnect from the grid and operate as an island, using the on-site resources described together with its back-up diesel generators. In other words, the Santa Rita Jail is a true microgrid, or ?grid, because it fills both requirements, i.e. it is a locally controlled system, and it can operate both grid connected and islanded. The battery’s electronics includes Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology (CERTS) Microgrid technology. This enables the battery to maintain energy balance using droops without need for a fast control system.

  16. Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Parks; Bernhard R. Tittmann

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminumnitride-based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 × 1018 neutron/cm2 and 5.8 × 1018 neutron/cm2, respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers.

  17. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

  18. Technology Pathway Partnership Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John C. Dr.; Godby, Larry A.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the scientific progress and results made in the development of high efficiency multijunction solar cells and the light concentrating non-imaging optics for the commercial generation of renewable solar energy. During the contract period the efficiency of the multijunction solar cell was raised from 36.5% to 40% in commercially available fully qualified cells. In addition significant strides were made in automating production process for these cells in order to meet the costs required to compete with commercial electricity. Concurrent with the cells effort Boeing also developed a non imaging optical systems to raise the light intensity at the photovoltaic cell to the rage of 800 to 900 suns. Solar module efficiencies greater than 30% were consistently demonstrated. The technology and its manufacturing were maturated to a projected price of < $0.015 per kWh and demonstrated by automated assembly in a robotic factory with a throughput of 2 MWh/yr. The technology was demonstrated in a 100 kW power plant erected at California State University Northridge, CA.

  19. Impact Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the U.S. Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The US electricity grid is a national infrastructure that has the potential to deliver significant amounts of the daily driving energy of the US light duty vehicle (cars, pickups, SUVs, and vans) fleet. This paper discusses a 2030 scenario with 37 million plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on the road in the US demanding electricity for an average daily driving distance of about 33 miles (53 km). The paper addresses the potential grid impacts of the PHEVs fleet relative to their effects on the production cost of electricity, and the emissions from the electricity sector. The results of this analysis indicate significant regional difference on the cost impacts and the CO2 emissions. Battery charging during the day may have twice the cost impacts than charging during the night. The CO2 emissions impacts are very region-dependent. In predominantly coal regions (Midwest), the new PHEV load may reduce the CO2 emission intensity (ton/MWh), while in others regions with significant clean generation (hydro and renewable energy) the CO2 emission intensity may increase. Discussed will the potential impact of the results with the valuation of carbon emissions.

  20. Design, performance, and cost characteristics of high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.M.; Meier, W.R. (W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)); Fagaly, R.L.; Heiberger, M.; Stephens, R.B.; Leuer, J.A.; Guzman, R.A. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) using oxide superconductors with higher critical temperature than metallic superconductors has been analyzed for design features, refrigeration requirements, and estimated costs of major components. The study covered the energy storage range from 2 to 200 MWh at power levels from 4 to 400 MW. A SMES that uses high temperature superconductors (HTS) and operates at high magnetic field (e.g., 10 tesla), can be more compact than a comparable, conventional low-temperature device at lower field. The refrigeration power required for a higher temperature unit (20 to 77 Kelvin) will be less by 60 to 90 percent. The improvement in energy efficiency is significant for small units, but less important for large ones. The material cost for HTS units is dominated by the cost of superconductor, so that the total cost of an HTS system will be comparable to a low temperature system only if the superconductor price in $/Ampere-meter is made comparable by increasing current density or decreasing wire cost.

  1. Computer-specific metrics for the regulation and load following ancillary services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In competitive electricity markets, the costs for each ancillary service should be charged to those who cause the costs to be incurred with charges based on the factors that contribute to these costs. For example, the amount of generating capacity assigned to the regulation service is a function of the short-term volatility of system load. Therefore, the charges for regulation should be related to the volatility of each load, not to its average demand. This report discusses the economic efficiency and equity benefits of assessing charges on the basis of customer-specific costs (rather than the traditional billing determinants, MWh or MW), focusing on two key real-power ancillary services, regulation and load following. The authors determine the extent to which individual customers and groups of customers contribute to the system's generation requirements for these two services. In particular, they analyze load data to determine whether some customers account for shares of these two services that differ substantially from their shares of total electricity consumption.

  2. Performance assessment of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Dakota; Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Schoenwald, David A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the technical performance of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project, and to identify lessons learned that can be used to improve similar projects in the future. The PNM Prosperity electricity storage project consists of a 500 kW/350 kWh advanced lead-acid battery with integrated supercapacitor (for energy smoothing) and a 250 kW/1 MWh advanced lead-acid battery (for energy shifting), and is co-located with a 500 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) resource. The project received American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding. The smoothing system is e ective in smoothing intermittent PV output. The shifting system exhibits good round-trip efficiencies, though the AC-to-AC annual average efficiency is lower than one might hope. Given the current utilization of the smoothing system, there is an opportunity to incorporate additional control algorithms in order to increase the value of the energy storage system.

  3. Chapter 2: Sustainable and Unsustainable Developments in the U.S. Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Levine, Mark D.; Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the United States developed a wealthy society on the basis of cheap and abundant fossil fuel energy. As fossil fuels have become ecologically and economically expensive in the twenty-first century, America has shown mixed progress in transitioning to a more sustainable energy system. From 2000 to 2006, energy and carbon intensity of GDP continued favorable long-term trends of decline. Energy end-use efficiency also continued to improve; for example, per-capita electricity use was 12.76 MWh per person per year in 2000 and again in 2006, despite 16 percent GDP growth over that period. Environmental costs of U.S. energy production and consumption have also been reduced, as illustrated in air quality improvements. However, increased fossil fuel consumption, stagnant efficiency standards, and expanding corn-based ethanol production have moved the energy system in the opposite direction, toward a less sustainable energy system. This chapter reviews energy system developments between 2000 and 2006 and presents policy recommendations to move the United States toward a more sustainable energy system.

  4. Water: May be the Best Near-Term Benefit and Driver of a Robust Wind Energy Future (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, L.; Reategui, S.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water may be the most critical natural resource variable that affects the selection of generation options in the next decade. Extended drought in the western United States and more recently in the Southeast has moved water management and policy to the forefront of the energy options discussions. Recent climate change studies indicate that rising ambient temperatures could increase evapotranspiration by more than 25% to 30% in large regions of the country. Increasing demand for electricity, and especially from homegrown sources, inevitably will increase our thermal fleet, which consumes 400 to 700 gal/MWh for cooling. Recovering the vast oil shale resources in the West (one of the energy options discussed) is water intensive and threatens scarce water supplies. Irrigation for the growing corn ethanol industry requires 1,000 to 2,000 gallons of water for 1 gallon of production. Municipalities continue to grow and drive water demands and emerging constrained market prices upward. As illustrated by the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, wind offers an important mitigation opportunity: a 4-trillion-gallon water savings. This poster highlights the emerging constrained water situation in the United States and presents the case for wind energy as one of the very few means to ameliorate the emerging water wars in various U.S. regions.

  5. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA, Appendix 2: LaCapra Financial Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial analysis and summary results presented in this document represent a first cut at an economic assessment of the proposed Hull Offshore Wind Project. Wind turbine price increases have outpaced the materials and labor price pressures faced by nonrenewable power plant developers due to increased demands on a limited pool of turbine manufacturers and offshore installation companies. Moreover, given the size of the proposed offshore facility, it may be difficult to contract with turbine manufacturers and/or foundation companies given the size and scope of competing worldwide demand. The results described in this report assume that such conditions will not significantly impact the prices that will have to be received from the output of the project; rather, the project size may require as a prerequisite that Hull be able to piggyback on other offshore efforts. The financial estimates provided here necessarily feature a range due to uncertainty in a number of project assumptions as well as overall uncertainty in offshore wind costs. Nevertheless, taken together, the analysis provides a ballpark revenue requirement of approximately $157/MWh for the municipal financing option, with higher estimates possible assuming escalation in costs to levels higher than assumed here.

  6. Design Concepts for Co-Production of Power, Fuels & Chemicals Via Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A. D.; Chen, Q.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the program is to develop design concepts, incorporating advanced technologies in areas such as oxygen production, feed systems, gas cleanup, component separations and gas turbines, for integrated and economically viable coal and biomass fed gasification facilities equipped with carbon capture and storage for the following scenarios: (i) coproduction of power along with hydrogen, (ii) coproduction of power along with fuels, (iii) coproduction of power along with petrochemicals, and (iv) coproduction of power along with agricultural chemicals. To achieve this goal, specifically the following objectives are met in this proposed project: (i) identify advanced technology options and innovative preliminary design concepts that synergistically integrate plant subsections, (ii) develop steady state system simulations to predict plant efficiency and environmental signature, (iii) develop plant cost estimates by capacity factoring major subsystems or by major equipment items where required, and then capital, operating and maintenance cost estimates, and (iv) perform techno- economic analyses for the above described coproduction facilities. Thermal efficiencies for the electricity only cases with 90% carbon capture are 38.26% and 36.76% (HHV basis) with the bituminous and the lignite feedstocks respectively. For the coproduction cases (where 50% of the energy exported is in the form of electricity), the electrical efficiency, as expected, is highest for the hydrogen coproduction cases while lowest for the higher alcohols (ethanol) coproduction cases. The electrical efficiencies for Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases are slightly higher than those for the methanol coproduction cases but it should be noted that the methanol (as well as the higher alcohol) coproduction cases produce the finished coproduct while the Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases produce a coproduct that requires further processing in a refinery. The cross comparison of the thermal performance between the various coproduct cases is further complicated by the fact that the carbon footprint is not the same when carbon leaving with the coproduct are accounted for. The economic analysis and demand for a particular coproduct in the market place is a more meaningful comparison of the various coproduction scenarios. The first year cost of electricity calculated for the bituminous coal is $102.9/MWh while that for the lignite is $108.1/MWh. The calculated cost of hydrogen ranged from $1.42/kg to $2.77/kg depending on the feedstock, which is lower than the DOE announced hydrogen cost goal of $3.00/kg in July 14, 2005. Methanol cost ranged from $345/MT to $617/MT, while the market price is around $450/MT. For Fischer-Tropsch liquids, the calculated cost ranged from $65/bbl to $112/bbl, which is comparable to the current market price of crude oil at around $100/bbl. It should be noted, however, that F-T liquids contain no sulfur and nitrogen compounds. The calculated cost of alcohol ranged from $4.37/gal to $5.43/gal, while it ranged from $2.20/gal to $3.70/gal in a DOE funded study conducted by Louisiana State University. The Louisiana State University study consisted of a significantly larger plant than our study and benefited from economies of scale. When the plant size in our study is scaled up to similar size as in the Louisiana State University study, cost of alcohol is then reduced to a range of $3.24/gal to $4.28/gal, which is comparable. Urea cost ranged from $307/MT to $428/MT, while the market price is around $480/MT.

  7. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the long-run economic value of variable renewable generation with increasing penetration using a unique investment and dispatch model that captures long-run investment decisions while also incorporating detailed operational constraints and hourly time resolution over a full year. High time resolution and the incorporation of operational constraints are important for estimating the economic value of variable generation, as is the use of a modeling framework that accommodates new investment decisions. The model is herein applied with a case study that is loosely based on California in 2030. Increasing amounts of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) with and without thermal energy storage (TES) are added one at a time. The marginal economic value of these renewable energy sources is estimated and then decomposed into capacity value, energy value, day-ahead forecast error cost, and ancillary services. The marginal economic value, as defined here, is primarily based on the combination of avoided capital investment cost and avoided variable fuel and operations and maintenance costs from other power plants in the power system. Though the model only captures a subset of the benefits and costs of renewable energy, it nonetheless provides unique insights into how the value of that subset changes with technology and penetration level. Specifically, in this case study implementation of the model, the marginal economic value of all three solar options is found to exceed the value of a flat-block of power (as well as wind energy) by \\$20--30/MWh at low penetration levels, largely due to the high capacity value of solar at low penetration. Because the value of CSP per unit of energy is found to be high with or without thermal energy storage at low penetration, we find little apparent incremental value to thermal storage at low solar penetration in the present case study analysis. The marginal economic value of PV and CSP without thermal storage is found to drop considerably (by more than \\$70/MWh) as the penetration of solar increases toward 30\\percent on an energy basis. This is due primarily to a steep drop in capacity value followed by a decrease in energy value. In contrast, the value of CSP with thermal storage drops much less dramatically as penetration increases. As a result, at solar penetration levels above 10\\percent, CSP with thermal storage is found to be considerably more valuable relative to PV and CSP without thermal storage. The marginal economic value of wind is found to be largely driven by energy value, and is lower than solar at low penetration. The marginal economic value of wind drops at a relatively slower rate with penetration, however. As a result, at high penetration, the value of wind can exceed the value of PV and CSP without thermal storage. Though some of these findings may be somewhat unique to the specific case study presented here, the results: (1) highlight the importance of an analysis framework that addresses long-term investment decisions as well as short-term dispatch and operational constraints, (2) can help inform long-term decisions about renewable energy procurement and supporting infrastructure, and (3) point to areas where further research is warranted.

  8. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  9. Optimal Synthesis of a Pulverized Coal Power Plant with Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash R. Kotecha; Juan M. Salazar; Stephen Zitney

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal constitutes an important source of fuel for the production of power in the United States. For instance, in January 2009, pulverized coal (PC) power plants alone contributed to over 45 percent of the Nation's total electric power production. However, PC power plants also contribute to increased emissions of greenhouse gases principally carbon-dioxide (CO2). Recently, various carbon capture strategies have been under active investigation so as to make these plants compete with the more environmental friendly renewable energy sources. One such technology that has received considerable success is the capture of CO2 by an amine-based solvent extraction process. However, an aqueous absorption/stripping technology when used in a PC power plant can reduce the net power output of the plant by as much as 20-40%. The energy penalty comes from heating up the solvent in the regenerator, balancing the enthalpy of reaction, and water stripping. This energy penalty poses considerable limitations on commercial viability of the solvent extraction process and, as a result, various energy-saving modifications have been proposed in the literature ranging from the use of hybrid solvents to novel stripper configurations. In this paper, we show that the energy penalty can be further reduced by heat integration of various PC plant components with the carbon capture system. In addition to the release of greenhouse gases to the environment, PC plants also consume a large amount of freshwater. It is estimated that subcritical and supercritical PC plants have water losses of 714 gal/MWh and 639 gal/MWh, respectively. Water loss is based on an overall balance of the plant source and exit streams. This includes coal moisture, air humidity, process makeup, cooling tower makeup (equivalent to evaporation plus blowdown), process losses (including losses through reactions, solids entrainment, and process makeup/blowdown) and flue gas losses. The primary source of water used in PC power plants is the closed-loop steam-based (Rankine) power cycles. These plants need to condense large quantities of low-pressure steam back to water so that it can be reused to produce high pressure steam. However, this requires the removal of large quantities of heat from the low pressure steam in the condensation process. This is usually done by transferring the heat to cooling water, which in turn transfers this heat to the environment by evaporation to the atmosphere. Also, the inclusion of a carbon capture process can increase the raw water usage by as much as 95 percent. In this work, we use heat exchanger network synthesis followed by an optimization approach to process synthesis for developing strategies for reducing water use in a supercritical PC power plant with a carbon capture and compression system. Uncertainties associated with dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and demand will also be considered in this analysis.

  10. Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosfjord, T; Tredway, W; Chen, A; Mulugeta, J; Bhatia, T

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 2000, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) was one of five recipients of a US Department of Energy contract under the Advanced Microturbine System (AMS) program managed by the Office of Distributed Energy (DE). The AMS program resulted from several government-industry workshops that recognized that microturbine systems could play an important role in improving customer choice and value for electrical power. That is, the group believed that electrical power could be delivered to customers more efficiently and reliably than the grid if an effective distributed energy strategy was followed. Further, the production of this distributed power would be accomplished with less undesirable pollutants of nitric oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), and carbon monoxide (CO). In 2000, the electrical grid delivered energy to US customers at a national average of approximately 32% efficiency. This value reflects a wide range of powerplants, but is dominated by older, coal burning stations that provide approximately 50% of US electrical power. The grid efficiency is also affected by transmission and distribution (T&D) line losses that can be significant during peak power usage. In some locations this loss is estimated to be 15%. Load pockets can also be so constrained that sufficient power cannot be transmitted without requiring the installation of new wires. New T&D can be very expensive and challenging as it is often required in populated regions that do not want above ground wires. While historically grid reliability has satisfied most customers, increasing electronic transactions and the computer-controlled processes of the 'digital economy' demand higher reliability. For them, power outages can be very costly because of transaction, work-in-progress, or perishable commodity losses. Powerplants that produce the grid electrical power emit significant levels of undesirable NOx, UHC, and CO pollutants. The level of emission is quoted as either a technology metric or a system-output metric. A common form for the technology metric is in the units of PPM {at} 15% O2. In this case the metric reflects the molar fraction of the pollutant in the powerplant exhaust when corrected to a standard exhaust condition as containing 15% (molar) oxygen, assuring that the PPM concentrations are not altered by subsequent air addition or dilution. Since fuel combustion consumes oxygen, the output oxygen reference is equivalent to a fuel input reference. Hence, this technology metric reflects the moles of pollutant per mole of fuel input, but not the useful output of the powerplant-i.e. the power. The system-output metric does embrace the useful output and is often termed an output-based metric. A common form for the output-based metric is in the units of lb/MWh. This is a system metric relating the pounds of pollutant to output energy (e.g., MWh) of the powerplant.

  11. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

  13. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  14. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  15. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  16. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  17. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, Christopher R. [President & CEO] [President & CEO; McEntee, Jarlath [VP Engineering & CTO] [VP Engineering & CTO

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric Company on January 1, 2013 for up to 5 megawatts at a price of $215/MWh, escalating at 2.0% per year.

  18. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  19. Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

  20. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013: ? 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered. ? 797 new participants installed a HAN. ? Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components. ? Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program. ? On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly. ? An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  1. Ancillary service details: Voltage control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage control is accomplished by managing reactive power on an alternating-current power system. Reactive power can be produced and absorbed by both generation and transmission equipment. Reactive-power devices differ substantially in the magnitude and speed of response and in their capital costs. System operators, transmission owners, generators, customers, power marketers, and government regulators need to pay close attention to voltage control as they restructure the U.S. electricity industry. Voltage control can affect reliability and commerce in three ways: (1) Voltages must be maintained within an acceptable range for both customer and power-system equipment to function properly. (2) The movement of reactive power consumes transmission resources, which limits the ability to move real power and worsens congestion. (3) The movement of reactive power results in real-power losses. When generators are required to supply excessive amounts of reactive power, their real-power production must be curtailed. These opportunity costs are not currently compensated for in most regions. Current tariffs are based on embedded costs. These embedded-cost tariffs average about $0.51/MWh, equivalent to $1.5 billion annually for the United States as a whole. Although this cost is low when compared with the cost of energy, it still aggregates to a significant amount of money. This report takes a basic look at why the power system requires reactive power (an appendix explains the fundamentals of real and reactive power). The report then examines the various types of generation and transmission resources used to supply reactive power and to control voltage. Finally it discusses how these resources are deployed and paid for in several reliability regions around the country. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, the generation, transmission, and system-control equipment and functions that maintain voltages within the appropriate ranges are being deintegrated.

  2. Historical deposition and fluxes of mercury in Narraguinnep Reservoir, southwestern Colorado,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, John E.; Fey, David L.; Holmes, Charles W.; Lasorsa, Brenda K.

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Narraguinnep Reservoir has been identified as containing fish with elevated Hg concentrations and has been posted with an advisory recommending against consumption of fish. There are presently no point sources of significant Hg contamination to this reservoir or its supply waters. To evaluate potential historical Hg sources and deposition of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir, the authors measured Hg concentrations in sediment cores collected from this reservoir. The cores were dated by the 137Cs method and these dates were further refined by relating water supply basin hydrological records with core sedimentology. Rates of historical Hg flux were calculated (ng/cm(2)/a) based on the Hg concentrations in the cores, sediment bulk densities, and sedimentation rates. The flux of Hg found in Narraguinnep Reservoir increased by approximately a factor of 2 after about 1970. The 3 most likely sources of Hg to Narraguinnep Reservoir are surrounding bedrocks, upstream inactive Au/Ag mines, and several coal-fired electric power plants in the Four Corners region. Patterns of Hg flux do not support dominant Hg derivation from surrounding bedrocks or upstream mining sources. There are 14 coal-fired power plants within 320 km of Narraguinnep Reservoir that produce over 80 x 10(6) MWH of power and about 1640 kg-Hg/a are released through stack emissions, contributing significant Hg to the surrounding environment. Two of the largest power plants, located within 80 km of the reservoir, emit about 950 kg-Hg/a. Spatial and temporal patterns of Hg fluxes for sediment cores collected from Narraguinnep Reservoir suggest that the most likely source of Hg to this reservoir is from atmospheric emissions from the coal-fired electric power plants, the largest of which began operation in this region in the late-1960s and early 1970s.

  3. Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

  5. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  6. Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yongqi; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Ruhter, David; Khodayari, Arezoo; Rood, Mark

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was aimed at obtaining process engineering and scale-up data at a laboratory scale to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a patented post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture process?the Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP). Unique features of the IVCAP include its ability to be fully-integrated with the power plant?s steam cycle and potential for combined sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal and CO{sub 2} capture. Theoretical and experimental studies of this project were aimed at answering three major technical questions: 1) What additives can effectively reduce the water vapor saturation pressure and energy requirement for water vaporization in the vacuum stripper of the IVCAP? 2) What catalysts can promote CO{sub 2} absorption into the potassium carbonate (PC) solution to achieve an overall absorption rate comparable to monoethanolamine (MEA) and are the catalysts stable at the IVCAP conditions and in the flue gas environment? 3) Are any process modifications needed to combine SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} removal in the IVCAP? Lab-scale experiments and thermodynamic and process simulation studies performed to obtain detailed information pertinent to the above three technical questions produced the following results: 1) Two additives were identified that lower the saturation pressure of water vapor over the PC solution by about 20%. 2) The carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme was identified as the most effective catalyst for promoting CO{sub 2} absorption. The absorption rate into the CO{sub 2}-lean PC solution promoted with 300 mg/L CA was several times slower than the corresponding 5 M MEA solution, but absorption into the CO{sub 2}-rich PC solution was comparable to the CO{sub 2}-rich MEA solution. The tested CA enzymes demonstrated excellent resistance to major flue gas impurities. A technical-grade CA enzyme was stable at 40{degrees}C (104{degrees}F) over a six-month test period, while its half-life was about two months at 50{degrees}C (122{degrees}F). Enzyme immobilization improved the CA enzyme?s thermal stability by up to three times compared to its free counterpart. 3) Two process modifications were proposed to improve the technical performance of the IVCAP for combined SO{sub 2} removal and CO{sub 2} capture. The results from a techno-economic study of a 528 MWe (gross) pulverized coal-fired, subcritical steam power plant revealed that the cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance with the IVCAP was about 30% lower than conventional MEA-based processes. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of the IVCAP ranged from $40 to 46/MWh, an increase of 60 to 70% compared to a reference power plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The overall conclusion of this study is that the IVCAP is a technically feasible and economically more attractive process than available MEA-based processes. A scale-up study using the slipstream of an actual coal-derived flue gas and development of a more stable CA enzyme are recommended for future studies.

  8. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  9. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  10. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, Abbas Ali; Yamane, Mike (Kauai Island Utility Cooperative, Lihu'e, HI); Murray, Aaron T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories performed an assessment of the benefits of energy storage for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative. This report documents the methodology and results of this study from a generation and production-side benefits perspective only. The KIUC energy storage study focused on the economic impact of using energy storage to shave the system peak, which reduces generator run time and consequently reduces fuel and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. It was determined that a 16-MWh energy storage system would suit KIUC's needs, taking into account the size of the 13 individual generation units in the KIUC system and a system peak of 78 MW. The analysis shows that an energy storage system substantially reduces the run time of Units D1, D2, D3, and D5 - the four smallest and oldest diesel generators at the Port Allen generating plant. The availability of stored energy also evens the diurnal variability of the remaining generation units during the off- and on-peak periods. However, the net economic benefit is insufficient to justify a load-leveling type of energy storage system at this time. While the presence of storage helps reduce the run time of the smaller and older units, the economic dispatch changes and the largest most efficient unit in the KIUC system, the 27.5-MW steam-injected combustion turbine at Kapaia, is run for extra hours to provide the recharge energy for the storage system. The economic benefits of the storage is significantly reduced because the charging energy for the storage is derived from the same fuel source as the peak generation source it displaces. This situation would be substantially different if there were a renewable energy source available to charge the storage. Especially, if there is a wind generation resource introduced in the KIUC system, there may be a potential of capturing the load-leveling benefits as well as using the storage to dampen the dynamic instability that the wind generation could introduce into the KIUC grid. General Electric is presently conducting such a study and results of this study will be available in the near future. Another study conducted by Electric Power Systems, Inc. (EPS) in May 2006 took a broader approach to determine the causes of KIUC system outages. This study concluded that energy storage with batteries will provide stability benefits and possibly eliminate the load shedding while also providing positive voltage control. Due to the lack of fuel diversity in the KIUC generation mix, SNL recommends that KIUC continue its efforts to quantify the dynamic benefits of storage. The value of the dynamic benefits, especially as an enabler of renewable generation such as wind energy, may be far greater than the production cost benefits alone. A combination of these benefits may provide KIUC sufficient positive economic and operational benefits to implement an energy storage project that will contribute to the overall enhancement of the KIUC system.

  11. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0