Sample records for mega kilo hecto

  1. Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,KasVinod Private investorKilo Geothermal

  2. R/V KILO MOANA SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL TITLE PREPARED BY: REVISION NO. PROCEDURE NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    R/V KILO MOANA SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL TITLE PREPARED BY: REVISION NO. PROCEDURE NO. SHIP and safe shipboard management practices towards ensuring new crewmembers, embarked science personnel of the indoctonation and orientation process. #12;R/V KILO MOANA SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL TITLE PREPARED BY: REVISION

  3. MEGA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002444SUPER00 Modular Environment for Graph Research and Analysis with a Persistent http://software.sandia.gov/trac/megraphs

  4. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library;Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will find in this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File

  5. Charcoal kilos and environmental history in the eastern Pyrenees (France). A methodological approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    #12;Charcoal kilos and environmental history in the eastern Pyrenees (France). A methodological years, an interdiscip1inary research prograrn on long-term forest history and the impact of metallurgy as a tool for reconstructing environmental history and ancient woodlands. Two different methods

  6. MegaPipe: the MegaCam image stacking pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen. D. J. Gwyn

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the MegaPipe image processing pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre. The pipeline combines multiple images from the MegaCam mosaic camera on CFHT and combines them into a single output image. MegaPipe takes as input detrended MegaCam images and does a careful astrometric and photometric calibration on them. The calibrated images are then resampled and combined into image stacks. The astrometric calibration of the output images is accurate to within 0.15 arcseconds relative to external reference frames and 0.04 arcseconds internally. The photometric calibration is good to within 0.03 magnitudes. The stacked images and catalogues derived from these images are available through the CADC website:

  7. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library://www.cmla.ens-cachan.fr/Cmla/Megawave #12; Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will #12;nd) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File (external) types or #12;le formats

  8. Introducing MegaHAL Jason L. Hutchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of convers- ing with a user in natural language. Alan Turing devised a simple test in order to de- cide- ings of MegaHAL, the primary author's entry to the 1998 Loebner contest. 1 Introduction Alan Turing pose hypothetical situations in order to ask the subjects how they would react. Alan Turing died

  9. MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy ResourcesMegaWatt Solar

  10. Mechanism and Site Requirements for Ethanol Oxidation on Vanadium Oxide Domains Beata Kilos, Alexis T. Bell,* and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Mechanism and Site Requirements for Ethanol Oxidation on Vanadium Oxide Domains Beata Kilos, Alexis for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde were examined on VOx domains supported on -Al2O3 at surface densities dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethanol to acetaldehyde occurs at low temperatures (473-523 K) with high primary

  11. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  12. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two MegaWave2 System Library by Jacques FromentWave2 System Library Contents * * 2 Contents 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . 6

  13. ,Mega London` bezeichnet erstens das Entwurfsthema fr ein Gebude, in dem zwei Nutzungsprogramme hnlicher Gre Platz finden ein Megastore fr Sportartikel und ein Fitnesscenter fr Sportbegeisterte. ,Mega London` charakterisiert zweitens die Stand-ortwahl d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universitt

    ,Mega London` bezeichnet erstens das Entwurfsthema fr ein Gebude, in dem zwei Nutzungsprogramme. ,Mega London` charakterisiert zweitens die Stand- ortwahl das Projektgebiet ,Royal Albert Dock` ist ein wichtiger Entwicklungsbereich im Londoner Osten. Der hier betrachtete Bereich zeigt die

  14. Lessons for Chinese mega-mall development : a case study of the South China Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is embracing mega-mall development: Seven out of the ten largest shopping malls in the world will have been located in China by the year 2010. All the completed mega-malls are now suffering from high vacancy rates ...

  15. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R. V., E-mail: rvale006@fiu.edu; Boeglin, W. U.; Angulo, A.; Avila, P.; Leon, O.; Lopez, C. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8 ST, CP204, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecconello, M.; Klimek, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 20 (Sweden); Allan, S. Y.; Akers, R. J.; Keeling, D. L.; McClements, K. G.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turnyanskiy, M. [ITER Physics Department, EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Jones, O. M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Michael, C. A. [Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PDs compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  16. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang emission from the interaction of an ultrafast ( 29 fs), intense ( 1018 W/cm2 ) laser pulse with underdense of such an ultrafast laser pulse with matter and possible new approaches to MeV electron generation. In this paper we

  17. MegaPipe: A New Programming Interface for Scalable Network I/O Sangjin Han+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    that, by embracing a clean-slate design approach, MegaPipe is able to exploit new opportunities to which it can be optimized for performance. In contrast, a clean- slate redesign offers the opportunity and tedious burden of layering several abstractions for the sake of concurrency. Once again, a clean-slate

  18. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecastsEWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1 Durante5 , Jrg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University

  19. HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS of CPS (Cyber Physical System). However, current software development process in the automotive industry automotive software devel- opment process in the perspective of CPS and proposes a new kernel-based approach

  20. Entering the Era of Mega-genomics ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Michael C [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory] [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael Schatz from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on "Entering the Era of Mega-genomics" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  1. Entering the Era of Mega-genomics ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schatz, Michael C [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael Schatz from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on "Entering the Era of Mega-genomics" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of the Geodesic Acoustic Mode at the edge region of Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Spherical Tokamak J. R. Robinson1, B. Hnat1, P. Dura1, A. Kirk2, P. Tamain3, A. Thyagaraja4, K. G. Mc Acoustic Mode (GAM) at the edge of an Ohmic plasma on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A strong 10 k

  3. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soulli, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissariat lnergie Atomique et aux nergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an air-box that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  4. New Songdo City and the value of flexibility : a case study of implementation and analysis of a mega-scale project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Junho (Junho Justin)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the modern real estate industry, mega-scale developments have been a notable feature. The distinctiveness of these projects is that they are enormous in scale and thus require many years to develop. Unlike regular sized ...

  5. AFLP-based study of genetic difference and mega-base DNA isolation for BAC library construction from greenbug Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Homoptera:Aphididae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haiwen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the study of genetic differences among eight greenbug biotypes revealed by AFLP analyses and isolation of mega-base DNA for BAC library construction. Genetic relationship among greenbug biotypes is an old, but interesting...

  6. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClements, K. G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hole, M. J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  7. Coherence imaging of scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flows in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silburn, S. A., E-mail: s.a.silburn@durham.ac.uk; Sharples, R. M. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, J. R.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C. A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Howard, J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Gibson, K. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new coherence imaging Doppler spectroscopy diagnostic has been deployed on the UKs Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak for scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flow measurements. The system has successfully obtained 2D images of C III, C II, and He II line-of-sight flows, in both the lower divertor and main scrape-off-layer. Flow imaging has been obtained at frame rates up to 1 kHz, with flow resolution of around 1 km/s and spatial resolution better than 1 cm, over a 40 field of view. C III data have been tomographically inverted to obtain poloidal profiles of the parallel impurity flow in the divertor under various conditions. In this paper we present the details of the instrument design, operation, calibration, and data analysis as well as a selection of flow imaging results which demonstrate the diagnostic's capabilities.

  8. Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega Cities Sundar A. Christopher 1; J.Wang1; P. Gupta 1; M.A. Box2; and G.P. Box2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution, consistent, and cost-effective way for monitoring air pollution. Using Terra/Aqua data, we demonstrate (PM2.5) is an important tool for evaluating air quality. However, PM2.5 has larger spatiotemporal

  9. Using Bayesian analysis and Gaussian processes to infer electron temperature and density profiles on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified, Bayesian inference of midplane electron temperature and density profiles using both Thomson scattering (TS) and interferometric data is presented. Beyond the Bayesian nature of the analysis, novel features of the inference are the use of a Gaussian process prior to infer a mollification length-scale of inferred profiles and the use of Gauss-Laguerre quadratures to directly calculate the depolarisation term associated with the TS forward model. Results are presented from an application of the method to data from the high resolution TS system on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak, along with a comparison to profiles coming from the standard analysis carried out on that system.

  10. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  11. Mega Nap Kft | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy Resources

  12. Mega Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNewMassachusettsMayoOregon:Medical

  13. PUBLISHED VERSION Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I, Allan S Y, Akers R J, Keeling D L, McClements K G, Scannell R, Turnyanskiy M, Angulo A, Avila P emissions (invited)a) R. V. Perez, W. U. Boeglin, D. S. Darrow, M. Cecconello, I. Klimek, S. Y. Allan, R. J. Allan,4 R. J. Akers,4 D. L. Keeling,4 K. G. McClements,4 R. Scannell,4 M. Turnyanskiy,5 A. Angulo,1 P

  14. Smoothed Particle Inference: A Kilo-Parametric Method for X-ray Galaxy Cluster Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, John R.; Marshall, P.J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Andersson, K.; /Stockholm U. /SLAC

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an ambitious new method that models the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies as a set of X-ray emitting smoothed particles of plasma. Each smoothed particle is described by a handful of parameters including temperature, location, size, and elemental abundances. Hundreds to thousands of these particles are used to construct a model cluster of galaxies, with the appropriate complexity estimated from the data quality. This model is then compared iteratively with X-ray data in the form of adaptively binned photon lists via a two-sample likelihood statistic and iterated via Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The complex cluster model is propagated through the X-ray instrument response using direct sampling Monte Carlo methods. Using this approach the method can reproduce many of the features observed in the X-ray emission in a less assumption-dependent way that traditional analyses, and it allows for a more detailed characterization of the density, temperature, and metal abundance structure of clusters. Multi-instrument X-ray analyses and simultaneous X-ray, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and lensing analyses are a straight-forward extension of this methodology. Significant challenges still exist in understanding the degeneracy in these models and the statistical noise induced by the complexity of the models.

  15. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Automotive oils sector is further segmented into hydraulic oil, engine oil, and gear oil. Improving GDP in developing nations such as India and China has significantly spurred...

  16. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020 Driven by

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage CablesWellsIGrowing

  17. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation Coupled Thermionic Converters. 8 th InternationalMulti-Cell (CIM) Thermionic Converter for Solar Power andCylindrical Inverted Thermionic Converter. Proceedings of 1

  18. Transportation planning for mega events : a model of urban change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassens, Eva

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My study is about opportunities for revolutionary developments in urban transport. Often, we think of transport and urban development as an evolutionary process, yet there exist a few opportunities for cities to revolutionize ...

  19. Micro-home ownership in a mega-metropolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCarroll, Christian D. (Christian David)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a means to keep pace with today's globally networked society, the home is reconceived as a portable, transformable device that adapts and reconfigures itself to coexist within a range of changing terrains. Ownership ...

  20. Exhaust Energy Recovery: 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce or eliminate the need for increased heat rejection capacity for future heavy duty engines in Class 8 Tractors A 10% increase in fuel efficiency would: Save a linehaul,...

  1. Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

  2. Mega shed : regional rooms for the Orgman's City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, Stephen Andrew

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent legitimization of Landscape Urbanism as a theory for architectural design may signal a growing cultural shift toward environmental custodianship. Design strategies that blur buildings and landscape have become ...

  3. Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site Characterization Mega Transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration leads and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO2-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format Atlas of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO2 storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO2 injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial?scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well?documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine?filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO2 utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO2 leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably

  4. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputof Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputin panel mold Item: Epoxy resin and hardener Manufacturer:

  5. August 2000 (Convex Optimization ) JP Goux The mega title ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yair Censor , Eli Tom .... Yair Censor , Tommy Elfving , Nirit Kopf , Thomas Bortfeld .... Peder Olsen, Figen Oztoprak, Jorge Nocedal, Stephen Rennie

  6. Mega-Pore Nano-Structured Carbon - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings High Energy PhysicsEnergy

  7. 33S PR I NG 2012 ENGINEERING & SCIENCE down to a depth of nearly 2,900 kilo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Synthetic seismograms are models that use wave-propagation data to help model the earth's structure earth is an incredible, dynamic system," says geophysicist Mike Gurnis, whose specialty is computa--from a variety of sources--and integrate them into a comprehensive model. Some of this data is taken from

  8. DISCOVERY OF THREE z > 6.5 QUASARS IN THE VISTA KILO-DEGREE INFRARED GALAXY (VIKING) SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venemans, B. P.

    Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 ...

  9. Design and imaging performance of achromatic diffractive/refractive X-ray and Gamma-ray Fresnel lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald K. Skinner

    2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Achromatic combinations of a diffractive Phase Fresnel Lens and a refractive correcting element have been proposed for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and for microlithography, but considerations of absorption often dictate that the refractive component be given a stepped profile, resulting in a double Fresnel lens. The imaging performance of corrected Fresnel lenses, with and without `stepping' is investigated and the trade-off between resolution and useful bandwidth in different circumstances is discussed. Provided the focal ratio is large, correction lenses made of low atomic number materials can be used with X-rays in the range approximately 10--100 keV without stepping. The use of stepping extends the possibility of correction to higher aperture systems, to energies as low as a few kilo electron volts and to gamma-rays of $\\sim$ mega electron volt energy.

  10. Ryan Naraine, InternetNews, 2004.09.08: "Apple issues mega security update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    -language instructions handling registers int *sp and int cx: A (i.e., 0x41) means ++cx. D means sp += 0.25. I means --cx. L means sp -= 0.25. Q means *--sp = cx. T means *--sp = sp. Y means cx = *sp++. hABCD means *--sp = 0x44434241. kaDA means sp = ((int*)cx)[17] * 65. hABCDhABCDYIQDYAQDYIIQDYAAQD means what? #12;Look

  11. A world-class challenge: Kazakhstan mega-project still looming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Energy Detente describes how one massive development plan has been scaled back for the moment, but which is destined to play a major role in the future -- no matter how the particulars of development evolve. Last month, Chevron downward adjusted its budget for the development of the Tengiz oil field in Kazakhstan. This article highlights the media attention that has been paid to the Former Soviet Union as a potential oil giant, which will increase further with Chevron`s recent decision.

  12. Design of Mega-Voltage X-ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Performance Phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aufderheide, M B; Martz, H E; Curtin, M

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of fundamental scientific questions have arisen concerning the operation of high-energy DR and CT systems. Some of these questions include: (1) How deeply can such systems penetrate thickly shielded objects? (2) How well can such systems distinguish between dense and relatively high Z materials such as lead, tungsten and depleted uranium and lower Z materials such as steel, copper and tin? (3) How well will such systems operate for a uranium material which is an intermediate case between low density yellowcake and high density depleted uranium metal? These questions have led us to develop a set of phantoms to help answer these questions, but do not have any direct bearing on any smuggling concern. These new phantoms are designed to allow a systemic exploration of these questions by gradually varying their compositions and thicknesses. These phantoms are also good probes of the blurring behavior of radiography and tomography systems. These phantoms are composed of steel ({rho} assumed to be 7.8 g/cc), lead ({rho} assumed to be 11.4 g/cc), tungsten ({rho} assumed to be 19.25 g/cc), uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) ({rho} assumed to be 4.6 g/cc), and depleted uranium (DU) ({rho} assumed to be 18.9 g/cc). There are five designed phantoms described in this report: (1) Cylindrical shells of Tungsten and Steel; (2) Depleted Uranium Inside Tungsten Hemi-cube Shells; (3) Nested Spherical Shells; (4) UO{sub 3} Cylinder; and (5) Shielded DU Sphere.

  13. New SLED 3 system for Multi-mega Watt RF compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact X band SLED is introduced for X band RF compressing application. This SLED compressor consists two major parts: a rectangular to circular waveguide converter and an overmoded spherical cavity. The RF compressor is designed to convert 50 magawatt X band RF power with pulse length 1.5 microseconds and deliver 200 megawatts with pulse length 106 nanoseconds to the X band accelerating structure.

  14. Making climate adaptation work : strategies for resource constrained South Asian mega-cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta-Koehler, Madhu Chhanda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation compares the responses of Dhaka, Bangladesh and Kolkata, India to the serious challenges posed by climate change, particularly in the water sector. Drawing on the theories of "adaptation as development" ...

  15. MEGA-Event Stadiums as vehicles for urban transformation : an argument for integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Soledad (Candace Soledad)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All cultures across the world engage in significant public events whether religious, traditional or competitive. Many of these celebrations, small or large, are central to their communities and cultures, bringing people ...

  16. Bi-directional Alfvn cyclotron instabilities in the mega-amp spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharapov, S. E., E-mail: Sergei.Sharapov@ccfe.ac.uk; Akers, R.; Ayed, N. Ben; Cunningham, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lilley, M. K. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cecconello, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75105 Uppsala (Sweden); Cook, J. W. C.; Verwichte, E. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alfvn cyclotron instabilities excited by velocity gradients of energetic beam ions were investigated in MAST experiments with super-Alfvnic neutral beam injection over a wide range of toroidal magnetic fields from ?0.34?T to ?0.585?T. In MAST discharges with high magnetic field, a discrete spectrum of modes in the sub-cyclotron frequency range is excited toroidally propagating counter to the beam and plasma current (toroidal mode numbers n??0 arises, in addition to the modes with n??0 become dominant, they are observed in frequency range from ?250 kHz for n=1 to ?3.5?MHz for n=15, well above the on-axis ion cyclotron frequency (?2.5 MHz). The data is interpreted in terms of normal and anomalous Doppler resonances modified by magnetic drift terms due to inhomogeneity and curvature of the magnetic field. A Hall MHD model is applied for computing the eigenfrequencies and the spatial mode structure of CAEs and a good agreement with the experimental frequencies is found.

  17. IBM Research -ChinaIBM Research China Internet-of-Things for Sustainability of Mega Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zigang

    people, physical objects and IT systems, supported by scalable and affordable technologies, to better Corporation Process efficiency, automation and control #12;Case: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and LogisticsCase: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and Logistics © 2010 IBM Corporation #12;

  18. RESTARAUNTS 24 hour dining at Nafis located at the BIG mega shopping compound. There are also

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berend, Daniel

    , Russian, Japanese, Spanish and many Middle Eastern restaurants in town which are moderately pricy. Beer, behind Gimmel Dormitories Manga - Teacher's Center, Rager St KOSHER ESTABLISHMENTS IN BEER SHEVA, ISRAEL: Avaz HaZahav Hebron 60 Beer Sheva, Israel Tel: 08-628-7675 Cuisine: Self Serve, Mediterranean

  19. Emerald cities : the emergence of mega developments in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weikal, Steven P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the recent worldwide boom in megacity development. Its basis is a global survey of megacity building that quantifies the amount of current development and qualifies the various city types and themes, ...

  20. Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R.

    manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system/instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts...

  1. Maximizing nuclear power plant performance via mega-uprates and subsequent license renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to develop a methodology to evaluate the engineering and economic implications of maximizing performance of the United States' commercial fleet of nuclear power plants. This methodology addresses ...

  2. Mega-project politics : the evolution of Lahore's first BRT corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajjad, Fizzah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks how opportunities emerge for states in the Global South to undertake large-scale spending on public transport, particularly in cases where they have previously withdrawn from its provision. In recent years, ...

  3. Exhaust Energy Recovery: 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducational OpportunitiesEngineRecovery: 2008

  4. Investigating Aeroelastic Performance of Multi-Mega Watt Wind Turbine Rotors Using CFD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign Investigating

  5. Abstract--During power deregulation, companies and ISOs are releasing their transmission grids to form RTOs/Mega-RTOs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Abstract--During power deregulation, companies and ISOs are releasing their transmission grids, College Station, TX 77843, USA E-mail: huang@ee.tamu.edu, lei.jiansheng@ieee.org during power deregulation under such a power deregulation environment: First of all, the state estimation over the whole grid

  6. PUBLISHED VERSION Coherence imaging of scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flows in the Mega Amp Spherical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingdom 3 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia 4 York

  7. Incorporating Sustainability into Brownfield Remediation and Redevelopment in Mega-project: Experience and Lessons Learnt at the London Olympic Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Deyi; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Hellings, Jan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainability issues. The third source of information is qualitative interview with two anonymous decision makers who worked on the remediation at the Olympic Park site. The interviewees were assured anonymity and confidentiality, and that no business... sensitive information would be released. This source of information was used to identify challenges and lessons learned during the course of the remediation process. This study uses a single, exploratory case study to investigate how sustainability...

  8. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  9. An emplacement mechanism for the mega-block zone within the Chicxulub crater, (Yucata n, Mexico) based on chemostratigraphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    -5100.2012.01345.x #12;information obtained from wells drilled by PEMEX in the 1950s1960s for oil exploration

  10. Pairing mega events and hydrological systems for urban sustainability : strategy framework for Delhi beyond the Commonwealth Games 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherian, Danny, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) initiate a process by which the city learns to seize opportunities through benign and sustainable change. Furthermore, this thesis intends to inform decision makers with a checklist of crucial tradeoffs, risks and ...

  11. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampre spherical K. G. McClements and M. J. Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia (Received 30 April 2012; accepted 27 June 2012; published online 20

  12. Power Module User's Manual 3/2/05 Commercial Confidential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    by forced ventilation systems kW Kilowatt kPa(g) Kilo-Pascals gauge pressure LPH Litres per hour MTBF Mean

  13. Testing and Evaluation of a Power Factor Correction for Power-Savings Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alotaibi, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was then reduced from 13.9 to 3.0 kVAR (kilo volts amps reactive), the apparent power was decreased from 17.5 to 11.0 kVA (kilo volts amps). and the current was reduced from 23.4 to 14.5 amps. The Ministry of Electricity & Water (MEW) in Kuwait is expected...

  14. AVTA: Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 BRP Commander Electric2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega2009 Vantage Pickup EVX10002009 Vantage Van EVC1000

  15. Data:A563ad4a-6f47-40bd-9bfa-d67a6d66a93d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which may interfere with service to other customers, or all transformer-type welding machines larger than 25 kilo-volt amperes, will not be served on this rate. Source or...

  16. Data:84e2fa36-5dd3-49d9-9563-8f646c3f8450 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which may interfere with service to other customers, or all transformer-type welding machines larger than 25 kilo-volt amperes, will not be served on this rate. Source or...

  17. Quality of life (QOL) is usually defined as a person's general well-being,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    facilities (quality) Fire services quality Responsiveness of local government Sanitation services quality of kilo- watt hours of electricity. · The area has the world's largest deposit of trona, supplying 90 quality Hunting opportunities Outdoor recreation opportunities Medical facilities (amount) Medical

  18. Original Article Exploration of the extracellular space by a large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    mechanisms that underly cell-cell interactions. The importance of intercellular signaling has long been, insulin-like growth factor; kD, kilo Dalton; LiCl, lithium chloride; NCBI, national center

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND WORKSHOP ON EXPERIMENTS AND DETECTORS FOR A RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC), LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, MAY 25-29, 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Hans Georg

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.1 seconds per track on a VAX 780, approximately linear into approximately 500 x VAX 780 speed (roughly a kiloVAX)coupled by Ethernet to a VAX online computer as. part of its

  20. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX

  1. Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Clean Combustion February 27, 2008 Tim Frazier Research & Technology 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Agenda Project Goals and Objectives Project Partners Technical...

  2. Enabling High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Clean Combustion 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Donald Stanton Research & Technology February 26 th , 2008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or...

  3. Supporting Text Identification of co-regulated genes through Bayesian clustering of predicted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun

    .e., the total counts of nucleotide type i in the jth column of the kth mega-profile. Let 4 kjk( )k i W

  4. advanced cold moderator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues CERN Preprints Summary: The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization have been developing a Mega-Watt scale spallation...

  5. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit...

  6. Low Cost Components: Advanced High Power & High Energy Battery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08amine2.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering of High...

  7. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08salari.pdf More Documents & Publications DOEs Effort to Reduce...

  8. Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08mccarty6.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra Large Castings...

  9. NonDestructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08dasch2.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Destructive...

  10. Bonding Similar and Dissimilar Lightweight Materials using Reactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08sun.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of...

  11. Benchmarking of Advanced HEVs and PHEVs over a Wide Range...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08carlson.pdf More Documents & Publications Off-Cycle Benchmarking...

  12. Magnesium Research and Technology Development: Project 48976...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith5.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting...

  13. Molecular Simulations of Electrolytes and Electrolyte/Electrode...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith.pdf More Documents & Publications Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies...

  14. Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith3.pdf More Documents & Publications Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform...

  15. Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith7.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of...

  16. Western Meter Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as Western) VAC Voltage Alternating Current VAR, Mvar Volt-Ampere-Reactive (Instantaneous Reactive Power), Mega-Var VDC Voltage Direct Current Western Area Power Administration...

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - LANL Student Symposium Poster.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential effects of large wildfires, thereby encouraging managers to implement best management practices to decrease the probability of mega-fires in Southwestern forests. Authors...

  18. Treatment of experimental asthma using a novel peptide inhibitor of the inducible T cell kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimond, David M.; Guimond, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supernatant -! small centrifuge tubes (4 per MegaPrep) forvacuum manifold -! centrifuge -! -20C freezer Materials: -!freezer -! refrigerated centrifuge -! liquid nitrogen vessel

  19. Regulatory Science in a Developing State: Environmental Politics in Chile, 1980-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barandiaran, Javiera

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mega-hydroelectric dams in the Patagonia, that received EIA134 Chapter 6: Dams in Patagonia? Evaluatingfor Ecology Research in Patagonia Europe-Latin America

  20. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an essential component of the modern grid: IC creates a dynamic, interactive "mega-infrastructure" for real-time information and power exchange IC allows the various...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - air base korea Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quality in areas where ground-based observations are limited. Fire Emission... Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite ... Source: Wang, Jun - Department...

  2. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  3. Materials Compatibility of Power Electronics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  4. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NETL Agreement 13919 Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement 13919 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  5. 3Energy in the Home Every month, we get the Bad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating, the accelerator requires 70 megaWatts of electricity ­ about the same as the power consumption) What is the Tevatron's electricity consumption in kilowatt hours? B) At $0.11 per kilowatt hour, how operating, the accelerator requires 70 megaWatts of electricity ­ about the same as the power consumption

  6. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 617629 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14068.x Evolution of the radio-loud galaxy population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z- luminous red galaxy (MegaZ-LRG) catalogue of LRGs derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data constructed from the cross-correlation of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) radio surveys with the Mega

  7. A very short literature search Target videoconference 28.1.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    · ... 28.1.2004 A.Fabich, CERN #12;MegaPie · MegaPie: Megawatt Pilot Experiment ­ Spallation source · Li­50 · IPUL, RIGA working for ESS, LiSoR · http://mhd.sal.lv/ ­ High pressure and high flowrate induction

  8. Poverty Reduction during the Rural-Urban Transformation -The Role of the Missing Middle *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Poverty Reduction during the Rural-Urban Transformation - The Role of the Missing Middle * Luc (rural diversification versus agglomeration in mega-cities) affects the rate of poverty reduction towns ) is strongly associated with poverty reduction, while expansion of mega-cities is not. Migration

  9. The JASMIN super-data-cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, B N; Churchill, J; Juckes, M; Kershaw, P; Oliver, P; Pritchard, M; Stephens, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The JASMIN super-data-cluster is being deployed to support the data analysis requirements of the UK and European climate and earth system modelling community. Physical colocation of the core JASMIN resource with significant components of the facility for Climate and Environmental Monitoring from Space (CEMS) provides additional support for the earth observation community, as well as facilitating further comparison and evaluation of models with data. JASMIN and CEMS together centrally deploy 9.3 PB of storage - 4.6 PB of Panasas fast disk storage alongside the STFC Atlas Tape Store. Over 370 computing cores provide local computation. Remote JASMIN resources at Bristol, Leeds and Reading provide additional distributed storage and compute configured to support local workflow as a stepping stone to using the central JASMIN system. Fast network links from JASMIN provide reliable communication between the UK supercomputers MONSooN (at the Met Office) and HECToR (at the University of Edinburgh). JASMIN also supports...

  10. Article published in Built Environment, Volume 36, No 2, "Arab Mega projects", ed. P.-A. Barthel, 2010, p.162-175. Valrie Clerc is Post-Doc Researcher at Institut franais du Proche-Orient (French Institute for Near-East) in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    government adopted the 10th Plan (2006­2010), which introduced a new model of development: the social market in investments in the Mediterranean. The rise in oil prices, particularly from 2003, created large hard currency reserves in the Gulf countries. Faced with saturated local markets, they invested more and more money

  11. The Fisheries and Fish Trade of Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -3 percent of the labor force is employed in fJsheries related activity (canning, cold storage, etc was over 29 kilos) and for export earnings (US$98.4 million in 1979). The industry is characterized by lack- tunities for foreign sales to Portugal and investment in Portuguese industry are expected to grow

  12. Mr Jacques Chirac President of the French Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the South, whose representatives I warmly welcome. Europe and France particularly appreciate the honour you warming call for a revolution in our methods of production and consumption. It is our duty to undertake of seawater as a litre of oil or a kilo of coal. #12;A great deal of progress has been made since the first

  13. ANTARCTIC OFFSHORE LEADS AND POLYNYAS AND OCEANOGRAPHIC EFFECTS H. Jay Zwally and J. C. Comiso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    water are located within the Antarctic sea ice pack in a near-shore zone of several hundred kilo- meters Introduction The Antarctic sea ice pack is known to con- rain substantial areas of open water during all pack are highly variable located offshore of major outlet glaciers that as the sea ice grows, deforms

  14. Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basset, Yves

    LETTERS Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests Vojtech Novotny1 , Scott E) and fruit (fruitflies, Diptera) found a low rate of change in species composition (beta diversity) across 75 of kilo- metres. Low beta diversity was also documented in groups with differing host specificity

  15. SusLabNWE: Integrating qualitative and quantitative data to understand peoples everyday energy behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockton, Dan; Bowden, Flora; Greene, Catherine; Brass, Clare; Gheerawo, Rama

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design. Kybernetes, 36(9), 1301-1317 E.ON (undated). Whatsa (kilo)Watt? Coventry: E.ON UK. Fell, D. , King, G. (or even a boy band. (E.ON, undated) Van Dam et al (2010)

  16. For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    and the Solar Radiation Monitoring LaboratoryG:SourcesforBackgroundInformation© Useful Web Sites: UO Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Website: http://solardata.uoregon.edu/Educational Solar Radiation Basics Solar Electric Lesson Plans o What is a KiloWatt Hour? o Experiments

  17. 2002 Fall Meeting Cite abstracts as: Eos. Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract #####-##, 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    and footwall rocks in the Madi Khola allows us to begin to validate aspects of some models and eliminate others and Greater Himalayan rocks). We use Nd isotopes to map the MCT across the 60 kilo- meters between the Modi and Marsyandi Rivers based on previous studies that showed that Lesser Himalayan rocks contain more radiogenic

  18. Technical Report DHPC-015 Spatial Interpolation on Distributed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawick, Ken

    grid resolutions of a few kilo- metres at best. Current forecasting technology is only beginning at a wavelength of approximately seven micro me- tres, chosen to be sensitive to water vapour. This is illustrated are investigating storage systems to handle on-line applicatio

  19. u.s. FISHERIES: A View of Their Status & Potential John P. Wis e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - April 1972.) Per -Capita Consumption & Use Increased utilization and importation of fishery products is perhaps best reflected in consumption and utilization per capita (Figure 2, Table 3) . Annual per-capita consumption of fishery products since 1951 has been relatively constant at about 5 kilo- grams. Per-capita

  20. APE project: a Gigaflop processor for lattice calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacilieri, P.; Cabasino, S.; Marzano, F.; Paohicci, P.; Petrarce, S.; Salina, G.; Cabibo, H.; Giovannella, C.; Marinari, E.; Parisi, G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new special purpose parallel processor (APE) presently under development is presented. The theoretical computing power of the processor is 1 Giga-Flop and the memory can be expanded to 512 Mega-bytes. Sixteen 52 bit floating point processors each with a computing power of 64 Mega-Flops are driven in parallel as a single instruction multiple data machine under the control of a 3081/E. Each floating point unit is connected to two 8 Mega-byte memories which can also be accessed by the 3081.E. Though this machine can be used as a general purpose array processor the hardware has been optimized for lattice QCD calculations.

  1. Introverted architecture and the human dimension : the conflict of placemaking in the disconnected urban fabric of Doha, Qatar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabouni, Farrah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doha, the capital city of Qatar, has become a metropolis of disconnected inward-facing mega-projects with no regard to the remaining fabric of the city. This can be owed to the relatively short urbanization period that the ...

  2. units.sty -nicefrac.sty Axel Reichert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintmire, John W.

    your collection of delicious recipes (typeset in a mega-cool ultra condensed bold italic calligraphical font) contain those spindle Computer Modern Roman just for half a litre of milk

  3. androgen receptor coregulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the total counts of nucleotide type i in the jth column of the kth mega-profile. Let 4 kjk( )k i W column is equally informative, then the full likelihood function can be written...

  4. Urban stairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yoonhee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent decades, Seoul in Korea has experienced a rapid economic and urban development. As a result, the city exposes extreme disharmony between different zones. For example, the heavy mega structures are inconsiderately ...

  5. The Challenges of Massive On-chip Concurrency Kostas Bousias and Chris Jesshope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesshope, Chris

    . Chip-level mul- tiprocessors exploiting massive concurrency we term Microgrids. The direc- tions Microgrids. Microgrids will also form the basis of mega-scale computing systems, comprising millions

  6. Design against nature : flooding, water supply, and public space in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thelander, Max William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting in the late 19th century, Southern California saw the first of several waves of explosive population growth that have resulted in today's mega-region. While many early settlers were attracted by the city's famous ...

  7. Save Energy Now Data Center Assessments to Identify Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - raising total energy use * Most don't know if their center is good or bad Slide 7 LBNL super computer systems power: 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 MegaWatts 2001 2003 2005 2007...

  8. Bill -n- (kris'tl) at OSB, Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Robert Anthony

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Can the individual be implicated in the mega-scale environment by mediating the barriers and marginal zones of the urban landscape? This investigation engages the megalopolis and its full grotesqueness in terms of scale ...

  9. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hand, A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scalingof a Multi-MegaWatt Wind Turbine. Renewable Energy, vol.David. 2008. Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. WindStats

  10. http://www.caymannetnews.com/cgi-script/csArticles/articles/000107/010744.htm Barkers National Park or Dump?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    by mega-ships which loomed over the island like mythical monoliths. Then up West Bay Road and past . . . the very thing that is the focus of the Brac's eco-tourism marketing program. Put in proper park gates. How

  11. New information technologies in the old political economy : an exploration of community-based GIS for improving basic services for the poor in New Delhi, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canepa, Claudia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid urbanization, limited neighborhood-level data, and the multiplicity of overlapping agencies in mega-cities in the developing world are creating a significant gap between citizens, particularly the poor, and government. ...

  12. PROGRAMME BLANC EDITION 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    proposition de projet Mega-séismes au Chili: Exemple de Maule en 2010 (Mw 8.8) et implications sismo-tectoniques Proposal title Megathrust earthquakes in Chile: 2010 Maule Earthquake (Mw 8.8) and sismo

  13. Comparative Genomics of Gossypium spp. through GBS and Candidate Genes Delving into the Controlling Factors behind Photoperiodic Flowering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Carla Jo Logan

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF GOSSYPIUM SPP. THROUGH GBS AND CANDIDATE GENES ? DELVING INTO THE CONTROLLING FACTORS BEHIND PHOTOPERIODIC FLOWERING A Dissertation by CARLA JO LOGAN YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A.../Deletion Polymorphism IPGB Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Ka Non-synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate kb Kilobase(s) kDa KiloDalton Ks Synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate LD Long Day LD Linkage Disequilibrium MAS Marker Assisted...

  14. Unidades de Energa Energa mecanica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bor, Gil

    refrescos) = 11.7 kilowatt-hora (1 foco prendido 117 hrs)] Energa solar Radiacion solar en la tierra: 1 kilowatt por metro cuadrado (max.) [El promedio es la 1/4 parte. Un calentador solar da 60 %; celda-watt-segundo ; 1 cerrillo que se quema = 1 kilo-joule; 1 latido de corazon = 0.5 joules Mas informacion: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energia

  15. Comparative Genomics of Gossypium spp. through GBS and Candidate Genes Delving into the Controlling Factors behind Photoperiodic Flowering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Carla Jo Logan

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF GOSSYPIUM SPP. THROUGH GBS AND CANDIDATE GENES ? DELVING INTO THE CONTROLLING FACTORS BEHIND PHOTOPERIODIC FLOWERING A Dissertation by CARLA JO LOGAN YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A.../Deletion Polymorphism IPGB Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Ka Non-synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate kb Kilobase(s) kDa KiloDalton Ks Synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate LD Long Day LD Linkage Disequilibrium MAS Marker Assisted...

  16. Real-Time Pricing- A Flexible Alternative for Electrical Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, S. D.; Frye, A. O. Jr.

    REAL-TIME PRICING - A FLEXIBLE ALTERNATIVE ..OR ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY S. D. REYNOLDS Manager of Industrial Marketing & Services Tennessee Valley Authority Chattanooga, Tennessee ABSTRACT In an increasingly competitive operating... conditions to more tl,an 240 mills per kilo,~atthollr 78 REAL-TIME PRICING A FLEXIBLE ALTERNATIVE rOR ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY S. D. REYNOLDS Manager of Industrial Marketing & Services Tennessee Valley Authority Chattanooga, Tennessee ABSTRACT...

  17. Relationships among distribution of milk proteins and transmitting ability and yield of milk, efficiency of protein yield and biochemical polymorphisms in Holstein and Jersey cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nmai, Iris Bella

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for first and second stages (trimesters) of lactation. Concentrate Ingredient Stage 1 Stage 2 Corn Kilo 21 55 49 35 Wheat bran Cottonseed meal 9. 60 Limestone Trace minera1 salt Dicalcium phosphate Magnesium oxide Sulfur Vitamin A 1. 00 . 10... to differences in stage of lacta- tion, parity or somatic cell counts. Variation in CN was greater among Holsteins than Jerseys. In early lactation, Jerseys had 4. 7' more protein as casein than Holsteins. Over the two trimesters of lactation, casein...

  18. New Results on the Time lags of the Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Low-mass X-ray Binary 4U 1636--53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Avellar, Marcio G B; Altamirano, Diego; Sanna, Andrea; Zhang, Guobao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the energy and frequency dependence of the Fourier time lags of the hectoHertz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and of the QPOs at the frequency at which the power density spectrum shows a break in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53, using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that: (i) For the break frequency QPO: for low frequencies, in general the time lag is positive, but it is decreasing with increasing frequency, reaching zero lag at 20 Hz. Between 20 and 35 Hz there is a small fluctuation around zero, from where the time lags become positive again and increase slightly above zero up to 65 Hz. (ii) For the hHz QPO: we see that when the frequency is 100 Hz the time lag is negative, but it increases to zero already at 110 Hz, being consistent with this value up to 130 Hz from where it increases to 0.5 msec at around 140 Hz. From 140 Hz the time lag decreases sharply, being strongly negative for hHz greater than 220 Hz. We compar...

  19. Deciphering the genetic basis for polyketide variation among mycobacteria producing mycolactones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pidot, Sacha J; Hong, Hui; Seemann, Torsten; Porter, Jessica L; Yip, Marcus J; Men, Artem; Johnson, Matthew; Wilson, Peter; Davies, John K; Leadlay, Peter F; Stinear, Timothy P

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Chembiochem 2003, 4:654-657. 24. Kaser M, Rondini S, Naegeli M, Stinear T, Portaels F, Certa U, Pluschke G: Evolution of two distinct phylogenetic lineages of the emerging human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. BMC Evol Biol 2007, 7:177. 25. Nei M, Rooney AP... . Nucleic Acids Research 1995, 23:4992-4999. 35. Tamura K, Dudley J, Nei M, Kumar S: MEGA4: Molecular Evolu- tionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) Software Version 4.0. Mol Biol Evol 2007, 24:1596-1599. 36. Sonnhammer EL, Durbin R: A dot-matrix program...

  20. Forced Oscillations in Fluid Tori and Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Lee

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The kilo-Hertz Quasi--Periodic Oscillations in X-ray binaries could originate within the accretion flow, and be a signature of non--linear fluid oscillations and mode coupling in strong gravity. The possibility to decipher these systems will impact our knowledge of fundamental parameters such as the neutron star mass, radius, and spin. Thus they offer the possibility to constrain the nuclear equation of state and the rotation parameter of stellar--mass black holes. We review the general properties of these oscillations from a hydrodynamical point of view, when the accretion flow is subject to external perturbations and summarize recent results.

  1. The application of bi-level non-linear programming to the aluminum industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a bi-level non-linear mathematical model of an aluminum smelter is described. The model is based on the Portland Aluminum smelter and aims at maximizing the aluminum production while minimizing the costs associated with the production of this maximum output. The model has two variables, the power input (kilo-Amperes) and the setting cycle (of the anode replacement). The solution algorithm, based on a grid search which enumerates the appropriate intersections of the resource and other constraints is then discussed. Additionally, some of the areas currently being developed, including sensitivity analysis and the incorporation of dependencies between some of the variables and coefficients are considered.

  2. Paleoenvironment of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cregg, Allen Kent

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of' Department) ( Mem'her ) (Member) May 198Z ABSTRACT Paleoenvironment of an Upper Cotton Valley (Knowles Limestone) Patch Reef, Milam County, Texas (May 1982) Allen Kent Cregg, B. S. , University of New Orleans Chairman of Advisory.... Depth in kilo- meters (km) and thousands of feet (kft). Two-way time in seconds {sec). (Seismic section courtesy of Mohil Producing Texas and New Mexico Incorporated-United Geo- physical). - NW 1? 5 2? SR I A 1 SA 2 1 'I S ? 10 4? 15'-' 5? Z...

  3. Evolution of candidate transcriptional regulatory motifs since the human-chimpanzee divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Ian J; Gottgens, Berthold

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    chromosome into 50 kilo- base (kb) nonoverlapping tiles and calculated the following: the relative number of mouse-chimpanzee conserved sites as a proportion of these sites on the chromosome; the relative number of human mutated sites as a proportion... enrichment at 9.68, 6.33, and 12.67, respectively. Chromosome Y only had two enriched tiles and we set enrichment thresholds to 6, 5, and 10, respec- tively. The chromosome specific data were plotted against the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC...

  4. Kimball Wind Project Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,KasVinod Private investorKilo

  5. Kinden Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,KasVinod Private investorKiloKinden

  6. Product Innovation and Strategy, case Stora Enso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction Structural products for building and construction industries Fibre products to pulp, panel and Strategy, case Stora Enso Timber Mega trends in society Drivers in construction value chain Stora Enso raw materials Circular flow economy We have a good story to tell! low carbon footprint we help

  7. 1/12/14 Energytechnologyand engineering: Micro-windmills mayone daypower your smart phone energy-engineer.blogspot.com/2014/01/micro-windmills-may-one-day-power-your.html 1/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    trends in 2014 and beyond Two more mega solar deals in China Oil markets and the shale boom 2014 System overload slows Hawaii's solar energy boom Power play: Utilities want solar users to pay up China adds solar pollution funds poised to deliver on advanc... US new solar PV installations reach record 4.2 GW Solar

  8. Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b O. V. Gotchev,1,2,3 P. Y, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East-driven magnetic-field compression producing a magnetic field of tens of megaGauss is reported for the first time

  9. Departments Project title Department of Biology and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    . Greening mega data centers 3. A distributed resource allocation framework using Hadoop 4. GPU network data 8. 5G Wireless Network Resource Allocation and Interference Management 9. Cyber Security Protocols for Online Social Network 10. Network Resilience in the Internet of Things 11

  10. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 51615186, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/5161/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and Physics Aerosol optical properties in a rural environment near the mega-city Guangzhou, China and absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key element of the Earth's ra- diative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however, highly variable

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the following vehicles is available in downloadable form: 2013 BRP Commander Electric, 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega, 2009 Vantage Pickup EVX1000, and 2009 Vantage Van EVC1000.

  12. Seminario Internacional Licitaciones en Mercados Elctricos, Santiago, Noviembre 2005 Estrategias de generadores yEstrategias de generadores y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    50 60 MWmedio Mega Leilão 50 30 10 2005 2006 2007 26 Valor Esperado das Contratações 0 10 20 30 40 50 Precios Subastas 24 Ejemplo (datos de entrada: parámetros) #12;25 Ejemplos: resultados (1/4) 0 10 20 30 40

  13. Beyond Myopic Best Response (in Cournot Competition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ligett, Katrina

    . Petroleum. Wildcat Drillers has a production cost of $0.5 USD per mega-barrel; W. Petroleum has a production Cournot competition) or to maximize revenue (by masquerading as a firm with zero production costs will depress market prices, (2) which will reduce the production of other firms, (3) which will gain market

  14. 1120 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 25, NO. 5, MAY 2010 Digital Sliding-Mode Controller For High-Frequency DC/DC SMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    -frequency switching-mode power supply (SMPS), sliding-mode (SM) control. I. INTRODUCTION DIGITAL control technique has-performance control algorithms. Most existing digital controller for high-frequency (in mega- hertz range) and low-power limitations to control low-power high-frequency SMPS. Analog controllers are sensitive to analog component

  15. Progress and prospects for an FI relevant point design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, M; Amendt, P; Bellei, C; Clark, D; Cohen, B; Divol, L; Ho, D; Kemp, A; Larson, D; Marinak, M; Patel, P; Shay, H; Strozzi, D; Tabak, M

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics issues involved in scaling from sub ignition to high gain fast ignition are discussed. Successful point designs must collimate the electrons and minimize the stand off distance to avoid multi mega-joule ignition energies. Collimating B field configurations are identified and some initial designs are explored.

  16. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The centrepiece of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST), a leading low aspect-ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST

  17. Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The primary focus of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association Tokamak Development programme is MAST, the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (Figure 5.1). A key feature of spherical tokamaks (STs

  18. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2008/09 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2008/09 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The focus of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST), a leading low aspect- ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST

  19. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2006/07 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2006/07 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 TOKAMAK DEVELOPMENT 5.1 OVERVIEW The EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is based primarily on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) a leading low aspect-ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST). STs

  20. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 461, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 137-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    of South-East Asia and the unique videotaped scenes of the tsunami evolution over the coastal zone-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI- RESISTING COASTAL STRUCTURES Christopher Koutitas* and Theophanis The recent mega-tsunami event on the 26th December 2004, revealed the importance and the necessity

  1. CX-004104: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program Conductor Optimized Rotary Energy Mega-Watt Scale Direct Wind GeneratorCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): Ronan, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  2. Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions 12 November 2008 Keyword: Mega-city pollution TES O3­CO correlation INTEX-B Mexico city a b s t r a c regions were used to examine Mexico City pollution outflow on a regional scale. The pollution outflow from

  3. DISEASE-SPECIFIC BRAIN ATLASES Paul M. Thompson, 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    1 DISEASE-SPECIFIC BRAIN ATLASES 1 Paul M. Thompson, 1,2 Michael S. Mega, and 1 Arthur W. Toga 1. Mazziotta and Arthur W. Toga, Editors Academic Press Please address correspondence to: Dr. Paul Thompson (Rm-mail: thompson@loni.ucla.edu Acknowledgments: This work was supported by research grants from the National Center

  4. Determination of Optimal Electricity Reserve Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    load demand forecast error, the wind production forecast error and the failures of the power plants of wind power production and power load demand 14 2.4.2 Mega Watts failed to avoid it is to allocate electricity reserves and use them to balance up the system if required

  5. Outdoor Programs Coordinator Equipment Room Nathan van der Most 907-564-8614

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Diamond Mega-Mid -3-4person/4season 5.00 10.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (+20) 3.00 5.00 Synthetic Sleeping.00 2.00 Rubber Boots 1.00 2.00 Neoprene Boots 1.00 2.00 More Rentals on back page! Accepted Forms

  6. APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Ricardo Mendes, Joo Mateus, Eduardo.mendes}@ceo.inesc.pt {jgm ,ejms}@mega.ist.utl.pt {jose.tribolet}@ceo.inesc.pt Abstract Organizational change can be regarded Modeling, Organizational Change, UML, Process Re-engineering, Process Improvement, Business Strategy

  7. Numro d'ordre: 2011ISAL0066 Anne 2011 prsente devant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .72.43 83 18 Fax 04 72 43 85 28 Jean-marc.Pelletier@insa-lyon.fr MEGA MECANIQUE, ENERGETIQUE, GENIE CIVIL some new ideas and methods to solve the problem of choosing the coming back paths of underwater robot

  8. Power and Poverty: The Dilemma of NGO-Supported Development in Africa from a Danish Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Power and Poverty: The Dilemma of NGO-Supported Development in Africa from a Danish Perspective of people in Sub-Saharan Africa still lives and dies in poverty. With a public image determined by disasters of the many factors, powers and interests from micro- to mega-level that maintain the poverty and oppression

  9. Technical Assistance Project Data Center Efficiency Opportunities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with infrastructure upgrades * Most don't know if their center is good or bad Slide 9 LBNL feels the energy cost pain Slide 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 MegaW atts 2001 2003 2005...

  10. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 97, No. 5, pp. 16071620, October 2007, doi: 10.1785/0120060236 Subsidence, Compaction, and Gravity Sliding: Implications for 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fault geometry. A prime example occurs along the San Cayetano fault that bounds the eastern Ventura of this mega-slide off the hanging-wall block most likely occurred within the Rincon Formation, a thick ductile-dipping fault beneath the San Fer- nando Valley that is considered part of the active fault and fold system

  11. Daniel Delahaye ENAC 7, Ave Ed Belin 31055 Toulouse France Stephane Puechmorel ENAC 7, Ave Ed Belin 31055 Toulouse France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    a high energy electromagnetic pulse (several mega watts (peak power) during one micro second is developed for which a Kalman lter is used to produce high quality wind estimate. When only aircraft position their routes (heading, speed, altitude) in order to keep a minimum distance be- tween them during the crossing

  12. The birth of ant genomics Raghavendra Gadagkar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    and dominance, accounting for more than a third of all insect biomass and, along with termites, for more than 25% of all animal biomass in some tropical forests (1). Whole-genome sequencing was, until recently most of Europe and North America (9), and even more so because it appears to form mega

  13. Choices and benefits : alternative access and venue sites for İstanbul Olympics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkan, zgr, BaŸ ak, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on the idea that the Olympics, a global mega-project that interrupts and re-channels the forces of urban evolution in its host city, can be planned in ways that bring long-term benefits to that city. ...

  14. Pasqualetti_Answers 111.pdf Student questions: Martin (Mike) Pasqualetti colloquium on "Renewable Energy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    thermal energy require so much use of water (~1200 gals/megaWatt)? There is a steam cycle involved turbines that are more visually aesthetic than the current functioning models? The current models are much: Are vertical axis wind turbines more or less socially accepted than windmill-style? Can these wind farms

  15. Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region J methods on a redesigned modern Mega-Watt sized wind turbine, where the new design includes an increase of the blade in the vicinity of the wind turbine nacelle, to obtain an aerodynamically more efficient rotor

  16. Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D. Department of Otolaryngology there happens to be a castle nearby). #12;Wind turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting MegaWatts(MW) Total Installed Change by year 3% of US Energy Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind

  17. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  18. Abstract: During power deregulation, power companies are releasing their transmission grids to form ISOs/RTOs while

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to form ISOs/RTOs while maintaining their own state estimators over their own areas. A recent trend for these ISOs/RTOs is to further combine and enlarge to become a bigger Mega-RTO grid for a better market the whole state; in our algorithm, the existing state estimators in local companies/ISOs/RTOs are fully

  19. Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

  20. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  1. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  2. Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Khaled A.

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    be seen in expanding and upgrading infrastructure across the Kingdom such as: mega-real estate projects, transport (rail, airports, and port), municipality developments (Amman Master Plan, Salt Master Plan), Red Sea to Dead Sea Canal and many more... and granite. According to the expert tile layers interviewed above, imported tiles have more selection of colors and patterns than locally extracted marble and granite slabs. Marble and granite slabs that compete in quality and color selections...

  3. Molecular evolution of the control region in feliform carnivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, John Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -based phylogenetic analysis was performed using the neighbor- joining tree building method (Saitou and Nei 1987) as implemented in the MEGA program (Kumar et al. 1993). OC BC8 Car1 CL EurF Car2 IBM Eur Jagl IBU Jag2 SER BC5 Fcatus . . . . . . C. . 4...-RATRCRTGCCCTCCCTRAGRCTTCARGGRFIGARGCFIRTAGCCCCRCCRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C. . . . . . . . T . . . C. . . C T OC BCB Carl CL EurF Car2 IBM Eur Jag1 IBU Jag2 SER BC5 Fcatus 128 CFIGCRCCCARFIGCTGAARTTCTTTCTTRARCTRTTCCTTGCTRATRCCRARRACTRRCCC C. . . . . . C. . . . . C. . . . C. . . . . . . G. . . . . C...

  4. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  5. Integrated Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heins, S.

    Integrated Energy Efficiency Steve Heins VP Communications and Government Affairs Orion Energy Systems, Inc. 2 MegaTrend Convergence We need companies to commercialize technologies that use less energy without compromise to operations. Energy... Environment US electricity consumption growing 43% by 2030 Power generation expected to account for 50% of CO 2 emission increases 3 How Electricity Is Used 24 Hour Operation Midnight 6 a.m. Noon 6 p.m. Midnight kW 4 Lighting is a Major Component...

  6. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piot, P [Northern Illinois U.; Fermilab; Behrens, C; Gerth, C; Dohlus, M [DESY; Lemery, F; Mihalcea, D [Northern Illinois U.; Stoltz, P [Tech-X, Boulder; Vogt, M [DESY

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak accelerating electric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.

  7. Generation and Characterization of Electron Bunches with Ramped Current Profiles in a Dual-Frequency Superconducting Linear Accelerator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piot, P; Fermilab; Behrens, C; Gerth, C; Dohlus, M; Lemery, F; Mihalcea, D; Stoltz, P; Vogt, M

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful experimental generation of electron bunches with ramped current profiles. The technique relies on impressing nonlinear correlations in the longitudinal phase space using a superconducing radiofrequency linear accelerator operating at two frequencies and a current-enhancing dispersive section. The produced {approx} 700-MeV bunches have peak currents of the order of a kilo-Ampere. Data taken for various accelerator settings demonstrate the versatility of the method and in particular its ability to produce current profiles that have a quasi-linear dependency on the longitudinal (temporal) coordinate. The measured bunch parameters are shown, via numerical simulations, to produce gigavolt-per-meter peak acceleratingmoreelectric fields with transformer ratios larger than 2 in dielectric-lined waveguides.less

  8. Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

  9. Theory of current-drive in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuous toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods has been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods which utilize particle beams or radio frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  10. That Fading Taste of the Inevitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Thomas

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    mistake, it is too late. She has moved on, she doesn't want to talk to him anymore, and he finds himself crushed and abandoned. It is at heart that ultimate mainstream story: "boy loses girl." True, in this case the girl is a mega-smart artificial... their big, frightened eyes, and the way the smart one had built the tall, red, boxy brick house to beat the wolf -- tried to focus on all of that instead of the pain . . . The other books clutched his pages between their covers and ripped him apart...

  11. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  12. Study of New FNAL-NICADD Extruded Scintillator as Active Media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Grachov; T. M. Cormier; A. Pla-Dalmau; A. Bross; V. Rykalin

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  13. SOLVING THE STAND-OFF PROBLEM FOR MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION: PLASMA STREAMS AS DISPOSABLE ELECTRODES, PLUS A LOCAL SPHERICAL BLANKET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fusion reactor based on the Magnetized Target Fusion approach, the permanent power supply has to deliver currents up to a few mega-amperes to the target dropped into the reaction chamber. All the structures situated around the target will be destroyed after every pulse and have to be replaced at a frequency of 1 to 10 Hz. In this paper, an approach based on the use of spherical blanket surrounding the target, and pulsed plasma electrodes connecting the target to the power supply, is discussed. A brief physic analysis of the processes associated with creation of plasma electrodes is discussed.

  14. Outdoor Programs Coordinator Outdoor Programs Assistant Coordinator Brent Gorman Nathan van der Most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    .00 $9.00 $18.00 Black Diamond Mega-Mid -3-4person/4season $5.00 $10.00 $8.00 $18.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (+20) $3.00 $6.00 $5.00 $9.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (-20) $4.00 $8.00 $7.00 $11.00 Thermarest $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Paddle $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Throw Bag $1.00 $2.00 $2.00 $4.00 Rubber Boots

  15. The XMM-LSS Survey: Mapping hot, luminous, obscured and dark material out to z~1-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marguerite Pierre

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the unique cosmological implications of the XMM-LSS survey in association with its multi-WL follow-up: (1) Large Scale Structures traced by X-ray clusters and AGNs, optical galaxies, weak lensing as well as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect; (2) location of IR star forming galaxies and IR (obscured) AGNs within the cosmic web. The XMM/MegaCam/VIRMOS/SIRTF data base will provide the first comprehensive study of structure formation - from hundreds of Mpc to galaxy scale - in close connection with environmental processes.

  16. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  17. Instabilities and transport in magnetized plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosin, Mark

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . The ensuing flows and tem- perature profiles are anisotropic with respect to the direction of the magnetic field, and lead to highly filamentary structures. Left Panel: X-ray emission im- age of solar coronal loops taken by the Transition Region and Coronal... Explorer (TRACE) (Reale & Peres, 2000; Reale et al., 2000; TRACE, 2000). Right Panel: D? emission images (visible light) from Edge Localised Modes (ELMS) on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokomak (MAST) (Kirk et al., 2005; Dudson et al., 2008). in an asymptotic...

  18. Megargel, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy ResourcesMegaWatt

  19. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of these unexpected discoveries have lead to new research directions to address challenges.

  20. Obligate Biotrophy Features Unraveled by the Genomic Analysis of the Rust Fungi, Melampsora larici-populina and Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi; Chiu, Readman; Couthinho, Pedro; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tangay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Peer, Yves Van de; Henrissat, Bernard; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin1, Francis

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101 mega base pair genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89 mega base pair genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,841 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina to the 18,241 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic life-style include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins (SSPs), impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino-acid, oligopeptide and hexose membrane transporters. The dramatic upregulation of transcripts coding for SSPs, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells

  1. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ? 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta ? (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as ? ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation ?, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  2. BRIGHT 'MERGER-NOVA' FROM THE REMNANT OF A NEUTRON STAR BINARY MERGER: A SIGNATURE OF A NEWLY BORN, MASSIVE, MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhang, Bing; Gao, He, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A massive millisecond magnetar may survive the merger of a neutron star (NS) binary, which would continuously power the merger ejecta. We develop a generic dynamic model for the merger ejecta with energy injection from the central magnetar. The ejecta emission (the {sup m}erger-nova{sup )} powered by the magnetar peaks in the UV band and the peak of the light curve, progressively shifts to an earlier epoch with increasing frequency. A magnetar-powered merger-nova could have an optical peak brightness comparable to a supernova, which is a few tens or hundreds times brighter than the radioactive-powered merger-novae (the so-called macro-nova or kilo-nova). On the other hand, such a merger-nova would peak earlier and have a significantly shorter duration than that of a supernova. An early collapse of the magnetar could suppress the brightness of the optical emission and shorten its duration. Such millisecond-magnetar-powered merger-novae may be detected from NS-NS merger events without an observed short gamma-ray burst, and could be a bright electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers. If detected, it suggests that the merger leaves behind a massive NS, which has important implications for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter.

  3. A magnetic field evolution scenario for brown dwarfs and giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Ansgar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Very little is known about magnetic fields of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. We use the energy flux scaling law presented by Christensen et al. (2009) to calculate the evolution of average magnetic fields in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs under the assumption of fast rotation, which is probably the case for most of them. We find that massive brown dwarfs of about 70 M_Jup can have fields of a few kilo-Gauss during the first few hundred Million years. These fields can grow by a factor of two before they weaken after deuterium burning has stopped. Brown dwarfs with weak deuterium burning and extrasolar giant planets start with magnetic fields between ~100G and ~1kG at the age of a few Myr, depending on their mass. Their magnetic field weakens steadily until after 10Gyr it has shrunk by about a factor of 10. We use observed X-ray luminosities to estimate the age of the known extrasolar giant planets that are more massive than 0.3M_Jup and closer than 20pc. Taking into account the age estimate, and ass...

  4. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Bernard Raymond

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 {+-} 7.6(system.) {+-} 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 {+-} 4.7(system.) {+-} 5.6(stat.) events with {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.4 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by {nu}{sub {mu}} and 10 events being consistent with being produced by {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. No evidence of CPT violation is observed.

  5. Development of Strengthened Bundle High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Demko, J.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Tomsic, M. [Plastronic, Inc., Troy, OH (United States); Sinha, U. [Southwire Company, Carollton, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of developing high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables, it was found that mechanical strength of the superconducting tape is the most crucial property that needs to be improved. It is also desirable to increase the current carrying capacity of the conductor so that fewer layers are needed to make the kilo-amp class cables required for electric utility usage. A process has been developed by encapsulating a stack of Bi-2223/Ag tapes with a silver or non-silver sheath to form a strengthened bundle superconductor. This process was applied to HTS tapes made by the Continuous Tube Forming and Filling (CTFF) technique pursued by Plastronic Inc. and HTS tapes obtained from other manufacturers. Conductors with a bundle of 2 to 6 HTS tapes have been made. The bundled conductor is greatly strengthened by the non-silver sheath. No superconductor degradation as compared to the sum of the original critical currents of the individual tapes was seen on the finished conductors.

  6. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earths surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earths surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  7. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulators, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of $1+h_b R_{56}^a$ in phase space, where $h_b$ is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, $R_{56}^a$ is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than $400$ MW, $170$ atto-seconds pulse, $1$ nm coherent X-ray radiation using a $60$ Ampere electron beam out of the linac and $200$ nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  8. Flexibility of short DNA helices with finite-length effect: from base pairs to tens of base pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexibility of short DNA helices is important for the biological functions such as nucleosome formation and DNA-protein recognition. Recent experiments suggest that short DNAs of tens of base pairs (bps) may have apparently higher flexibility than those of kilo bps, while there is still the debate on such high flexibility. In the present work, we have studied the flexibility of short DNAs with finite-length of 5 to 50 bps by the all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo simulations with the worm-like chain model. Our microscopic analyses reveal that short DNAs have apparently high flexibility which is attributed to the significantly strong bending and stretching flexibilities of ~6 bps at each helix end. Correspondingly, the apparent persistence length lp of short DNAs increases gradually from ~29nm to ~45nm as DNA length increases from 10 to 50 bps, in accordance with the available experimental data. Our further analyses show that the short DNAs with excluding ~6 bps at each helix end have...

  9. Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study Task 6 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Tobin

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report is covers the completion of the Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study. The objective of this project was to research, engineer, and demonstrate high-power laboratory testing protocols to accurately reproduce the conditions on the electric power grid representing both normal load switching and abnormalities such as short-circuit fault protection. Test circuits, equipment, and techniques were developed and proven at reduced power levels to determine the feasibility of building a large-scale high-power testing laboratory capable of testing equipment and systems at simulated high-power conditions of the U.S. power grid at distribution levels up through 38 kiloVolts (kV) and transmission levels up through 230 kV. The project delivered demonstrated testing techniques, high-voltage test equipment for load testing and synthetic short-circuit testing, and recommended designs for future implementation of a high-power testing laboratory to test equipment and systems, enabling increased reliability of the electric transmission and distribution grid.

  10. Transformation of the Bennet distribution in a rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Movsesyants, Yu.B.; Chikhachev, A.S.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual Bennet distribution of particles in a beam is characterized by a density which decreases comparatively slowly with increasing radius. This is a negative factor in the solution of problems associated with the formation of a thin, powerful, quasistationary, relativistic electron beam. Under sufficiently high pressure of the residual gas the effect of the current of secondary electrons of the plasma, produced by the ionization of the gas by the beam, on the state of the main beam must be taken into account. As a result of this effect, an equilibrium state of the relativistic beam with a drop in the particle density deeper than in the case of the Bennet distribution toward the periphery of the beam can form. For sufficiently high currents in the beam, say in excess of 1 kilo amp, the average Larmor radius of the electrons of the secondary plasma is shorter than the mean-free-path length and the flow of secondary electrons acquires, owing to the magnetization, a longitudinal component which can change the parameters of the beam if the secondary-electron current is comparable to the beam current. This paper examines these phenomena in a kinetic description of the beam and a magnetohydrodynamic description of the plasma.

  11. Reducing auxiliary power consumption with F. D. fans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, G.E. (PSI Energy, Cayuga Generating Station, Cayuga, IN (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 6, 1988, the Unit No. 1-A forced draft fan at Cayuga station failed in service. This failure and the subsequent replacement of the 1-A F.D. fan and 1.-B F.D. fan with a more energy efficient design, resulted in a reduction in auxiliary power consumption by 2,000 Kilo watts/hr. Annual savings are projected to be $129,000.00 for 1989. Cayuga station was designed and constructed with pressurized boilers. The forced draft fans supplied combustion air, and also were designed to force this air through the entire boiler. In 1975, induced draft (I.D.) fans were installed. This design change modified the boiler to a balanced draft system, which reduced the force or pressure of the air that the F.D. fans were required to supply. Operating as a balance draft unit, the station had considerably more F.D. fan capacity than was necessary. After the failure, a system and economic evaluation warranted a change in design specifications for the F.D. fans, with the quantity of air remaining unchanged, but supplied at a lower pressure. This paper deals with the cause of failure, economic details and justification of the new design fans, as well as the final testing of the fans after being placed in service.

  12. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Wu, Juhao

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulators, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched kilo-Ampere current electron beam from a few tens Ampere electron beam out of a linac. The initial modulation energy wavelength can be compressed by a factor of 1 + h{sub b}R{sub 56}{sup a} phase space, where h{sub b} is the energy bunch length chirp introduced by the laser chirper, R{sub 56}{sup a} is the momentum compaction factor of the first bunch compressor. As an illustration, we present an example to generate more than 400 MW, 170 atto-seconds pulse, 1 nm coherent X-ray radiation using a 60 Ampere electron beam out. of the linac and 200 nm laser seed. Both the final wavelength and the radiation pulse length in the proposed scheme are tunable by adjusting the compression factor and the laser parameters.

  13. Strength and conformance testing of a GCL used in a solid waste landfill lining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, K.S. [CH2M Hill, Anchorage, AK (United States); O`Brien, A.J. [CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes strength and conformance tests conducted on a Bentomat ST geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) used in a composite lining system for the Cells 4 and 5 expansion of the Anchorage Regional Landfill in Anchorage, Alaska. The Cells 4 and 5 lining system included use of an 80-mil, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) liner overlying a GCL on both the sideslopes and base of the cells. The use of this lining system in a Seismic Zone 4 area on relatively steep side slopes required careful evaluation of both internal shear strength of the GCL and interface friction between the GCL and textured HDPE. Laboratory tests were carried out to evaluate both peak and residual GCL internal strengths at normal loads up to 552 kiloPascals (80 pounds per square inch). Laboratory tests also were conducted to evaluate the interface strength between the GCL and Serrot box and point textured HDPE. Interface strengths between both woven and nonwoven sides of the GCL and the textured HDPE were evaluated. Considerations related to use of peak or residual strengths for various interim stability cases are described in this paper. Stability analyses using stress-dependent interface and internal strengths for the GCL are addressed. The quality assurance and conformance testing program adopted for the project on GCL is discussed also.

  14. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  15. Electron energy boosting in laser-wake-field acceleration with external magnetic field Bapprox1 T and laser prepulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosokai, Tomonao [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Mizuta, Yoshio [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 22-2 Shirane-shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred-mega-electron-volt electron beams with quasi-monoenergetic distribution, and a transverse geometrical emittance as small as approx0.02 pi mm mrad are generated by low power (7 TW, 45 fs) laser pulses tightly focused in helium gas jets in an external static magnetic field, Bapprox1 T. Generation of monoenergetic beams strongly correlates with appearance of a straight, at least 2 mm length plasma channel in a short time before the main laser pulse and with the energy of copropagating picosecond pedestal pulses (PPP). For a moderate energy PPP, the multiple or staged electron self-injection in the channel gives several narrow peaks in the electron energy distribution.

  16. Seismic response of steel suspension bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Astaneh-Asl, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing accurate, realistic numerical simulations of the seismic response of long-span bridges presents a significant challenge to the fields of earthquake engineering and seismology. Suspension bridges in particular represent some of the largest and most important man-made structures and ensuring the seismic integrity of these mega-structures is contingent on accurate estimations of earthquake ground motions and accurate computational simulations of the structure/foundation system response. A cooperative, multi-year research project between the Univ. of California and LLNL was recently initiated to study engineering and seismological issues essential for simulating the response of major structures. Part of this research project is focused on the response of the long-span bridges with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge serving as a case study. This paper reports on the status of this multi-disciplinary research project with emphasis on the numerical simulation of the transient seismic response of the Bay Bridge.

  17. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  18. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  19. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  20. Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  1. Voltage breakdown limits at a high material temperature for rapid pulse heating in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pincosy, P A; Speer, R

    1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Advanced Hydro Facility (AHF) is required to produce multi-pulse radiographs. Electron beam pulse machines with sub-microsecond repetition are not yet available to test the problem of electron beam propagation through the hydro-dynamically expanding plasma from the nearby previously heated target material. A proposed test scenario includes an ohmically heated small volume of target material simulating the electron beam heating, along with an actual electron beam pulse impinging on nearby target material. A pulse power heating circuit was tested to evaluate the limits of pulse heating a small volume of material to tens of kilo-joules per gram. The main pulse heating time (50 to 100 ns) was to simulate the electron beam heating of a converter target material. To avoid skin heating non-uniformity a longer time scale pulse of a few microseconds first heats the target material to a few thousand degrees near the liquid to vapor transition. Under this state the maximum electric field that the current carrying conductor can support is the important parameter for insuring that the 100 ns heating pulse can deposit sufficient power. A small pulse power system was built for tests of this limit. Under cold conditions the vacuum electric field hold-off limit has been quoted as high as many tens of kilovolts per centimeter. The tests for these experiments found that the vacuum electric field hold-off was limited to a few kilovolts per centimeter when the material approached melting temperatures. Therefore the proposed test scenario for AHF was not achievable.*

  2. Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat Nadeem [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD and PIC modeling of the system. A first generation college undergraduate student was employed to assist in experiments and data analysis throughout the project. Data resulting from the research program were broadly disseminated by publication in scientific journals, and presentation at international and national conferences and workshops.

  3. Combining prior day contours to improve automated prostate segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godley, Andrew; Sheplan Olsen, Lawrence J.; Stephans, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States); Zhao Anzi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 and Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of automatically segmented prostate, rectum, and bladder contours required for online adaptive therapy. The contouring accuracy on the current image guidance [image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)] scan is improved by combining contours from earlier IGRT scans via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: Six IGRT prostate patients treated with daily kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) had their original plan CT and nine CBCTs contoured by the same physician. Three types of automated contours were produced for analysis. (1) Plan: By deformably registering the plan CT to each CBCT and then using the resulting deformation field to morph the plan contours to match the CBCT anatomy. (2) Previous: The contour set drawn by the physician on the previous day CBCT is similarly deformed to match the current CBCT anatomy. (3) STAPLE: The contours drawn by the physician, on each prior CBCT and the plan CT, are deformed to match the CBCT anatomy to produce multiple contour sets. These sets are combined using the STAPLE algorithm into one optimal set. Results: Compared to plan and previous, STAPLE improved the average Dice's coefficient (DC) with the original physician drawn CBCT contours to a DC as follows: Bladder: 0.81 {+-} 0.13, 0.91 {+-} 0.06, and 0.92 {+-} 0.06; Prostate: 0.75 {+-} 0.08, 0.82 {+-} 0.05, and 0.84 {+-} 0.05; and Rectum: 0.79 {+-} 0.06, 0.81 {+-} 0.06, and 0.85 {+-} 0.04, respectively. The STAPLE results are within intraobserver consistency, determined by the physician blindly recontouring a subset of CBCTs. Comparing plans recalculated using the physician and STAPLE contours showed an average disagreement less than 1% for prostate D98 and mean dose, and 5% and 3% for bladder and rectum mean dose, respectively. One scan takes an average of 19 s to contour. Using five scans plus STAPLE takes less than 110 s on a 288 core graphics processor unit. Conclusions: Combining the plan and all prior days via the STAPLE algorithm to produce treatment day contours is superior to the current standard of deforming only the plan contours to the daily CBCT. STAPLE also improves the precision, with a substantial decrease in standard deviation, a key for adaptive therapy. Geometrically and dosimetrically accurate contours can be automatically generated with STAPLE on prostate region kV CBCT in a time scale suitable for online adaptive therapy.

  4. Comparison of LaBr3:Ce and NaI(Tl) Scintillators for Radio-Isotope Identification Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrath, Brian D.; Choate, Bethany J.; Fast, Jim E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators offer significantly better resolution (<3 percent at 662 kilo-electron volt [keV]) relative to sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and have recently become commercially available in sizes large enough for the hand-held radio-isotope identification device (RIID) market. There are drawbacks to lanthanum halide detectors, however. These include internal radioactivity that contributes to spectral counts and a low-energy response that can cause detector resolution to be lower than that of NaI(Tl) below 100 keV. To study the potential of this new material for RIIDs, we performed a series of measurements comparing a 1.5?1.5 inch LaBr?3:Ce detector with an Exploranium GR 135 RIID, which contains a 1.5-2.2 inch NaI(Tl) detector. Measurements were taken for short time frames, as typifies RIID usage. Measurements included examples of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), typically found in cargo, and special nuclear materials. Some measurements were noncontact, involving short distances or cargo shielding scenarios. To facilitate direct comparison, spectra from the different detectors were analyzed with the same isotope identification software (ORTEC ScintiVision TM). In general, the LaBr3:Ce detector was able to find more peaks and find them faster than the NaI(Tl) detector. To the same level of significance, the LaBr3:Ce detector was usually two to three times faster. The notable exception was for 40K containing NORM where interfering internal contamination in the LaBr3:Ce detector exist. NaI(Tl) consistently outperformed LaBr3:Ce for this important isotope. LaBr3:Ce currently costs much more than NaI(Tl), though this cost-difference is expected to diminish (but not completely) with time. As is true of all detectors, LaBr3:Ce will need to be gain-stabilized for RIID applications. This could possibly be done using the internal contaminants themselves. It is the experience of the authors that peak finding software in RIIDs needs to be improved, regardless of the detector material.

  5. Comparison of Activity Determination of Radium 226 in FUSRAP Soil using Various Energy Lines - 12299

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Brian [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Stoughton, MA 02072 (United States); Donakowski, Jough [Unites States Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, MO 64106 (United States); Hays, David [United States Army Corps of Engineers, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma spectroscopy is used at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Maywood Superfund Site as the primary radioanalytical tool for quantization of activities of the radionuclides of concern in site soil. When selecting energy lines in gamma spectroscopy, a number of factors are considered including assumptions concerning secondary equilibrium, interferences, and the strength of the lines. The case of the Maywood radionuclide of concern radium-226 (Ra-226) is considered in this paper. At the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site, one of the daughters produced from radioactive decay of Ra-226, lead-214 (Pb- 214), is used to quantitate Ra-226. Another Ra-226 daughter, bismuth-214 (Bi-214), also may be used to quantitate Ra-226. In this paper, a comparison of Ra-226 to Pb-214 activities and Ra-226 to Bi-214 activities, obtained using gamma spectrometry for a large number of soil samples, was performed. The Pb-214, Bi-214, and Ra-226 activities were quantitated using the 352 kilo electron volt (keV), 609 keV, and 186 keV lines, respectively. The comparisons were made after correcting the Ra-226 activities by a factor of 0.571 and both ignoring and accounting for the contribution of a U-235 interfering line to the Ra-226 line. For the Pb-214 and Bi-214 activities, a mean in-growth factor was employed. The gamma spectrometer was calibrated for efficiency and energy using a mixed gamma standard and an energy range of 59 keV to 1830 keV. The authors expect other sites with Ra-226 contamination in soil may benefit from the discussions and points in this paper. Proper use of correction factors and comparison of the data from three different gamma-emitting radionuclides revealed agreement with expectations and provided confidence that using such correction factors generates quality data. The results indicate that if contamination is low level and due to NORM, the Ra-226 can be measured directly if corrected to subtract the contribution from U-235. If there is any indication that technologically enhanced uranium may be present, the preferred measurement approach for quantitation of Ra-226 activity is detection of one of the Ra-226 daughters, Pb-214 or Bi-214, using a correction factor obtained from an in-growth curve. The results also show that the adjusted Ra-226 results compare very well with both the Pb-214 and Bi-214 results obtained using an in-growth curve correction factor. (authors)

  6. Stability and support issues in the construction of large span caverns for physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughton, C.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New physics experiments, proposed to study neutrinos and protons, call for the use of large underground particle detectors. In the United States, such detectors would be housed in the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), sited within the footprint of the defunct Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Although the experimental proposals differ in detail, all rely heavily upon the ability of the mined and reinforced rock mass to serve as a stable host for the detector facilities. Experimental proposals, based on the use of Water Cherenkov detector technology, specify rock caverns with excavated volumes in excess of half a million cubic meters, spans of at least 50 m, sited at depths of approximately one to 1.5 kilometers. Although perhaps sited at shallower depth, proposals based on the use of Liquid Argon (LAr) detector technology are no less challenging. LAr proposals not only call for the excavation of large span caverns, but have an additional need for the safe management of large quantities (kilo-tonnes) of cryogenic liquid, including critical provisions for the fail-safe egress of underground personnel and the reliable exhaust of Argon gas in the event of a catastrophic release. These multi-year, high value physics experiments will provide the key experimental data needed to support the research of a new generation of physicists as they probe the behavior of basic particles and the fundamental laws of nature. The rock engineer must deliver caverns that will reliably meet operational requirements and remain stable for periods conservatively estimated to be in excess of twenty years. This paper provides an overview of the DUSEL site conditions and discusses key end-user requirements and design criteria likely to dominate in determining the viability of experimental options. The paper stresses the paramount importance of collecting adequate site-specific data to inform early siting, dimensioning and layout decisions. Given the large-scale of the excavation and likely timeline to construction, the paper also strongly suggests that there are exciting opportunities for the rock mechanics and engineering community to identify and efficiently integrate research components into the design and construction process.

  7. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  8. An Overview of the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign: Mexico City Emissions and their Transport and Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, Luisa T.; Madronich, Sasha; Gaffney, Jeffrey; Apel, Eric; de Foy, B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ferrare, R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lamb, Brian K.; Orsonio-Vargas, A. R.; Russell, P. B.; Schauer, James J.; Stevens, P. S.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zavala, Miguel A.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The worlds population is projected to increase 33% during the next three decades, to 8.1 billion. Nearly all of the projected growth is expected to be concentrated in urban centers. These rapidly expanding urban regions and surrounding suburban areas are leading to the phenomenon of megacities (metropolitan areas with populations exceeding 10 million inhabitants). Well governed, densely populated settlements can reduce the need for land conversion and provide proximity to infrastructure and services. However, many urban areas experience uncontrolled sprawl and their activities are the leading cause of environmental problems. These mega-centers of human population are tied directly to increasing demands for energy and associated industrial activities and motorization that lead to more emission of pollutants into the atmosphere. Air pollution is one of the most important environmental challenges of this century. This challenge is particularly acute in the developing world where the rapid growth of megacities is producing atmospheric pollution of unprecedented severity and extent. MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations) is the first international collaborative project to examine the behavior and the export of atmospheric pollutants generated in megacities. The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) - one of the worlds largest megacities and North Americas most populous city -- was selected as the initial case study to characterize the sources and processes of emissions from the urban center and to evaluate the regional and global impacts of the Mexico City air pollution plume

  9. MAST Upgrade - Construction Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milnes, Joe; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O'Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: 1) Testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); 2) Adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and 3) Exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progr...

  10. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  11. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Rahul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this e...

  12. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Suresh; Andrew Meulenberg

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this effect in the Polar Regions. One such proposed ring could reduce the peak summer temperature of the Polar Regions (80-90 degree latitude) by almost 3K. The tilting of the solar-shades, to reduce their cooling effect at the poles and to increase it in the near-polar regions, is recommended.

  13. Science and Technology of the 10-MA Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Y-K.M.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 MA in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 MA in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.

  14. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  15. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  16. Advanced High-Speed 16-Bit Digitizer System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fastest commercially available 16-bit ADC can only perform around 200 mega-samples per second (200 MS/s). Connecting ADC chips together in eight different time domains increases the quantity of samples taken by a factor of eight. This method of interleaving requires that the input signal being sampled is split into eight identical signals and arrives at each ADC chip at the same point in time. The splitting of the input signal is performed in the analog front end containing a wideband filter that impedance matches the input signal to the ADC chips. Each ADC uses a clock to tell it when to perform a conversion. Using eight unique clocks spaced in 45-degree increments is the method used to time shift when each ADC chip performs its conversion. Given that this control clock is a fixed frequency, the clock phase shifting is accomplished by tightly controlling the distance that the clock must travel, resulting in a time delay. The interleaved ADC chips will now generate digital data in eight different time domains. These data are processed inside a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to move the data back into a single time domain and store it into memory. The FPGA also contains a Nios II processor that provides system control and data retrieval via Ethernet.

  17. Measurement of Activation Reaction Rate Distributions in a Lead Assembly Bombarded with 500-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichro; Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Yasuda, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co, {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(n,4n){sup 194}Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code.

  18. THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  19. Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Selforganization of Atoms and Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Gareev; I. E. Zhidkova

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula (in MeV/$c^{2}$) $\\Delta M=\\frac{n_{1}}{n_{2}}*0.0076294, n_{i}=1,2,3,...$ Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different $A, N$ and $Z$ and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

  20. The Lisbon new international airport: The story of a decision-making process and the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partidario, Maria R., E-mail: mrp@civil.ist.utl.p [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Arquitectura, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 LISBOA (Portugal); Coutinho, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.coutinho@ua.p [IDAD-Instituto do Ambiente e Desenvolvimento, Campus Universitario, 3810-193 AVEIRO (Portugal)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the brief story of a decision process and the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment in government political decision-making. Following a prolonged, and agitated, decision process, initiated in the 1960s, the Government of Portugal in 2005 took the final decision to build the new international airport of Lisbon at the controversial location of Ota, 40 km north of Lisbon. The detailed project design and EIA were started. However this decision would change in 2007 due to the challenge raised by a private sponsored study that identified an alternative location for the airport at Campo de Tiro de Alcochete (CTA). This new site, which had never been considered as an option before, appeared to avoid many of the problems that caused public controversy at the Ota site. The Government, pressured by this challenge, promoted a strategic comparative assessment between the two sites. The result of this study was the choice of CTA as the preferred location. This paper discusses this radical change in the decision from a socio-political perspective. It will highlight the relevance of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), and the strategic and constructive approach it enables in mega-project decision-making.

  1. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Haddad; M. Ruan; V. Boudry

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling calorimeter equipped with gaseous sensor layers with digital readout is near perfect for "Particle Flow Algorithm" approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. The response of a finely segmented digital calorimeter is characterized by track efficiency and multiplicity. Monte Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate "digitization" process. We developed a general method for simulating the pad response, a digitization, reproducing efficiency and multiplicity, using the spatial information from a simulation done at higher granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas. Validating the method on test beam data, experimental observables such as efficiency, multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  2. A spinning mirror for fast angular scans of EBW emission for magnetic pitch profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpe, Francesco [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A tilted spinning mirror rapidly steers the line of sight of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) emission radiometer at the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). In order to resist high mechanical stresses at rotation speeds of up to 12 000 rpm and to avoid eddy current induced magnetic braking, the mirror consists of a glass-reinforced nylon substrate of a special self-balanced design, coated with a reflecting layer. By completing an angular scan every 2.5-10 ms, it allows one to characterize with good time resolution the Bernstein-extraordinary-ordinary mode-conversion efficiency as a function of the view angles. Angular maps of conversion efficiency are directly related to the magnetic pitch angle at the cutoff layer for the ordinary mode. Hence, measurements at various frequencies provide the safety factor profile at the plasma edge. Initial measurements and indications of the feasibility of the diagnostic are presented. Moreover, angular scans indicate the best launch conditions for EBW heating.

  3. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. IV. NGC 4216: A Bombarded Spiral in the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Cote, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Ferrarese, Laura; Ferriere, Etienne; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Mihos, J Christopher; Vollmer, Bernd; Balogh, Michael L; Carlberg, Ray G; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R; Emsellem, Eric; MacArthur, Lauren A; Mei, Simona; Michel-Dansac, Leo; van Driel, Wim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird Telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low-surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already catalogued VCC dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g-i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf gal...

  4. Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

  5. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  6. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  7. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  8. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  9. Petrophysical characterization of the Carito Norte, Mulata and Carito fields, Norte de Monagas, Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porras, J.C. [Corpoven, S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela); De J. Valle, [Amoco Production Company, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Norte de Monagas trend is located in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin and is characterized by high temperature, high initial pressure and production rates, variable PVT properties, GORs, and asphaltene content, and the presence of a tar mat at the base of the oil column. These reservoirs were petrophysically characterized through the integration of core and log data. Productive sands are composed of very coarse- to medium-grained sands deposited primarily in deltaic to shallow marine environments. These sands are quartz-rich, with clay matrix averaging 3% in the Oligocene and 6% in the Cretaceous. The main difference is the presence of up to 30% feldspars in the Cretaceous. Clay mineralogy is dominated by illitic material in the Cretaceous and by kaolinite in the Oligocene. Post-depositional changes dominated by cementation, mechanical compaction and subsequent dissolution processes have resulted in marked improvement or degradation of the productive characteristics of these reservoirs. Rocks were divided into four petrophysical. categories based on grain size, pore throat radius, porosity and permeability. Mercury saturation vs. mercury saturation over capillary pressure plots show the dominant interconnected pore system which controls flow rates is best defined by 50% saturation. Plots constructed using R50 pore aperture correlation indicate the pore throats to be macro to mega porous. Average log calculated water saturation is 14% compared with estimated from capillary pressure data of 12% at 1200{prime} above free water level, and 15% from relative permeability data. Relative permeability data indicate the rocks behave preferably as water-wet.

  10. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from large scale structure probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Baccigalupi, Carlo [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Galilei'', Universit di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Verde, Licia [ICREA (Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats) and Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos, (ICC-UB-IEEC) Universidad de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: xia@sissa.it, E-mail: bacci@sissa.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we measure the angular power spectra C{sub l} of three high-redshift large-scale structure probes: the radio sources from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the quasar catalogue of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Release Six (SDSS DR6 QSOs) and the MegaZ-LRG (DR7), the final SDSS II Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) photometric redshift survey. We perform a global analysis of the constraints on the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity from these angular power spectra, as well as from their cross-correlation power spectra with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature map. In particular, we include non-Gaussianity of the type arising from single-field slow roll, multifields, curvaton (local type), and those which effects on the halo clustering can be described by the equilateral template (related to higher-order derivative type non-Gaussianity) and by the enfolded template (related to modified initial state or higher-derivative interactions). When combining all data sets, we obtain limits of f{sub NL} = 4820, f{sub NL} = 50265 and f{sub NL} = 18395 at 68% confidence level for local, equilateral and enfolded templates, respectively. Furthermore, we explore the constraint on the cubic correction g{sub NL}?{sup 3} on the bias of dark matter haloes and obtain a limit of ?1.2 10{sup 5} < g{sub NL} < 11.3 10{sup 5} at 95% confidence level.

  11. A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L. [Magplane Technology Inc., Littleton, MA (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

  12. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  13. Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 10c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm. Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

  14. {open_quotes}Just-in-time inventory{close_quotes} proceed with caution!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katterhenry, W.E.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Just when the power generation industry was stabilizing along came mega government regulations and changing economic conditions that threw a monkey wrench into the works. Although improved inventory practices have helped solve some coal problems, other still remain. The Clean Air Act has resulted in fuel switching, blending, equipment changes, and other factors, all contributing to power plant personnel grey hair. Then along came Just-In-Time inventory practices. Not only is the plant required to make all these changes to meet regulatory requirements, but reduce the quantity of fuel in inventory to unheard of low levels. Why is it so difficult to precisely account for coal in inventory? After all, inventory is a simple matter of accurately measuring the coal coming in to the plant, measuring the coal used by the plant, and conducting an accurate physical inventory to measure the remaining coal. Add to this, a major coal inventory reduction policy, when base maps are not maintained or updated and are, therefore, not likely to be accurate. Some coal may have been stored below the prevailing water table, rendering the coal unusable. Weather conditions, such as major ice storms can render much of the coal unburnable. Unless accounted for, these things reduce the perceived amount of coal in inventory. This presentation will address these issues to assist in preventing potential unscheduled plant shut down and the need to purchase unscheduled blocks of emergency power. Just-In-Time Inventory isn`t as straightforward as first meets the eye.

  15. SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goettler, Richard

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    LGFCS is developing an integrated planar (IP) SOFC technology for mega-watt scale power generation including the potential for use in highly efficient, economically competitive central generation power plant facilities fuel by coal synthesis gas. This Department of Energy Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program has been aimed at achieving further cell and stack technical advancements and assessing the readiness of the LGFCS SOFC stack technology to be scaled to larger-scale demonstrations as a path to commercialization. Significant progress was achieved in reducing to practice a higher performance and lower cost cell technology, identifying and overcoming degradation mechanisms, confirming the structural capability of the porous substrate for reliability, maturing the strip design for improved flow to allow high fuel utilization operation while minimizing degradation mechanisms and obtaining full scale block testing at 19 kW under representative conditions for eventual product and meeting SECA degradation metrics. The SECA program has played a key role within the overall LGFCS development program in setting the foundation of the technology to justify the progression of the technology to the next level of technology readiness testing.

  16. Study of the pulse power supply unit for the four-horn system of the CERN to Frjus neutrino super beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baussan, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power supply studies for the four-horn system for the CERN to Frjus neutrino Super Beam oscillation experiment are discussed here. The power supply is being studied to meet the physics potential and the mega-watt (MW) power requirements of the proton driver of the Super Beam. A one-half sinusoid current waveform with a 350 kA maximum current and pulse length of 100 \\mu s at 50 Hz frequency is generated and distributed to four-horns. In order to provide the necessary current needed to focus the charged mesons producing the neutrino beam, a bench of capacitors is charged at 50 Hz frequency to a +12 kV reference voltage and then discharged through a large switch to each horn via a set of strip-lines at the same rate. A current recovery stage allows to invert rapidly the negative voltage of the capacitor after the discharging stage in order to recuperate large part of the injected energy and thus to limit the power consuption. The energy recovery efficiency of that system is very high at 97%. For feasibilit...

  17. Microwave Power Beaming Infrastructure for Manned Lightcraft Operations: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrabo, Leik N. [Lightcraft Technologies, Inc., Bennington, VT (United States)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past {approx}7 years, microwave gyrotron technology has rapidly evolved to a critical threshold wherein ultra-energetic space launch missions based on beamed energy propulsion (BEP) now appear eminently feasible. Over the next 20 years, hundred megawatt-class microwave power-beaming stations could be prototyped on high deserts and 3- to 4 km mountain peaks before migrating into low Earth orbit, along with their passive microwave relay satellites. Described herein is a 20 GW rechargeable nuclear power satellite and microwave power-beaming infrastructure designed for manned space launch operations in the year 2025. The technological readiness of 2500 GJ superconducting magnetic energy storage 'batteries', 433-m ultralight space structures, 100 MW liquid droplet radiators, 1-6+ MW gyrotron sources, and mega-scale arrays (e.g., 3000 phase-locked units) is addressed. Microwave BEP is 'breakthrough' technology with the very real potential to radically reduce space access costs by factors of 100 to 1000 in the forseeable future.

  18. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  19. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  20. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  1. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  2. The All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey(AEGIS) Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.P.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.C.; Coil,A.L.; Conselice, C.J.; Cooper, M.C.; Croton, D.J.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Ellis, R.S.; Faber, S.M.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke,B.F.; Goss, W.M.; Gwyn, S.; Harker, J.; Hopkins, A.M.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R.J.; Kassin, S.A.; Kirby, E.N.; Koekemoer, A.M.; Koo, D.C.; Laird, E.S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lin, L.; Lotz, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Martin,D.C.; Metevier, A.J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Nandra, K.; Noeske, K.G.; Papovich, C.; Phillips, A.C.; Rich,R. M.; Rieke, G.H.; Rigopoulou, D.; Salim, S.; Schiminovich, D.; Simard, L.; Smail, I.; Small,T.A.; Weiner,B.J.; Willmer, C.N.A.; Willner, S.P.; Wilson, G.; Wright, E.L.; Yan, R.

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z{approx}1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200-2500 Angstroms), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600-9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400-8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  3. The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.; Coil, A.L.; Conselice, C.; Cooper, M.; Croton,; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R.; Faber, S.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, B.; Goss, W.M.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this the first of a series of ''Letters'', we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z {approx} 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS{sup 30} X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX{sup 31} ultraviolet (1200-2500 A), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey{sup 32} optical (3600-9000 {angstrom}), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 {angstrom}), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS{sup 33} optical (4400-8500 {angstrom}), Palomar/WIRC{sup 34} near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC{sup 35} mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA{sup 36} radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope{sup 37}. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  4. Research on pinches driven by SPPED 2 generator hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snchez-Soto, L L; Silva, P; Sylvester, G S; Zambra, M; Pavez, C; Raspa, V; Castillo, F; Kies, W; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian; Raspa, Veronica; Castillo, Fermin; Kies, Walter

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. SPEED2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 mF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt~1013 A/s). Currently the SPEED2 is operating at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN, Chile, being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in SPEED2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from SPEED2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kiloamperes to mega-amperes, using the SPEED2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration oper...

  5. Tests of the Hardware and Software for the Reconstruction of Trajectories in the Experiment MINERvA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomino Gallo, Jose Luis; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINERvA experiment has a highly segmented and high precision neutrino detector able to record events with high statistic (over 13 millions in a four year run). MINERvA uses FERMILAB NuMI beamline. The detector will allow a detailed study of neutrino-nucleon interactions. Moreover, the detector has a target with different materials allowing, for the first time, the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. We present here the work done with the MINERvA reconstruction group that has resulted in: (a) development of new codes to be added to the RecPack package so it can be adapted to the MINERvA detector structure; (b) finding optimum values for two of the MegaTracker reconstruction package variables: PEcut = 4 (minimum number of photo electrons for a signal to be accepted) and Chi2Cut = 200 (maximum value of {chi}{sup 2} for a track to be accepted); (c) testing of the multi anode photomultiplier tubes used at MINERvA in order to determine the correlation between different channels and for checking the device's dark counts.

  6. Forestry management for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Silva, E.; Appanah, S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests in the developing world are in crisis. Nowhere is this more acute than in Asia: though one-third of the land mass is covered with forests, this ratio is shrinking rapidly at the rate of 2 million hectares per year. By current trends, half of the original 725 million hectares will disappear by the year 2000. The dramatic declines will occur in India, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Some of the economic costs of deforestation are obvious. Timber export has long been an important income earner (eg, it is a second major export after oil earning $4.2 billion in 1991 for Indonesia and $3.8 billion in 1992 for Malaysia). Some of the losses from deforestation are of concern to the world community. China, India, Indonesia, and Malaysia are among the 12 'mega-diversity' countries in which half of the earth's plant and animal species are to be found. (Copyright (c) 1993 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

  7. Machos in M31? Absence of Evidence but not Evidence of Absence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Jong, Jelte T.A.; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Cseresnjes, Patrick; Kuijken, Konrad; Crotts, Arlin P.S.; Bergier, Alexander; Baltz, Edward A.; Gyuk, Geza; Sackett, Penny D.; Uglesich, Robert R.; Sutherland, Will J.; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Queen's U., Kingston /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. /Leiden Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Chicago U.,

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a microlensing survey toward the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) carried out during four observing seasons at the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). This survey is part of the larger microlensing survey toward M31 performed by the Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda (MEGA) collaboration. Using a fully automated search algorithm, we indentify 14 candidate microlensing events, three of which are reported here for the first time. Observations obtained at the Mayall telescope are combined with the INT data to produce composite light curves for these candidates. The results from the survey are compared with theoretical predictions for the number and distribution of events. These predictions are based on a Monte Carlo calculation of the detection efficiency and disk-bulge-halo models for M31. The models provide the full phase-space distribution functions (DFs) for the lens and source populations and are motivated by dynamical and observational considerations. They include differential extinction and span a wide range of parameter space characterized primarily by the mass-to-light ratios for the disk and bulge. For most models, the observed event rate is consistent with the rate predicted for self-lensing--a MACHO halo fraction of 30% or higher can be ruled at the 95% confidence level. The event distribution does show a large near-far asymmetry hinting at a halo contribution to the microlensing signal. Two candidate events are located at particularly large projected radii on the far side of the disk. These events are difficult to explain by self lensing and only somewhat easier to explain by MACHO lensing. A possibility is that one of these is due to a lens in a giant stellar stream.

  8. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30N-40N and 40N-50N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  9. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G., E-mail: fsantana@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  10. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE NINTH MAGNITUDE CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STAR BD+44 Degree-Sign 493

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hiroko; Aoki, Wako [Department of Astronomical Science, School of Physical Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [Kwasan Observatory, School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 377-0702 (Japan); Carollo, Daniela, E-mail: aoki.wako@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: beers@noao.edu, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: honda@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: daniela.carollo@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonic Research Center, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detailed chemical abundances for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star BD+44 Degree-Sign 493, previously reported on by Ito et al. Our measurements confirm that BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is an extremely metal-poor ([Fe/H] =-3.8) subgiant star with excesses of carbon and oxygen. No significant excesses are found for nitrogen and neutron-capture elements (the latter of which place it in the CEMP-no class of stars). Other elements that we measure exhibit abundance patterns that are typical for non-CEMP extremely metal-poor stars. No evidence for variations of radial velocity has been found for this star. These results strongly suggest that the carbon enhancement in BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is unlikely to have been produced by a companion asymptotic giant-branch star and transferred to the presently observed star, nor by pollution of its natal molecular cloud by rapidly-rotating, massive, mega metal-poor ([Fe/H] < - 6.0) stars. A more likely possibility is that this star formed from gas polluted by the elements produced in a ''faint'' supernova, which underwent mixing and fallback, and only ejected small amounts of elements of metals beyond the lighter elements. The Li abundance of BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 (A(Li) = log (Li/H)+12 =1.0) is lower than the Spite plateau value, as found in other metal-poor subgiants. The upper limit on Be abundance (A(Be) = log (Be/H)+12 < - 1.8) is as low as those found for stars with similarly extremely-low metallicity, indicating that the progenitors of carbon- (and oxygen-) enhanced stars are not significant sources of Be, or that Be is depleted in metal-poor subgiants with effective temperatures of {approx}5400 K.

  11. Nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic waves with the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Alfred Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionosphere provides us with an opportunity to perform plasma experiments in an environment with long confinement times, very large-scale lengths, and no confining walls. The auroral ionosphere with its nearly vertical magnetic field geometry is uniquely endowed with large amount of free energy from electron and ion precipitation along the magnetic field and mega-ampere current across the magnetic field. To take advantage of this giant outdoor laboratory, two facilities HAARP and HIPAS, with frequencies ranging from the radio to optical bands, are now available for active probing of and interaction with this interesting region. The ponderomotive pressures from the self-consistent wave fields have produced significant local perturbations of density and particle distributions at heights where the incident EM frequency matches a plasma resonance. This paper will review theory and experiments covering the nonlinear phenomena of parametric decay instability to wave collapse processes. At HF frequencies plasma lenses can be created by preconditioning pulses to focus what is a normally divergent beam into a high-intensity spot to further enhance nonlinear phenomena. At optical wavelengths a large rotating liquid metal mirror is used to focus laser pulses up to a given height. Such laser pulses are tuned to the same wavelengths of selected atomic and molecular resonances, with resulting large scattering cross sections. Ongoing experiments on dual-site experiments and excitation of ELF waves will be presented. The connection of such basic studies to environmental applications will be discussed. Such applications include the global communication using ELF waves, the ozone depletion and remediation and the control of atmospheric CO{sub 2} through the use of ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  12. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE M33 STAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Aparicio, Antonio, E-mail: izaskun@astro.ufl.ed, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.ed, E-mail: antapaj@iac.e [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n. E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a catalog of 2990 extended sources in a 1{sup 0} x 1{sup 0} area centered on M33 using the MegaCam camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The catalog includes 599 new candidate stellar clusters, 204 previously confirmed clusters, 1969 likely background galaxies, and 218 unknown extended objects. We present ugriz integrated magnitudes of the candidates and confirmed star clusters (SCs) as well as the full width at half maximum, ellipticity, and stellarity. Based on the properties of the confirmed SCs, we select a sub-sample of highly probable clusters composed of 246 objects. The integrated photometry of the complete cluster catalog reveals a wide range of colors of -0.4 < (g - r) < 1.5 and -1.0 < (r - i) < 1.0 with no obvious cluster subpopulations. Comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages some as old as {approx}10 Gyr. In addition, we find a sequence in the color-color diagrams that deviates from the expected direction of evolution. This feature could be associated with very young clusters (<10{sup 7} yr) possessing significant nebular emission. Analysis of the radial density distribution suggests that the cluster system of M33 has suffered from significant depletion possibly due to interactions with M31. We also detect a gap in the cluster distribution in the color-color diagram at (g - r) {approx_equal} 0.3 and (u - g) {approx_equal} 0.8. This gap could be interpreted as an evolutionary effect. This complete catalog provides promising targets for deep photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to study the structure and star formation history of M33.

  13. A human chromosome 7 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resource: Construction, characterization, and screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, E.D.; Braden, V.V.; Fulton, R.S. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, ST. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others] [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, ST. Louis, MO (United States); and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paradigm of sequence-tagged site (STS)-content mapping involves the systematic assignment of STSs to individual cloned DNA segments. To date, yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) represent the most commonly employed cloning system for constructing STS maps of large genomic intervals, such as whole human chromosomes. For developing a complete YAC-based STS-content map of human chromosome 7, we wished to utilize a limited set of YAC clones that were highly enriched for chromosome 7 DNA. Toward that end, we have assembled a human chromosome 7 YAC resource that consists of three major components: (1) a newly constructed library derived from a human-hamster hybrid cell line containing chromosome 7 as its only human DNA; (2) a chromosome 7-enriched sublibrary derived from the CEPH mega-YAC collection by Alu-polymerase chain reaction (Alu-PCR)-based hybridization; and (3) a set of YACs isolated from several total genomic libraries by screening for >125 chromosome 7 STSs. In particular, the hybrid cell line-derived YACs, which comprise the majority of the clones in the resource, have a relatively low chimera frequency (10-20%) based on mapping isolated insert ends to panels of human-hamster hybrid cell lines and analyzing individual clones by fluorescence in situ hybridization. An efficient strategy for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening of this YAC resource, which totals 4190 clones, has been developed and utilized to identify corresponding YACs for >600 STSs. The results of this initial screening effort indicate that the human chromosome 7 YAC resource provides an average of 6.9 positive clones per STS, a level of redundancy that should support the assembly of large YAC contigs and the construction of a high-resolution STS-content map of the chromosome. 72 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Study of electron-positron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  15. Evidence cross-validation and Bayesian inference of MAST plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Svensson, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Appel, L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, current profiles for plasma discharges on the mega-ampere spherical tokamak are directly calculated from pickup coil, flux loop, and motional-Stark effect observations via methods based in the statistical theory of Bayesian analysis. By representing toroidal plasma current as a series of axisymmetric current beams with rectangular cross-section and inferring the current for each one of these beams, flux-surface geometry and q-profiles are subsequently calculated by elementary application of Biot-Savart's law. The use of this plasma model in the context of Bayesian analysis was pioneered by Svensson and Werner on the joint-European tokamak [Svensson and Werner,Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50(8), 085002 (2008)]. In this framework, linear forward models are used to generate diagnostic predictions, and the probability distribution for the currents in the collection of plasma beams was subsequently calculated directly via application of Bayes' formula. In this work, we introduce a new diagnostic technique to identify and remove outlier observations associated with diagnostics falling out of calibration or suffering from an unidentified malfunction. These modifications enable a good agreement between Bayesian inference of the last-closed flux-surface with other corroborating data, such as that from force balance considerations using EFIT++[Appel et al., ''A unified approach to equilibrium reconstruction'' Proceedings of the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (Rome, Italy, 2006)]. In addition, this analysis also yields errors on the plasma current profile and flux-surface geometry as well as directly predicting the Shafranov shift of the plasma core.

  16. [Cyclotron based nuclear science]. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 saw the initial runs of three new spectrometers, which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP) (data from which are shown on the cover of this document), the Mass Achroniat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole Dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. The ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. The beam was on target 39% of this time. Studies of nuclear dynamics and nuclear thermodynamics using the neutron ball have come to fruition. A critical re-evaluation of the available data on the giant monopole resonance indicated that the incompressibility is not specified to a range smaller than 200--350 MeV by those data. New systematic experiments using the MDM spectrometer are now underway. The MEGA collaboration obtained the first data on the {mu} {yields} e{gamma} decay rate and determination of the Michel parameter in normal {mu} decay. Experiments appear to confirm the existence of monoenergetic pair peaks even for relatively low Z{sub projectile} -- Z{sub target} combinations. Studies of the ({alpha},2{alpha}) knockout reaction indicate that this reaction may prove to be a valuable tool for determination of reaction rates of astrophysical interest. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. New measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported. The research is presented in nearly 50 brief summaries usually including data and references.

  17. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  18. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  19. Building State-of-the-Art Wind Technology Testing Facilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers are required to test their blades as part of the turbine certification process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) to design, construct, and operate the Wind Technology Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts. The WTTC offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. NREL worked closely with MTS Systems Corporation to develop the novel large-scale test systems needed to conduct the static and fatigue tests required for certification. Static tests pull wind turbine blades horizontally and vertically to measure blade deflection and strains. Fatigue tests cycle the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine. For static testing, the WTTC is equipped with servo-hydraulic winches and cylinders that are connected to the blade through cables to apply up to an 84-mega Newton meter maximum static bending moment. For fatigue testing, MTS developed a commercial version of NREL's patented resonant excitation system with hydraulic cylinders that actuate linear moving masses on the blade at one or more locations. This system applies up to a 21-meter tip-to-tip fatigue test tip displacement to generate 20-plus years of cyclic field loads in a matter of months. NREL also developed and supplied the WTTC with an advanced data acquisition system capable of measuring and recording hundreds of data channels at very fast sampling rates while communicating with test control systems.

  20. Bedforms in a turbulent stream.Part 2: Formation of ripples by primary linear instability and of dunes by non-linear pattern coarsening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fourrire; P. Claudin; B. Andreotti

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely accepted that both ripples and dunes form in rivers by primary linear instability, the wavelength of the former scaling on the grain size, that of the latter being controled by the water depth. We revisit here this problem, using the computation of the turbulent flow over a wavy bottom performed in Part 1. The details of the different mechanisms controlling sediment transport are encoded into three quantities: the saturated flux, the saturation length and the threshold shear stress. Theses quantities are modelled in the case of erosion and momentum limited bed loads. This framework allows to give a clear picture of the instability in terms of dynamical mechanisms. The relation between the wavelength at which ripples form and the flux saturation length is quantitatively derived. Inverting the problem, experimental data is used to determine the saturation length as a function of grain size and shear velocity. Finally, using the systematic expansion of the flow field with respect to the corrugation amplitude, we discuss the non-linear selection of ripple aspect ratio. Investingating the effect of a free surface on the linear instability, we show that the excitation of standing waves at the surface has a stabilising effect, independently of the details of the flow and sediment transport models. Consequently, the shape of the dispersion relation is such that dunes can not result from a primary linear instability. We present the results of field experiments performed in the natural sandy Leyre river, which evidence the formation of ripples by a linear instability and the formation of dunes by a non-linear pattern coarsening limited by the free surface. We show that mega-dunes form when the sand bed presents heterogeneities such as a wide distribution of grain sizes.

  1. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the magnetic field spreads from the hot spot over the surface that contains the toroidal gap, it will propagate through the gap and set up a steady state in the capsule. The main compression is then initiated. First, it closes the gap and crow-bars the field, then it compresses the fuel to ignition. In addition to this application, we discuss the use of this mechanism to induce Mega-gauss fields in laboratory apparatus for measurements of the effects of large magnetic fields on material samples. A preliminary target design for this purpose is presented. It is made of high-density material with no hydrogen surface contamination to minimize fast ion losses and to minimize x-ray preheat of the sample (the material, whose magnetic properties are to be measured). In it, the gap is designed to allow the magnetic field to move into the interior of the target while minimizing the flow of hot electrons into the interior. By adjusting the size of the gap as well as its configuration, the hot electron effects can be minimized. Since the strength of the magnetic field depends on the radial distance to the sample from the center of the conductor carrying the return current, the sample is located at a point of minimum conductor radius. This location also minimizes the effects on the measurement of any hot electrons that flow into the interior. Useful experiments can be accomplished with the seed field alone in this geometry. Compressing the capsule after the insertion of the seed field may allow experiments with even larger magnetic fields. We have used computer-simulation techniques to address a number of issues. Our conclusions include: This magnetic-field generating mechanism is a viable method for generating magnetic fields in ICF targets and for laboratory experiments. Useful experiments on material samples can be done with the seed field of 1 to10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) and higher magnetic fields can be obtained by subsequently compressing the capsule. The results reported here can be studied experimentally with a modest CO2 laser that emits 4.5 J of ene

  2. Building opportunities for photovoltaics in the U.S. Final report [PV BONUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Nicklas

    1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the North Carolina's PV Bonus Team was to develop and demonstrate a commercially viable, building-integrated, photovoltaic system that, in addition to providing electricity, would capture and effectively utilize the thermal energy produced by the photovoltaic array. This project objective was successfully achieved by designing, testing, constructing, and monitoring two roof integrated photovoltaic systems--one on a Applebee's Restaurant in Salisbury, North Carolina and the second on a Central Carolina Bank in Bessemer City, North Carolina. The goal of Innovative Design is to now use these successful demonstrations to facilitate entry of building integrated, pv/thermal systems into the marketplace. The strategy was to develop the two systems that could be utilized in future applications. Both systems were designed and then constructed at the North Carolina Solar Center at North Carolina State University. After extensive testing at the North Carolina Solar Center, the systems were moved to the actual construction sites and implemented. The Applebee's Restaurant system was designed to substitute for the roof assembly of a low sloping, south-facing sunspace roof that typically incorporated clay tile. After monitoring the installed system for one year it was determined that the 1.2 kilowatt (peak) system produces an average peak reduction of 1 kilowatt (rated peak is 1.7 kiloWatts), saves 1,529 kilowatt-hours of electricity, and offsets 11,776 kilowatt-hours of thermal energy savings used to pre-heat water. A DC fan connected directly to eight of the thirty-two amorphous modules moves air through air passages mounted on the backside of the modules and into a closed loop duct system to a heat exchanger. This heat exchanger is, in turn, connected to a pre-heat hot water tank that is used to heat the water for the restaurant. The Central Carolina Bank system was designed to substitute for the roof assembly of the drive-in window area of the bank. The design featured a triangulated truss that incorporated ten crystalline photovoltaic modules on one side of the truss and a reflective panel on the opposite side. The system used a utility interactive, programmable inverter and a 18.9 kilowatt-hour battery bank. The system is designed so that a DC fan, connected to one of the modules, forces ambient air across the back side of the modules. In the summer this heat is vented to the outside but in the winter this heated, fresh air is introduced into the building as ventilation air. Like the Applebee's system, the design allowed the entire roof assembly to be constructed off-site, tested, and then shipped to the site in pie-assembled, large components. During the first full year of operation, the 2.2 kilowatt (rated peak is 2.7 kilowatts) system contributed to an average peak reduction of .9 kilowatts. The system, as designed, saves 2,576 kilowatt-hours of electricity and offsets 3,473 kilowatt hours (of a potential thermal benefit of 10,172 collected kWhs) of thermal energy savings that is used as fresh air make-up in the colder months. This report is a summary of their conclusions.

  3. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soer, Wouter

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. The high-power warm-white LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability through extensive reliability tests. The new kilo-lumen package has been commercialized under the product name LUXEON M. As of the end of the program, the LUXEON M product has been released in the following CCT/CRI combinations: 3000K/70, 4000K/70, 5000K/70, 5700K/70, 2700K/80, 3000K/80 and 4000K/80. LM-80 tests for the products with CCTs of 4000 K and higher have reached 8500 hours, and per IESNA TM-21-11 have established an L70 lumen maintenance value of >51,000 hours at A drive current and up to 120 C board temperature.

  4. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  5. TomoTherapy MLC verification using exit detector data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Quan; Westerly, David; Fang Zhenyu; Sheng, Ke; Chen Yu [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Xinghua Cancer Hospital, Xinghua, Jiangsu 225700 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Treatment delivery verification (DV) is important in the field of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). While IMRT and image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), allow us to create more conformal plans and enables the use of tighter margins, an erroneously executed plan can have detrimental effects on the treatment outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a DV technique to verify TomoTherapy's multileaf collimator (MLC) using the onboard mega-voltage CT detectors. Methods: The proposed DV method uses temporal changes in the MVCT detector signal to predict actual leaf open times delivered on the treatment machine. Penumbra and scattered radiation effects may produce confounding results when determining leaf open times from the raw detector data. To reduce the impact of the effects, an iterative, Richardson-Lucy (R-L) deconvolution algorithm is applied. Optical sensors installed on each MLC leaf are used to verify the accuracy of the DV technique. The robustness of the DV technique is examined by introducing different attenuation materials in the beam. Additionally, the DV technique has been used to investigate several clinical plans which failed to pass delivery quality assurance (DQA) and was successful in identifying MLC timing discrepancies as the root cause. Results: The leaf open time extracted from the exit detector showed good agreement with the optical sensors under a variety of conditions. Detector-measured leaf open times agreed with optical sensor data to within 0.2 ms, and 99% of the results agreed within 8.5 ms. These results changed little when attenuation was added in the beam. For the clinical plans failing DQA, the dose calculated from reconstructed leaf open times played an instrumental role in discovering the root-cause of the problem. Throughout the retrospective study, it is found that the reconstructed dose always agrees with measured doses to within 1%. Conclusions: The exit detectors in the TomoTherapy treatment systems can provide valuable information about MLC behavior during delivery. A technique to estimate the TomoTherapy binary MLC leaf open time from exit detector signals is described. This technique is shown to be both robust and accurate for delivery verification.

  6. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

  7. The mediation of environmental assessment's influence: What role for power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Matthew, E-mail: cashmore@plan.aau.dk [Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 15, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark); Axelsson, Anna [Naturskyddsforeningen, Box 4625, 116 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable empirical research has been conducted on why policy tools such as environmental assessment (EA) often appear to have 'little effect' (after Weiss) on policy decisions. This article revisits this debate but looks at a mediating factor that has received limited attention to-date in the context of EA - political power. Using a tripartite analytical framework, a comparative analysis of the influence and significance of power in mediating environmental policy integration is undertaken. Power is analysed, albeit partially, through an exploration of institutions that underpin social order. Empirically, the research examines the case of a new approach to policy-level EA (essentially a form of Strategic Environmental Assessment) developed by the World Bank and its trial application to urban environmental governance and planning in Dhaka mega-city, Bangladesh. The research results demonstrate that power was intimately involved in mediating the influence of the policy EA approach, in both positive (enabling) and negative (constraining) ways. It is suggested that the policy EA approach was ultimately a manifestation of a corporate strategy to maintain the powerful position of the World Bank as a leading authority on international development which focuses on knowledge generation. Furthermore, as constitutive of an institution and reflecting the worldviews of its proponents, the development of a new approach to EA also represents a significant power play. This leads us to, firstly, emphasise the concepts of strategy and intentionality in theorising how and why EA tools are employed, succeed and fail; and secondly, reflect on the reasons why power has received such limited attention to-date in EA scholarship. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conducts empirical research on the neglected issue of power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Employs an interpretation of power in which it is viewed as a productive phenomenon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses the influence of power in the trial application of a new approach to policy environmental assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrates the importance of power dynamics in understanding the successes and failures of environmental assessment.

  8. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  9. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, R. T. [AREVA Inc., 303 Ravendale Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  10. Scaling Up: Kilolumen Solid-State Lighting Exceeding 100 LPW via Remote Phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waqidi Falicoff

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thirty-month project was successful in attaining its ambitious objectives of demonstrating a radically novel 'remote-phosphor' LED light source that can out-perform conventional conformal coated phosphor LED sources. Numerous technical challenges were met with innovative techniques and optical configurations. This product development program for a new generation of solid-state light sources has attained unprecedented luminosity (over 1 kilo-lumen) and efficacy (based on the criterion lumens per 100mw radiant blue). LPI has successfully demonstrated its proprietary technology for optical synthesis of large uniform sources out of the light output of an array of separated LEDs. Numerous multiple blue LEDs illuminate single a phosphor patch. By separating the LEDs from the phosphor, the phosphor and LEDs operate cooler and with higher efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions (from startup to steady state). Other benefits of the system include: better source uniformity, more types of phosphor can be used (chemical interaction and high temperatures are no longer an issue), and the phosphor can be made up from a pre-manufactured sheet (thereby lowering cost and complexity of phosphor deposition). Several laboratory prototypes were built and operated at the expected high performance level. The project fully explored two types of remote phosphor system: transmissive and reflective. The first was found to be well suited for a replacement for A19 type incandescent bulbs, as it was able to replicate the beam pattern of a traditional filament bulb. The second type has the advantages that it is pre-collimate source that has an adjustable color temperature. The project was divided in two phases: Phase I explored a transmissive design and Phase II of the project developed reflective architectures. Additionally, in Phase II the design of a spherical emitting transmissive remote phosphor bulb was developed that is suitable for replacement of A19 and similar light bulbs. In Phase II several new reflective remote phosphor systems were developed and patents applied for. This research included the development of reflective systems in which the short-pass filter operated at a nominal incidence angle of 15{sup o}, a major advancement of this technology. Another goal of the project was to show that it is possible to align multiple optics to multiple LEDs (spaced apart for better thermal management) to within an accuracy in the z-direction of 10 microns or less. This goal was achieved. A further goal was to show it is possible to combine and homogenize the output from multiple LEDs without any flux loss or significant increase in etendue. This goal also was achieved. The following color-coded computer drawing of the Phase 2 reflective remote phosphor prototype gives an idea of the accuracy challenges encountered in such an assembly. The actual setup has less functional clarity due to the numerous items of auxiliary equipment involved. Not only did 10 degrees of freedoms alignment have to be supplied to the LEDs and component prisms as well, but there were also micro-titrating glue dispensers and vacuum hoses. The project also utilized a recently introduced high-index glass, available in small customized prisms. This prototype also embodies a significant advance in thin-film design, by which an unprecedented 98% single-pass efficiency was attained over a 30 degree range of incidence angle (Patents Pending). Such high efficiency is especially important since it applies to the blue light going to the phosphor and then again to the phosphor's light, so that the 'system' efficiency associated with short-pass filter was 95.5%. Other losses have to be kept equally small, towards which a new type of ultra-clear injection-moldable acrylic was discovered and used to make ultra-transparent CPC optics. Several transmissive remote phosphor prototypes were manufactured that could replace screw-in type incandescent bulbs. The CRI of the white light from these prototypes varied from 55 to 93. The system efficiency achieved was between 27 to 29.5

  11. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as Saltstone. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a mega vault and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0, 2.4, and 0.72. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 to 0.9. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.

  12. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.

  13. SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goettler, Richard

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LGFCS is developing an integrated planar (IP) SOFC technology for mega-watt scale power generation including the potential for use in highly efficient, economically competitive central generation power plant facilities fuel by coal synthesis gas. This Department of Energy Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is aimed at achieving further cell and stack technical advancements and assessing the readiness of the LGFCS SOFC stack technology to be scaled to larger-scale demonstrations in subsequent phases. LGFCS is currently in Phase 2 of the program with the Phase 1 test carrying over for completion during Phase 2. Major technical results covering the initial Phase 2 budget period include: Metric Stack Testing: 1. The Phase I metric test is a ~7.6 kW block test (2 strips) in Canton that started in March 2012 and logged 2135 hours of testing prior to an event that required the test to be shutdown. The degradation rate through 2135 hours was 0.4%/1000 hours, well below the Phase I target of 2%/1000 hours and the Phase 2 target of 1.5%/1000 hours. 2. The initial Phase II metric test consisting of 5 strips (~19 kW) was started in May 2012. At the start of the test OCV was low and stack temperatures were out of range. Shutdown and inspection revealed localized structural damage to the strips. The strips were repaired and the test restarted October 11, 2012. 3. Root cause analysis of the Phase 1 and initial Phase 2 start-up failures concluded a localized short circuit across adjacent tubes/bundles caused localized heating and thermal stress fracture of substrates. Pre-reduction of strips rather than in-situ reduction within block test rigs now provides a critical quality check prior to block testing. The strip interconnect design has been modified to avoid short circuits. Stack Design: 1. Dense ceramic strip components were redesigned to achieve common components and a uniform design for all 12 bundles of a strip while meeting a flow uniformity of greater than 95% of the mean flow for all bundles. The prior design required unique bundle components and pressure drops specifications to achieve overall strip fuel flow uniformity. 2. Slow crack growth measurements in simulated fuel environments of the MgO-MgAl2O4 substrate by ORNL reveal favorable tolerance against slow crack growth. Evidence as well of a high stress intensity threshold below which crack growth would be avoided. These findings can have very positive implications on long-term structural reliability. More testing is required, including under actual reformate fuels, to gain a deeper understanding of such time dependent reliability mechanisms. 3. A next generation (Gen2) substrate from the LGFCS supplier has been qualified. The substrate incorporates cost reductions and quality improvements. Cell Developments: 1. Subscale testing of the epsilon technology under system relevant conditions surpassed 16,000 hours with a power degradation rate of <1%/1000 hours. Key degradation mechanisms have been identified: (1) MnOx accumulation near the cathode-electrolyte interface and cathode densification (2) metals migration across the anode-ACC bilayer and general microstructure coarsening at high temperatures and peak fuel utilizations and (3) metal migration into primary interconnect (lesser mechanism) 5 2. Alternate LSM cathodes show slightly lower ASR and lesser free MnOx and chromium contamination. Long-term durability screening of three alternate cathodes is being performed. 3. Single layer anodes show very significant improvement in microstructure stability after 5000 hours testing at aggressive conditions of 925C and bundle outlet, high utilization fuel. 4. New primary interconnect designs are being tested that achieve lower ASR. Modeling performed to further balance ASR and cost through optimized designs.

  14. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

  15. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

  16. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the towerâ??s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribeâ??s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribeâ??s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribeâ??s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribeâ??s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projectsâ?? energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

  17. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL LESS RISKY MORE PRODUCTIVE MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs and to environmental pollution and other

  18. Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value