Sample records for median expected lifetime

  1. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  2. Abstract -In wireless sensor networks where deployment is expected to surpass the lifetime of batteries, a major part of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    Abstract - In wireless sensor networks where deployment is expected to surpass the lifetime propose a maintenance model to explain sources of maintenance costs in wireless sensor networks. We also. Keywords - Sensor networks, maintenance, routing, GPSR. I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION Wireless sensor

  3. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

  4. THE MAXIMAL EXPECTED LIFETIME OF BROWNIAN MOTION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Pitman (Advanced Publishing Program), Boston, Mass.-London. [2] R. Ba˜nuelos, 2009 Four unknown constants. Oberwolfach Report 06, workshop on'Low ...

  5. Weighted median of the data in solving least absolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scitovski, Rudolf

    is illustrated by an example of hourly natural gas consumption forecast. Key words. median, weighted median

  6. Lifetime and Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A DOE Solid-State Lighting Program technology fact sheet on lifetime, reliability, and failure as related to LED-based products.

  7. Lifetime Benefits through Load Balancing in Homogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haenggi, Martin

    , battery depletion is emulated so that it becomes possible to actually measure the load balancingLifetime Benefits through Load Balancing in Homogeneous Sensor Networks Daniele Puccinelli network. The use of load balancing schemes can be expected to provide significant lifetime benefits

  8. The Neutron Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Wietfeldt

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. The nucleon vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G_V and G_A determine the neutron lifetime as well as the strengths of weak interaction processes involving free neutrons and protons that are important in astrophysics, cosmology, solar physics and neutrino detection. In combination with a neutron decay angular correlation measurement, the neutron lifetime can be used to determine the first element of the CKM matrix Vud. Unfortunately the two main experimental methods for measuring the neutron lifetime currently disagree by almost 4 sigma. I will present a brief review of the status of the neutron lifetime and prospects for the future.

  9. Introduction The median problem for the reversal distance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    genomes E. Ohlebusch, M.I. Abouelhoda, K. Hockel, J. Stallkamp University of Ulm, Germany CPM 2005 The median problem for the reversal distance in circular bacterial genomes #12;Introduction Methods Conclusion General Problem Distances Specific Problem Median Problem Given 3 genomes G1, G2, and G3, find

  10. NMDOT Application for Permit to Construct an Access or Median...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMDOT Application for Permit to Construct an Access or Median Opening on Public Right of WayLegal Published NA...

  11. Property:EstimatedTimeMedian | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationTypeEstimatedCostMedianUSD Jump to:EstimatedTimeMedian Jump to:

  12. EXPECTATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    odavis

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPECTATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS. STUDENTS SHOULD SPEND A MINIMUM OF 10 HOURS OF. COURSE WORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS PER WEEK

  13. Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdous, Md Rubiat

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus...

  14. Securely Computing an Approximate Median in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setia, Sanjeev

    Securely Computing an Approximate Median in Wireless Sensor Networks Sankardas Roy 1 sroy1@gmu and the unattended nature of sensor nodes, sensor network protocols need to be designed with security in mind and efficient. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.2.0 [Computer-Communication Networks]: General- Security

  15. Preliminary Expected Performance Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capabilities. To facilitate discussion of the scientific impact and design optimization of such a lattice, this document describes the expected performance characteristics...

  16. Runtime verification of object lifetime specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Zev (Zev A.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports on the implementation of a runtime verification system for object lifetime specifications. This system is used to explore and evaluate the expressiveness object lifetime specifications. Object lifetime ...

  17. Expectations across entertainment media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Alexander Chance

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An audience's satisfaction with an entertainment product is dependent on how well their expectations are fulfilled. This study delves into the implicit contract that is formed between the purveyor of an entertainment ...

  18. Property:EstimatedCostMedianUSD | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationTypeEstimatedCostMedianUSD Jump to: navigation, search Property

  19. Performance expectation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON ACCRETION DISK LIFETIMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillenbrand, Lynne

    of stellar mass. #12; METHODOLOGY Constraining disk lifetimes means measuring infrared excesses and stellar ages and masses for large samples of young stellar objects. #12; Infrared excesses: #15; A combination of stellar irradiative and viscous heating in circumstellar disks produces ux excesses at micro

  1. The algebra of metric betweenness II: geometry and equational characterization of weakly median graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepoi, Victor

    . This demonstrates that the median algebras featured by Avann and Sholander half a century ago and, more generally

  2. Salt-and-Pepper Noise Removal by Median-type Noise Detectors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Raymond

    1 Salt-and-Pepper Noise Removal by Median-type Noise Detectors and Detail-preserving Regularization for removing salt-and-pepper impulse noise. In the first phase, an adaptive median filter is used to identify remove salt-and-pepper-noise with noise level as high as 90%. Index Terms Impulse noise, adaptive median

  3. Ratio of D/sup 0/ and D/sup +/ lifetimes from their semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conventional expectation for the decays of D mesons assumes that the charm quark decays in the presence of light, spectator quarks and thus the lifetimes of both charged and uncharged states are equal. In this article, evidence is presented from DELCO (at SPEAR) that the D lifetimes are quite different for neutral and charged mesons, and the results which have also become available from other experiments are reviewed.

  4. Precision measurement of the Lambda_b baryon lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; M. Dogaru; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; P. Gorbounov; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; J. Luisier; H. Luo; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; E. Maurice; A. Mazurov; B. Mc Skelly; J. McCarthy; A. McNab; R. McNulty; B. Meadows; F. Meier; M. Meissner; M. Merk; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; A. Mordà; M. J. Morello; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the \\Lambda b baryon lifetime to that of the B0 meson is measured using 1.0/fb of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The \\Lambda b baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode \\Lambda b -> J/\\psi pK-, while the B0 meson decay used is the well known B0 -> J/\\psi pi+K- mode, where the pi+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K*0(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B0 meson lifetime, the \\Lambda b lifetime is found to be 1.482 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.012 ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  5. Reaching 10 ms single photon lifetimes for superconducting aluminum cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Reagor; Hanhee Paik; G. Catelani; L. Sun; C. Axline; E. Holland; I. M. Pop; N. A. Masluk; T. Brecht; L. Frunzio; M. H. Devoret; L. I. Glazman; R. J. Schoelkopf

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional microwave cavities have recently been combined with superconducting qubits in the circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. These cavities should have less sensitivity to dielectric and conductor losses at surfaces and interfaces, which currently limit the performance of planar resonators. We expect that significantly (>10^3) higher quality factors and longer lifetimes should be achievable for 3D structures. Motivated by this principle, we have reached internal quality factors greater than 0.5x10^9 and intrinsic lifetimes of 0.01 seconds for multiple aluminum superconducting cavity resonators at single photon energies and millikelvin temperatures. These improvements could enable long lived quantum memories with submicrosecond access times when strongly coupled to superconducting qubits.

  6. Improvement of multichannel seismic data through application of the median concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naess, O.E.; Bruland, L.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different types of median-based methods can be used to improve multichannel seismic data, particularly at the stacking stage in processing. Different applications of the median concept are described and discussed. The most direct application is the Simple Median Stack (SMS), i.e. to use as output the median value of the input amplitudes at each reflection time. By the Alpha-Trimmed Mean (ATM) method it is possible to exclude and optional amount of the input amplitudes that differ most from the median value. A more novel use of the median concept is the Weighted Median Stack (WMS). This method is based on a long-gapped median filter. The implicit weighting, which is purely statistical in nature, is due to the edge effects that occur when the gapped filter is applied. By shifting the traces around before filtering, the maximum weight may be given to, for example, the far-offset traces. The fourth method is the Iterative Median Stack (IMS). This method, which also includes a strong element of weighting, consists of a repeated use of a gapped median filter combined with a gradual shortening of the filter after each pass. Examples show how the seismic data can benefit from the application of these methods.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: accelerated lifetime testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerated lifetime testing Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage,...

  8. ON THE p-MEDIAN POLYTOPE OF A SPECIAL CLASS OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    p-median and the uncapacitated facility location polytopes, the odd cycle ... description of the fractional extreme points of the linear relaxation for the p-

  9. Drogue and Transmitter Lifetime Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors still "max out" and the GDP is waiting on strain gauge drifters to be deployed for evaluation. #12Drogue and Transmitter Lifetime Evaluation Presented by: Erik Valdes Drifter Data Assembly Center lifetime Evaluation All manufacturers except Pacific Gyre have changed to tether strain by early 2010

  10. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide David Archer,1 Michael Eby,2 Victor Brovkin,3 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial

  11. Exceeding Energy Consumption Design Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castleton, H. F.; Beck, S. B. M.; Hathwat, E. A.; Murphy, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the building consumed 208.7 kWh m-2 yr-1, 83% of the expected energy consumption (250 kWh m-2 yr-1). This dropped further to 176.1 kWh m-2 yr-1 in 2012 (70% below expected). Factors affecting building energy consumption have been discussed and appraised...

  12. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  13. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation...

  14. Occupational Complexity and Lifetime Cognitive Abilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, Emily

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Associations were examined between complexity of main lifetime occupation and cognitive performance in later life. Occupational complexity ratings for data, people and things were collected from the Dictionary of Occupational ...

  15. Development of guidelines for the aesthetic surface treatment of safety-shaped median barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, Jacob Raymond

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety-shaped median barriers have long been employed to keep misguided vehicles on the roadway. In recent years there has been a growing national desire for more aesthetically pleasing roadside safety systems. Adding ...

  16. Comparison of median frequency between traditional and functional sensor placements during activity monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Selina

    Long-term monitoring is of great clinical relevance. Accelerometers are often used to provide information about activities of daily living. The median frequency (f[subscript m]) of acceleration has recently been suggested ...

  17. Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Kostin, M.; /Michigan State U., NSCL; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

  18. Diffusion Simulation and Lifetime Calculation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam lifetime is an important parameter for any storage ring. For protons in RHIC it is dominated by the non-linear nature of the head-on collisions that causes the particles to diffuse outside the stable area in phase space. In this report we show results from diffusion simulation and lifetime calculation for the 2006 and 2008 polarized proton runs in RHIC.

  19. Development of guidelines for the aesthetic surface treatment of safety-shaped median barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, Jacob Raymond

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF GUIDELINES FOR THE AESTHETIC SURFACE TREATMENT OF SAFETY-SHAPED MEDIAN BARRIERS A Thesis by JACOB...) Harry Hogan (Member) Paul N. Roschke (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Development of Guidelines for the Aesthetic Surface Treatment of Safety-Shaped Median Barriers. (August 2004...

  20. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  1. -98 -97 -96 -95 -94 -93 -92 -91 -90 -89 -88 -87 -86 -85 Longitude (median for dredges)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    -85 Nb/Zr Longitude (median for dredges) Existing Data Western GSC Eastern GSC Ingle Investigating -98 -96 -94 -92 -90 -88 -86 -84 -82 -80 K/Ti*100 Longitude (median for dredges) Existing data Western

  2. Vickers microindentation toughness of a sintered SiC in the median-crack regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Asish; Kobayashi, A.S. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Engineering); Li, Zhuang (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Henager, C.H. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Bradt, R.C. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vickers microindentation method for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics was investigated in the median crack regime for a sintered alpha SiC. The results are compared with fracture toughness measurements by conventional fracture mechanics technique and also with the reported indentation toughness for the low-load Palmqvist crack regime. Indentation toughnesses in the median crack regime vary widely depending on the choice of the specific equation which is applied. The indentation toughnesses are also load (crack length) dependent. A decreasing R-curve trend results, in contradiction to the flat R-curve that has been observed with conventional fracture mechanics techniques. It is concluded that the Vickers microindentation method is not a reliable technique for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics in the median crack regime.

  3. Dispersion in the lifetime and accretion rate of T Tauri discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip J. Armitage; Cathie J. Clarke; Francesco Palla

    2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare evolutionary models for protoplanetary discs that include disc winds with observational determinations of the disc lifetime and accretion rate in Taurus. Using updated estimates for stellar ages in Taurus, together with published classifications, we show that the evolution of the disc fraction with stellar age is similar to that derived for ensembles of stars within young clusters. Around 30 percent of stars lose their discs within 1 Myr, while the remainder have disc lifetimes that are typically in the 1-10 Myr range. We show that the latter range of ages is consistent with theoretical models for disc evolution, provided that there is a dispersion of around 0.5 in the log of the initial disc mass. The same range of initial conditions brackets the observed variation in the accretion rate of Classical T Tauri stars at a given age. We discuss the expected lifetime of discs in close binary systems, and show that our models predict that the disc lifetime is almost constant for separations exceeding 10 au. This implies a low predicted fraction of binaries that pair a Classical T Tauri star with a Weak-lined T Tauri star, and is in better agreement with observations of the disc lifetime in binaries than disc models that do not include disc mass loss in a wind.

  4. Theoretical update of $B$-Mixing and Lifetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Lenz

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of theoretical predictions for mixing quantities and lifetimes in the $B$-sector. In particular, due to the first non-zero measurement of the decay rate difference in the neutral $B_s$-system, $\\Delta \\Gamma_s/ \\Gamma_s = 17.6 % \\pm 2.9 %$ by the LHCb collaboration and very precise data for $\\tau_{B_s}$ from TeVatron and LHCb our theoretical tools can now be rigorously tested and it turns out that the Heavy Quark Expansion works in the $B$-system to an accuracy of at least 30% for quantities like $\\Gamma_{12}$, which is most sensitive to hypothetical violations of quark hadron duality. This issue that gave rise in the past to numerous theoretical papers, has now been settled experimentally. Further data will even allow to shrink this bound. For total inclusive quantities like lifetimes the compliance is even more astonishing: $\\tau_{B_s}^{\\rm LHCb}/ \\tau_{B_d}^{\\rm HFAG} = 1.001 \\pm 0.014$ is in perfect agreement with the theory expectation of $\\tau_{B_s}/\\tau_{B_d} = 0.996 ... 1.000$. Despite the fact that the new data show no deviations from the standard model expectations, there is still some sizable room for new physics effects. Model-independent search strategies for these effects are presented with an emphasis on the interconnection with many different observables that have to be taken into account. In that respect a special emphasis is given to the large value of the di-muon asymmetry measured by the D0 collaboration.

  5. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  6. B lifetimes and mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedeschi, Franco; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present recent results on b-hadron lifetimes and mixing obtained from the analysis of the data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the period 2002-2004. Many lifetime measurements have been updated since the Summer 2004 conferences, sometimes improving significantly the accuracy. Likewise the measurement of the B{sub d} oscillation frequency has been updated. New limits on the B{sub s} oscillation frequency have been determined using for the first time Run II data.

  7. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  8. Spontaneous fission modes and lifetimes of super-heavy elements in the nuclear density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staszczak; A. Baran; W. Nazarewicz

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of super-heavy (SH) nuclei are primarily governed by alpha decay and spontaneous fission (SF). Here we study the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 cold fusion" and "hot fusion" reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on $^{294}$Ds with a total half-life of ?1.5 days.

  9. Stability yields a PTAS for k-Median and k-Means Clustering Pranjal Awasthi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, Avrim

    Stability yields a PTAS for k-Median and k-Means Clustering Pranjal Awasthi Carnegie Mellon and k-means clustering in Euclidean spaces, in the setting where k is part of the input (not a constant). For the k-means problem, Ostrovsky et al. [18] show that if the optimal (k-1)-means clustering of the input

  10. Online Maintenance of k-Medians and k-Covers Rudolf Fleischer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Rudolf

    Processing, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Shanghai, China. Email: fleischer@acm.org. 2 are given a graph G = (V, E) with nonnegative edge costs. We want to choose k nodes (the medians) from V so Region, China (Project No. HKUST6010/01E) and by RGC/HKUST Direct Allocation Grant DAG03/04.EG05

  11. Online Maintenance of k-Medians and k-Covers Rudolf Fleischer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Rudolf

    , Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Shanghai, China. Email: fleischer@acm.org. 2 Department are given a graph G = (V, E) with nonnegative edge costs. We want to choose k nodes (the medians) from V so Region, China (Project No. HKUST6010/01E) and by RGC/HKUST Direct Allocation Grant DAG03/04.EG05

  12. Adaptive hybrid mean and median filtering of high-ISO long-exposure sensor noise for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabie, Tamer

    Adaptive hybrid mean and median filtering of high-ISO long-exposure sensor noise for digital for Standardization (ISO) and long- exposure settings. The problem lies in the fact that the algorithm must deal, namely blue-channel noise and JPEG blocking artifacts, common in high-ISO digital camera images. A third

  13. Critique of ``Expected Value`` models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, W.L.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a number of models in the defense community which use a methodology referred to as ``Expected Value`` to perform sequential calculations of unit attritions or expenditures. The methodology applied to two-sided, dependent, sequential events can result in an incorrect model. An example of such an incorrect model is offered to show that these models may yield results which deviate significantly from a stochastic or Markov process approach. The example was derived from an informal discussion at the Center for Naval Analyses.

  14. Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

  15. Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

  16. LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadfan, Adam

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

  17. LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadfan, Adam

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

  18. On Models for Object Lifetime Distributions Darko Stefanovi c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ---memory management (garbage collection); G.3 [Mathematics of Computing]: Probability and Statistics---survival in salient shape characteristics with the gamma distribution family used in statistical survival analysis analysis General Terms Measurement Keywords Object lifetimes, lifetime distributions, garbage collection

  19. Aging behavior and lifetime modeling for polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahlen, S. [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Wallner, G.M. [Institute of Materials Science and Testing of Plastics, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef Strasse 18, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Lang, R.W. [Institute for Polymeric Materials and Testing, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, Linz 4040 (Austria)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, polycarbonate (PC) as a material candidate for solar absorber applications is investigated as to the aging behavior at different temperatures in air and water. The aging conditioning was performed in air in the temperature range from 120 to 140 C and in water between 70 and 95 C. Tensile tests were performed on unaged and aged PC film specimens at ambient temperature using strain-to-break values as a performance indicator for the degree of aging. For PC the effect of aging was found to strongly depend on the aging conditions. Activation energy based lifetime prediction models according to various methods described in the literature were applied. The activation energies and corresponding lifetime predictions for the temperature range from 40 to 60 C in water and from 90 to 110 C in air derived from these models are compared and interpreted as to their practical relevance. (author)

  20. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  1. Quasars Are Not Light-Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip F. Hopkins; Lars Hernquist

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of AGN lifetimes and lightcurves. Given the observed AGN luminosity function, a model for AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity) translates directly to a predicted Eddington ratio distribution. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a 'blowout' decay phase after some peak luminosity (shutting down accretion) make specific predictions for the lifetimes distinct from those expected if AGN are simply gas starved (without feedback) and very different from simple phenomenological 'light bulb' models. Present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning 5 decades in Eddington ratio, 3 in BH mass, and redshifts z=0-1, agree with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out 'light-bulb', pure exponential, and gas starvation models at high significance. We compare the Eddington ratio distributions at fixed BH mass and fixed luminosity (both are consistent, but the latter are much less constraining). We present empirical fits to the lifetime distribution and show how the Eddington ratio distributions place tight limits on AGN lifetimes at various luminosities. We use this to constrain the shape of the typical AGN lightcurve, and provide simple analytic fits. Given independent constraints on episodic lifetimes, most local BHs must have gained their mass in no more than a couple of bright episodes, in agreement with merger-driven fueling models.

  2. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Terrill, Edward R. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Borowczak, Marc [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  3. Quasars Are Not Light-Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of AGN lifetimes and lightcurves. Given the observed AGN luminosity function, a model for AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity) translates directly to a predicted Eddington ratio distribution. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a 'blowout' decay phase after some peak luminosity (shutting down accretion) make specific predictions for the lifetimes distinct from those expected if AGN are simply gas starved (without feedback) and very different from simple phenomenological 'light bulb' models. Present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning 5 decades in Eddington ratio, 3 in BH mass, and redshifts z=0-1, agree with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out 'light-bulb', pure exponential, and gas starvation models at high significance. We compare the Eddington ratio distributions at fixed BH mass and fixed luminosity (both ...

  4. Nonlinear Diffusions and Stable-Like Processes with Coefficients Depending on the Median or VaR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolokoltsov, Vassili N., E-mail: v.kolokoltsov@warwick.ac.uk [University of Warwick, Department of Statistics (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to the well-posedness for nonlinear McKean-Vlasov type diffusions with coefficients depending on the median or, more generally, on the {alpha}-quantile of the underlying distribution. The median is not a continuous function on the space of probability measures equipped with the weak convergence. This is one reason why well-posedness of the SDE considered in the paper does not follow by standard arguments.

  5. LIFETIME PREDICTION FOR MODEL 9975 O-RINGS IN KAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently storing plutonium materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and transported and stored in KAMS in Model 9975 shipping packages, which include double containment vessels sealed with dual O-rings made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75 (based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT). The outer O-ring of each containment vessel is credited for leaktight containment per ANSI N14.5. O-ring service life depends on many factors, including the failure criterion, environmental conditions, overall design, fabrication quality and assembly practices. A preliminary life prediction model has been developed for the V0835-75 O-rings in KAMS. The conservative model is based primarily on long-term compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments and Arrhenius accelerated-aging methodology. For model development purposes, seal lifetime is defined as a 90% loss of measurable sealing force. Thus far, CSR experiments have only reached this target level of degradation at temperatures {ge} 300 F. At lower temperatures, relaxation values are more tolerable. Using time-temperature superposition principles, the conservative model predicts a service life of approximately 20-25 years at a constant seal temperature of 175 F. This represents a maximum payload package at a constant ambient temperature of 104 F, the highest recorded in KAMS to date. This is considered a highly conservative value as such ambient temperatures are only reached on occasion and for short durations. The presence of fiberboard in the package minimizes the impact of such temperature swings, with many hours to several days required for seal temperatures to respond proportionately. At 85 F ambient, a more realistic but still conservative value, bounding seal temperatures are reduced to {approx}158 F, with an estimated seal lifetime of {approx}35-45 years. The actual service life for O-rings in a maximum wattage package likely lies higher than the estimates due to the conservative assumptions used for the model. For lower heat loads at similar ambient temperatures, seal lifetime is further increased. The preliminary model is based on several assumptions that require validation with additional experiments and longer exposures at more realistic conditions. The assumption of constant exposure at peak temperature is believed to be conservative. Cumulative damage at more realistic conditions will likely be less severe but is more difficult to assess based on available data. Arrhenius aging behavior is expected, but non-Arrhenius behavior is possible. Validation of Arrhenius behavior is ideally determined from longer tests at temperatures closer to actual service conditions. CSR experiments will therefore continue at lower temperatures to validate the model. Ultrasensitive oxygen consumption analysis has been shown to be useful in identifying non-Arrhenius behavior within reasonable test periods. Therefore, additional experiments are recommended and planned to validate the model.

  6. DISSERTATION IMPACT OF LIFETIME VARIATIONS AND SECONDARY BARRIERS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION IMPACT OF LIFETIME VARIATIONS AND SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CdTe SOLAR-CELL PERFORMANCE UNIVERSITY June 21, 2007 WE HEREBY RECOMMEND THAT THE DISSERTATION PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY JUN PAN Department Head #12;iii ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION Impact of Lifetime Variations and Secondary Barriers on Cd

  7. Prolonging Network Lifetime for Target Coverage in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    limits the network lifetime and impairs the network quality. To prolong the network lifetime, energy-efficiency network used for monitoring targets. One efficient method of reducing the energy consumption of sensors Department of Computer Science, The Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia Abstract

  8. On Nodems for Object Lifetime Distributions Darko Stefanovi6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    in salient shape characteristics with the gamma distribution family used in statistical survival analysis]:Processors--memorymanagement (garbagecollection);G.3 [Mathematicsof Computing]:Probability and Statistics--survival analysis General Terms Measurement Keywords Object lifetimes, lifetime distributions, garbage collection modelling 1. INTRODUCTION

  9. Online Prediction of Battery Lifetime for Embedded and Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    conditions (e.g. ambient temperature, battery recharge count, etc.), and ­ portable so that a varietyOnline Prediction of Battery Lifetime for Embedded and Mobile Devices Ye Wen, Rich Wolski,rich,ckrintz}@cs.ucsb.edu Abstract. This paper presents a novel, history-based, statistical tech- nique for online battery lifetime

  10. WSN Lifetime Optimization through Controlled Sink Mobility and Packet Bufferization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    delay. One solution to trade-off energy and latency is to consider hybrid routing schemes which combineWSN Lifetime Optimization through Controlled Sink Mobility and Packet Bufferization Tifenn Rault 20529 60205 Compiègne, France Abstract--Maximizing the lifetime of energy constrained wire- less sensor

  11. Experimental Investigation of Excited-State Lifetimes in Atomic Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, C.J.; Budker, D.; Commins, E.D.; DeMille, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Shang, S.-Q.; /UC, Berkeley; Zolotorev, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of 21 excited states in atomic Yb were measured using time-resolved fluorescence detection following pulsed laser excitation. The lifetime of the 4f{sup 14}5d6s {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, which is of particular importance for a proposed study of parity nonconservation in atoms, was measured to be 380(30) ns.

  12. Measurement of the lifetime of Pb$^{52+}$, Pb$^{53+}$ and Pb$^{54+}$ beams at 4.2 MeV per nucleon subject to electron cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, S A; Carli, Christian; Chanel, M; Lefèvre, P; Ley, R; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Meshkov, I N; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Motsch, F; Mulder, H; Tranquille, G; Varenne, F

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By measuring the lifetime of stored beams, the recombination of the ions with cooling electrons was investigated. Rates found are larger than expected for radiative electron capture and significantly higher for Pb53+ than for Pb54+ and Pb52+. These results are important for the design of the lead ion injection system for the Large Hadron Collider and for recombination theories.

  13. Lifetime Measurement of the 2+1 state in 20C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petri, Marina-Kalliopi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetime Measurement of the 2 1+ state in 20 C M. Petri,of California. Lifetime Measurement of the 2 + state in C M.Here we report the ?rst measurement of the lifetime of the 2

  14. Brain MRI Classification using the Expectation Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Brain MRI Classification using the Expectation Maximization made a brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) classification algorithm that uses a twostage applied to a set of normal brain MR images for further testing. We accomplished a working

  15. An expectation model of referring expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kræmer, John, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces EMRE, an expectation-based model of referring expressions. EMRE is proposed as a model of non-syntactic dependencies - in particular, discourse-level semantic dependencies that bridge sentence gaps. ...

  16. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er...

  17. WRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR AWRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR A COURSECOURSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    for a course, it is a good idea to think broadly. Course-level expected learning outcomes do not need to focus will know). Be sure to include learning outcomes that describe what the student can do and who they are2424 WRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR AWRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR A COURSECOURSE

  18. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: B_c lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; /Indiana U.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} meson is studied in the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{mu}{sup {+-}} + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/{psi} + {mu} invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 {+-} 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: {tau}(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}) = 0.448{sub -0.036}{sup +0.038}(stat) {+-} 0.032(sys) ps.

  19. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas emissions over the full fuel cycle and vehicle lifetime.are estimated over the full fuel cycle and entire vehicleoperation and maintenance, full fuel-cycle air-pollutant and

  20. Excess carrier lifetimes in Ge layers on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, R., E-mail: richard.geiger@psi.ch, E-mail: hans.sigg@psi.ch; Sigg, H., E-mail: richard.geiger@psi.ch, E-mail: hans.sigg@psi.ch [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Frigerio, J.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G. [L-NESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Süess, M. J. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials Science, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Scientific Center for Optical and Electron Microscopy (SCOPEM), ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, R. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials Science, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Faist, J. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The excess charge carrier lifetimes in Ge layers grown on Si or germanium-on-insulator are measured by synchrotron based pump-probe transmission spectroscopy. We observe that the lifetimes do not strongly depend on growth parameters and annealing procedure, but on the doping profile. The defect layer at the Ge/Si interface is found to be the main non-radiative recombination channel. Therefore, the longest lifetimes in Ge/Si (2.6?ns) are achieved in sufficiently thick Ge layers with a built-in field, which repels electrons from the Ge/Si interface. Longer lifetimes (5.3?ns) are obtained in overgrown germanium-on-insulator due to the absence of the defective interface.

  1. annihilation lifetime study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photons andor other similar pairs 7 Bounds on Cross-sections and Lifetimes for Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay into Charged Leptons from Gamma-ray Observations of Dwarf...

  2. Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anikeev, Konstantin

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

  3. Grid Security: Expecting the Mingchao Ma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University College London

    of a communications line; Power failure; Internet connection failure; Mis-configuration; · Security incidents ­ SystemGrid Security: Expecting the Unexpected Mingchao Ma STFC ­ Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK #12;Slide 2 Overview · Security Service Challenges (SSC) Review · Grid Security Incident ­ What had happened

  4. History Department Field Internship Contract and Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    History Department Field Internship Contract and Expectations HIST 496 Over the course in a journal (either paper or electronic). At the conclusion of the internship, the student should provide, and any other issues of merit or concern. Incomplete grades are not available for internships

  5. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime: Applications in Design and Health Management (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.; Jun, M.; Pesaran, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses models for battery reliability and lifetime and the Battery Ownership Model.

  6. DYNAMIC ILM AN APPROACH TO INFRARED-CAMERA BASED DYNAMICAL LIFETIME IMAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements in measurement times as fast as 1 sec per wafer. Keywords: carrier lifetime, imaging, thermography

  7. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  8. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  9. Verification of automotive networks -what to expect (and not expect) from each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    Verification of automotive networks - what to expect (and not expect) from each technique Nicolas NAVET ­ nicolas.navet@uni.lu "Automotive Bus systems + Ethernet" Stuttgart, Germany, December 9-11, 2013. December 09, 2013 #12;1 Outline - 212/11/2013Automotive Bus systems + Ethernet Early-stage timing

  10. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er... assessment of automotive industry practices in 1971 and concluded that only 50% of controls/displays on various models could be said to have a common location. Perel (1974) reviewed prior research and found that it would be difficult to pinpoint...

  11. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA).

  12. Measurement of the KL meson lifetime with the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The KLOE collaboration

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the KL lifetime using the KLOE detector. From a sample of 4 x 10^8 KS KL pairs following the reaction e+ e- -> phi -> KS KL we select 15 x 10^6 KL -> p0 p0 p0 decays tagged by KS -> pi+ pi- events. From a fit of the proper time distribution we find tau_L = (50.92 +- 0.17{stat} +- 0.25{syst})$ ns. This is the most precise measurement of the KL lifetime performed to date.

  13. Infrared-Active Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Ultralong Carrier Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Doh C.; Robel, Istvan; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the synthesis of composite PbSe/CdSe/CdS nanocrystals with two distinct geometries: core/shell/shell structures and tetrapods. These novel nanostructures exhibit extremely long carrier decay times up to 20 ?s that are combined with high emission efficiencies in the infrared. The increase in carrier lifetimes is attributed to the reduction of the electron?hole overlap as a result of delocalization of the electron wave function into the outer CdS shell or arms. The ultralong carrier lifetimes and controlled geometry render these nanocrystals attractive for a variety of applications from lasing to photocatalysis and photovoltaics.

  14. On an additional realization of supersymmetry in orthopositronium lifetime anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Levin; V. I. Sokolov

    2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Expansion of Standard Model for the quantitative description of the orthopositronium lifetime anomalies (from QED to supersymmetric QED) allows to formulate experimental tests of supervision of additional realization of the supersymmetry in final state of the positron beta-decay of the nuclei such as Na-22, Ga-68. The expermentum crucis program is based on supervision of the orthopositronium "isotope anomaly", on the quantitative description of the "lifetime anomaly", and will allow to resolve the alternative as results of the last Michigan work (2003).

  15. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicola Bartolo; Marco Peloso; Angelo Ricciardone; Caner Unal

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the "solid" must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy $\\gtrsim 3\\%$ in the power spectrum is to be expected, if inflation lasted $\\gtrsim 20-30$ e-folds more than the final $50-60$ efolds required to generare the CMB modes. We also comment and point out various similarities between solid inflation and models of inflation where a suitable coupling of the inflaton to a vector kinetic term $F^{2}$ gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  16. AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

  17. MAJOR, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR POET, PROF. PAUL MARIANI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    MAJOR, LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR POET, PROF. PAUL MARIANI CHESTNUT HILL, MA (February 2009) -- University Prof. of English Paul Mariani, a noted Catholic poet and essayist who is one of America's foremost regarded biographies of twentieth-century American poets": William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked (1981

  18. General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network Deployment Strategies Zhao Cheng, Mark Perillo, and Wendi B. Heinzelman, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--In multihop wireless sensor to energy imbalance among sensors often appear. Sensors closer to a data sink are usually required

  19. Design of the Muon Lifetime Experiment By Steve Kliewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the lifetime of the Muon particle. This planned device will use 4, low voltage, classroom safe scintillator detectors and a data acquisition electronics board developed by Quarknet of FermiLab. Analysis, low voltage, classroom safe, detectors 2. DAQ: use the electronics developed by Quarknet (QNET2) 3

  20. Lifetime Prediction for Supercapacitor-powered Wireless Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Lifetime Prediction for Supercapacitor-powered Wireless Sensor Nodes Christian Renner, J step towards reaching this goal: It explores discharging-characteristics of supercapacitors, discusses-ion polymers, supercapacitors can last for 10 years or even more. Superca- pacitors do not need a complex

  1. NRC Leadership Expectations and Practices for Sustaining a High...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NRC Leadership Expectations and Practices for Sustaining a High Performing Organization NRC Leadership Expectations and Practices for Sustaining a High Performing Organization May...

  2. UIUC Collector Erosion and Optical Lifetime Project Results: Time Dependent Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spila, Timothy P.

    UIUC Collector Erosion and Optical Lifetime Project Results: Time Dependent Exposures Darren A is the lifetime of collector optics. Frequent replacement of the mirror system will detract from the economic

  3. Detection of counterfeit U.S. paper money using intrinsic fluorescence lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levene, Michael J.

    -photon spectral and lifetime fluorescence microscopy," Appl. Opt. 43(27), 5173­5182 (2004). #118121 - $15.00 USD

  4. Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuwana, Eddy

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    fluorescence sensor and the reliability of fluorescence lifetime measurement verify the prospect of this technology for implantable purposes....

  5. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  6. Measurement of the Lambda_b lifetime using semileptonic decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clement, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutíerrez, P; Gutíerrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the Lambda_b lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002--2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda_b baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda_b -> mu nu Lambda_c X. Using $4437 \\pm 329$ signal candidates, we measure the Lambda_b lifetime to be $\\tau(Lambda_b)$ = 1.290^{+0.119}_{-0.110}(stat) ^{+0.087}_{-0.091} (syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda_b decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value.

  7. Lifetime statistics of quantum chaos studied by a multiscale analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Falco, A.; Krauss, T. F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Fratalocchi, A. [PRIMALIGHT, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In a series of pump and probe experiments, we study the lifetime statistics of a quantum chaotic resonator when the number of open channels is greater than one. Our design embeds a stadium billiard into a two dimensional photonic crystal realized on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. We calculate resonances through a multiscale procedure that combines energy landscape analysis and wavelet transforms. Experimental data is found to follow the universal predictions arising from random matrix theory with an excellent level of agreement.

  8. Orientation-Dependent Entanglement Lifetime in a Squeezed Atomic Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.; Vuletic, Vladan [Department of Physics, MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study experimentally the application of a class of entangled states, squeezed spin states, to the improvement of atomic-clock precision. In the presence of anisotropic noise, the entanglement lifetime is strongly dependent on squeezing orientation. We measure the Allan deviation spectrum of a clock operated with a phase-squeezed input state. For averaging times up to 50 s the squeezed clock achieves a given precision 2.8(3) times faster than a clock operating at the standard quantum limit.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF BACK SURFACE ACRYLIC SOLAR MIRRORS TO ASSURE 25 YEAR LIFETIME PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF BACK SURFACE ACRYLIC SOLAR MIRRORS TO ASSURE 25 YEAR LIFETIME of this work. Explicit thanks to Mark A. Schuetz, Kara Shell and Dave Hollingshead for their diligence 1 Lifetime and Degradation Science: Applicability to Renewable energy 1 Lifetime and Degradation

  10. A Precise measurement of the B0(s) lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime in the semileptonic decay channel B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}X (and its charge conjugate), using approximately 0.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2004. They have reconstructed 5176 D{sub s}{sup -} {mu}{sup +} signal events, where the D{sub s}{sup -} is identified via the decay D{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Using these events, they have measured the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to be {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.398 {+-} 0.044 (stat){sub -0.025}{sup +0.028}(syst) ps. This is the most precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime to date.

  11. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  12. The Business of Expectations: How Promissory Organisations Shape Technology & Innovation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, N.; Williams, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The business of technological expectations has yet to be thoroughly explored by scholars interested in the role of expectations and visions in the emergence of technological innovations. However, intermediaries specialising in the production...

  13. Lifetimes of negative parity states in {sup 168}Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genilloud, L. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Jolie, J. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Boerner, H. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Lehmann, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Becvar, F. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Krticka, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Zamfir, N. V. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States) [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Casten, R. F. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the GRID method the lifetimes of 12 states belonging to four negative parity bands in {sup 168}Er were measured at the high flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). For K{sup {pi}}=0{sub 1}{sup -} and K{sup {pi}}=2{sub 1}{sup -} bands the absolute E1 transitions are in agreement with those obtained within the framework of the sdf IBA-1 model and their octupole vibrational character is confirmed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Lifetimes of N = Z Nuclei As-66 and Br-70

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 38, NUMBER 3 Lifetimes of N =Z nuclei As and Br SEPTEMBER 1988 R. H. Burch Jr., C. A. Gagliardi, and R. E. Tribble Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 5 May 1988) We have... of the target wheel, the detector telescope, and the detector shielding. 1988 The American Physical Society 1366 R. H. BURCH, JR., C. A. GAGLIARDI, AND R. E. TRIBBLE 38 indexer with an antibacklash circuit drove the stepping motor. After each irradiation...

  15. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  16. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  17. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  18. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  19. Emission lifetimes of europium-doped pyrochlores for phosphor thermometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansel, Rachael A [ORNL; Desai, Saunak [ORNL; Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Heyes, Andrew [Imperial College, London; Walker, D. Greg [Vanderbilt University

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminescent lifetime of La2Zr2O7 and La2Hf2O7 has been determined as a function of temperature. We have shown that the luminescence of both materials can be used to determine the temperature of a surface up to 1073 K. The results are qualitatively explained via multiphonon emission. Phonon energies and the number of phonons needed to cross the energy gap are estimated. The results are useful in the design of phosphors for noncontact thermometry in high-temperature applications.

  20. NREL: Energy Storage - Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNRELPowerNewsletterAcademy AlumniNewsLifetime

  1. On the convergence of the expected improvement algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note deals with the convergence of the Expected Improvement (EI) algorithm. Several interesting open problems raised.

  2. The Impact of Teachers' Expectations, Parents' Expectations, and Academic Self-Efficacy on the Achievement of English Language Learners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Vivina

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . Riccio Committee Members, Anita S. McCormick Fuhui Tong Victor Arizpe Head of Department, Victor L. Willson August 2012 Major Subject: School Psychology iii ABSTRACT The Impact of Teachers’ Expectations, Parents’ Expectations...

  3. The Differential Lifetimes of Protostellar Gas and Dust Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taku Takeuchi; C. J. Clarke; D. N. C. Lin

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a protostellar disk model that takes into account the combined effect of viscous evolution, photoevaporation and the differential radial motion of dust grains and gas. For T Tauri disks, the lifetimes of dust disks that are mainly composed of millimeter sized grains are always shorter than the gas disks' lifetimes, and become similar only when the grains are fluffy (density 10 AU), without strong signs of gas accretion nor of millimeter thermal emission from the dust. For Herbig AeBe stars, the strong photoevaporation clears the inner disks in 10^6 yr, before the dust grains in the outer disk migrate to the inner region. In this case, the grains left behind in the outer gas disk accumulate at the disk inner edge (at 10-100 AU from the star). The dust grains remain there even after the entire gas disk has been photoevaporated, and form a gas-poor dust ring similar to that observed around HR 4796A. Hence, depending on the strength of the stellar ionizing flux, our model predicts opposite types of products around young stars. For low mass stars with a low photoevaporation rate, dust-poor gas disks with an inner hole would form, whereas for high mass stars with a high photoevaporation rate, gas-poor dust rings would form. This prediction should be examined by observations of gas and dust around weak line T Tauri stars and evolved Herbig AeBe stars.

  4. Extending the lifetime of fuel cell based hybrid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianli Zhuo; Chaitali Chakrabarti; Naehyuck Chang; Sarma Vrudhula

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cells are clean power sources that have much higher energy densities and lifetimes compared to batteries. However, fuel cells have limited load following capabilities and cannot be efficiently utilized if used in isolation. In this work, we consider a hybrid system where a fuel cell based hybrid power source is used to provide power to a DVFS processor. The hybrid power source consists of a room temperature fuel cell operating as the primary power source and a Li-ion battery (that has good load following capability) operating as the secondary source. Our goal is to develop polices to extend the lifetime of the fuel cell based hybrid system. First, we develop a charge based optimization framework which minimizes the charge loss of the hybrid system (and not the energy consumption of the DVFS processor). Next, we propose a new algorithm to minimize the charge loss by judiciously scaling the load current. We compare the performance of this algorithm with one that has been optimized for energy, and demonstrate its superiority. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the hybrid system under different system configurations and show how to determine the best combination of fuel cell size and battery capacity for a given embedded application.

  5. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  6. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around two-thirds of oil consumption [1]. U.S. oil importsimport share of U.S oil consumption is expected to stabilizeGHG emissions, and oil consumption. The analysis includes

  7. Measurements of ultracold neutron lifetimes in solid deuterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Morris; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; A. Saunders; S. J. Seestrom; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; M. Utsuro; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurements of the survival time of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in solid deuterium SD2. This critical parameter provides a fundamental limitation to the effectiveness of superthermal UCN sources that utilize solid ortho-deuterium as the source material. Superthermal UCN sources offer orders of magnitude improvement in the available densities of UCNs, and are of great importance to fundamental particle-physics experiments such as searches for a static electric dipole moment and lifetime measurements of the free neutron. These measurements are performed utilizing a SD2 source coupled to a spallation source of neutrons, providing a demonstration of UCN production in this geometry and permitting systematic studies of the influence of thermal up-scatter and contamination with para-deuterium on the UCN survival time.

  8. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime at the SLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujino, D.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the average B hadron lifetime from Z{sup 0} {r arrow} b{bar b} events using the Mark II detector at the SLC. We use an impact parameter tag, requiring two or more tracks with significant impact parameter ({delta}) in a hemisphere, to obtain a 40% efficiency and an 80% B-purity. The {Sigma}{delta} distribution from charged tracks in the hemisphere opposite the tag is used to fit for {tau}{sub b}. From 53 tagged B decays we find {tau}{sub b} = 1.63{sub {minus}0.40}{sup +0.64}(stat) {plus minus}0.16(syst) psec (preliminary), consistent with the world average. This method can be competitive with {tau}{sub b} measurements using high P{sub T} leptons and has a different sensitivity to {tau}(B{sup +})/{tau}(B{sup 0}).

  9. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime at the SLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujino, D.; The MARK II Collaboration.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the average B hadron lifetime from Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} b{bar b} events using the Mark II detector at the SLC. We use an impact parameter tag, requiring two or more tracks with significant impact parameter ({delta}) in a hemisphere, to obtain a 40% efficiency and an 80% B-purity. The {Sigma}{delta} distribution from charged tracks in the hemisphere opposite the tag is used to fit for {tau}{sub b}. From 53 tagged B decays we find {tau}{sub b} = 1.63{sub {minus}0.40}{sup +0.64}(stat) {plus_minus}0.16(syst) psec (preliminary), consistent with the world average. This method can be competitive with {tau}{sub b} measurements using high P{sub T} leptons and has a different sensitivity to {tau}(B{sup +})/{tau}(B{sup 0}).

  10. Proton lifetime bounds from chirally symmetric lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; P. Boyle; P. Cooney; L. Del Debbio; R. Kenway; C. M. Maynard; A. Soni; R. Tweedie

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs). The calculation is performed at a fixed lattice spacing a^{-1}=1.73(3) GeV using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions on lattices of size 16^3\\times32 and 24^3\\times64 with a fifth dimension of length 16. We use the indirect method which relies on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where we need to estimate the low energy constants, \\alpha = -0.0112(25) GeV^3 and \\beta = 0.0120(26) GeV^3. We relate these low energy constants to the proton decay matrix elements using leading order chiral perturbation theory. These can then be combined with experimental bounds on the proton lifetime to bound parameters of individual GUTs.

  11. Measuring beam intensity and lifetime in BESSY II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakker, R; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the intensity of the beam in the transfer lines and the storage ring are based on current transformers. The pulsed current in the transfer lines is measured with passive Integrating Beam Current Transformers (ICT). The bunch charge is transferred to a DC-voltage and sampled with a multifunction I/O-board of a PC. The beam current of the storage ring is measured with a high precision Parametric Current Transformer (PCT) and sampled by a high quality digital volt meter (DVM). A stand alone PC is used for synchronisation, real-time data acquisition and signal processing. Current and lifetime data are updated every second and send via CAN- bus to the BESSY II control system. All PC programs are written in LabVIEW.

  12. Gender differences in the employment expectations of final year undergraduates in a university in Central China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Jian

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the gender differences in final year undergraduates’ employment expectations, broken down by salary expectations, occupational expectations and working region expectations, in a university in ...

  13. The lifetime problem of evaporating black holes: mutiny or resignation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Barceló; Raúl Carballo-Rubio; Luis J. Garay; Gil Jannes

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is logically possible that regularly evaporating black holes exist in nature. In fact, the prevalent theoretical view is that these are indeed the real objects behind the curtain in astrophysical scenarios. There are several proposals for regularizing the classical singularity of black holes so that their formation and evaporation do not lead to information-loss problems. One characteristic is shared by most of these proposals: these regularly evaporating black holes present long-lived trapping horizons, with absolutely enormous evaporation lifetimes in whatever measure. Guided by the discomfort with these enormous and thus inaccessible lifetimes, we elaborate here on an alternative regularization of the classical singularity, previously proposed by the authors in an emergent gravity framework, which leads to a completely different scenario. In our scheme the collapse of a stellar object would result in a genuine time-symmetric bounce, which in geometrical terms amounts to the connection of a black-hole geometry with a white-hole geometry in a regular manner. The two most differential characteristics of this proposal are: i) the complete bouncing geometry is a solution of standard classical general relativity everywhere except in a transient region that necessarily extends beyond the gravitational radius associated with the total mass of the collapsing object; and ii) the duration of the bounce as seen by external observers is very brief (fractions of milliseconds for neutron-star-like collapses). This scenario motivates the search for new forms of stellar equilibrium different from black holes. In a brief epilogue we compare our proposal with a similar geometrical setting recently proposed by Haggard and Rovelli.

  14. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross-section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanov, Alexander

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in the lepton+jets channels with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the lifetime-tagging techniques is presented. The t{bar t} cross section is estimated from the combination of the e+jets and {mu}+jets channels. The obtained result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.47{sub -1.14}{sup +1.22}(stat){sub -1.03}{sup +1.65}(syst) {+-} 0.49(lumi) pb is consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

  15. Worst-case-expectation approach to optimization under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shapiro

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 30, 2012 ... Worst-case-expectation approach to optimization under uncertainty ... approximation, risk neutral and risk averse approaches, case studies.

  16. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methane that actually preceded recent concerns about potential emissions from fracking," Dubey said. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over...

  17. A note on the expected probability of constraint v...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... this topic): V = expected number of support constraints. 1 + number of constraints . This result (Theorem 1) is obtained using a simple technique based

  18. Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation either for a base network (one without any energy conservation technique) or for one using cooperative energy conservation strategies. In this paper, we investigate the lifetime/density tradeoff under

  19. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  20. Ris-R-1515(EN) Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1515(EN) Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries Henrik Bindner, Tom Cronin, Per Lundsager Baring-Gould Title: Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries Department: VEA, VES Risø-R-1515 April 2005 storage in batteries are an important part of many renewable based energy systems. Not only do batteries

  1. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  2. Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Catherine P.

    1 Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based Interference crucial design objectives for a number of multihop wireless network applica- tions. As these two this tradeoff between the network throughput and lifetime, for the case of fixed wireless networks where link

  3. Post-Doctoral Research Associate Position in Photovoltaic Lifetime and Degradation Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Post-Doctoral Research Associate Position in Photovoltaic Lifetime and Degradation Science A Post and environmental durability of photovoltaic materials, elements and systems. The research associate will help establish a facility for PV lifetime and degradation studies, including solar and environmental exposures

  4. A near optimal algorithm for lifetime optimization in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A near optimal algorithm for lifetime optimization in wireless sensor networks Karine Deschinkel1.deschinkel, mourad.hakem}@univ-fcomte.fr Keywords: target coverage, wireless sensor networks, centralized method in wireless sensor networks (WSN) is lifetime optimization. Indeed, in WSN each sensor node is battery powered

  5. SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Yunxia Chen in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Analyzing the lifetime per unit cost of a linear WSN, we find that deploying of sensors deployed in the network, can be used to measure the utilization efficiency of sensors

  6. Maximum-Lifetime Multi-Channel Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    Maximum-Lifetime Multi-Channel Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal and Asis Nasipuri and routing problem in multi-channel wireless sensor networks for maximizing the worst case network lifetime solution for the problem. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, multi-channel rout- ing, distributed

  7. SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS Edoardo Regini, Daeseob Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 {eregini, dalim, tajana}@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Maximizing battery lifetime. This is because in heavy traffic conditions, the chance of nodes to successfully transmit a packet decreases

  8. NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME-vessel steels. We irradiated samples ofASTM A508 nuclear reactor pressure-vessel steel to fast neutron 17 2 (PALS) to study the effects of neutron damage in the steels on positron lifetimes. Non

  9. SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

  10. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  11. Silicon detectors for the next generation of high energy physics experiments: expected degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Lazanu; S. Lazanu

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists an enormous interest for the study of very high energy domain in particle physics, both theoretically and experimentally, in the aim to construct a general theory of the fundamental constituents of matter and of their interactions. Until now, semiconductor detectors have widely been used in modern high energy physics experiments. They are elements of the high resolution vertex and tracking system, as well as of calorimeters. The main motivation of this work is to discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion voltage, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. In this paper, physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are discussed and effects are analysed at the device level (leakage current and effective carrier concentration) in the radiation environments expected in the next generation of hadron colliders after LHC, at the next lepton and gamma-gamma colliders, as well as in astroparticle experiments, in conditions of long time continuum irradiations, for different technological options. The predicted results permit a better decision to obtain devices with harder parameters to radiation.

  12. The Energetics and Lifetimes of Local Radio Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Ross J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model describing the evolution of Fanaroff-Riley type I and II radio AGN, and the transition between these classes. We quantify galaxy environments using a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, and apply our model to a volume-limited low redshift ($0.03 \\leqslant z \\leqslant 0.1$) sample of observed AGN to determine the distribution of jet powers and active lifetimes at the present epoch. Radio sources in massive galaxies are found to remain active for longer, spend less time in the quiescent phase, and inject more energy into their hosts than their less massive counterparts. The jet power is independent of the host stellar mass within uncertainties, consistent with maintenance-mode AGN feedback paradigm. The environments of these AGN are in or close to long-term heating-cooling balance. We also examine the properties of high- and low-excitation radio galaxy sub-populations. The HERGs are younger than LERGs by an order of magnitude, whilst their jet powers are greater by a factor of four. The Edd...

  13. Learning with Heterogeneous Expectations in an Evolutionary World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guse, Eran A

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    be any variable that is a¤ected by expectations, think of the variable yt to be prices at time t. Under a situation of homogeneous expectations, there are two REE: PLM1 : yt = a1 + vt (2) PLM2 : yt = a2 + b2yt#0;1 + vt. (3) 3These solutions could also... of their forecasting model to form expectations of yt and yt+1. If a proportion of #22; agents have a perceived law of motion (PLM) of equation (2) and the remaining (1#0; #22;) agents have a PLM of (3), then the actual law of motion (ALM) is: yt = #11; + #22;a1...

  14. Expected Behavior of Quantum Thermodynamic Machines with Prior Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the expected behavior of a quantum model of heat engine when we have incomplete information about external macroscopic parameters, like magnetic field controlling the intrinsic energy scales of the working medium. We explicitly derive the prior probability distribution for these unknown parameters, $a_i, (i=1,2)$. Based on a few simple assumptions, the prior is found to be of the form $\\Pi(a_i) \\propto 1/a_i$. By calculating the expected values of various physical quantities related to this engine, we find that the expected behavior of the quantum model exhibits thermodynamic-like features. This leads us to a surprising proposal that incomplete information quantified as appropriate prior distribution can lead us to expect classical thermodynamic behavior in quantum models.

  15. What Does Industry Expect From An Electrical Utility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, C. V.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WHAT DOES INDUSTRY EXPECT FROM AN ELECTRICAL UTILITY C. V. JENSEN Manager, Energy Policy and Supply Union Carbide Corporation Danbury, Connecticut ABSTRACT and federal laws, rules and regulations. The electric utility industry...

  16. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudzinovic, M.; Sopori, B. [comp.] [comp.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  17. Expectation Values in the Lieb-Liniger Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kormos, M.; Trombettoni, A. [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Beirut 2/4, I-34151, Trieste (Italy); Mussardo, G. [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Beirut 2/4, I-34151, Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), I-34151, Trieste (Italy)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel method to compute expectation values in the Lieb-Liniger model both at zero and finite temperature. These quantities, relevant in the physics of one-dimensional ultracold Bose gases, are expressed by a series that has a remarkable behavior of convergence. Among other results, we show the computation of the three-body expectation value at finite temperature, a quantity that rules the recombination rate of the Bose gas.

  18. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Olivia L.

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................25 Satisfaction and Weight Loss 37 Measurement of Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction with Weight Loss...............41 Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction in the Treatment of Obesity 43 Limitations of Previous Research... of approximately 15-25% of initial weight in 2 to 4 months of treatment, but may also result in substantially greater weight regain than more conventional, calorie-restrictive diets (Wadden & Osei, 2002). Pharmacological interventions have been presented...

  19. Laser spectroscopic studies of state-dependent collisional quenching of the lifetimes of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hori, M; Torii, H A; Ishikawa, T; Maas, F E; Yamazaki, T; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Kumakara, M; Morita, N; Sugai, I; Horváth, D; Ketzer, B; Hartmann, F J; Maierl, C; Hasinoff, M D; Von Egidy, T; Tamura, H

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser spectroscopic studies of state-dependent collisional quenching of the lifetimes of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms

  20. Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  2. Strength and Lifetime Analysis of SMT Solder Joints: An Exemplary Study of the MiniMELF Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    626 Strength and Lifetime Analysis of SMT Solder Joints: An Exemplary Study of the Mini, ZT ME 7, Berlin ABSTRACT The reliability and lifetime of SMT solder joints obtained by reflow or wave Since the appearance of surface mount technology (SMT) the reliability and lifetime of solder joints has

  3. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuhiro Yamada; Youhei Yamaji; Masatoshi Imada

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

  4. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

  5. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  6. Calculation of the extinction cross section and lifetime of a gold nanoparticle using FDTD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhakrishnan, Archana, E-mail: anju.archana@gmail.com [B.Tech, Engineering Physics, National Institute Of Technology, Calicut (India); Murugesan, Dr V., E-mail: murugesh@serc.iisc.in [Assistant Professor, Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic theory of light explains the behavior of light in most of the domains quite accurately. The problem arises when the exact solution of the Maxwell's equation is not present, in case of objects with arbitrary geometry. To find the extinction cross-section and lifetime of the gold nanoparticle, the software FDTD solutions 8.6 by Lumerical is employed. The extinction cross-sections and lifetimes of Gold nanospheres of different sizes and arrangements are studied using pulse lengths of the order of femtoseconds. The decay constant and other properties are compared. Further, the lifetimes are calculated using frequency and time domain calculations.

  7. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  8. Sacrificial high-temperature phosphorus diffusion gettering for lifetime improvement of multicrystalline silicon wafers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Stephanie Morgan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is among the most deleterious lifetime-limiting impurities in crystalline silicon solar cells. In as-grown material, iron is present in precipitates and in point defects. To achieve conversion efficiencies in excess ...

  9. Norwegian National Program for Lifetime Commissioning and Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakovic, V.; Djuric, N.; Holst, J.; Frydenlund, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project “Life-Time Commissioning for Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings” is actually a network of industrial companies, private and public entities, and R&D organizations. The overall objective of the project is to contribute...

  10. Norwegian National Program for Lifetime Commissioning and Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakovic, V.; Djuric, N.; Holst, J.; Frydenlund, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project “Life-Time Commissioning for Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings” is actually a network of industrial companies, private and public entities, and R&D organizations. The overall objective of the project is to contribute...

  11. Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms for Early Detection of Oral Epithelial Cancer Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joohyung

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the clinical potential of the endogenous multispectral Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was investigated to objectively detect oral cancer. To this end, in vivo FLIM imaging was performed on a hamster cheek pouch model...

  12. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  13. Theory of SEI Formation in Rechargeable Batteries: Capacity Fade, Accelerated Aging and Lifetime Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinson, Matthew Bede

    Cycle life is critically important in applications of rechargeable batteries, but lifetime prediction is mostly based on empirical trends, rather than mathematical models. In practical lithium-ion batteries, capacity fade ...

  14. Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    1 Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges Mihaela problem in wireless sensor networks with adjustable sensing range. Communication and sensing consume Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) constitute the foundation of a broad range of applications related

  15. A Method to Quantify FRET Stoichiometry with Phasor Plot Analysis and Acceptor Lifetime Ingrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, WeiYue; Avezov, Edward; Schlachter, Simon C.; Gielen, Fabrice; Laine, Romain F.; Harding, Heather P.; Hollfelder, Florian; Ron, David; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    pixel. The method makes use of fluorescence lifetime information from both donor and acceptor molecules and takes advantage of the linear properties of the phasor plot approach. We demonstrate the capability of our method in vitro in a microfluidic...

  16. Comparison of spatially resolved carrier lifetimes in mc-Si with solar cell and material characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glunz, S.W.; Hebling, C.; Warta, W.; Wettling, W. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme, Freiburg (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors introduce a novel application of modulated free carrier absorption (MFCA) for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in multicrystalline silicon with high spatial resolution. The improved lateral resolution compared to other contactless techniques allows the correlation between these lifetime maps and solar cell characteristics as well as microscopic properties, like dislocations, precipitates, oxygen concentration, etc. Comparisons of the lifetime maps measured on the starting material and light beam induced current (LBIC) maps exhibit a very good qualitative correlation of the structures observed in both cases. In addition, correlations to microscopic characteristics like high dislocation density in regions with low lifetimes are investigated and a comparison with spatially resolved FT-IR measurements of the interstitial oxygen concentration is performed.

  17. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN Milano (Italy); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw (Poland); University of York (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  18. Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuwana, Eddy

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    fluorescent dyes, 3,3-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) and Indocynanine Green (ICG), which exhibit distinctly different lifetimes and each exhibits single-exponential decay kinetics, were employed. Measurements of phase-modulation as a function...

  19. Effective lifetimes exceeding 300 ?s in gettered p-type epitaxial kerfless silicon for photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, D. M.

    We evaluate defect concentrations and investigate the lifetime potential of p-type single-crystal kerfless silicon produced via epitaxy for photovoltaics. In gettered material, low interstitial iron concentrations (as low ...

  20. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D., E-mail: salthouse@ecs.umass.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J. [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States) [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 ?M. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  1. Methodologies to assess potential lifetime limits for extended burnup nuclear fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vore, Curtis Vincent

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGIES TO ASSESS POTENTIAL LIFETIME LIMITS FOR EXTENDED BURNUP NUCLEAR FUEL A Thesis by CURTIS VINCENT DE VORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering METHODOLOGIES TO ASSESS POTENTIAL LIFETIME LIMITS FOR EXTENDED BURNUP NUCLEAR FUEL A Thesis by CURTIS VINCENT DE VORE Approved as to style and content by: K. L. Peddicord (Chair...

  2. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  3. Extended space expectation values in quantum dynamical system evolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demiralp, Metin [Istanbul Technical University, Informatics Institute, Maslak, 34469, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The time variant power series expansion for the expectation value of a given quantum dynamical operator is well-known and well-investigated issue in quantum dynamics. However, depending on the operator and Hamiltonian singularities this expansion either may not exist or may not converge for all time instances except the beginning of the evolution. This work focuses on this issue and seeks certain cures for the negativities. We work in the extended space obtained by adding all images of the initial wave function under the system Hamiltonian’s positive integer powers. This requires the introduction of certain appropriately defined weight operators. The resulting better convergence in the temporal power series urges us to call the new defined entities “extended space expectation values” even though they are constructed over certain weight operators and are somehow pseudo expectation values.

  4. 3DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    total cost (quality level 2) $32.41 million Payback 0.7 years Quality level 1 buy-up estimate $203DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits (quality level 2) $45.73 million Estimated resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction

  5. Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age Topic: What are the changing demands disabled pupils, inclusion increased significantly, particularly in high schools. Blind learners, who used. For this lecture, I will present a few blind students' opinions, which will help building the items for the case

  6. Analyzing Facebook Privacy Settings: User Expectations vs. Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Krishna P.

    Analyzing Facebook Privacy Settings: User Expectations vs. Reality Yabing Liu Northeastern of personal data has emerged as a popular ac- tivity over online social networking sites like Facebook privacy. We de- ploy a survey, implemented as a Facebook application, to 200 Facebook users recruited via

  7. Eddy-current testing with the Expected Improvement optimization algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eddy-current testing with the Expected Improvement optimization algorithm S´andor Bilicz , Emmanuel presents an inverse problem methodology in the domain of non-destructive testing, and more precisely eddy-current in the light of preliminary numerical examples obtained using synthetic data. Keywords: eddy current testing

  8. CLINICAL RETENTION EXPECTATIONS AND UNLV ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    CLINICAL RETENTION EXPECTATIONS AND STANDARDS UNLV ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM The Program Director and Clinical Education Coordinator will evaluate retention in the Athletic Training Program. Athletic training, the athletic training student will be permitted to take the scheduled SIM clinical course and will be given

  9. Nonparametric Estimation of Expected Shortfall1 SONG XI CHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -155-000-026-112). 1 #12;Running Head: Nonparametric Estimation of Expected Shortfall. Corresponding) be the negative log return (log loss) over the t-th period. Suppose {Yt}n j=1 is a weakly dependent stationaryR specifies a level of excessive losses such that the probability of a loss larger than p is less than p. See

  10. Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access Running Heading: Duopoly Interaction and Expected Price for Local Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capital costs of access and, using U.S. Census data, compute an average network cost per subscriber for a household and compute the future expected value to the providers. #12;3 2 Replacement Cost Data For this study, we developed our own cost data so that we could explicitly link these data to data from the U

  11. Processing Expected Reward in Decision-Making Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    ; Worthy et al., 2007; see also Sutton and Barto, 1998 #12;0 PICK A CARD! Yes Bonus No 450 174 #12;0 174 Correct 181 Yes Bonus No 450 7 #12;0 PICK A CARD! Yes Bonus No 450 181 #12;0 181 Correct 184 Yes Bonus No 450 3 #12;0 PICK A CARD! Yes Bonus No 450 184 #12;Expected Value (EV) · EV ­ How many points you

  12. Vacuum Expectation Values of Twisted Mass Fermion Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Randy Lewis; Walter Wilcox

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using noise methods on a quenched $20^3 \\times 32$ lattice at $\\beta=6.0$, we have investigated vacuum expectation values and relative linear correlations among the various Wilson and twisted mass scalar and pseudoscalar disconnected loop operators. We show results near the maximal twist lines in $\\kappa$, $\\mu$ parameter space, either defined as the absence of parity mixing or the vanishing of the PCAC quark mass.

  13. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore »result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  14. Sudden Lifetime Drop Phenomena and their Effective Cures in PF-ring and PF-AR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanimoto, Yasunori; Honda, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takashi; Nogami, Takashi [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In PF-ring and PF-AR, sudden drops in the electron beam lifetime, which are attributed to dust trapping, were frequently observed after extensive renewals of the storage rings. The reduced-lifetime state sometimes lasts for a few hours, and the mitigation of this problem was strongly demanded for stable user operations. Since a major source of dust particles was thought to be a distributed ion pump (DIP), we attempted switching the DIPs off during user operations in both the rings. As a result, occurrence of the lifetime drops was almost completely suppressed during single-bunch mode in PF-ring, while the occurrence frequency was reduced by only 38% in PF-AR. We found that the lifetime drops were sometimes accompanied by a transient increase in the vacuum pressure at some discharge-prone devices. Based on the hypothesis that the harmful dust could be generated by an electric discharge in vacuum, we attempted the conditioning of these devices in PF-AR by storing 25% higher current than usual. By combination of the DIP-OFF operation and the high-current conditioning, the occurrence frequency of the lifetime drops in PF-AR was reduced by no less than 67%.

  15. Simulation free measurement of the B+ lifetime using decays selected using displaced tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malde, Sneha; /Oxford U.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of the B{sup {+-}} meson is measured using the decay channel B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}. The measurement is made using approximately 1.0 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron proton-anti-proton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF detector. The data were collected using impact parameter based triggers that were designed to select events with a secondary vertex. The trigger selection criteria result in data rich in a variety of B hadron decays, but intrinsically bias the lifetime distribution of the collected signal events. The traditional way to compensate for the bias is to use information from simulation. Presented here is a new method for correction of the lifetime bias using an analytical technique that uses information from the data only. This eliminates measurement uncertainty due to data and simulation agreement, ultimately resulting in a smaller systematic measurement uncertainty. The B{sup {+-}} lifetime measurement is the first measurement using this new technique and demonstrates its potential for use in future measurements. The B{sup {+-}} lifetime is measured to be {tau}(B{sup {+-}}) = 1.662 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.015(syst)ps.

  16. Metastable lifetimes from electron-shelving measurements with ion clouds and single ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knoop, M; Hagel, G; Houssin, M; Lisowski, C; Vedel, M; Vedel, F; Knoop, Martina; Champenois, Caroline; Hagel, Ga\\"etan; Houssin, Marie; Lisowski, Caroline; Vedel, Michel; Vedel, Fernande

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of the 3d^2D_{5/2}-level in singly-ionized calcium has been measured by the electron-shelving technique on different samples of rf trapped ions. The metastable state has been directly populated by exciting the dipole-forbidden 4S_{1/2} - 3D_{5/2} transition. In ion clouds, the natural lifetime of this metastable level has been measured to be (1095+-26) ms. For a single ion, we determined a lifetime of (1152+-17) ms. The 1sigma-error bars at the 2%-level have different origins for the two kinds of experiments: data fitting methods for lifetime measurements in an ion cloud and control of experimental parameters for a single ion. De-shelving effects are extensively discussed. The influence of differing approaches for the processing of the single-ion quantum jump data on the lifetime values is shown. Comparison with recent measurements shows excellent agreement when evaluated from a given method.

  17. Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Moehring; B. B. Blinov; D. W. Gidley; R. N. Kohn Jr.; M. J. Madsen; T. D. Sanderson; R. S. Vallery; C. Monroe

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report precision measurements of the excited state lifetime of the $5p$ $^2P_{1/2}$ and $5p$ $^2P_{3/2}$ levels of a single trapped Cd$^+$ ion. The ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser and the distribution of arrival times of spontaneously emitted photons is recorded. The resulting lifetimes are 3.148 $\\pm$ 0.011 ns and 2.647 $\\pm$ 0.010 ns for $^2P_{1/2}$ and $^2P_{3/2}$ respectively. With a total uncertainty of under 0.4%, these are among the most precise measurements of any atomic state lifetimes to date.

  18. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. DeVience; Ronald L. Walsworth; Matthew S. Rosen

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the lifetime of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field and present a simple theoretical model that agrees well with our measurements, including the low-RF-power regime. We also measure the lifetime of a long-lived coherence between singlet and triplet states that does not require a spin-locking field for preservation. Our results indicate that for many molecules, singlet states can be created using weak RF spin-locking fields: more than two orders of magnitude lower RF power than in previous studies. Our findings suggest that in many biomolecules, singlets and related states with enhanced lifetimes might be achievable in vivo with safe levels of RF power.

  19. Phonon lifetime in SiSn and its suitability for hot-carrier solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levard, Hugo; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François [Institute for Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174, EDF R and D/CNRS/Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a phononic and electronic study of SiSn in the zinc-blende phase. A detailed description of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon decay in a three-phonon process is presented together with the corresponding lifetime. The necessity to go beyond the zone center phonon approximation in this case is highlighted as it reveals a steep dependence of the lifetime on the initial phonon wavenumber, which differs from usual semiconductors. The electronic band structure is calculated within the GW formalism and shows a small direct band gap. It is shown that the LO-phonon resulting from electron cooling has a lifetime four to eight orders of magnitude above all the known value in semiconductors for this process. We finally show the suitability of SiSn for hot-carrier solar cells, as it is endowed with ultra-slow cooling of hot carriers.

  20. Photosystem II fluorescence lifetime imaging in avocado leaves: Contributions of the lutein-epoxide and violaxanthin cycles to fluorescence quenching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Photosystem II fluorescence lifetime imaging in avocado leaves: Contributions of the lutein a fluorescence were made on leaves of avocado plants to study whether rapidly reversible Dp

  1. The Lifetime Estimate for ACSR Single-Stage Splice Connector Operating at Higher Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the continuation of Part I effort to develop a protocol of integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector (SSC) assembly during service at high operating temperature.1The Part II efforts are mainly focused on the thermal mechanical testing, thermal-cycling simulation and its impact on the effective lifetime of the SSC system. The investigation indicates that thermal cycling temperature and frequency, conductor cable tension loading, and the compressive residual stress field within a SSC system have significant impact on the SSC integrity and the associated effective lifetime.

  2. The Effective Lifetime of ACSR Full Tension Splice Connector Operated at Higher Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL] [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)] [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)] [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Goodwin, Tip [PBS& J] [PBS& J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is to address the issues related to integrity of ACSR full tension splice connectors operated at high temperatures. A protocol of integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector (SSC) assembly during service at high operating temperature was developed. Based on the developed protocol the effective lifetime evaluation was demonstrated with ACSR Drake conductor SSC systems. The investigation indicates that thermal cycling temperature and frequency, conductor cable tension loading, and the compressive residual stress field within a SSC system have significant impact on the SSC integrity and the associated effective lifetime.

  3. The acquisition of assertion and accompanying expectations of outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truemper, Timothy Carl

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Nonassert' ve people may distort their expectancies, evaluations, and per- ceptions of outcomes for different reasons that have been All rules of style and format followed in this thesis are those used by the Journal of Consultin and Clinical ~Ph 1...) for the severity measure (see Appendix 4) 22 CHAPTER 3 RESULTS The data were analyzed on two 3X2X3X2X2X2 designs of analysis of covariance with repeated variables (level of assertion X sex X type of learning X valence of outcome X type of outcome; level...

  4. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0ProvedExpected Future

  5. California Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpected Future Production

  6. California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpected Future(Million(Billion

  7. Colorado Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c.+ LeaseExpected

  8. Florida Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use asFeet)SecondProductionExpected Future

  9. Kansas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYear JanProvedExpected Future

  10. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Expected

  11. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year JanDecadeExpected Future

  12. Michigan Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet)Expected Future

  13. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale ProductionExpected Future

  14. Montana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off)ThousandProductionExpected Future

  15. Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production (Billion Cubic

  16. Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected FutureReservesBarrels) Crude

  17. Utah Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197 14,1978. Number ofCoalbedExpected

  18. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet)ProvedFeet) Expected

  19. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS willProvedExpected Future Production

  20. Louisiana--North Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next(Million Barrels) Expected Future

  1. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear JanProduction (Million Barrels) Expected

  2. Hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: expectations and progress in drug development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, C.N.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When misonidazole (MISO) was introduced into clinical trials there were great expectations that the cure rate of many tumors would be dramatically increased. The lack of efficacy of MISO discouraged further studies with hypoxic cell sensitizers. In recent years superior sensitizers SR 2508 and RO-03-8799 have been introduced into the clinic. SR 2508 is less neurotoxic than MISO, allowing more than three times the total amount of drug to be administered. Furthermore, based on the analysis of a patient's plasma pharmacokinetic profile, neurotoxicity may be largely avoidable. RO-03-8799 is superior in that it produces a higher sensitizer enhancement ratio than MISO for the same administered dose. Unlike with MISO and SR 2508, the dose of RO-03-8799 that can be administered is limited by acute toxicity with no cumulative toxicity having yet been encountered. Study design has improved and the expected clinical benefit from sensitizers has been clarified. Sensitizers, like particle radiation therapy and hyperthemia will, if successful, effect the rate of local tumor control, but cannot improve the cure rate of patients with preexisting metastatic disease. Taking into account the need to optimize reoxygenation, the various reasons for tumor radioresistance other than hypoxia, and the lower oxygen and sensitizer enhancement ratios at 200 cGy per fraction, it is likely that sensitizers will provide some clinical benefit for patients with selected tumor types.

  3. E-Health Initiative and Customer's Expectation: Case Brunei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Low, Patrick Kim Cheng; Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is to determine the dimension of e-health services in Brunei Darussalam (Brunei) from customers' perspective. It is to identify, understand, analyze and evaluate public's expectation on e-health in Brunei. A questionnaire was designed to gather quantitative and qualitative data to survey patients, patient's family, and health practitioners at hospitals, clinics, or home care centers in Brunei starting from February to March, 2011. A 25-item Likert-type survey instrument was specifically developed for this study and administered to a sample of 366 patients. The data were analyzed to provide initial ideas and recommendation to policy makers on how to move forward with the e-health initiative as a mean to improve healthcare services. The survey revealed that there exists a high demand and expectation from people in Brunei to have better healthcare services accessible through an e-health system in order to improve health literacy as well as quality and efficiency of healthcare. Regardless of the limita...

  4. Increased activity expected in Permian basin, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagar, R.

    1988-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration and development activities in two of the most important petroleum provinces in the U.S. are mixed, but the outlook is bright. There has been a steady increase in drilling in oil plays of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico and in the Permian basin of West Texas and New Mexico. But natural gas drilling has not seen much of an increase, although activity involving Miocne sands in the shallow water portion of the gulf is starting to pick up. Deep gas drilling, stalled by the 1986 spot price collapse, has not yet shown signs of new life, even though production is scheduled to begin this year from the Jurassic Norphlet deep gas play off Alabama. There should be continued increases this year in deepwater and Permian basin drilling if oil prices remain in the $18-20/bbl range. And gas drilling is expected to pick up considerably if spot prices strengthen. An important factor in the drilling outlook is an expectation that major interstate transmission companies this year will resume buying long term gas supplies for resale. Long term contracts reduce producer uncertainty in project economics.

  5. Markets with random lifetimes and private values: mean-reversion and option to trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cvitanic, Jaksa

    Markets with random lifetimes and private values: mean-reversion and option to trade Jaksa Cvitani values for the single traded asset. A trader's optimal trading decision is formulated in terms of exercising the option to trade one unit of the asset at the optimal stopping time. We solve the optimal

  6. Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellin, Paul

    Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap1. Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Department of Physics University of Surrey www, Hungary. #12;Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Introduction r Development of compound

  7. Kinetics of the photoreactions of some organic free radicals and lifetimes of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oginets, V.Ya.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetimes of electronically excited states of the antraquinone radical anion and of the stable 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (DPPA) radical during their photoreactions with organic solvents have been evaluated by analyzing kinetic curves. The results obtained suggest that the anthraquinone radical anion undergoes a photoreaction in a quartet state, while DPPA does so in one of the higher doublet states.

  8. Electron attachment to SF6 and lifetimes of SF6 negative ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribakin, Gleb

    Electron attachment to SF6 and lifetimes of SF6 - negative ions L. G. Gerchikov1,* and G. F capture by the SF6 molecule. Our approach is based on the model of Gauyacq and Herzenberg J. P. Gauyacq provides a limit on the characteristic time of intramolecular vibrational relaxation in highly excited SF6

  9. Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers M. John optical fiber on the environmental parameters temperature, humidity and pH. It is shown that the stress used by the fiber optics industry provides a good fit to fatigue data for high strength fiber

  10. TIME DEPENDENT BREAKDOWN OF GATE OXIDE AND PREDICTION OF OXIDE GATE LIFETIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoodi, Hamid

    TIME DEPENDENT BREAKDOWN OF GATE OXIDE AND PREDICTION OF OXIDE GATE LIFETIME A thesis submitted Masters of Science In Engineering: Embedded System by Bin Wu San Francisco, California May, 2012 #12;CERTIFICATION OF APPROVAL I certify that I have read Time dependent Breakdown of Gate Oxide and Prediction

  11. Lifetimes of ultralong-range Rydberg molecules in vibrational ground and excited state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Butscher; Vera Bendkowsky; Johannes Nipper; Jonathan B. Balewski; Ludmila Kukota; Robert Löw; Tilman Pfau; Weibin Li; Thomas Pohl; Jan Michael Rost

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Since their first experimental observation, ultralong-range Rydberg molecules consisting of a highly excited Rydberg atom and a ground state atom have attracted the interest in the field of ultracold chemistry. Especially the intriguing properties like size, polarizability and type of binding they inherit from the Rydberg atom are of interest. An open question in the field is the reduced lifetime of the molecules compared to the corresponding atomic Rydberg states. In this letter we present an experimental study on the lifetimes of the ^3\\Sigma (5s-35s) molecule in its vibrational ground state and in an excited state. We show that the lifetimes depends on the density of ground state atoms and that this can be described in the frame of a classical scattering between the molecules and ground state atoms. We also find that the excited molecular state has an even more reduced lifetime compared to the ground state which can be attributed to an inward penetration of the bound atomic pair due to imperfect quantum reflection that takes place in the special shape of the molecular potential.

  12. A Hybrid Solid-State Storage Architecture for the Performance, Energy Consumption, and Lifetime Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    A Hybrid Solid-State Storage Architecture for the Performance, Energy Consumption, and Lifetime-place updating so that it significantly im- proves the usage efficiency of log pages by eliminating out- of results show that our proposed methods can substantially improve the perfor- mance, energy consumption

  13. Extending the Lifetime of Media Recorders Constrained by Battery and Flash Memory Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    balancing the energy consumption and the flash memory usage. The proposed method can be effectively employed recorders that signifi- cantly enhances their lifetime while minimizing the flash memory usage.3 [Microcomputers]: Portable devices (e.g., laptops, personal digital assistants) General Terms Design, Performance

  14. Lifetime of the Bose Gas with Resonant Interactions B. S. Rem,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifetime of the Bose Gas with Resonant Interactions B. S. Rem,1 A. T. Grier,1 I. Ferrier-Barbut,1 U at and around unitarity using a Feshbach resonance in lithium 7. At unitarity, we measure the temperature length a describing two-body interactions becomes infinite. It has been demonstrated both experimentally

  15. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  16. Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology Michael L) In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground contributor to climate change (1). One promising technology to mitigate CO2 emissions is carbon cap- ture

  17. Life-Add: Lifetime Adjustable Design for WiFi Networks with Heterogeneous Energy Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Prasun

    Life-Add: Lifetime Adjustable Design for WiFi Networks with Heterogeneous Energy Supplies Shengbo Chen§, Tarun Bansal§, Yin Sun§, Prasun Sinha and Ness B. Shroff Department of ECE, The Ohio State University Department of CSE, The Ohio State University Email: {chens,shroff}@ece.osu.edu, {bansal,prasun}@cse.ohio

  18. Lifetime Behavior and its Impact on Web Caching Xiangping Chen and Prasant Mohapatra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohapatra, Prasant

    Lifetime Behavior and its Impact on Web Caching Xiangping Chen and Prasant Mohapatra Department@iastate.edu Abstract The exponential growth of the World Wide Web has made it the most popular information on the web to al­ leviate the web server load, conserve the network band­ width, and reduce the retrieval

  19. Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve Maximum Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve performance because most of them are designed without considering a ultra low duty cycled environment to improve a network lifetime and a routing maintenance cost. We explain the issues of a ultra low duty

  20. MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES IN TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES of the damage will essentially depend on the intensity and duration of energy deposited on PFC. Both bulk and surface damages can take place depending on these parameters. For this reason different deposition times

  1. Analysis of Energy Consumption and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mingyan

    Analysis of Energy Consumption and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Enrique J-- The paper examines the performance as well as energy con- sumption issues of a wireless sensor network to be deployed in large quantities to form wireless sensor networks for a wide variety of purposes, e.g., im- age

  2. Prolonging Network Lifetime Through the Use of Mobile Base Station in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    , and transmitting ca- pabilities, that are powered by small batteries. Therefore energy efficiency in the design University Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia oday.jerew@anu.edu.au Weifa Liang Department of Computer Science, Australia wliang@cs.anu.edu.au ABSTRACT Prolonging network lifetime is one of the most important design

  3. An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    An Interactive Context-aware Power Management Technique for Optimizing Sensor Network Lifetime an important event with desired fidelity). To that end, in this paper we propose a novel interactive power sensor data and system specifications (battery and solar panel specs, sensing and communication costs

  4. A METHODOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF THE RESIDUAL LIFETIMES OF CARBON FIBRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on composite materials, France (2005)" #12;carbon fibre composites are considered by these authors as beingA METHODOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF THE RESIDUAL LIFETIMES OF CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED COMPOSITE of their loading history with precision. KEYWORDS: pressure vessels, carbon fibre composites, life time prediction

  5. Photoconductive Decay Lifetime and Suns-Voc Diagnostics of Efficient Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal L.; Bauer, R.; Yan, H.-C.; Wang, Q.; Meier, D. L.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of minority carrier lifetime measurements for double-sided p-type Si heterojunction devices and compare Suns-Voc results to Light I-V measurements on 1 cm2 solar cell devices measured on an AM1.5 calibrated XT-10 solar simulator.

  6. Measurement of the ?(0)(b) lifetime in pp collisions at s?=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the ?(0)(b) lifetime using the decay ?(0)(b)?J/?? in protonproton collisions at s?=7 TeV is presented. The data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 5 fb(?1), was recorded with the CMS ...

  7. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  8. Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasaki, Hironori [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

  9. Extending the Lifetime of Portable Video Communication Devices Using Power-Rate-Distortion Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    -Rate-Distortion Optimization Zhihai He, Wenye Cheng, and Xi Chen £ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University framework to save the data processing energy and extend the operational lifetime of portable video communication devices. Video compression is computationally intensive and energy-consuming. However, portable

  10. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  11. A LIFETIME PREDICTION MODEL FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOYS SUBJECTED TO THERMOMECHANICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    materials tensile, creep and LCF test data at different temperatures. Some parameters, independentA LIFETIME PREDICTION MODEL FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOYS SUBJECTED TO THERMOMECHANICAL CREEP for Single Crystal Superalloys operated at high temperatures and subjected to creep, fatigue and oxidation

  12. Extending the Lifetime of Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Systems* Jianli Zhuo1, Chaitali Chakrabartil, Naehyuck Chang2, Sarma Vrudhula3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    34.1 Extending the Lifetime of Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Systems* Jianli Zhuo1, Chaitali Chakrabartil@asu.edu ABSTRACT for portable applications. Fuel cells have very high energy densities Fuel cells are clean power densities and lifetimes compared to batteries. However, fuel cells

  13. Lifetime of high-k gate dielectrics and analogy with strength of quasibrittle Jia-Liang Le,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    , Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA 2 Department of Materials Science to breakdown i.e., the integral of the tunneling current over the lifetime .2,4 Re- cently, histogram testingLifetime of high-k gate dielectrics and analogy with strength of quasibrittle structures Jia

  14. An Expectation-Maximization Method for Calibrating Synchronous Machine Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Da; Zhou, Ning; Lu, Shuai; Lin, Guang

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy of a power system dynamic model is essential to its secure and efficient operation. Lower confidence in model accuracy usually leads to conservative operation and lowers asset usage. To improve model accuracy, this paper proposes an expectation-maximization (EM) method to calibrate the synchronous machine model using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. First, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is applied to estimate the dynamic states using measurement data. Then, the parameters are calculated based on the estimated states using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. The EM method iterates over the preceding two steps to improve estimation accuracy. The proposed EM method’s performance is evaluated using a single-machine infinite bus system and compared with a method where both state and parameters are estimated using an EKF method. Sensitivity studies of the parameter calibration using EM method are also presented to show the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of measurement noise and initial parameter uncertainty.

  15. Siting Samplers to Minimize Expected Time to Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Travis; Lorenzetti, David M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a probabilistic approach to designing an indoor sampler network for detecting an accidental or intentional chemical or biological release, and demonstrate it for a real building. In an earlier paper, Sohn and Lorenzetti(1) developed a proof of concept algorithm that assumed samplers could return measurements only slowly (on the order of hours). This led to optimal detect to treat architectures, which maximize the probability of detecting a release. This paper develops a more general approach, and applies it to samplers that can return measurements relatively quickly (in minutes). This leads to optimal detect to warn architectures, which minimize the expected time to detection. Using a model of a real, large, commercial building, we demonstrate the approach by optimizing networks against uncertain release locations, source terms, and sampler characteristics. Finally, we speculate on rules of thumb for general sampler placement.

  16. Ergodicity properties of quantum expectation values in entangled states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudheesh, C; Balakrishnan, V

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a model Hamiltonian for a single-mode electromagnetic field interacting with a nonlinear medium, we show that quantum expectation values of subsystem observables can exhibit remarkably diverse ergodic properties even when the dynamics of the total system is regular. The time series of the mean photon number is studied over a range of values of the ratio of the strength $\\gamma$ of the nonlinearity to that of the inter-mode coupling $g$. We obtain the power spectrum, estimate the embedding dimension of the reconstructed phase space and the maximal Liapunov exponent $\\lambda_{\\rm max}$, and find the recurrence-time distribution of the coarse-grained dynamics. The dynamical behavior ranges from quasiperiodicity (for $\\gamma/g \\ll 1$) to chaos as characterized by $\\lambda_{\\rm max} > 0$ (for $\\gamma/g \\gtrsim 1$), and is interpreted.

  17. Ergodicity properties of quantum expectation values in entangled states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sudheesh; S. Lakshmibala; V. Balakrishnan

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a model Hamiltonian for a single-mode electromagnetic field interacting with a nonlinear medium, we show that quantum expectation values of subsystem observables can exhibit remarkably diverse ergodic properties even when the dynamics of the total system is regular. The time series of the mean photon number is studied over a range of values of the ratio of the strength $\\gamma$ of the nonlinearity to that of the inter-mode coupling $g$. We obtain the power spectrum, estimate the embedding dimension of the reconstructed phase space and the maximal Liapunov exponent $\\lambda_{\\rm max}$, and find the recurrence-time distribution of the coarse-grained dynamics. The dynamical behavior ranges from quasiperiodicity (for $\\gamma/g \\ll 1$) to chaos as characterized by $\\lambda_{\\rm max} > 0$ (for $\\gamma/g \\gtrsim 1$), and is interpreted.

  18. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of the expression 'CSC studies' ('computing system commissioning'), which is occasionally referred to in these volumes. The work reported does generally assume that the detector is fully operational, and in this sense represents an idealised detector: establishing the best performance of the ATLAS detector with LHC proton-proton collisions is a challenging task for the future. The results summarised here therefore represent the best estimate of ATLAS capabilities before real operational experience of the full detector with beam. Unless otherwise stated, simulations also do not include the effect of additional interactions in the same or other bunch-crossings, and the effect of neutron background is neglected. Thus simulations correspond to the low-luminosity performance of the ATLAS detector. This report is broadly divided into two parts: firstly the performance for identification of physics objects is examined in detail, followed by a detailed assessment of the performance of the trigger system. This part is subdivided into chapters surveying the capabilities for charged particle tracking, each of electron/photon, muon and tau identification, jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction, b-tagging algorithms and performance, and finally the trigger system performance. In each chapter of the report, there is a further subdivision into shorter notes describing different aspects studied. The second major subdivision of the report addresses physics measurement capabilities, and new physics search sensitivities. Individual chapters in this part discuss ATLAS physics capabilities in Standard Model QCD and electroweak processes, in the top quark sector, in b-physics, in searches for Higgs bosons, supersymmetry searches, and finally searches for other new particles predicted in more exotic models.

  19. Monte Carlo: in the beginning and some great expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metropolis, N.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The central theme will be on the historical setting and origins of the Monte Carlo Method. The scene was post-war Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. There was an inevitability about the Monte Carlo Event: the ENIAC had recently enjoyed its meteoric rise (on a classified Los Alamos problem); Stan Ulam had returned to Los Alamos; John von Neumann was a frequent visitor. Techniques, algorithms, and applications developed rapidly at Los Alamos. Soon, the fascination of the Method reached wider horizons. The first paper was submitted for publication in the spring of 1949. In the summer of 1949, the first open conference was held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Of some interst perhaps is an account of Fermi's earlier, independent application in neutron moderation studies while at the University of Rome. The quantum leap expected with the advent of massively parallel processors will provide stimuli for very ambitious applications of the Monte Carlo Method in disciplines ranging from field theories to cosmology, including more realistic models in the neurosciences. A structure of multi-instruction sets for parallel processing is ideally suited for the Monte Carlo approach. One may even hope for a modest hardening of the soft sciences.

  20. Why hasn't earth warmed as much as expected?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.E.; Charlson, R.; Kahn, R.; Ogren, J.; Rodhe, H.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) over the industrial era is less than 40% of that expected from observed increases in long-lived greenhouse gases together with the best-estimate equilibrium climate sensitivity given by the 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Possible reasons for this warming discrepancy are systematically examined here. The warming discrepancy is found to be due mainly to some combination of two factors: the IPCC best estimate of climate sensitivity being too high and/or the greenhouse gas forcing being partially offset by forcing by increased concentrations of atmospheric aerosols; the increase in global heat content due to thermal disequilibrium accounts for less than 25% of the discrepancy, and cooling by natural temperature variation can account for only about 15%. Current uncertainty in climate sensitivity is shown to preclude determining the amount of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions that would be compatible with any chosen maximum allowable increase in GMST; even the sign of such allowable future emissions is unconstrained. Resolving this situation by empirical determination of Earth’s climate sensitivity from the historical record over the industrial period or through use of climate models whose accuracy is evaluated by their performance over this period is shown to require substantial reduction in the uncertainty of aerosol forcing over this period.

  1. Recombination Lifetime of InxGa1-xAs Alloys Used in Thermophotovoltaic Converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Ellingson, R.; Johnston, S.; Webb, J.; Carapella, J.; Wanlass, M.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The family of ternary compounds of composition InxGa1-xAs are of considerable interest for thermophotovoltaic energy converters. The recombination lifetimes of the various compositions are critical to the successful application of these materials as efficient converters. Here we will describe experimental results on the composition. In0.53Ga0.47 that is lattice-matched to InP. We will also describe lifetime results on the compositions In0.68Ga0.32As, with bandgap of 0.60 eV to compositions In0.78Ga0.22As with a bandgap of 0.50 eV. Double heterostructure confinement devices have been made over a range of both n- and p-type doping. These results are preliminary, but the goal is to obtain the radiative and Auger recombination coefficients for the alloys in this composition range.

  2. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO); Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  3. Gamma-ray induced Doppler broadening and the determination of lifetimes of excited nuclear states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boerner, H.G.; Jolie, J.; Robinson, S.J. (Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kessler, E.G.; Dewey, S.M.; Greene, G.; Deslattes, R. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); Ulbig, S.; Lieb, K.P. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Casten, R.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Krusche, B. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Cizewski, J.A. (Rutgers--the

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of lifetimes of excited states in nuclei yield crucial information for sensitive tests of nuclear models. Here a novel method will be discussed which involves the GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) technique, in which Doppler broadening is observed in a transition from a nucleus recoiling from the emission of a previous gamma ray. As the recoil energy is extremely small, ultra-high energy resolving power has to be used. To date all such experiments have been carried out at ILL using the GAMS4 double flat crystal spectrometer which is operated in a NIST-ILL collaboration. The method can be used for all lifetimes below a few picoseconds. The wide range of applicability, together with the very exhaustive set of data often obtained, is an advantage with respect to many other methods. The characteristic features of GRID will be discussed using some selected examples. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Phosphazene Based Additives for Improvement of Safety and Battery Lifetimes in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K Harrup; Kevin L Gering; Harry W Rollins; Sergiy V Sazhin; Michael T Benson; David K Jamison; Christopher J Michelbacher

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There need to be significant improvements made in lithium-ion battery technology, principally in the areas of safety and useful lifetimes to truly enable widespread adoption of large format batteries for the electrification of the light transportation fleet. In order to effect the transition to lithium ion technology in a timely fashion, one promising next step is through improvements to the electrolyte in the form of novel additives that simultaneously improve safety and useful lifetimes without impairing performance characteristics over wide temperature and cycle duty ranges. Recent efforts in our laboratory have been focused on the development of such additives with all the requisite properties enumerated above. We present the results of the study of novel phosphazene based electrolytes additives.

  5. Measurement of the Lifetime of the B(±)(c) Meson in the Semileptonic Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ; published 2 March 2009) Using approximately 1:3 fb#2;1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the B#1;c meson in the B#1;c ! J=c#1;#1; þ X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J=c þ#1... weakly-decaying b hadrons. Examples of final states where the c quark acts as a spectator while the b quark decays weakly are B#1;c ! J=c#3;#1;, B#1;c ! J=cD#1;s , and B#1;c ! J=c ‘#1;#4;. In this Letter we present a measurement of the lifetime of the B#1...

  6. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  7. Theory of SEI Formation in Rechargeable Batteries: Capacity Fade, Accelerated Aging and Lifetime Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinson, Matthew B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cycle life is critically important in applications of rechargeable batteries, but lifetime prediction is mostly based on empirical trends, rather than mathematical models. In practical lithium-ion batteries, capacity fade occurs over thousands of cycles, limited by slow electrochemical processes, such as the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) in the negative electrode, which compete with reversible lithium intercalation. Focusing on SEI growth as the canonical degradation mechanism, we show that a simple single-particle model can accurately explain experimentally observed capacity fade in commercial cells with graphite anodes, and predict future fade based on limited accelerated aging data for short times and elevated temperatures. The theory is extended to porous electrodes, predicting that SEI growth is essentially homogeneous throughout the electrode, even at high rates. The lifetime distribution for a sample of batteries is found to be consistent with Gaussian statistics, as predicted by th...

  8. The effect of frequency on the lifetime of a surface micromachined microengine driving a load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, D.M.; Miller, W.M.; Eaton, W.P.; Irwin, L.W.; Peterson, K.A.; Dugger, M.T.; Senft, D.C.; Smith, N.F.; Tangyunyong, P.; Miller, S.L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed on surface micromachined microengines driving load gears to determine the effect of the rotation frequency on median cycles to failure. The authors did observe a frequency dependence and have developed a model based on fundamental wear mechanisms and forces exhibited in resonant mechanical systems. Stressing loaded microengines caused observable wear in the rotating joints and in a few instances led to fracture of the pin joint in the drive gear.

  9. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Fuller, Merrian C.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Peters, Jane S.; McRae, Marjorie; Albers, Nathaniel; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Spahic, Mersiha

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy efficiency services sector (EESS) is poised to become an increasingly important part of the U.S. economy. Climate change and energy supply concerns, volatile and increasing energy prices, and a desire for greater energy independence have led many state and national leaders to support an increasingly prominent role for energy efficiency in U.S. energy policy. The national economic recession has also helped to boost the visibility of energy efficiency, as part of a strategy to support economic recovery. We expect investment in energy efficiency to increase dramatically both in the near-term and through 2020 and beyond. This increase will come both from public support, such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and significant increases in utility ratepayer funds directed toward efficiency, and also from increased private spending due to codes and standards, increasing energy prices, and voluntary standards for industry. Given the growing attention on energy efficiency, there is a concern among policy makers, program administrators, and others that there is an insufficiently trained workforce in place to meet the energy efficiency goals being put in place by local, state, and federal policy. To understand the likelihood of a potential workforce gap and appropriate response strategies, one needs to understand the size, composition, and potential for growth of the EESS. We use a bottom-up approach based upon almost 300 interviews with program administrators, education and training providers, and a variety of EESS employers and trade associations; communications with over 50 sector experts; as well as an extensive literature review. We attempt to provide insight into key aspects of the EESS by describing the current job composition, the current workforce size, our projections for sector growth through 2020, and key issues that may limit this growth.

  10. An experimental study of spatial effects on mean neutron lifetime measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooke, William Bruce

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE May, 1966 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SPATIAL EFFECTS ON MEAN NEUTRON LIFETIME MEASUREMENT A Thesis By William Bruce Hooks Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommx tee ea o epar men e er e er e er... Showing Pertinent Dimensions Transfer Function Magnitude versus Oscillator Frequency 20 Transfer Function Phase versus Oscillator 21 Frequency CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A particularly useful way of describing the kinetic behavior of a nuclear reactor...

  11. S and 4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The S and 4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at {approx}1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S and 4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 cent /K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S and 4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 cent /K; -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  12. Comparison of Accelerated Testing with Modeling to Predict Lifetime of CPV Solder Layers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell assemblies can fail due to thermomechanical fatigue in the die-attach layer. In this presentation, we show the latest results from our computational model of thermomechanical fatigue. The model is used to estimate the relative lifetime of cell assemblies exposed to various temperature histories consistent with service and with accelerated testing. We also present early results from thermal cycling experiments designed to help validate the computational model.

  13. Lifetime of oil drops pressed by buoyancy against a planar interface: Large drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clara Rojas; Máximo García-Sucre; Germán Urbina-Villalba

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous report [10] it was shown that emulsion stability simulations are able to reproduce the lifetime of micrometer-size drops of hexadecane pressed by buoyancy against a planar water-hexadecane interface. It was confirmed that small drops (rioil stabilized with bovine serum albumin. The potential obtained is then employed to study the lifetime of deformable drops in the range 10 \\leq ri \\leq 1000 {\\mu}m. It is established that the average lifetime of these drops can be adequately replicated using the model of truncated spheres. However, the results depend sensibly on the expressions of the initial distance of deformation and the maximum film radius used in the calculations. The set of equations adequate for large drops is not satisfactory for medium-size drops (10 \\leq ri \\leq 100 {\\mu}m), and vice versa. In the case of large particles, the increase in the interfacial area as a consequence of the deformation of the drops generates a very large repulsive barrier which opposes coalescence. Nevertheless, the buoyancy force prevails. As a consequence, it is the hydrodynamic tensor of the drops which determine the characteristic behavior of the lifetime as a function of the particle size. While the average values of the coalescence time of the drops can be justified by the mechanism of film thinning, the scattering of the experimental data of large drops cannot be rationalized using the methodology previously described. A possible explanation of this phenomenon required elaborate simulations which combine deformable drops, capillary waves, repulsive interaction forces, and a time-dependent surfactant adsorption.

  14. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  15. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases.

  16. Effects of impurity atoms and molecules on the lifetime of antiprotonic helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Hayano, R S; Iwasaki, M; Nakamura, S N; Tamura, H; Ito, T M; Kawachi, A; Nishida, N; Higemoto, M; Ito, Y; Morita, N; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Schmid, W; Hoffmann, J; Eades, John

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed annihilation time spectra of antiprotons (DATS) in room temperature helium gas have been studied as a function of the concentration of admixed noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) as well as molecular gases (N_2,O_2,H_2) at the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN. The DATS were a superposition of two exponential components, one with lifetime of several 100 ns and the other with lifetime 1 to 3 \\mus. They showed a shorter average lifetime (T_{av}) than DATS of pure helium. Ne, Ar, and Kr were found to affect T_{av} only slightly even in concentrations up to 20\\%, while Xe showed a much stronger influence. In the case of molecular gases the presence of N_2 influenced the DATS much less than O_2 and H_2 which destroyed the metastability almost completely in concentrations of 100 ppm and less. The decay rate of the slow component of DATS was found to exhibit a linear relation to the number density of the admixture. From this a collisional destruction (``quenching'') cross section \\sigma_q was extracted. No ...

  17. Measurement of the B ? lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Huffman, B. T.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of a large number of B-hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II Detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper-decay-time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias, and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty due to the differences between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B? using the mode B??D???. The B? lifetime is measured as ?B?=1.663±0.023±0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  18. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  19. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenway, W. G.; Kwan, J. W.

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ?1275{degrees}C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ? 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A source with an alumino-silicate coating 6.35 mm in diameter and ?0.25 mm thick, has a lifetime of ?40 hours at ?1275{degrees}C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ?6 ?s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Furthermore, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  20. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  1. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  2. Constraining the Lifetime of QSOs with Present-day Mass Function of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hosokawa

    2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the theoretical models of the QSO formation, we can reproduce optical QSO luminosity functions (LFs) at high redshifts (z > 2.2). Two different models can reproduce LFs successfully, though the lifetime of QSOs, t_Q, and the relation between the black hole mass and the host halo mass are different each other; t_Q = 10^6yr, in one model, t_Q > 10^7yr, in other models. Here, we propose a method to break this degeneracy. We calculate the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z=2.5, and compare the result with the current mass function obtained by Salucci et al.(1999). In the shorter lifetime model, the mass function at z=2.5 exceeds that of z=0.0 by one order of magnitude, then it should be ruled out. We conclude that the lifetime is at least t_Q > 10^7yr. Next, we examine the difference of the formation epoch of SMBHs existing at z=3.0 for each model under the model assumptions. We simply discuss the difference of formation epoch as another possible model-discriminator.

  3. Measurement of D0 lifetime with the BaBar detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simi, Gabriele; /Pisa U. /SLAC

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the result of the researchers carried out during a three years Ph.D. period in the BABAR experiment. The first chapter consists in an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime determination and CP violation parameters, as well as an overview of the CP violation in the B sector, which is the main topic of the experiment. The description of the experimental apparatus follows with particular attention to the Silicon Vertex Tracker detector, the most critical detector for the determination of decay vertices and thus of lifetimes and time dependent CP violation asymmetries. In the fourth chapter the operation and running of the vertex detector is described, as a result from the experience as Operation Manager of the SVT, with particular attention to the safety of the device and the data quality assurance. The last chapter is dedicated to the determination of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime with the BABAR detector, which is the main data analysis carried out by the candidate. The analysis is characterized by the selection of an extremely pure sample of D{sup 0} mesons for which the decay flight length and proper time is reconstructed. The description of the unbinned maximum likelihood fit follows, as well as the discussion of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties. In the appendix is also presented a preliminary study of a possible development regarding the determination of mixing and CP violation parameters for the D{sup 0} meson.

  4. Slow changes in performance consistent with expectations for increasing radiation damage and contamination deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    (i.e. non-flaring) particle background should continue to drop as we approach solar maximum · ACIS hardware and software continue to perform nominally · No known limitations on ACIS lifetime Energy Scale degraded · Slow decay in energy scale with time - Directly related to increasing CTI - Structure in FI CCD

  5. Lifetime Tests on a High Ohms/Square Metalized High Crystalline Polypropylene Film Capacitor with Application to a Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Mark A.; Burkhart, Craig; Tang, Tao; /SLAC; ,

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents accelerated lifetime tests on a polypropylene film capacitor. Experimental parameters (20% droop, 5 Hz repetition rate) simulate anticipated operating conditions encountered in the SLAC P2 Marx. Elevated film electric field stress is utilized as the acceleration parameter. Results indicate that, for the particular film of interest, a film stress of {approx}290 V/{mu}m corresponds to a 10{sup 5} hour lifetime. In addition, the voltage scaling exponent for this film is 13.1.

  6. What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power Plants What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from Commercial Nuclear Power...

  7. Lifetime Response of a Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Singh, M.

    1999-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetime studies in four-point flexure were performed on a Hi-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite over a temperature range of 700 degrees to 1150 degrees C in air. The composite consisted of ~40 vol. % Hi-NicalonTM fiber (8-harness weave) with a 0.5 Mu-m BN fiber coating and a melt-infiltration SiC matrix wand was tested with as-machined surfaces. Lifetime results indicated that the composite exhibited a stress-dependent lifetime at stress levels above an apparent fatigue limit, similar to the trend observed in CG-NicalonTM fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. At less than or equal to 950 degrees C, the lifetimes of Hi-Nicalon/MI SiC composites decreased with increasing applied stress level and test temperature. However, the lifetimes were extended as test temperature increased from 950 degees to 1150 degrees C as a result of surface crack sealing due to glass formation by the oxidation of Mi SiC matrix. The lifetime governing processes were, in general, attributed to the progressive oxidation of BN fiber coating and formation of glassy phase, which formed a strong bond between fiber and matrix, resulting in embrittlement of the composite with time.

  8. Economically rational expectations theory: evidence from the WTI oil price survey data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    strength in the oil market. KEYWORDS: expectations formation, oil price CLASSIFICATION: D84, G14, Q43 expectations in the oil market: evidence from survey data 1. Introduction Oil price shocks are among the mainEconomically rational expectations theory: evidence from the WTI oil price survey data Georges PRAT

  9. Wind, Hydrogen and other Energy Technologies Similarities and Differences in Expectation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Hydrogen and other Energy Technologies ­ Similarities and Differences in Expectation Dynamics But mostly a "storytelling" on expectations and wind energy Per Dannemand Andersen Head of Technology Scenarios research programme Risoe National Laboratory per.dannemand@risoe.dk #12;Expectations and Wind

  10. Intervention strategies for energy efficient municipal buildings: Influencing energy decisions throughout buildings` lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current energy-related decisionmaking processes that take place during the lifetimes of municipal buildings in San Francisco do not reflect our ideal picture of energy efficiency as a part of staff awareness and standard practice. Two key problems that undermine the success of energy efficiency programs are lost opportunities and incomplete actions. These problems can be caused by technology-related issues, but often the causes are institutional barriers (organizational or procedural {open_quotes}people problems{close_quotes}). Energy efficient decisions are not being made because of a lack of awareness or policy mandate, or because financial resources are not available to decisionmakers. The Bureau of Energy Conservation (BEC) is working to solve such problems in the City & County of San Francisco through the Intervention Strategies project. In the first phase of the project, using the framework of the building lifetime, we learned how energy efficiency in San Francisco municipal buildings can be influenced through delivering services to support decisionmakers; at key points in the process of funding, designing, constructing and maintaining them. The second phase of the project involved choosing and implementing five pilot projects. Through staff interviews, we learned how decisions that impact energy use are made at various levels. We compiled information about city staff and their needs, and resources available to meet those needs. We then designed actions to deliver appropriate services to staff at these key access points. BEC implemented five pilot projects corresponding to various stages in the building`s lifetime. These were: Bond Guidelines, Energy Efficient Design Practices, Commissioning, Motor Efficiency, and Facilities Condition Monitoring Program.

  11. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arimoto, Y; Igarashi, Y; Iwashita, Y; Ino, T; Katayama, R; Kitahara, R; Kitaguchi, M; Matsumura, H; Mishima, K; Oide, H; Otono, H; Sakakibara, R; Shima, T; Shimizu, H M; Sugino, T; Sumi, N; Sumino, H; Taketani, K; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, T; Yamashita, S; Yokoyama, H; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  12. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh [Microtron Centre, Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574199 (India); Pandey, A. K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri-570006 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  13. Addressing Inter-set Write-Variation for Improving Lifetime of Non-Volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a technique which minimizes inter-set write variation in NVM caches for improving its lifetime. Our technique uses cache coloring scheme to add a software-controlled mapping layer between groups of physical pages (called memory regions) and cache sets. Periodically, the number of writes to different colors of the cache is computed and based on this result, the mapping of a few colors is changed to channel the write traffic to least utilized cache colors. This change helps to achieve wear-leveling.

  14. An experimental study of spatial effects on mean neutron lifetime measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooke, William Bruce

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactor by means of a rotating neutron absorber located in an access port. The AGN-201 is a low power, graphite reflected, homogeneous training reactor. It operates at a power level of 100 milli- watts with 20$ enriched fuel. Several measurements were... to the two, access port measurements being made in the graphite reflector region. The neutron lifetime in graphite is considerably longer than its life- time in the core region. In addition to the core diameter, 24 there was slightly more than six inches...

  15. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  16. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  17. A Modification of the Inner and Outer Core for Reactor Pressure Vessel Lifetime Extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Bo Kyun [Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae Je [Nuclear Fuel Company (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of nuclear power plant lifetime extension was examined by reducing the fast neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and relieving irradiation embrittlement of materials, and thus ensuring enough structural integrity beyond the design lifetime. Two fluence reduction options, peripheral assembly replacement and additional shield installation in the outer core structures, were applied to the Kori Unit-1 reactor, and the fluence reduction effect was carefully analyzed. For an accurate estimate of the neutron fluence at the RPV and a reasonable description of the modified peripheral assemblies, a full-scope explicit modeling of a Monte Carlo simulation was employed in all calculations throughout this study. The Kori Unit-1 cycle-16 core was modeled on a three-dimensional representation by using the MCNP4B code, and the fluence distribution was estimated at the inner wall beltline around the circumferential weld of the RPV. On the basis of fracture toughness requirements of the RPV, the two modified cases were predicted to have an additional life of 7 to 10 effective full-power years. Throughout the core nuclear characteristics analyses, it was confirmed that the critical peaking factors for safe reactor operation were satisfied with the design limits.

  18. Lifetime Prediction of IGBT in a STATCOM Using Modified-Graphical Rainflow Counting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopi Reddy, Lakshmi Reddy [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rainflow algorithms are one of the best counting methods used in fatigue and failure analysis [17]. There have been many approaches to the rainflow algorithm, some proposing modifications. Graphical Rainflow Method (GRM) was proposed recently with a claim of faster execution times [10]. However, the steps of the graphical method of rainflow algorithm, when implemented, do not generate the same output as the four-point or ASTM standard algorithm. A modified graphical method is presented and discussed in this paper to overcome the shortcomings of graphical rainflow algorithm. A fast rainflow algorithm based on four-point algorithm but considering point comparison than range comparison is also presented. A comparison between the performances of the common rainflow algorithms [6-10], including the proposed methods, in terms of execution time, memory used, and efficiency, complexity, and load sequences is presented. Finally, the rainflow algorithm is applied to temperature data of an IGBT in assessing the lifetime of a STATCOM operating for power factor correction of the load. From 5-minute data load profiles available, the lifetime is estimated to be at 3.4 years.

  19. Preliminary Chemical Aging and Lifetime Assessment for High Density S5370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S

    2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary lifetime assessment of S5370 stress cushions has been performed. Data from three sources were obtained and reviewed to perform this assessment. The sources were the following: (1) the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Honeywell FM&T Kansas City Plant's 2-year and 9-year accelerated aging studies; (2) a large selection of weapon surveillance return data; (3) laboratory experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Honeywell FM&T Kansas City Plant on artificially aged material. The general conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) There is an inherently large degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity in S5370 cushions that complicates lifetime assessments; (2) Current surveillance testing procedures are inadequate for providing insight into aging trends; (3) LANL PMAP data suggests a 60 year load retention of greater than 40%; however, this is for low density versions and extrapolation to high density must be performed with caution and a new set of testing is recommended; (4) Results of chemical aging assessments suggest that radiation damage is minimal at stockpile relevant doses, thermal degradation leads to compression set due to disentanglement of the network structure over time and a negligible amount of chain scissioning at relevant temperatures. The compression set is accelerated by exposure to radiation; (5) In the absence of further testing, a 60-year load retention of greater than 40% is estimated.

  20. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP (Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter) instrument on Spacelab 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flight of the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 allowed the collection of time sequences of diffraction-limited (0.5 arc second) granulation images with excellent pointing (0.003 arc second jitter RMS) and freedom from the distortion that plagues ground-based images. The solar 5 minute oscillations are clearly seen in the data. Using Fourier transforms in the temporal and spatial domain, the authors show that these dominate the autocorrelation lifetime in magnetic regions. When the oscillations are removed the autocorrelation lifetime is found to be 410 and 890 seconds, respectively, in quiet and magnetic regions. In quiet areas exploding granules are common. It is hard to find that neither explodes nor is unaffected by a nearby explosion. A significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Local correlation-tracking techniques are used to measure horizontal displacements, and thus transverse velocities, in the intensity field. In the quiet sun it is possible to detect both super- and mesogranulation. Horizontal velocities are as great as 1000 m/s quiet sun, and the average velocity is 400 m/s. In magnetic regions, horizontal velocities are much less, about 200 m/s. These flows effect the measured lifetime. A lower limit to the lifetime in quiet and magnetic sun is estimated to be 440 and 950 seconds respectively.

  1. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Li, Zhiying [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  2. Measurement of the t anti-t production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using lepton + jets events with lifetime b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair (t{bar t}) production cross section ({sigma}{sub t{bar t}}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 230 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We select events with one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and jets in the final state. We employ lifetime-based b-jet identification techniques to further enhance the t{bar t} purity of the selected sample. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV, we measure {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 8.6{sub -1.5}{sup +1.6}(stat. + syst.) {+-} 0.6 (lumi.) pb, in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  3. PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected to be dominated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected vessel. Another possible technique to mitigate tritium accumulation in these codeposited surfaces

  4. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

  5. Photosynthesis: Research for Food, Fuel and Future--15th International Conference on Photosynthesis518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow Fluorescence avocado leaves (Persea americana Mill.) during the slow part of chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence transient

  6. Evaluation of Lifetime of High Efficiency Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-379

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, D.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of this joint work, Solarmer and NREL will investigate the lifetime and stability of Organic Photovoltaic Devices based on Solarmer high efficiency active layer materials.

  7. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  8. Electron attachment to SF6 and lifetimes of SF6- negative ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerchikov, L G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the process of low-energy electron capture by the SF6 molecule. Our approach is based on the model of Gauyacq and Herzenberg [J. Phys. B 17, 1155 (1984)] in which the electron motion is coupled to the fully symmetric vibrational mode through a weakly bound or virtual s state. By tuning the two free parameters of the model, we achieve an accurate description of the measured electron attachment cross section and good agreement with vibrational excitation cross sections of the fully symmetric mode. An extension of the model provides a limit on the characteristic time of intramolecular vibrational relaxation in highly-excited SF6-. By evaluating the total vibrational spectrum density of SF6-, we estimate the widths of the vibrational Feshbach resonances of the long-lived negative ion. We also analyse the possible distribution of the widths and its effect on the lifetime measurements, and investigate nonexponential decay features in metastable SF6-.

  9. PREDICTION OF DISSOLVER LIFETIMES THROUGH NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND LABORATORY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Woodsmall, T.; Hinz, W.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-destructive evaluation was used as the primary method of monitoring the corrosion degradation of nuclear material dissolvers and assessing the remaining lifetimes. Materials were typically processed in nitric acid based (4-14M) solutions containing fluoride concentrations less than 0.2 M. The primary corrosion issue for the stainless steel dissolvers is the occurrence of localized corrosion near the tank bottom and the heat affected zones of the welds. Laboratory data for a range of operational conditions, including solution chemistry and temperature, was used to assess the impact of processing changes on the dissolver corrosion rate. Experimental and NDE-based general corrosion rates were found to be in reasonable agreement for standard dissolution chemistries consisting of nitric acid with fluorides and at temperatures less than 95 C. Greater differences were observed when chloride was present as an impurity and temperatures exceeded 100 C.

  10. Theory and models of material erosion and lifetime during plasma instabilities in a tokamak environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and structural damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) due to the frequent loss of plasma confinement remains a serious problem for the tokamak reactor concept. The deposited plasma energy causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure, and frequent plasma contamination. Surface damage consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials. Structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. To evaluate the lifetimes of plasma-facing materials and nearby components and to predict the various forms of damage that they experience, comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are developed, integrated self-consistently, and enhanced. Splashing mechanisms such as bubble boiling and various liquid magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials are being examined. The design requirements and implications of plasma-facing and nearby components are discussed, along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components.

  11. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Marina-Kalliopi; Fallon, Paul; Macchiavelli, Augusto; Paschalis, Stephanos; Starosta, Krzysztof; Baugher, Travis; Bazin, Daniel; Cartegni, Lucia; Clark, Roderick; Crawford, Heather; Cromaz, Mario; Dewald, Alfred; Gade, Alexandra; Grinyer, Geoff; Gros, Sebastian; Hackstein, Matthias; Jeppesen, Hendrick; Lee, I-Yang; McDaniel, Sean; Miller, Doug; Rajabali, Mustafa; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Rother, Wolfram; Voss, Phillip; Walsh, Kathleen Ann; Weisshaar, Dirk; Wiedeking, Mathis; Brown, Boyd Alex

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub #28;2{sup +}{sub 1}} = 9.8 ± 2.8(stat){sup +0.5}{sub ?1.1}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub g.s.}) = 7.5{sup +3.0}{sub ?1.7}(stat){sup +1.0}{sub ?0.4}(syst) e{sup 2}fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  12. An overview of the US Department of Energy Plant Lifetime Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moonka, A.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief summary of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (USDOE`s) cooperative effort with the nuclear industry to develop technology to manage the effects of material degradation in systems, structures and components (SSCs) that impact plant safety or can significantly improve plant performance/economics and to establish and demonstrate the license renewal process. Also included are efforts to reduce decontamination/decommission costs, and reduce the uncertainty in long-term service-life decision making. During 1995, the Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program was renamed the Commercial Operating Light Water Reactor (COLWR) Program activities are focused on sustaining the LWR option for domestic electricity generation by supporting operation of existing LWRs as long as they are safe, efficient, and economical. The status of the key projects is discussed in this paper.

  13. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  14. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  15. An overview of the United States Department of Energy plant lifetime improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Clauss, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US. The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of the regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; (2) development, verification, and validation of the various technical criteria and bases for needed monitoring, refurbishment, or replacement of plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues, including degradation of long-lived components, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement management approaches, and analytical methodologies to characterize RPV integrity.

  16. CONSTRAINTS ON THE LIFETIMES OF DISKS RESULTING FROM TIDALLY DESTROYED ROCKY PLANETARY BODIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girven, J.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Brinkworth, C. S.; Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Farihi, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Koester, D., E-mail: j.m.girven@warwick.ac.uk [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal-polluted white dwarfs reveal infrared excesses in the spectral energy distributions of HE 0110-5630, GD 61, and HE 1349-2305. All three of these stars have helium-dominated atmospheres, and their infrared emissions are consistent with warm dust produced by the tidal destruction of (minor) planetary bodies. This study brings the number of metal-polluted, helium and hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs surveyed with IRAC to 53 and 38, respectively. It also nearly doubles the number of metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs found to have closely orbiting dust by Spitzer. From the increased statistics for both atmospheric types with circumstellar dust, we derive a typical disk lifetime of log [t{sub disk}(yr)] = 5.6 {+-} 1.1 (ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). This assumes a relatively constant rate of accretion over the timescale where dust persists, which is uncertain. We find that the fraction of highly metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs that have an infrared excess detected by Spitzer is only 23%, compared to 48% for metal-polluted hydrogen-rich white dwarfs, and we conclude from this difference that the typical lifetime of dusty disks is somewhat shorter than the diffusion timescales of helium-rich white dwarf. We also find evidence for higher time-averaged accretion rates onto helium-rich stars compared to the instantaneous accretion rates onto hydrogen-rich stars; this is an indication that our picture of evolved star-planetary system interactions is incomplete. We discuss some speculative scenarios that can explain the observations.

  17. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uozumi, Satoru; /Tsukuba U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetimes of the B{sup -}, B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sup 0}X; B{sup -}/B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D*{sup +}X; B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{nu}D{sub s}{sup +}x, where {ell}{sup -} denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pb{sup -1} used for the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sub s}{sup +}, followed by D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}; D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +}, followed by {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Here {pi}{sub s}{sup +} denotes a slow pion from D*{sup +} decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B{sup -}/B{sup 0} semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D{sup 0} final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D{sup 0} sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D{sup 0} sample, they look for the D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sub s}{sup +} signal. The inclusive D{sup 0} sample is then split into the two samples of D{sup 0} mesons which are from the D*{sup +} meson and not from D*{sup +}. They use the fact that D*{sup +} sample is dominated by the B{sup 0} component, and the D{sup 0} sample after excluding the D*{sup +} events is dominated by the B{sup -} component. Fraction of remaining mixture of B{sup -}/B{sup 0} components in each sample is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation. From the lepton + charm meson pairs, they measure the B meson decay lengths to extract the lifetimes. Since the B meson momentum, necessary to calculate the B meson decay time, is not fully reconstructed in semileptonic decays, the missing momentum is corrected using a Monte Carlo simulation during lifetime fits. Also, contributions of various kinds of backgrounds are considered and subtracted. As a result of the fit, the B meson lifetimes are measured to be c{tau}(B{sup -}) = 495.6 {+-} 8.6 {sub -12.8}{sup +13.3} {micro}m; c{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 441.5 {+-} 10.9 {+-} 17.0 {micro}m; c{tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 414.0 {+-} 16.6 {sub -13.8}{sup +15.6} {micro}m or {tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.653 {+-} 0.029 {sub -0.031}{sup +0.033} ps; {tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.473 {+-} 0.036 {+-} 0.054 ps; {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0}) = 1.381 {+-} 0.055 {sub -0.046}{sup +0.052} ps, and the lifetime ratios to be {tau}(B{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 1.123 {+-} 0.040 {sub -0.039}{sup +0.041}; {tau}(B{sub s}{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 0.938 {+-} 0.044 {sub -0.046}{sup +0.049} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Comparison Of Expected Yields For Light Radioactive Beams At SPIRAL-1 And 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Comparison Of Expected Yields For Light Radioactive Beams At SPIRAL-1 And 2 Saint-Laurent M of this contribution is the comparison of yields expected for light radioactive beams at SPIRAL-1 and after an upgrade, Switzerland. Abstract. Light-particles stable high-intensity beams (p, d, 3,4 He...) will be available from

  19. Power and Effective Study Size Based on Approximations to the Expected Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Power and Effective Study Size Based on Approximations to the Expected Likelihood Ratio Test statistical power and precision of heritability estimates can be difficult particularly in complex pedigrees. Previous work focused on the power to detect heritability by using the expectation of the likelihood ratio

  20. Title of Dissertation: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF STUDENTS' CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF STUDENTS' CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS classes. The first study uses a Likert-scale instrument, adapted from the Maryland Physics Expectations implications for how researchers should approach curricular reforms in the future. #12;EXAMINING THE EFFECTS

  1. Trends in life expectancy by education in Norway 19612009 O lof Anna Steingrimsdottir yvind Nss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MORTALITY Trends in life expectancy by education in Norway 1961­2009 O´ lo¨f Anna Steingri in life expectancy by education in Norway in the period 1961­2009, and to determine whether the patterns, 0403 Oslo, Norway e-mail: Olof.Anna.Steingrimsdottir@fhi.no �. Næss Á J. O. Moe Department of Health

  2. Background Paper -Research Workshop on Expectations in Science & Technology April 29 30, 2004, Ris, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or less explicit on the future rather than on the present or the past. The ability to discuss aspects, Risø, Denmark Expectations in Nanotechnology and in Energy ­ Foresight in the Sea of Expectations Mads of the future and to define the understanding of the future at present is central and of strategic importance

  3. Evaluation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} terminal level lifetime for several neodymium-doped laser crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibeau, C.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    All models of lasing action require knowledge of the physical parameters involved, of which many can be measured or estimated. The value of the terminal level lifetime is an important parameter in modeling many high power laser systems since the terminal level lifetime can have a substantial impact on the extraction efficiency of the system. However, the values of the terminal level lifetimes for a number of important laser materials such as ND:YAG and ND:YLF are not well known. The terminal level lifetime, a measure of the time it takes for the population to drain out of the terminal (lower) lasing level, has values that can range from picoseconds to microseconds depending on the host medium, thus making it difficult to construct one definitive experiment for all materials. Until recently, many of the direct measurements of the terminal level lifetime employed complex energy extraction or gain recovery methods coupled with a numerical model which often resulted in large uncertainties in the measured lifetimes. In this report we demonstrate a novel and more accurate approach which employs a pump-probe technique to measure the terminal level lifetime of 16 neodymium-doped materials. An alternative yet indirect method, which is based on the ``Energy Gap Law,`` is to measure the nonradiative lifetime of another transition which has the same energy gap as the transition of the terminal level lifetime. Employing this simpler approach, we measured the lifetime for 30 neodymium-doped materials. We show for the first time a direct comparison between the two methods and determine that the indirect method can be used to infer the terminal level lifetime within a factor of two for most neodymium-doped glasses and crystals.

  4. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  5. Improving the lifetime performance of ceramic fuel cells Fuel cells generate electricity from fuels more efficiently and with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    2014 Improving the lifetime performance of ceramic fuel cells Fuel cells generate electricity from to produce electricity from fuels. To speed the search for why fuel cell performance decreases over time fuels more efficiently and with fewer emissions per watt than burning fossil fuels. But as fuel cells

  6. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power Stephen J. DeVience a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Matthew S

    Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power Stephen J. DeVience a: Received 6 January 2012 Revised 14 March 2012 Available online 28 March 2012 Keywords: Nuclear singlet of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field

  7. Prediction of the Creep-Fatigue Lifetime of Alloy 617: An Application of Non-destructive Evaluation and Information Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Richard Wright; Timothy Roney

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively simple method using the nominal constant average stress information and the creep rupture model is developed to predict the creep-fatigue lifetime of Alloy 617, in terms of time to rupture. The nominal constant average stress is computed using the stress relaxation curve. The predicted time to rupture can be converted to number of cycles to failure using the strain range, the strain rate during each cycle, and the hold time information. The predicted creep-fatigue lifetime is validated against the experimental measurements of the creep-fatigue lifetime collected using conventional laboratory creep-fatigue tests. High temperature creep-fatigue tests of Alloy 617 were conducted in air at 950°C with a tensile hold period of up to 1800s in a cycle at total strain ranges of 0.3% and 0.6%. It was observed that the proposed method is conservative in that the predicted lifetime is less than the experimentally determined values. The approach would be relevant to calculate the remaining useful life to a component like a steam generator that might fail by the creep-fatigue mechanism.

  8. An analysis of the lifetime of OLSR networks Jan-Maarten Verbree, Maurits de Graaf and Johann Hurink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    our results describe the structure of connected sets dominating the 2-hop neighborhood of a node. Key describe the structure of connected dominating sets covering the 2-hop neighborhood of a node. This paper of Service or to maximize the network lifetime (the time until the first node runs out of energy

  9. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

  10. Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

  11. Fast evaluation of the fatigue lifetime of rubber-like materials based on a heat build-up protocol and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fast evaluation of the fatigue lifetime of rubber-like materials based on a heat build-up protocol Cedex, France Abstract The temperature of rubber-like materials increases under cyclic loadings, due results. Key words: rubber-like materials, heat build-up, infrared thermography, X-ray micro

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of the 3d {sup 2}D-level lifetimes of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuter, A.; Becher, C.; Lancaster, G.P.T.; Mundt, A.B.; Russo, C.; Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.; Haensel, W.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Blatt, R.; Safronova, M.S. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the lifetimes of the 3d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} metastable states of a single laser-cooled {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion in a linear Paul trap. We introduce a measurement technique based on high-efficiency quantum state detection after coherent excitation to the D{sub 5/2} state or incoherent shelving in the D{sub 3/2} state, and subsequent free, unperturbed spontaneous decay. The result for the natural lifetime of the D{sub 5/2} state of 1168(9) ms agrees excellently with the most precise published value. The lifetime of the D{sub 3/2} state is measured with a single ion and yields 1176(11) ms which improves the statistical uncertainty of previous results by a factor of four. We compare these experimental lifetimes to high-precision ab initio all order calculations [D{sub 3/2} state: 1196(11) ms; D{sub 5/2} state: 1165(11) ms] and find a very good agreement. These calculations represent an excellent test of high-precision atomic theory and will serve as a benchmark for the study of parity nonconservation in Ba{sup +} which has similar atomic structure.

  13. Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

  14. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, J.R.; /Fermilab; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; /Georgia Tech; Deptuch, G.W.; /Fermilab; Gui, P.; /Southern Methodist U.; Lourenco, N.E.; /Georgia Tech; Wu, G.; /Southern Methodist U.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  15. Radiative recombination and ultralong exciton photoluminescence lifetime in GaN freestanding film via two-photon excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiative recombination and ultralong exciton photoluminescence lifetime in GaN freestanding film of a freestanding GaN film using one-photon and two-photon excitations to demonstrate the dramatic difference at 295 K is observed from a GaN freestanding film using two-photon excitation, whereas less than 100 ps

  16. Energy Consumption in Wireless Sensor Networks is a fundamental issue in terms of functionality and network lifetime. Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vouyioukas, Demosthenes

    ABSTRACT Energy Consumption in Wireless Sensor Networks is a fundamental issue in terms of functionality and network lifetime. Minimization of energy consumption by applying optimization techniques setup. Application driven profiling of energy consumption at the node level is a useful tool for optimal

  17. 306 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 25, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 Lifetime Maximization via Cooperative Nodes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K. J. Ray

    locations and energy levels among distributed nodes. First, a lifetime maximization problem via cooperative is with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineer- ing and the Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA (email: kjrliu@eng.umd.edu). Z. Han is with the Department

  18. In the Proceedings of The 32nd International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA'05), June 2005. Exploiting Structural Duplication for Lifetime Reliability Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adve, Sarita

    reliability benefit. £This work is supported in part by an equipment donation from AMD and the National 2005. Exploiting Structural Duplication for Lifetime Reliability Enhancement £ Jayanth Srinivasan of device scaling are predicted to cause significant lifetime reliability problems in the near future

  19. Extending the Lifetime of a Network of Battery-Powered Mobile Devices by Remote Processing: A Markovian Decision-based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Extending the Lifetime of a Network of Battery-Powered Mobile Devices by Remote Processing the lifetime of a battery- powered mobile host in a client-server wireless network by using task migration-line adaptive policy is proposed, which dynamically monitors the channel conditions and the server behavior

  20. Teacher trait anxiety, student evaluation apprehension and teacher expectancy for student performance: a possible arousal effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinnan, James Shepherd

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If this is so, negative expectancy could serve as a "non relaxer" or energizer. Given this possibility, if the results of this experiment were re-examined with low expectancy seen as an "energizer" and high expectancy as a "relaxer" and it is additionally... assumed that low teacher trait anxiety is a "relaxer" and high teacher trait anxiety is an "energizer"; the high scores do in fact occur under medium arousal (that is, "energizer"/"relaxer" condition and vice versa) rather than excessively high...

  1. Acculturation, Alcohol Expectancies, and Alcohol Use Among Mexican-American Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flato, Claudia Graciela

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study was designed to examine the influence of cultural orientation on alcohol involvement among Mexican-American adolescents. Also, this study assessed whether cultural orientation predicted positive and negative alcohol expectancies...

  2. Firefighters at Lab on June 5 for Training Program; Expect Congestion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Firefighters at Lab on June 5 for Training Program; Expect Congestion in CC Parking Lot, Front Atrium Nearly 100 Newport News Firefighters will be at Jefferson Lab on Friday, June...

  3. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andExpectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market IntroSidebar: The U.S. wind industry experienced unprecedented

  4. The Influence of Weight Concerns and Weight Control Expectancies in the Smoking Behavior of Spanish Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berrios-Hernandez, Mayra

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ) from schools in Alicante, Spain. The students completed questionnaires regarding smoking history and status. They also responded to questions regarding smoking expectancies and weigh concerns. Results suggested differences between smokers...

  5. Sequence estimation in the presence of interference via the expectation-maximization algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Quan G

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we developed a method for obtaining near-optimal sequence estimates in the presence of interference for direct sequence spread spectrum communication using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. We assume binary phase shift...

  6. craton, where the pattern matches that expected from the gas-hydrate model. Fur-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    craton, where the pattern matches that expected from the gas-hydrate model. Fur- ther, values-lived changes in the carbon-isotopic composition of the ocean. But the gas-hydrate model avoids some

  7. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNG StorageConsumptionPlant Liquids, Expected

  8. ,"New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,Dry Natural Gas Expected Future

  9. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlant Liquids, Expected Future

  10. The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juanes, Ruben [MIT

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geologic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence of concerted government policy. Here, we clarify the potential of CCS to mitigate emissions in the United States by developing a storage-capacity supply curve that, unlike current large-scale capacity estimates, is derived from the fluid mechanics of CO2 injection and trapping and incorporates injection-rate constraints. We show that storage supply is a dynamic quantity that grows with the duration of CCS, and we interpret the lifetime of CCS as the time for which the storage supply curve exceeds the storage demand curve from CO2 production. We show that in the United States, if CO2 production from power generation continues to rise at recent rates, then CCS can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at current levels for at least 100 years. This result suggests that the large-scale implementation of CCS is a geologically viable climate-change mitigation option in the United States over the next century.

  11. ROTATIONAL EXCITATION AND RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF N{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, Bruce H.; O'Keefe, Anthony

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative system (B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) has been recorded by laser induced fluorescences of N{sub 2}{sup +} ions confined in an rf trap. The ions were produced by electron impact and had an initial rotational distribution close to the room temperature distribution of the target N{sub 2} gas. By admitting Ar gas at pressures 10 to 100 times in excess of the N{sub 2} pressure, variable numbers of N{sub 2}{sup +} - Ar collisions were allowed to occur before the N{sub 2}{sup +} distribution was interrogated by the laser. Since the N{sub 2}{sup +} was translationally energetic, being driven by the trap fields, a rapid and extensive T to R energy transfer was observed. In this way, high rotational states of N{sub 2}{sup +} were populated and the radiative lifetimes of These states was measured. No evidence for a perturbation by a {sup 4}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state was found in the region (N = 31, 32) where previous studies had indicated a possible perturbation. Evidence for enhanced charge transfer from N{sub 2}{sup +} X{sup 2} {Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} to Ar was found for N{sub 2}{sup +} in its first vibrational level.

  12. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  13. Clustering and lifetime of Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Epoch of Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) angular correlation functions (ACFs) at $z\\simeq6.6$ and the fraction of lifetime (for the 100 Myrs preceding $z\\simeq6.6$) galaxies spend as Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with/without Lyman Alpha (Ly\\alpha) emission using a model that combines SPH cosmological simulations (GADGET-2), dust attenuation and a radiative transfer code (pCRASH). The ACFs are a powerful tool that significantly narrows the 3D parameter space allowed by LAE Ly$\\alpha$ and UV luminosity functions (LFs) alone. With this work, we simultaneously constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons $f_{esc}=0.05-0.5$, the mean fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) $\\leq 0.01$ and the dust-dependent ratio of the escape fractions of Ly$\\alpha$ and UV continuum photons $f_\\alpha/f_c=0.6-1.2$. Our results show that reionization has the largest impact on the amplitude of the ACFs, and its imprints are clearly distinguishable from those of $f_{esc}$ and $f_\\alpha/f_c$. We also show that...

  14. Lifetime Prediction for Degradation of Solar Mirrors using Step-Stress Accelerated Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Kennedy, C.; Gray, M.; Jones, W.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is to illustrate the use of statistical inference techniques in order to quantify the uncertainty surrounding reliability estimates in a step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) scenario. SSADT can be used when a researcher is faced with a resource-constrained environment, e.g., limits on chamber time or on the number of units to test. We apply the SSADT methodology to a degradation experiment involving concentrated solar power (CSP) mirrors and compare the results to a more traditional multiple accelerated testing paradigm. Specifically, our work includes: (1) designing a durability testing plan for solar mirrors (3M's new improved silvered acrylic "Solar Reflector Film (SFM) 1100") through the ultra-accelerated weathering system (UAWS), (2) defining degradation paths of optical performance based on the SSADT model which is accelerated by high UV-radiant exposure, and (3) developing service lifetime prediction models for solar mirrors using advanced statistical inference. We use the method of least squares to estimate the model parameters and this serves as the basis for the statistical inference in SSADT. Several quantities of interest can be estimated from this procedure, e.g., mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) and warranty time. The methods allow for the estimation of quantities that may be of interest to the domain scientists.

  15. Lifetime, turnover time, and fast magnetic field regeneration in random flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, S. E. M. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast dynamo is thought to be relevant in the regeneration of magnetic fields in astrophysics where the value of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is immense. The fast dynamo picture is one in which chaotic flows provide a mechanism for the stretching of magnetic field lines. Furthermore, a cascade of energy down to small scales results in intermittent regions of a small-scale, intense magnetic field. Given this scenario it is natural to invoke the use of kinematic random flows in order to understand field regeneration mechanisms better. Here a family of random flows is used to study the effects that L, the lifetime of the cell, and {tau}, the turnover time of the cell, may have on magnetic field regeneration. Defining the parameter {gamma}=L/{tau}, it has been varied according to {gamma}>1, {gamma}<1, {gamma}{approx}O(1). In the kinematic regime, dynamo growth rates and Lyapunov exponents are examined at varying values of Rm. The possibility of fast dynamo action is considered. In the nonlinear regime, magnetic and kinetic energies are examined. Results indicate that there does appear to be a relationship between {gamma} and dynamo efficiency. In particular, the most efficient dynamos seem to operate at lower values of {gamma}.

  16. Enhanced oscillation lifetime of a Bose-Einstein condensate in the 3D/1D crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, B; Cotter, J P; Butler, E; Hinds, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the damped motion of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, oscillating with respect to a thermal cloud. The cigar-shaped trapping potential provides enough transverse confinement that the dynamics of the system are intermediate between three-dimensional and one-dimensional. We find that oscillations persist for longer than expected for a three-dimensional gas. We attribute this to the suppressed occupation of transverse momentum states, which are essential for damping.

  17. Measurement of the B+_c Meson Lifetime Using B+_c -->J/psi e+nu_e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Budd, S.; Chu, P.H.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Gerberich, H.; Grundler, U.; Junk, T.R.; Kraus, J.; Liss,T.M.; Marino, C.; Pitts,K.; Rogers, E.; Taffard, A.; Veramendi, G.; Zhang, X.; Acosta, D.; Cruz, A.; Field, R.

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the B{sub c}{sup +} meson lifetime in the decay mode B{sub c}{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}e{sup +}{nu}e using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about 360 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/{psi}e{sup +} pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4lifetime of 0.463((+0.073)/(-0.065))(stat){+-}0.036(syst) ps.

  18. Measurement of the B(c)+ meson lifetime using B(c)+ ---> J/psi e+ nu(e)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a measurement of the B{sub c}{sup +} meson lifetime in the semileptonic decay mode B{sub c}{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about 360 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, they reconstruct J/{psi}e{sup +} pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4 < M{sub J/{psi}e} < 6 GeV/c{sup 2}. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured B{sub c}{sup +} meson lifetime of 0.463{sub -0.065}{sup +0.073}(stat) {+-} 0.036(syst) ps.

  19. Design of a circuit for measuring the lifetimes of excited nuclear states of the order of nanoseconds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuritzky, Clarence Samuel

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inverter 10th Dynode Detector and Phototube 0 Source 10th Dynod Detector and Phototube Amplifier Anode Amplifier Delay Cable Single Channel Analyzer Pulse Single Channel Analyzer Time-to-pulse Stop Signal Height Converter Start Signal... the pulse shaper circuit. ABSTRACT Design of a Circuit for Measuring the Lifetimes of Excited Nuclear States of the Order of Nanoseconds (January 1964) Clarence S. Kuritzky, B. S. Air Force Institute of Technology Directed by Dr. Harnam S. Hans and Dr...

  20. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Safronova; U. I. Safronova

    2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n = 7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly-excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in accuracy of the 3d_{5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3) a.u., in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007)]. The blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s - 3d_{5/2} clock transition in Ca+ is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300K. Electric-quadrupole 4s -nd and electric-octupole 4s -nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 43Ca+ ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca+ atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

  1. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  2. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  3. Charge and fluence lifetime measurements of a dc high voltage GaAs photogun at high average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Grames, R. Suleiman, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, J. Hansknecht, D. Machie, M. Poelker, M.L. Stutzman

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs-based dc high voltage photoguns used at accelerators with extensive user programs must exhibit long photocathode operating lifetime. Achieving this goal represents a significant challenge for proposed high average current facilities that must operate at tens of milliamperes or more. This paper describes techniques to maintain good vacuum while delivering beam, and techniques that minimize the ill effects of ion bombardment, the dominant mechanism that reduces photocathode yield of a GaAs-based dc high voltage photogun. Experimental results presented here demonstrate enhanced lifetime at high beam currents by: (a) operating with the drive laser beam positioned away from the electrostatic center of the photocathode, (b) limiting the photocathode active area to eliminate photoemission from regions of the photocathode that do not support efficient beam delivery, (c) using a large drive laser beam to distribute ion damage over a larger area, and (d) by applying a relatively low bias voltage to the anode to repel ions created within the downstream beam line. A combination of these techniques provided the best total charge extracted lifetimes in excess of 1000 C at dc beam currents up to 9.5 mA, using green light illumination of bulk GaAs inside a 100 kV photogun.

  4. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Universita di Padova (Italy) and INFN Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Universita di Padova (Italy); and others

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2{sup +} state in {sup 15}O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,{sup 15}O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  5. Training Strategies to Mitigate Expectancy-Induced Response Bias in Combat Identification: A Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Andrews, Dee H.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical assessments of combat fratricide reveal principal contributing factors in the effects of stress, continuous operations or sleep deprivation, poor situational awareness, emotions, and lack of training. This paper discusses what and how improvements in combat identification (CID) may be achieved through training. In addition to skill-based training, CID training must focus on countering the negative effects of expectancy in the face of heightened anxiety and stressors of continuous operations that lead to combat errors or fratricide. The paper examines possible approaches to training for overcoming erroneous expectancies and emotional factors that may distort or limit accurate "blue force" identification.

  6. Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

  7. Expectation Maximization as Message Passing Justin Dauwels, Sascha Korl, and Hans-Andrea Loeliger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

    ISIT 2005 Expectation Maximization as Message Passing Justin Dauwels, Sascha Korl, and Hans, and used, as a message passing algorithm in factor graphs. I. INTRODUCTION Graphical models [1 algorithms, and particle filters can be naturally viewed and used as message passing in factor graphs [3], [4

  8. QUANTUM ENERGY EXPECTATION IN PERIODIC TIME-DEPENDENT HAMILTONIANS VIA GREEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTUM ENERGY EXPECTATION IN PERIODIC TIME-DEPENDENT HAMILTONIANS VIA GREEN FUNCTIONS C´ESAR R. DE. Introduction 1 2. Average Energy and Green Functions 4 3. Applications 10 3.1. Time-Independent Hamiltonians 10(t). For each positive and discrete observable A (which we call a probe energy), we derive a formula

  9. 1 INTRODUCTION Climatic change is expected to be the outcome of in-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    of those financing it. Global warming and changes in precipitation patterns will alter the timing, and may reduce production, implying lower revenues and poorer returns. Electricity industry liberalisation are caused, in part, by fossil-fuelled electricity generation, and as world energy demand is expected

  10. Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage : 10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.07.004 #12;2 1. Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing of carbon and the cost of capture. From the engineering, psychological or climatic point of view, one

  11. Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050-00487175,version2-10Feb2011 #12;1. Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing the CO2 is assessed integrating all steps of the CCS chain: additional coal production, coal transportation, carbon

  12. Two problems with variational expectation maximisation for time-series models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    optimisation of a free-energy, are widely used in time-series modelling. Here, we investigate the success of v as a variational optimisation of a free-energy (Hathaway, 1986; Neal and Hinton, 1998). Consider observationsChapter 1 Two problems with variational expectation maximisation for time-series models Richard

  13. Wavelet based multiresolution expectation maximization image reconstruction algorithm for positron emission tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raheja, Amar

    Wavelet based multiresolution expectation maximization image reconstruction algorithm for positron. This work transforms the MGEM and MREM algorithm to a Wavelet based Multiresolution EM (WMREM) algorithm by performing a 2D-wavelet transform on the acquired tube data that is used to reconstruct images at different

  14. Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Liang

    Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling effects. However, time-lagged extinctions due to extinction debt may lead to additional species loss (31 species abundances, at least until future extinction debt is paid. References and Notes 1. M. Gaertner, A

  15. Extended space expectation values of position related operators for hydrogen-like quantum system evolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalay, Berfin; Demiralp, Metin [?stanbul Technical University, Informatics Institute, Maslak, 34469, ?stanbul (Turkey)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The expectation value definitions over an extended space from the considered Hilbert space of the system under consideration is given in another paper of the second author in this symposium. There, in that paper, the conceptuality rather than specification is emphasized on. This work uses that conceptuality to investigate the time evolutions of the position related operators' expectation values not in its standard meaning but rather in a new version of the definition over not the original Hilbert space but in the space obtained by extensions via introducing the images of the given initial wave packet under the positive integer powers of the system Hamiltonian. These images may not be residing in the same space of the initial wave packet when certain singularities appear in the structure of the system Hamiltonian. This may break down the existence of the integrals in the definitions of the expectation values. The cure is the use of basis functions in the abovementioned extended space and the sandwiching of the target operator whose expectation value is under questioning by an appropriately chosen operator guaranteeing the existence of the relevant integrals. Work specifically focuses on the hydrogen-like quantum systems whose Hamiltonians contain a polar singularity at the origin.

  16. TESLA FEL 2004-06 Expected properties of the radiation from VUV-FEL at DESY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA FEL 2004-06 July 2004 Expected properties of the radiation from VUV-FEL at DESY (femtosecond pulse" (200 fs) mode of FEL operation at VUV- FEL, based on a linearized bunch compression that pro- duces FEL radiation. Such a mode of operation was successfully tested at VUV-FEL, Phase I

  17. WHY HASN'T THE EARTH CLIMATE WARMED AS MUCH AS EXPECTED?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    in greenhouse gas forcing. · Countervailing natural cooling over the industrial period. · Lag in reaching University, Stockholm, Sweden #12;HOW MUCH WARMING IS EXPECTED? Equilibrium change in global mean surface and natural variability. #12;Cloud-Climate Feedbacks Cloud feedback has been identified as a part

  18. Diabetes Metab . Author manuscript Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy: expected vs reported prevalence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diabetes Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 10 Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy: expected vs due to retinopathy are amongst the most feared complications in diabetic patients. As the number of diabetic patients is predicted to increase, a corresponding increase in the number of patients affected

  19. Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis Gonéri de Recherche et de Formation en Calcul Scientifique (Cerfacs) Sea level rise is a major consequence level rise is up to 3 times the global mean rate (estimated as 3.5 mm per year since the early 1990s

  20. High resolution RCM simulation of eastern Mediterranean climate and its expected changes to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    High resolution RCM simulation of eastern Mediterranean climate and its expected changes to 2050. Modern global climate change evaluations usually based on application of coupled atmosphere-ocean global by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A number of different anthropogenic emission scenarios have been

  1. US/UK second level panel discussions on the health and value of: Ageing and lifetime predictions (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Many healthy physics, engineering, and materials exchanges are being accomplished in ageing and lifetime prediction that directly supports US and UK Stockpile Management Programs. Lifetime assessment studies of silicon foams under compression - Joint AWE/LANLlLLNL study of compression set in stress cushions completed. Provides phenomenological prediction out to 50 years. Polymer volatile out-gassing studies - New exchange on the out-gassing of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) using isotopic {sup 13}C labeling studies to interrogate mechanistic processes. Infra-red (IR) gas cell analytical capabilities developed by AWE will be used to monitor polymer out-gassing profiles. Pu Strength ageing Experiments and Constitutive Modeling - In recently compared modeling strategies for ageing effects on Pu yield strength at high strain rates, a US/UK consensus was reached on the general principle that the ageing effect is additive and not multiplicative. The fundamental mechanisms for age-strengthening in Pu remains unknown. Pu Surface and Interface Reactions - (1) US/UK secondment resulted in developing a metal-metal oxide model for radiation damaged studies consistent with a Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential; and (2) Joint US/UK collaboration to study the role of impurities in hydride initiation. Detonator Ageing (wide range of activities) - (1) Long-term ageing study with field trials at Pantex incorporating materials from LANL, LLNL, SNL and AWE; (2) Characterization of PETN growth to detonation process; (3) Detonator performance modeling; and (4) Performance fault tree analysis. Benefits are a unified approach to lifetime prediction that Includes: materials characterization and the development of ageing models through improved understanding of the relationship between materials properties, ageing properties and detonator performance.

  2. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Lambda_b Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna; /Glasgow U.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce {Lambda}{sub b} baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} baryon in the semileptonic channel {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. In total 186 pb{sup -1} of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 {Lambda}{sub b} candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} is measured to be {tau} = 1.29 {+-} 0.11(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of c{tau} = 387 {+-} 33(stat.) {+-} 21 (syst.) {micro}m.

  3. Value Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Hacke, P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most silicon PV road maps forecast a continued reduction in wafer thickness, despite rapid declines in the primary incentive for doing so -- polysilicon feedstock price. Another common feature of most silicon-technology forecasts is the quest for ever-higher device performance at the lowest possible costs. The authors present data from device-performance and manufacturing- and system-installation cost models to quantitatively establish the incentives for manufacturers to pursue advanced (thin) wafer and (high efficiency) cell technologies, in an age of reduced feedstock prices. This analysis exhaustively considers the value proposition for high lifetime (p-type) silicon materials across the entire c-Si PV supply chain.

  4. High temperature electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN: Nanosecond spin lifetimes far above room-temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buß, J. H.; Schaefer, A.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J. [Arbeitsgruppe Spektroskopie der kondensierten Materie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Schupp, T.; As, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33095 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron spin dynamics in n-doped bulk cubic GaN is investigated for very high temperatures from 293?K up to 500?K by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. We find extraordinarily long spin lifetimes exceeding 1?ns at 500?K. The temperature dependence of the spin relaxation time is in qualitative agreement with predictions of Dyakonov-Perel theory, while the absolute experimental times are an order of magnitude shorter than predicted. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, including the role of phase mixtures of hexagonal and cubic GaN as well as the impact of localized carriers.

  5. EXPECTED LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE (LSST) YIELD OF ECLIPSING BINARY STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prsa, Andrej [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G., E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 2201 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we estimate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) yield of eclipsing binary stars, which will survey {approx}20,000 deg{sup 2} of the southern sky during a period of 10 years in six photometric passbands to r {approx} 24.5. We generate a set of 10,000 eclipsing binary light curves sampled to the LSST time cadence across the whole sky, with added noise as a function of apparent magnitude. This set is passed to the analysis-of-variance period finder to assess the recoverability rate for the periods, and the successfully phased light curves are passed to the artificial-intelligence-based pipeline ebai to assess the recoverability rate in terms of the eclipsing binaries' physical and geometric parameters. We find that, out of {approx}24 million eclipsing binaries observed by LSST with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 in mission lifetime, {approx}28% or 6.7 million can be fully characterized by the pipeline. Of those, {approx}25% or 1.7 million will be double-lined binaries, a true treasure trove for stellar astrophysics.

  6. Energy conservation in dissipative processes: Teacher expectations and strategies associated with imperceptible thermal energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis; Scherr, Rachel E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research has demonstrated that many students and some teachers do not consistently apply the conservation of energy principle when analyzing mechanical scenarios. In observing elementary and secondary teachers engaged in learning activities that require tracking and conserving energy, we find that challenges to energy conservation often arise in dissipative scenarios in which kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy (e.g., a ball rolls to a stop). We find that teachers expect that when they can see the motion associated with kinetic energy, they should be able to perceive the warmth associated with thermal energy. Their expectations are violated when the warmth produced is imperceptible. In these cases, teachers reject the idea that the kinetic energy transforms to thermal energy. Our observations suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong and productive association between forms of energy and their perceptible indicators. We see teachers resolve these ch...

  7. Moon's Radiation Environment and Expected Performance of Solar Cells during Future Lunar Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E Girish; S Aranya

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Several lunar missions are planned ahead and there is an increasing demand for efficient photovoltaic power generation in the moon. The knowledge of solar cell operation in the lunar surface obtained during early seventies need to be updated considering current views on solar variability and emerging space solar cell technologies. In this paper some aspects of the solar cell performance expected under variable lunar radiation environment during future space missions to moon are addressed. We have calculated relative power expected from different types of solar cells under extreme solar proton irradiation conditions and high lunar daytime temperature. It is also estimated that 2-3 % of annual solar cell degradation is most probable during the future lunar missions. We have also discussed photovoltaic power generation in long term lunar bases emphasizing technological needs such as sunlight concentration, solar cell cooling and magnetic shielding of radiation for improving the efficiency of solar cells in the lunar environment.

  8. Hypercritical accretion phase and neutrino expectation in the evolution of Cassiopeia A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraija, Nissim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassiopeia A the youngest supernova remnant known in the Milky Way is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky and a unique laboratory for supernova physics. Although its compact remnant was discovered in 1999 by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, nowadays it is widely accepted that a neutron star lies in the center of this supernova remnant. In addition, new observations suggest that such neutron star with a low magnetic field and evidence of a carbon atmosphere could have suffered a hypercritical accretion phase seconds after the explosion. Considering this hypercritical accretion episode, we compute the neutrino cooling effect, the number of events and neutrino flavor ratios expected on Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment. The neutrino cooling effect (the emissivity and luminosity of neutrinos) is obtained through numerical simulations performed in a customized version of the FLASH code. Based on these simulations, we forecast that the number of events expected on the Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment is around 3195. S...

  9. Moon's Radiation Environment and Expected Performance of Solar Cells during Future Lunar Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girish, T E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several lunar missions are planned ahead and there is an increasing demand for efficient photovoltaic power generation in the moon. The knowledge of solar cell operation in the lunar surface obtained during early seventies need to be updated considering current views on solar variability and emerging space solar cell technologies. In this paper some aspects of the solar cell performance expected under variable lunar radiation environment during future space missions to moon are addressed. We have calculated relative power expected from different types of solar cells under extreme solar proton irradiation conditions and high lunar daytime temperature. It is also estimated that 2-3 % of annual solar cell degradation is most probable during the future lunar missions. We have also discussed photovoltaic power generation in long term lunar bases emphasizing technological needs such as sunlight concentration, solar cell cooling and magnetic shielding of radiation for improving the efficiency of solar cells in the l...

  10. Poisson loglinear modeling with linear constraints on the expected cell frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Nirian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider Poisson loglinear models with linear constraints (LMLC) on the expected table counts. Multinomial and product multinomial loglinear models can be obtained by considering that some marginal totals (linear constraints on the expected table counts) have been prefixed in a Poisson loglinear model. Therefore with the theory developed in this paper, multinomial and product multinomial loglinear models can be considered as a particular case. To carry out inferences on the parameters in the LMLC an information-theoretic approach is followed from which the classical maximum likelihood estimators and Pearson chi-square statistics for goodness-of fit are obtained. In addition, nested hypotheses are proposed as a general procedure for hypothesis testing. Through a simulation study the appropriateness of proposed inference tools is illustrated.

  11. Quantum Energy Expectation in Periodic Time-Dependent hamiltonians via Green Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar R. de Oliveira; Mariza S. Simsen

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $U_F$ be the Floquet operator of a time periodic hamiltonian $H(t)$. For each positive and discrete observable $A$ (which we call a {\\em probe energy}), we derive a formula for the Laplace time average of its expectation value up to time $T$ in terms of its eigenvalues and Green functions at the circle of radius $e^{1/T}$. Some simple applications are provided which support its usefulness.

  12. Evidence for the existence of an expectancy effect in caffeine research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Maribeth

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    research that scientific investigation of the placebo construct has occurred most extensively. Haas, Fink, and Hartfelder (1963) reported that while placebo control conditions were initially used in drug studies early in this century, this practice did..., Fink, and Hartfelder, 1963). O' Leary and Borkovec (1978) cite a number of examples of expectancy effects, including a case where dramatic improvements were noted in patients with bleeding ulcers following injections of distilled water. Consequently...

  13. Programmable AC power supply for simulating power transient expected in fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halimi, B. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, K. Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); PHILOSOPHIA, 1 Gwanak Ro, Gwanak Gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focus on control engineering of the programmable AC power source which has capability to simulate power transient expected in fusion reactor. To generate the programmable power source, AC-AC power electronics converter is adopted to control the power of a set of heaters to represent the transient phenomena of heat exchangers or heat sources of a fusion reactor. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma operation scenario is used as the basic reference for producing this transient power source. (authors)

  14. Essays on A Rational Expectations Model of Dividend Policy and Stock Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Changwoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 77 III Size and Value Factors and the Size-BE=ME Portfolios : : : : : : : 78 IV Logit Regressions of Propensities of Payouts: Dividend Payment and Stock Repurchase, 1962 to 2009 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 79 V Statistics for Measures... : : : : : : : : : : : : : 94 11 Time-Varying VMG and Value Spread in Quarterly Frequency : : : : 95 12 Expected Returns on 10 Portfolios Formed on BE=ME and Mar- ket Size : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 96 13 Solow Residual and Dividend...

  15. Bounds on the expected entropy and KL-divergence of sampled multinomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Deb

    the samples are iid p, then the expected number of samples in bin i can be calculated as = n k=0 n k pk i (1 i (1 - pi)n-k k log k n Note that in this equation, pi is the true probability of bin i in p rather C. Roy bcroy@media.mit.edu Original: May 18, 2011 Revised: June 6, 2011 Abstract Information

  16. Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Krystal Tisha'

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

  17. ,"Ohio Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed Methane Proved Reserves (BillionDry

  18. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed Methane ProvedNetGas,Liquids

  19. ,"U.S. Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePriceExpected Future Production (Billion Cubic

  20. ,"Alabama Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996..........Region Natural GasPlantCoalbedExpected

  1. ,"California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry Natural Gas Expected Future

  2. ,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNet

  3. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlantCoalbed

  4. Recombination lifetime of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As alloys used in thermophotovoltaic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.; Ellingson, R.; Johnston, S.; Webb, J.; Carapella, J.; Wanlass, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The family of ternary compounds of composition In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As are of considerable interest for thermophotovoltaic energy converters. The recombination lifetimes of the various compositions are critical to the successful application of these materials as efficient converters. Here we will describe experimental results on the composition, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}, that is lattice-matched to InP. We will also describe lifetime results on the compositions In{sub 0.68}Ga{sub 0.32}As, with a bandgap of 0.60 eV to compositions In{sub 0.78}Ga{sub 0.22}As with a bandgap of 0.50 eV. Double heterostructure confinement devices have been made over a range of both {ital n}- and {ital p}-type doping. These results are preliminary, but the goal is to obtain the radiative and Auger recombination coefficients for the alloys in this composition range. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Precision lifetime measurement of the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ level using ultrafast pump-probe laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Brian M; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Gearba, Mirela A; Brooke, George M; Scoville, James; Knize, Randy J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the inherent timing stability of pulses from a mode-locked laser, we have precisely measured the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ excited state lifetime. An initial pump pulse excites cesium atoms in two counter-propagating atomic beams to the $6P_{3/2}$ level. A subsequent synchronized probe pulse ionizes atoms which remain in the excited state, and the photo-ions are collected and counted. By selecting pump pulses which vary in time with respect to the probe pulses, we obtain a sampling of the excited state population in time, resulting in a lifetime value of 30.462(46) ns. The measurement uncertainty (0.15%) is larger than our previous report of 0.12% [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010501(R) (2011)] due to the inclusion of additional data and systematic errors. In this follow-up paper we present details of the primary systematic errors encountered in the measurement, which include atomic motion within the intensity profiles of the laser beams, quantum beating in the photo-ion signal, and radiation trapping. Improvements to furt...

  6. Lifetime and Spectral Evolution of a Magma Ocean with a Steam Atmosphere: Its Detectability by Future Direct Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamano, Keiko; Abe, Yutaka; Onishi, Masanori; Hashimoto, George L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the thermal evolution and emergent spectra of solidifying terrestrial planets along with the formation of steam atmospheres. The lifetime of a magma ocean and its spectra through a steam atmosphere depends on the orbital distance of the planet from the host star. For a type-I planet, which is formed beyond a certain critical distance from the host star, the thermal emission declines on a timescale shorter than approximately $10^6$ years. Therefore, young stars should be targets when searching for molten planets in this orbital region. In contrast, a type-II planet, which is formed inside the critical distance, will emit significant thermal radiation from near-infrared atmospheric windows during the entire lifetime of the magma ocean. The Ks and L bands will be favorable for future direct imaging because the planet-to-star contrasts of these bands are higher than approximately 10$^{-7}$-10$^{-8}$. Our model predicts that, in the type-II orbital region, molten planets would be present over the main s...

  7. WriteSmoothing: Improving Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches Using Intra-set Wear-leveling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Dong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by the trends of increasing core-count and bandwidth-wall problem, the size of last level caches (LLCs) has greatly increased. Since SRAM consumes high leakage power, researchers have explored use of non-volatile memories (NVMs) for designing caches as they provide high density and consume low leakage power. However, since NVMs have low write-endurance and the existing cache management policies are write variation-unaware, effective wear-leveling techniques are required for achieving reasonable cache lifetimes using NVMs. We present WriteSmoothing, a technique for mitigating intra-set write variation in NVM caches. WriteSmoothing logically divides the cache-sets into multiple modules. For each module, WriteSmoothing collectively records number of writes in each way for any of the sets. It then periodically makes most frequently written ways in a module unavailable to shift the write-pressure to other ways in the sets of the module. Extensive simulation results have shown that on average, for single and dual-core system configurations, WriteSmoothing improves cache lifetime by 2.17X and 2.75X, respectively. Also, its implementation overhead is small and it works well for a wide range of algorithm and system parameters.

  8. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Moscow (Russia); Abbott, B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Acharya, B.? S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Agnew, J.? P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Alexeev, G.? D. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., St. Petersburg (Russia); Alton, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Askew, A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Atkins, S. [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Univ. de los Andes, Bogota (Columbia); Badaud, F. [Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont (France); Bagby, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bandurin, D.? V. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.? F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.? B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.? C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.? E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.? J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.? F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.? D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.? H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.? A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.? D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.? P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.? D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.? N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.? A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W.? M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.? L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.? G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.? K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ± 0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).

  9. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ±more »0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).« less

  10. Webinar: The L Prize-Winning LED A19 Replacement—What Commercial Building Owners/Operators Can Expect in 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This January 18, 2012 webinar presented an update on the status of LED A19 lamp options for commercial businesses, with an overview of DOE's L Prize competition and the rigorous lab, lifetime, and...

  11. Signatures of wave packet revival phenomena in the expectation values of observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sudheesh; S. Lakshmibala; V. Balakrishnan

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave packet revivals and fractional revivals are striking quantum interference phenomena that can occur under suitable conditions in a system with a nonlinear spectrum. In the framework of a specific model (the propagation of an initially coherent wave packet in a Kerr-like medium), it is shown that distinctive signatures of these revivals and fractional revivals are displayed by the time evolution of the expectation values of physical observables and their powers, i.e., by experimentally measurable quantities. Moreover, different fractional revivals can be selectively identified by examining appropriate higher moments.

  12. Temperature Fluctuation and an Expected Limit of Hubble Parameter in the Self-Consistent Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Morcos

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature gradient of microwave background radiation (CMBR) is calculated in the Self Consistent Model. An expected values for Hubble parameter have been presented in two different cases. In the first case the temperature is treated as a function of time only, while in the other one the temperature depends on relaxation of isotropy condition in the self-consistent model and the assumption that the universe expands adiabatically. The COBE's or WMAP's fluctuations in temperature of CMBR may be used to predict a value for Hubble parameter.

  13. Physiological response specificity to induced stress as predicted by perceptual and expectancy style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Rodney Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , as proposed by Lacey, (1976). It is suggested that it may be possible to predict differential response specificity on the basis of perceptual and and expectancy style. CHAPTER II METHOD ~Saa atta The subjects were 44 undergraduate students at a large.... 114 0. 045 1. 045 1. 746 1. 863 1. 886 2. 113" 3. 000 1. 000 1. 341 1. 818 1. 841 2. 068' 2, 999' 0. 341 0. 818 0. 841 1. 068 1. 999' 0. 477 0. 500 0. 727 1, 614 0. 023 0. 250 1. 137 0. 727 1. 114 0. 887 22 TABLE 8 SUMMARY OF NEWMAN KEULS...

  14. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J. [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that {approximately}5,500 m{sup 3} of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste.

  15. New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN ECoalbed MethaneExpected

  16. ,"North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNG Storage NetPriceCoalbed Methane Proved+Dry

  17. ,"Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed Methane ProvedNetGas, WetCoalbed+Dry

  18. ,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S.Plant Liquids, Expected Future

  19. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, andPrice (Dollars perPlant Liquids, Expected Future

  20. Texas--RRC District 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected(Million Barrels) Liquids

  1. Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected(Million

  2. Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected(MillionShale ProvedReserves

  3. Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected(MillionShaleProduction (Million

  4. ,"Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (MillionCrude Oil + LeaseDry

  5. ,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNetPrice (Dollars perPlant

  6. ,"New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7, 2008"PricePriceDry Natural Gas

  7. ,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,Dry Natural GasCoalbed MethaneDry

  8. Measurement of the Lambda/b lifetime in Lambda/b to Lambda/c pi decays at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumford, Jonathan Reid; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon (consisting of u, d and b quarks) is the theoretically most interesting of all b-hadron lifetimes. The lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} probes our understanding of how baryons with one heavy quark are put together and how they decay. Experimentally however, measurements of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime have either lacked precision or have been inconsistent with one another. This thesis describes the measurement of {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in proton-antiproton collisions with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Using 1070 {+-} 60pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), a clean sample of about 3,000 fully-reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (with {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} subsequently decaying via {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) is used to extract the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, which is found to be c{tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 422.8 {+-} 13.8(stat) {+-} 8.8(syst){micro}m. This is the most precise measurement of its kind, and is even better than the current world average. It also settles the recent controversy regarding the apparent inconsistency between CDF's other measurement and the rest of the world.

  9. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab; ,

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  10. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 3d 2D5/2 state in the 40Ca+ ion using the shelving technique on a few-ion string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staanum, P; Martinussen, R G; Voigt, D; Drewsen, M; Staanum, Peter; Jensen, Inger S.; Martinussen, Randi G.; Voigt, Dirk; Drewsen, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the lifetime of the metastable 3d 2D5/2 state in the 40Ca+ ion, using the so-called shelving technique on a string of five Doppler laser-cooled ions in a linear Paul trap. A detailed account of the data analysis is given, and systematic effects due to unwanted excitation processes and collisions with background gas atoms are discussed and estimated. From a total of 6805 shelving events, we obtain a lifetime tau=1149+/-14(stat.)+/-4(sys.)ms, a result which is in agreement with the most recent measurements.

  11. The Role of Test Expectancy in the Build-Up of Proactive Interference in Long-Term Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szpunar, Karl K.

    The Role of Test Expectancy in the Build-Up of Proactive Interference in Long-Term Memory Yana the hypothesis that interpolated testing in a multiple list paradigm protects against proactive interference by sustaining test expectancy during encoding. In both experiments, recall on the last of 5 word lists

  12. UCF-5.012 Organizational Rules of Conduct Student organizations are expected to abide by these Organizational Rules of Conduct,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    UCF-5.012 Organizational Rules of Conduct Student organizations are expected to abide by these Organizational Rules of Conduct, and administrators and faculty are expected to enforce them. These rules should these offenses, constitute violations of the Organizational Rules of Conduct. (1) Theft, Disregard for Property

  13. Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Expectation propagation for nonlinear inverse problems – with an application to electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehre, Matthias, E-mail: mgehre@math.uni-bremen.de [Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen, Bremen D-28344 (Germany)] [Center for Industrial Mathematics, University of Bremen, Bremen D-28344 (Germany); Jin, Bangti, E-mail: bangti.jin@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Riverside, University Ave. 900, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Riverside, University Ave. 900, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study a fast approximate inference method based on expectation propagation for exploring the posterior probability distribution arising from the Bayesian formulation of nonlinear inverse problems. It is capable of efficiently delivering reliable estimates of the posterior mean and covariance, thereby providing an inverse solution together with quantified uncertainties. Some theoretical properties of the iterative algorithm are discussed, and the efficient implementation for an important class of problems of projection type is described. The method is illustrated with one typical nonlinear inverse problem, electrical impedance tomography with complete electrode model, under sparsity constraints. Numerical results for real experimental data are presented, and compared with that by Markov chain Monte Carlo. The results indicate that the method is accurate and computationally very efficient.

  15. Optimal stopping of expected profit and cost yields in an investment under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djehiche, Boualem; Morlais, Marie Amélie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a finite horizon optimal stopping problem related to trade-off strategies between expected profit and cost cash-flows of an investment under uncertainty. The optimal problem is first formulated in terms of a system of Snell envelopes for the profit and cost yields which act as obstacles to each other. We then construct both a minimal and a maximal solutions using an approximation scheme of the associated system of reflected backward SDEs. When the dependence of the cash-flows on the sources of uncertainty, such as fluctuation market prices, assumed to evolve according to a diffusion process, is made explicit, we also obtain a connection between these solutions and viscosity solutions of a system of variational inequalities (VI) with interconnected obstacles. We also provide two counter-examples showing that uniqueness of solutions of (VI) does not hold in general.

  16. Supersymmetry and dark matter post LHC8: Why we may expect both axion and WIMP detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Howard [Dep't of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the post-LHC8 era, it is perceived that what is left of SUSY model parameter space is highly finetuned in the EW sector (EWFT). We discuss how conventional measures overestimate EWFT in SUSY theory. Radiatively-driven natural SUSY (RNS) models maintain the SUSY GUT paradigm with low EWFT at 10% level, but are characterized by light higgsinos ~100–300 GeV and a thermal underabundance of WIMP dark matter. Implementing the SUSY DFSZ solution to the strong CP problem explains the small ? parameter but indicates dark matter should be comprised mainly of axions with a small admixture of higgsino-like WIMPs. While RNS might escape LHC14 searches, we would expect ultimately direct detection of both WIMPs and axions. An e?e? collider with ?(s)~500–600 GeV should provide a thorough search for the predicted light higgsinos.

  17. Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

  18. EXPECTED TRIGGER RATES OF HIGH PT JETS AND DIRECT PHOTONS IN THE STAR EMC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELT-TONJES,M. FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION

    1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is a large acceptance detector. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will provide a sensitive trigger to study high p{sub t} jets and hard photons in AuAu, pp, and pAu collisions. The capability for the EMC to trigger on jets and direct photons was studied for trigger level 0. Trigger efficiencies and expected process rates were obtained for pp reactions. Results from pp interactions will be essential to the interpretation of AuAu results as well as for the spin physics program. These studies were performed with the standard STAR software chain which includes GEANT and EMC simulations. The HIJING event generator was used to provide input for the simulations.

  19. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  20. Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses D. L. Moehring,* B. B. Blinov, D. W. Gidley, R. N. Kohn, Jr., M. J. Madsen, T. D. Sanderson, R. S. Vallery, and C. Monroe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses D. L. Moehring and ultrafast laser technologies, the ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser excited state lifetime of order nanoseconds by an ultrafast laser pulse duration of order picoseconds

  1. Influences of aspirations and expectations on contest performance at the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event, 2001-2006 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Travis Scott

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine how performance expectations influence contest performance at the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event. The population for this study included all participants ...

  2. Re-examination of the Expected gamma-ray emission of supernova remnant SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhko, E G; Voelk, H J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonlinear kinetic theory, combining cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) with their gas dynamics, is used to re-examine the nonthermal properties of the remnant of SN 1987A for an extended evolutionary period of 5-50 yr. This spherically symmetric model is approximately applied to the different features of the SNR which consist of (i) a blue supergiant wind and bubble, and (ii) of the swept-up red supergiant (RSG) wind structures in the form of an HII region, an equatorial ring (ER), and an hourglass region. The RSG wind involves a mass loss rate that decreases significantly with elevation above and below the equatorial plane. The model adapts recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Potter et al. (2014) which use a significantly smaller ionized mass of the ER than assumed in the earlier studies by the present authors. The SNR shock has recently swept up the ER which is the densest region in the immediate circumstellar environment. Therefore the expected gamma-ray energy f...

  3. First laboratory perforating tests in coal show lower-than-expected penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, P.M.; Walton, I.C.; Skinner, T.K.; Atwood, D.C.; Grove, B.M.; Graham, C.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide Coal Bed Methane (CBM) resources are huge, estimated at 3,000 to 9,000 Tcf. The production rate from CBM reservoirs is low, perhaps 50-100 mcf/day. Various completion methods are being evaluated and new technologies are being developed with the aim of increasing production rates. Considering this interest and activity level, little attention has been paid to the CBM completion fundamentals. Perforating is a critical part of this process, especially considering the PRB development migration from single-coal, open-hole completions into multi-zone, cased-hole completions. This paper describes the first known laboratory-testing program to investigate shaped charge penetration in coal targets. We describe mechanical properties of the coals tested, and penetration results for different shaped charges (of different designs), shot at various stress conditions. CT scan and cutaway imaging of the perforation tunnels are also discussed. Tests were conducted under dry and saturated conditions. The preliminary experiments reported here indicate that shaped charge penetration in coal is significantly less than expected, considering the target's density and strength. The authors provide insight into what may be the reasons for these unexpected results and recommend a path forward for shaped charge testing, designs, predictive tools, and how to optimize CBM completions.

  4. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  5. Measurement of the B+-_c Meson Lifetime Using B+-_c -> J/psi + l+- + X Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartz, Mark Patrick; /Pittsburgh U.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a measurement of the average proper decay time of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} mesons, the ground state of bottom and charm quark bound states. The lifetime measurement is carried out in the decay modes B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi} + e{sup {+-}} + X and B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi} + {mu}{sup {+-}} + X, where the J/{psi} decays as J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the X are unmeasured particles such as {nu}{sub e} or {nu}{sub {mu}}. The data are collect by the CDF II detector which measures the properties of particles created in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions delivered by the Fermilab Tevatron. This measurement uses {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured average proper decay time of B{sub c}{sup {+-}} mesons, {tau} = 0.475{sub -0.049}{sup +0.053}(stat.) {+-} 0.018(syst.) ps, is competitive with the most precise measurements in the world and confirms previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  6. Testing and Analysis for Lifetime Prediction of Crystalline Silicon PV Modules Undergoing Degradation by System Voltage Stress: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Smith, R.; Terwiliger, K.; Glick, S.; Jordan, D.; Johnston, S.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration factors are calculated for crystalline silicon PV modules under system voltage stress by comparing the module power during degradation outdoors to that in accelerated testing at three temperatures and 85% relative humidity. A lognormal analysis is applied to the accelerated lifetime test data considering failure at 80% of the initial module power. Activation energy of 0.73 eV for the rate of failure is determined, and the probability of module failure at an arbitrary temperature is predicted. To obtain statistical data for multiple modules over the course of degradation in-situ of the test chamber, dark I-V measurements are obtained and transformed using superposition, which is found well suited for rapid and quantitative evaluation of potential-induced degradation. It is determined that shunt resistance measurements alone do not represent the extent of power degradation. This is explained with a two-diode model analysis that shows an increasing second diode recombination current and ideality factor as the degradation in module power progresses. Failure modes of the modules stressed outdoors are examined and compared to those stressed in accelerated tests.

  7. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  8. Expected environments in high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claiborne, H.C.; Rickertsen, L.D., Graham, R.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the expected environments associated with high-level waste (HLW) and spent fuel (SF) repositories in salt formations. These environments include the thermal, fluid, pressure, brine chemistry, and radiation fields predicted for the repository conceptual designs. In this study, it is assumed that the repository will be a room and pillar mine in a rock-salt formation, with the disposal horizon located approx. 2000 ft (610 m) below the surface of the earth. Canistered waste packages containing HLW in a solid matrix or SF elements are emplaced in vertical holes in the floor of the rooms. The emplacement holes are backfilled with crushed salt or other material and sealed at some later time. Sensitivity studies are presented to show the effect of changing the areal heat load, the canister heat load, the barrier material and thickness, ventilation of the storage room, and adding a second row to the emplacement configuration. The calculated thermal environment is used as input for brine migration calculations. The vapor and gas pressure will gradually attain the lithostatic pressure in a sealed repository. In the unlikely event that an emplacement hole will become sealed in relatively early years, the vapor space pressure was calculated for three scenarios (i.e., no hole closure - no backfill, no hole closure - backfill, and hole closure - no backfill). It was assumed that the gas in the system consisted of air and water vapor in equilibrium with brine. A computer code (REPRESS) was developed assuming that these changes occur slowly (equilibrium conditions). The brine chemical environment is outlined in terms of brine chemistry, corrosion, and compositions. The nuclear radiation environment emphasized in this report is the stored energy that can be released as a result of radiation damage or crystal dislocations within crystal lattices.

  9. In situ monitoring of stacking fault formation and its carrier lifetime mediation in p-type 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinmse@gmail.com; Chen, Jun; Yao, Yuanzhao; Sekiguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Okumura, Hajime [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the fine control of an electron beam (e-beam) in scanning electron microscopy with the capabilities of both electrical and optical imaging, the stacking fault (SF) formation together with its tuning of carrier lifetime was in situ monitored and investigated in p-type 4H-SiC homoepitaxial films. The SFs were formed through engineering basal plane dislocations with the energy supplied by the e-beam. The e-beam intensity required for the SF formation in the p-type films was ?100 times higher than that in the n-type ones. The SFs reduced the minority-carrier lifetime in the p-type films, which was opposite to that observed in the n-type case. The reason for the peculiar SF behavior in the p-type 4H-SiC is discussed with the cathodoluminescence results.

  10. Measured Lifetimes of Selected Metastable Levels of Arq+ Ions (Q=2, 3, 9, and 10) Stored in an Electrostatic Ion-Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, L. S.; Church, David A.; Tu, S. G.; Jin, J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in square brack- ets denote powers of 10. Ar + 3s 3p transition CK [28] Transition rates (s ') BH [32] H [33] MZ [34] 4S3/2 2P I /2 2 2D3/2 P1/2 2 2Ds/2- Pin Ml E2 M1 E2 M1 E2 0.972 1.19[?4] 0.488 0.190 0.122 0.954 3.346[ ?4] 0.462 0... in square brack- ets denote powers of 10. Ar + 2s 2p' transition Transition rates (s ') E, C-MZ [35] C, KD [36] KS [28] 2 2P3/2- Pi/2 Lifetime Pl/2 (ms) M1 M1+E2 E2 1.05[2] 9.52 1.044(2) 2.062[ ?3] 9.58 1.06[2] 9 43 Expt. lifetime 8...

  11. The effectiveness and stability of impurity/defect interactions and their impact on minority carrier lifetime. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1990--31 July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozgonyi, G.A.; Shimura, F.; Buczkowski, A.; Zhon, T.Q. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the investigation and understanding of electrical activity of ``clean`` and metallic impurity decorated defects. A heterostructure containing a controlled number of deliberately introduced misfit dislocations is used as a model system to simulate a variety of defect/impurity interactions in photovoltaic materials. In addition, a noncontact laser/microwave deep-level transient spectroscopy technique is applied to characterize the minority carrier lifetime and determine the energy levels of defects. 59 refs.

  12. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s ? J/? f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Gonzalez, B Alvarez [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/? f0(980) with J/? ? µ+µ- and f0(980) ? ?+?-. Using pp? collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of ?(B0s ? J/? f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/? f0(980) and f0(980) ? ?+?- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/?? and ??K+K- to be Rf0/? = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.

  13. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} using a single trapped ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letchumanan, V.; Wilson, M.A.; Gill, P.; Sinclair, A.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural lifetime of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} has been measured using a single laser-cooled, trapped ion. The ion was prepared in the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state by laser excitation of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} quadrupole transition at 674 nm. The decay time was measured by using Dehmelt's electron shelving method to monitor the ion's electronic state. Two separate investigations were conducted under slightly different experimental conditions. 160 000 decay times from the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state were observed in total, and two different methods for determining the statistical value of the measured lifetime have been compared. Systematic effects have also been estimated, and including these effects yields a value of {tau}=390.8(1.6) ms (1{sigma} uncertainty) for the natural lifetime.

  14. Posted: 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 20, 2012 Fourth of July travelers expected to stretch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Wednesday, Thursday and Friday off. Some people will take the whole week off." Declining gasoline prices a gallon for gas than they did a year ago. In Palm Beach County, the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline Tuesday was $3.46. Auto trips are expected to increase 4 percent over last year, accounting for 84

  15. ORMS Undergraduate Student Learning Goals All Operations Research and Management Science graduates are expected to acquire the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    -support tools, and · Comprehension and analysis of risk and uncertainty. In addition, we expect our graduates: · Quantitative modeling and analysis of a broad array of systems-level decision problems concerned with economic for solving these problems, · Collection and analysis of data and the use of database and decision

  16. Temporal expectation may affect the onset, not the rate, of evidence accumulation Sander Nieuwenhuis*, Marieke Jepma & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    Temporal expectation may affect the onset, not the rate, of evidence accumulation Sander process), enhancing the rate of evidence accumulation, or (less likely given the observed data) a change that the improved performance could be accounted for by an increased evidence-accumulation rate

  17. Academic Integrity Office (AIO), Syracuse University, August 2014 Topics for Engaging Students in Discussion of Academic Integrity Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    Academic Integrity Office (AIO), Syracuse University, August 2014 Topics for Engaging Students in Discussion of Academic Integrity Expectations 1. Giving students opportunities to hone their citation skills, paraphrase and quote from a source as well as relevant citation standards in each case. a. If writing

  18. Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you pursue. There are a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Chapter 2 Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you best light and reasoning will reach no farther. --Isaac Watts How should uncertainty be represented in this chapter, I discuss some other difficulties that probability has in representing uncertainty

  19. Expectation All students must be assigned a named member of academic staff as their academic mentor, whom they can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Expectation All students must be assigned a named member of academic staff as their academic mentor MENTORING DATE AUGUST 2014 LEARNING AND TEACHING BRIEFING PAPER 15 References and Further Information Contact: K.MacAskill@hw.wc.uk Academic Mentoring Policy and Guidelines: http://www1.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/mentoring

  20. CSE MENTOR PROGRAM EXPECTATIONS Following are guidelines that will help you to have a successful mentoring partnership.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    CSE MENTOR PROGRAM EXPECTATIONS Following are guidelines that will help you to have a successful mentoring partnership. Maintain regular contact Mentors and mentees should commit to speaking a minimum of twice a month during the men- toring cycle. Although email is an important tool in distance mentoring

  1. What to expect from the National Science Foundation's T4 Project: Talented Teachers in Training for Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    What to expect from the National Science Foundation's T4 Project: Talented Teachers in Training Camp: Major within the College of Science and Mathematics (?? or Computer Science major) Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or above Completed freshman or sophomore year U.S. citizen, national, or permanent

  2. INCOMING WIRE/ACH University units expecting to receive funds via wire or ACH (Automated Clearing House) should inform the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    INCOMING WIRE/ACH University units expecting to receive funds via wire or ACH (Automated Clearing form. The Bursar's Office cannot properly record there funds until University units provide deposit Transmittal and fax the completed form to 706-583-0832. OUTGOING WIRES University units needing to wire funds

  3. Academic Integrity Office (AIO), Syracuse University, August 2014 Topics for Engaging Students in Discussion of Academic Integrity Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    @syr.edu. We will be posting additional articles on our website over the course of the academic year. #12;Academic Integrity Office (AIO), Syracuse University, August 2014 Topics for Engaging Students in Discussion of Academic Integrity Expectations 1. Why do students (and others) cheat? Is college cheating

  4. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  5. As you think about where to go to college, we expect one of the big questions on your mind is this: "Will I fit in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As you think about where to go to college, we expect one of the big questions on your mind is this to college, we expect one of the big questions on your mind is this: "Will I fit in here?" Perhaps about where to go to college, we expect one of the big questions on your mind is this: "Will I fit

  6. Olkiluoto 1 and 2 - Plant efficiency improvement and lifetime extension-project (PELE) implemented during outages 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosonen, M.; Hakola, M. [Teollisuuden Voima Oyj, F- 27160 Eurajoki (Finland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) is a non-listed public company founded in 1969 to produce electricity for its stakeholders. TVO is the operator of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. TVO follows the principle of continuous improvement in the operation and maintenance of the Olkiluoto plant units. The PELE project (Plant Efficiency Improvement and Lifetime Extension), mainly completed during the annual outages in 2010 and 2011, and forms one part of the systematic development of Olkiluoto units. TVO maintains a long-term development program that aims at systematically modernizing the plant unit systems and equipment based on the latest technology. According to the program, the Olkiluoto 1 and Olkiluoto 2 plant units are constantly renovated with the intention of keeping them safe and reliable, The aim of the modernization projects is to improve the safety, reliability, and performance of the plant units. PELE project at Olkiluoto 1 was done in 2010 and at Olkiluoto 2 in 2011. The outage length of Olkiluoto 1 was 26 d 12 h 4 min and Olkiluoto 2 outage length was 28 d 23 h 46 min. (Normal service-outage is about 14 days including refueling and refueling-outage length is about seven days. See figure 1) The PELE project consisted of several single projects collected into one for coordinated project management. Some of the main projects were as follows: - Low pressure turbines: rotor, stator vane, casing and turbine instrumentation replacement. - Replacement of Condenser Cooling Water (later called seawater pumps) pumps - Replacement of inner isolation valves on the main steam lines. - Generator and the generator cooling system replacement. - Low voltage switchgear replacement. This project will continue during future outages. PELE was a success. 100 TVO employees and 1500 subcontractor employees participated in the project. The execution of the PELE projects went extremely well during the outages. The replacement of the low pressure turbines and seawater pumps improved the efficiency of the plant units, and a power increase of nearly 20 MW was achieved at both plant units. PELE wonderfully manifests one of the strategic goals of our company; developing the competence of our in-house personnel by working in projects. (authors)

  7. Groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective-dispersive systems: 1. Generalized reservoir theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F; 10.1016/j.advwatres.2005.10.009

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a methodology for determining reservoir groundwater age and transit time probability distributions in a deterministic manner, considering advective-dispersive transport in steady velocity fields. In a first step, we propose to model the statistical distribution of groundwater age at aquifer scale by means of the classical advection-dispersion equation for a conservative and nonreactive tracer, associated to proper boundary conditions. The evaluated function corresponds to the density of probability of the random variable age, age being defined as the time elapsed since the water particles entered the aquifer. An adjoint backward model is introduced to characterize the life expectancy distribution, life expectancy being the time remaining before leaving the aquifer. By convolution of these two distributions, groundwater transit time distributions, from inlet to outlet, are fully defined for the entire aquifer domain. In a second step, an accurate and efficient method is introduced to simulate the tr...

  8. Experimental Mg I oscillator strengths and radiative lifetimes for astrophysical applications on metal-poor stars - New data for the Mg I b triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aldenius; J. D. Tanner; S. Johansson; H. Lundberg; S. G. Ryan

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The stellar abundance ratio of Mg/Fe is an important tool in diagnostics of galaxy evolution. In order to make reliable measurements of the Mg abundance of stars, it is necessary to have accurate values for the oscillator strength (f-value) of each of the observable transitions. In metal-poor stars the Mg I 3p-4s triplet around 5175 AA (Fraunhofer's so-called b lines) are the most prominent magnesium lines. The lines also appear as strong features in the solar spectrum. We present new and improved experimental oscillator strengths for the optical Mg I 3p-4s triplet, along with experimental radiative lifetimes for six terms in Mg I. With these data we discuss the implications on previous and future abundance analyses of metal-poor stars. The oscillator strengths have been determined by combining radiative lifetimes with branching fractions, where the radiative lifetimes are measured using the laser induced fluorescence technique and the branching fractions are determined using intensity calibrated Fourier Transform (FT) spectra. The FT spectra are also used for determining new accurate laboratory wavelengths for the 3p-4s transitions. The f-values of the Mg I 3p-4s lines have been determined with an absolute uncertainty of 9 %, giving an uncertainty of +-0.04 dex in the log gf values. Compared to values previously used in abundance analyses of metal-poor stars, rescaling to the new values implies an increase of typically 0.04 dex in the magnesium abundance.

  9. Marriage and careers in Mexico: future role expectations of single, college educated women of the middle class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Dianna

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and content by: ' Norma Williams (Co-Chair of Committee) Zan Sell (Co-Chair of Committee) He ry Schmidt (Member) Ben Crouch (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Marriage and Careers in Mexico: Future Role Expectations of Single, College... Educated Women of the Middle Class. (December 1991) Dianna Densmore, B. A. , Stephen F. Austin State University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Norma Williams Dr. Jane Sell The focus of this thesis concerns two very important areas of women...

  10. ,"Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit:1996..........Region Natural GasPlant Liquids, Expected

  11. ,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

  12. ,"New Mexico--West Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlantCoalbed Methane

  13. Lifetime measurements by the Doppler-shift attenuation method in the {sup 115}Sn({alpha},n{gamma}){sup 118}Te reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihai, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Pasternak, A. A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pascu, S.; Filipescu, D.; Ivascu, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, I.; Deleanu, D.; Ghita, D. G.; Glodariu, T.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Negret, A.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Cata-Danil, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Physics Department, University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    {gamma} rays were measured at several angles in both singles and coincidence modes in the {sup 115}Sn({alpha},n{gamma}){sup 118}Te reaction at 15 MeV on a thick target. Multipolarities and mixing ratios were determined from the {gamma}-ray angular distribution analysis. Lifetimes of 11 low- and medium-spin excited states in {sup 118}Te were determined from a Monte Carlo Doppler-shift attenuation method analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes of {gamma} rays deexciting the levels. The results are discussed in comparison with the predictions of the interacting boson model.

  14. Analytic 1D pn junction diode photocurrent solutions following ionizing radiation and including time-dependent changes in the carrier lifetime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axness, Carl L.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuit simulation tools (e.g., SPICE) have become invaluable in the development and design of electronic circuits in radiation environments. These codes are often employed to study the effect of many thousands of devices under transient current conditions. Device-scale simulation tools (e.g., MEDICI) are commonly used in the design of individual semiconductor components, but require computing resources that make their incorporation into a circuit code impossible for large-scale circuits. Analytic solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation, an approximation to the carrier transport equations, may be used to characterize the transient currents at nodes within a circuit simulator. We present new transient 1D excess carrier density and photocurrent density solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation for low-level radiation pulses that take into account a finite device geometry, ohmic fields outside the depleted region, and an arbitrary change in the carrier lifetime due to neutron irradiation or other effects. The solutions are specifically evaluated for the case of an abrupt change in the carrier lifetime during or after, a step, square, or piecewise linear radiation pulse. Noting slow convergence of the raw Fourier series for certain parameter sets, we use closed-form formulas for some of the infinite sums to produce 'partial closed-form' solutions for the above three cases. These 'partial closed-form' solutions converge with only a few tens of terms, which enables efficient large-scale circuit simulations.

  15. Expectation values of flavor-neutrino numbers with respect to neutrino-source hadron states --Neutrino oscillations and decay probabilities--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujii, Kanji

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of quantum field theory, we consider a unified description of various processes accompanied by neutrinos, namely weak decays and oscillation processes. The structures of the expectation values of flavor-neutrino numbers with respect to neutrino-source hadron state are investigated. Due to the smallness of neutrino masses, we naturally obtain the old (i.e. pre-mixing) formulas of decay probabilities. Together, it is shown that the oscillation formulas, similar to the usual ones, are applied irrespectively of the details of neutrino-producing processes. The derived oscillation formulas are the same in form as the usually used ones except for the oscillation length.

  16. On some expectation and derivative operators related to integral representations of random variables with respect to a PII process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goutte, Stéphane; Russo, Francesco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a process with independent increments $X$ (not necessarily a martingale) and a large class of square integrable r.v. $H=f(X_T)$, $f$ being the Fourier transform of a finite measure $\\mu$, we provide explicit Kunita-Watanabe and F\\"ollmer-Schweizer decompositions. The representation is expressed by means of two significant maps: the expectation and derivative operators related to the characteristics of $X$. We also provide an explicit expression for the variance optimal error when hedging the claim $H$ with underlying process $X$. Those questions are motivated by finding the solution of the celebrated problem of global and local quadratic risk minimization in mathematical finance.

  17. ,"Texas - RRC District 10 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDry Natural Gas Expected Future

  18. ,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDry NaturalDry Natural Gas Expected

  19. ,"Texas - RRC District 5 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDry NaturalDryDry Natural Gas Expected

  20. ,"Texas - RRC District 7B Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDry Natural Gas Expected Future

  1. ,"Texas - RRC District 9 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry Natural Gas Expected Future

  2. ,"Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production

  3. ,"Texas--RRC District 5 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, Expected FuturePlant

  4. ,"Texas--RRC District 6 Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice SoldPlant Liquids, ExpectedLiquids LeasePlant

  5. ,"U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePriceExpected Future Production+ LeaseDry Natural

  6. U.S. net oil and petroleum product imports expected to fall to just 29 percent of demand in 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand expected to rise intonet oil

  7. ,"New Mexico--East Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,DryPlant Liquids,VolumeGas,CrudePlant

  8. MCZ 111215 1 Expectations!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ! 5.4! 4.3! 3.0! 4.3! 3.2! H98! 1.5! 1.5! 1.8! 1.3! 1.3! 1.2! 1.3! 1.7! N! 2.8! 3.7! 1.7! 4.3! 5.5! 3.5 Duration limited by CD-efficiency & Beta ITER-like case with R0=7.5 m fCD=0.3 fCD=0.2 fCD=0.1 fCD=0 N=3 N=4 outstanding Issues and Risks, · Plasma Issues for steady-state DEMOs · Steady-state tokamaks · Steady

  9. Supplementary Analysis Expected modularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bansal, Shweta

    -degree and average 1 #12;Figure S1: Degree distribution of the four biological networks. The within-degree distribution roughly follows the total degree distribution in all of the networks. within-degree, i.e., d1 = d2 of the empirical networks closely follows the network's total degree distribution indicating a fractal like

  10. Seismic Design Expectations Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer to FundPreparedContinuingHearings »Seismic Design

  11. Deviations from tribimaximal mixing due to the vacuum expectation value misalignment in A{sub 4} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, James; Rodejohann, Werner

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of an A{sub 4} family symmetry and extended Higgs sector to the standard model can generate the tribimaximal mixing pattern for leptons, assuming the correct vacuum expectation value alignment of the Higgs scalars. Deviating this alignment affects the predictions for the neutrino oscillation and neutrino mass observables. An attempt is made to classify the plethora of models in the literature, with respect to the chosen A{sub 4} particle assignments. Of these models, two particularly popular examples have been analyzed for deviations from tribimaximal mixing by perturbing the vacuum expectation value alignments. The effect of perturbations on the mixing angle observables is studied. However, it is only investigation of the mass-related observables (the effective mass for neutrinoless double beta decay and the sum of masses from cosmology) that can lead to the exclusion of particular models by constraints from future data, which indicates the importance of neutrino mass in disentangling models. The models have also been tested for fine-tuning of the parameters. Furthermore, a well-known seesaw model is generalized to include additional scalars, which transform as representations of A{sub 4} not included in the original model.

  12. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard (Delmar, NY)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  13. Measurement of the ?_{b}^{0} lifetime in the exclusive decay ?_{b}^{0}?J/??^{0} in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda}{sup 0} using 10.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} is also measured. We obtain {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.303 {+-} 0.075 (stat.) {+-} 0.035 (syst.) ps and {tau} (B{sup 0}) = 1.508 {+-} 0.025 (stat.) {+-} 0.043 (syst.) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})/{tau} (B{sup 0}) = 0.864 {+-} 0.052 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.).

  14. Significance of M2 and E3 transitions for $4p^54d^{N+1}$ and $4p^64d^{N-1}4f$ configuration metastable level lifetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuškien?, R; Kisielius, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic quadrupole and electric octupole transitions from the configurations $4p^54d^{N+1}$ and $4p^64d^{N-1}4f$ were calculated along with magnetic dipole, electric dipole and electric quadrupole radiative transitions in quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation. Their significance in determining the metastable level radiative lifetimes was investigated along several isoelectronic sequences for the ions from $Z=50$ to $Z=92$. Strontium-like ions, zirconium-like ions, molybdenum-like ions and rhodium-like ions were studied comprehensively. Remaining isoelectronic sequences with the ground configuration $4d^{N}$ ($N=1,3,5,7,8,10$) were also reviewed albeit in less detail. A systematic trends of determined total radiative lifetimes were studied. The importance of magnetic quadrupole and electric octupole transitions from metastable levels of ions from these isoelectronic sequences was investigated and discussed. Inclusion of such transitions of higher multipole order can change theoretical radiative lifetim...

  15. OSU Office of Institutional Research (KW) Expected-Updates-9-20-12.docx Strategic Plan: University Performance Metrics Academic Year 2011-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Expenditures/3.1 The NSF Higher Education R&D (HERD) Survey administered each fall. Current updates/TT Faculty The NSF Higher Education R&D (HERD) Survey administered each fall. Current updates are expected Dollar The NSF Higher Education R&D (HERD) Survey administered each fall. Current updates are expected

  16. Efficient Randomized Algorithms for the Repeated Median Line Estimator \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mount, David

    (n log 2 n) randomized algorithm for this problem, which uses no complex data structures. We provide of Computer Science and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies University of Maryland College Park, Maryland, Maryland, 20742, USA and Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences, Code 930.5 NASA

  17. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jie

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis­ tributed Algorithms # The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS­0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19­03­D­0004 through the In­ stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. Permission

  18. Medians and Beyond: New Aggregation Techniques for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    databases, Query processing General Terms Algorithms, Performance Keywords Sensor Networks, Aggregation, Approximation Algorithms, Dis- tributed Algorithms The authors were supported by NSF grant IIS-0121562 and Army Research Organisation grant DAAD19-03-D-0004 through the In- stitute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

  19. Computational study of large-scale p-Median problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques to the simplex method for the solution of large-scale instances. ... instances up to 5535 nodes and 666639 arcs, arising from an industrial ..... For each node v ? TF ? AF we build a “layered” graph rooted in v, where layer.

  20. Simulation, design, and testing of a portable concrete median barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kenneth Charles

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acts on. The initial end of segment i is at , + l + 2 + i-l VjR ? XR TllLl T11L2 . . Tll L. l (33) and the final end 1s at 1 iT iR 11 i (34) Virtual Work of External Loads The virtual work of the external loads is given by X, 9A, . FV, ~VA (35... highway departments are currently upgrading or expanding their major highways. This construction near a zone w1th large traff1c volumes travelling at h1gh speed creates a dangerous conflict between vehicles and workmen. To protect the vehicle occupants...