National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mecs energy measures

  1. MECS 2006 - Chemicals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Chemicals (121.71 KB) More Documents & Publications Chemicals (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum MECS 2006 - Cement

  2. MECS 2006 - Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Petroleum Refining (123.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Petroleum Refining (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum MECS 2006 - ...

  3. Cement (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cement (2010 MECS) Cement (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement Sector (NAICS 327310) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Cement (126.44 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Cement Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) Textiles

  4. Chemicals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemicals (2010 MECS) Chemicals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Chemicals (125.4 KB) More Documents & Publications All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) Cement (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment

  5. Textiles (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Textiles (2010 MECS) Textiles (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Textiles Sector (NAICS 313-316) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Textiles (124.04 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Textiles Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams Manufacturing energy Sankey

  6. Machinery (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machinery (2010 MECS) Machinery (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Machinery Sector (NAICS 333) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Machinery (122.63 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Machinery Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams Manufacturing energy Sankey

  7. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Fabricated Metals Sector (NAICS 332) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Fabricated Metals (124.58 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Fabricated Metals Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy Sankey

  8. MECS 2006 - All Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint All Manufacturing (NAICS 31-33) (120.28 KB) More Documents & Publications All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum ...

  9. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Transportation Equipment (125.57 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010

  10. All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for All Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 31-33) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: June 2015 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint All Manufacturing (111.63 KB) More Documents & Publications Cement (2010 MECS) Chemicals (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment

  11. Manufacturing-Industrial Energy Consumption Survey(MECS) Historical...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    reports, data tables and questionnaires Released: May 2008 The Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) is a periodic national sample survey devoted to measuring...

  12. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. ...

  13. MECS 2006 - Food and Beverage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Food and Beverage (121.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Food and Beverage (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum MECS 2006 - ...

  14. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) U. S. Census Regions and Divisions: census map About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams Manufacturing Energy Flows Tool

  15. Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) Iron and Steel (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Iron and Steel (125.81 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October

  16. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams Manufacturing Energy Flows Tool Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen MECS 2010 - Release date: September 6,

  17. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 1998-2010, September 6, 2013. New 2010 Manufacturing Energy

  18. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) MECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ B Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke

  19. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Archive MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Special Reports (click on table headings to sort) Title Release Year Cycle Year Format Energy-Related...

  20. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS) Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost-and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also

  1. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Data Show Large Reductions in Both Manufacturing Energy Use and the Energy Intensity of Manufacturing Activity between 2002 and 2010 MECS 2010 - Release date: March 19, 2013 Total energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased by 17 percent from 2002 to 2010 (Figure 1), according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). line chart:air

  2. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values SIC RSE Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National

  3. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates

  4. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 4 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region,

  5. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values RSE Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed

  6. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLS PDF Table

  7. Petroleum Refining (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The energy pathway-from primary sources (fuel, steam, and electricity) to facility end use-is shown ... of energy use or compare energy consumption across manufacturing subsectors. ...

  8. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost—and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also available in the U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis report.

  9. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 6 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms 2006 Data Tables Revision notice (November 2009): Tables 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.5, 4.1 and 4.2 have been slightly revised due to further editing. The revisions in XLS are indicated with a value of "R" in an adjacent column. In the PDF versions, the revised values are superscripted with an "R". No further revisions are anticipated for

  10. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  11. MECS 2006- Glass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  12. MECS 2006- Cement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement (NAICS 327310) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  13. MECS 2006- Machinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Machinery (NAICS 333) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  14. MECS 2006- Plastics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Plastics (NAICS 326) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  15. MECS 2006- Textiles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Textiles (NAICS 313-316) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  16. MECS 2006- Transportation Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  17. MECS 2006- Fabricated Metals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Fabricated Metals (NAICS 332) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  18. MECS 2006- Foundries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Foundries (NAICS 3315) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  19. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 - Derived measures of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    eialogo Calculation of MECS Energy Measures Reported energy values were used to construct several derived values, which, in turn, were used to prepare the estimates appearing in...

  20. Modeling plant-level industrial energy demand with the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G.A.; Neifer, M.J.; Ross, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses Phase 1 of a project to help the US Department of Energy determine the applicability of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD) for industrial modeling and analysis. Research was conducted at the US Bureau of the Census; disclosure of the MECS/LRD data used as a basis for this report was subject to the Bureau`s confidentiality restriction. The project is designed to examine the plant-level energy behavior of energy-intensive industries. In Phase 1, six industries at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level were studied. The utility of analyzing four-digit SIC samples at the plant level is mixed, but the plant-level structure of the MECS/LRD makes analyzing samples disaggregated below the four-digit level feasible, particularly when the MECS/LRD data are combined with trade association or other external data. When external data are used, the validity of using value of shipments as a measure of output for analyzing energy use can also be examined. Phase 1 results indicate that technical efficiency and the distribution of energy intensities vary significantly at the plant level. They also show that the six industries exhibit monopsony-like behavior; that is, energy prices vary significantly at the plant level, with lower prices being correlated with a higher level of energy consumption. Finally, they show to what degree selected energy-intensive products are manufactured outside their primary industry.

  1. Forest Products (2010 MECS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321, 322) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

  2. MECS Fuel Oil Figures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry...

  3. Foundries (2010 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Foundries Sector (NAICS 3315) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

  4. MECS 2006- Alumina and Aluminum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Alumina and Aluminum Sector (NAICS 3313) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  5. Plastics and Rubber Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The energy pathway-from primary sources (fuel, steam, and electricity) to facility end use-is shown ... of energy use or compare energy consumption across manufacturing subsectors. ...

  6. Glass and Glass Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The energy pathway-from primary sources (fuel, steam, and electricity) to facility end use-is shown ... of energy use or compare energy consumption across manufacturing subsectors. ...

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2010 MECS) | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Each footprint visualizes the flow of energy (in the form of fuel, electricity, or steam) to major end ... The analyses are based on manufacturing energy consumption data from the ...

  8. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Association of Electrical and Medical Imaging Equipment Manufacturers Manufacturing Solutions for Energy Efficiency in Buildings Patrick Hughes Policy Director, High Performance Buildings National Electrical Manufacturers Association The Association of Electrical and Medical Imaging Equipment Manufacturers What is NEMA? The Association of Electrical Equipment and Medical Imaging Manufacturers Which policies encourage energy efficiency in buildings? Energy Savings Performance Contracts Tax

  9. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Foundries (NAICS 3315), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    281 65 Steam Distribution Losses 1 11 Nonprocess Energy 101 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 281 0 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 26 130 57 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 123 Onsite Generation 157 154 4 158 180 0 3 0.0 10.9 10.9 0.2 0.2 4.1 13.3 2.6 16 5.2 16.1 0.9 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data source: 2006 MECS (with

  10. Food and Beverage (2010 MECS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Food and Beverage Sector (NAICS 311, 312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

  11. MECS 2006- Iron and Steel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  12. Alumina and Aluminum (2010 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Alumina and Aluminum Sector (NAICS 3313) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

  13. MECS 2006- Computer, Electronics and Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy Footprint for Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  14. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

  15. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: All Manufacturing (NAICS 31-33), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Performance | Department of Energy At a White House meeting of the Better Buildings Initiative on December 3rd, six manufacturers and three utilities officially joined the Department of Energy's Better Buildings Industrial Superior Energy Performance (SEP) Accelerator Program. Manufacturers joining the Accelerator include the 3M Company, Cummins Inc., General Dynamics OTS, Nissan, Schneider Electric, and Volvo Group North America. Utilities joining the program include the Bonneville

  16. Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment Sector (NAICS 334, 335) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (123.71 KB) More Documents

  17. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Alumina and Aluminum (NAICS 3313), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 Nonprocess Losses 603 134 Steam Distribution Losses 3 7 Nonprocess Energy 118 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 603 3 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 16 250 152 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 1 329 Onsite Generation 265 255 18 273 481 4 13 0.3 29.0 29.3 1.0 1.0 5.0 33.0 1.6 36 6.3 35.6 0.3 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data source:

  18. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Cement (NAICS 327310), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 Nonprocess Losses 471 154 Steam Distribution Losses 4 5 Nonprocess Energy 341 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 471 0 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 14 353 41 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 89 Onsite Generation 367 345 37 382 130 0 26 0.0 7.8 7.8 3.4 3.4 27.2 34.1 1.1 39 30.8 38.6 0.1 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data source: 2006

  19. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Fabricated Metals (NAICS 332), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9 Nonprocess Losses 708 127 Steam Distribution Losses 8 38 Nonprocess Energy 248 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 708 6 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 88 293 143 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 2 309 Onsite Generation 381 356 41 397 452 8 33 0.5 27.3 27.8 2.4 2.2 8.8 30.3 8.4 41 13.3 41.1 2.3 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data source:

  20. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Machinery (NAICS 333), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 Nonprocess Losses 444 51 Steam Distribution Losses 4 39 Nonprocess Energy 92 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 444 1 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 91 103 111 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 240 Onsite Generation 194 178 26 204 351 1 20 0.1 21.2 21.3 1.6 1.4 1.6 13.8 10.9 26 5.1 26.3 2.1 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data source:

  1. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Textiles (NAICS 313-316), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    21 Nonprocess Losses 472 107 Steam Distribution Losses 17 23 Nonprocess Energy 162 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 472 9 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 52 175 94 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 3 203 Onsite Generation 227 167 98 265 297 12 77 0.8 18.0 18.7 6.7 6.5 2.9 16.8 5.2 29 10.0 28.7 0.7 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data

  2. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Nonprocess Losses 904 106 Steam Distribution Losses 11 82 Nonprocess Energy 278 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 904 7 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 196 258 195 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 3 422 Onsite Generation 455 415 65 480 617 9 51 0.6 37.2 37.8 4.2 3.8 6.4 29.4 19.6 53 15.3 53.2 5.2 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e Energy use data

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Food and Beverage (NAICS 311, 312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    34 Nonprocess Losses 1,934 524 Steam Distribution Losses 111 63 Nonprocess Energy 928 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 1,934 86 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 166 884 281 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 32 607 Onsite Generation 1,051 677 618 1,295 888 118 485 7.5 53.7 61.1 39.7 38.5 14.7 63.2 14.3 117 56.1 117.2 2.9 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT CO 2 e

  4. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (NAICS 3272, 327993) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 5 Nonprocess Losses 466 162 Steam Distribution Losses 4 12 Nonprocess Energy 267 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 466 0 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 30 292 63 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 136 Onsite Generation 321 306 24 330 199 0 19 0.0 12.0 12.0 1.5 1.5 12.1 22.8 2.0 26 14.3 26.3 0.6 Fuel Total Energy

  5. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Petroleum Refining (NAICS 324110), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    45 Nonprocess Losses 3,546 641 Steam Distribution Losses 145 20 Nonprocess Energy 2,994 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 3,546 110 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 62 2,779 127 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 41 275 Onsite Generation 2,840 2,304 927 3,231 402 151 682 9.6 24.3 33.8 64.7 64.3 144.5 176.0 3.0 244 209.8 243.6 1.1 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu MMT

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Plastics (NAICS 326), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (NAICS 326) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 16 Nonprocess Losses 729 89 Steam Distribution Losses 13 36 Nonprocess Energy 154 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 729 0 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 84 223 182 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 393 Onsite Generation 307 255 81 336 575 0 65 0.0 34.8 34.8 5.1 4.9 2.3 28.9 9.7 44 8.9 43.7 1.7 Fuel Total Energy Total

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 10 Nonprocess Losses 541 68 Steam Distribution Losses 6 48 Nonprocess Energy 143 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 541 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 115 145 132 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 266 259 234 41 275 398 0 32 0.0 23.1 23.1 3.0 16.6 11.9 31 7.9 31.0 2.6 Fuel

  8. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Chemicals (NAICS 325), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    461 Nonprocess Losses 4,513 813 Steam Distribution Losses 282 89 Nonprocess Energy 2,138 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 4,513 540 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 253 2,198 517 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 201 1,118 Onsite Generation 2,452 1,690 1,505 3,195 1,635 740 1,044 46.9 98.7 145.6 95.6 93.3 34.0 159.4 19.8 275 129.2 274.8 1.9 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion

  9. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    04 Nonprocess Losses 3,559 1,079 Steam Distribution Losses 300 94 Nonprocess Energy 2,381 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 3,559 80 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 256 1,738 338 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 30 731 Onsite Generation 1,994 717 2,082 2,799 1,069 110 1,581 7.0 64.6 71.5 52.1 49.8 15.4 76.5 11.3 140 68.4 139.9 3.1 Fuel Total Energy Total Primary Energy Use: Total Combustion Emissions: TBtu

  10. Technical support document for proposed 1994 revision of the MEC thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the Council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1994 supplement to the 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for maximum component U{sub 0}-value. The 1994 amendments to the 1993 MEC were established in last year`s code change cycle and did not change the envelope requirements. The research underlying the proposed MEC revision was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Standards program. The goal of this research was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determines the most cost-effective (least total cost) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) (insulation levels and window types) for residential buildings. This least-cost set of ECMs was used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub 0}-values (thermal transmittances). ECMs include window types (for example, double-pane vinyl) and insulation levels (for example, R-19) for ceilings, walls, and floors.

  11. Water Energy Conservation Measures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products & Technologies Technology Deployment Efficient Technologies & Products Water Energy Conservation Measures Water Energy Conservation Measures Water and Sewer ...

  12. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335), October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    335) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 6 Nonprocess Losses 527 48 Steam Distribution Losses 5 43 Nonprocess Energy 89 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 527 1 Prepared for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) by Energetics Incorporated 103 114 138 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 298 Onsite Generation 217 199 29 228 436 1 23 0.0 26.4 26.4 1.8 1.6 1.6 16.6 13.0 31 4.9 31.3 1.7 Fuel Total Energy Energy use data

  13. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  14. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (NAICS 334, 335) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 5 Nonprocess Losses 493 46 Steam Distribution Losses 4 41 Nonprocess Energy 80 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 493 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 103 105 137 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 276 208 193 24 217 413 0 19 0.0 23.9 23.9 1.4 14.4 12.4

  15. Measuring Energy Achievements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measuring Energy Achievements Measuring Energy Achievements This presentation covers types of energy measurements essential to industrial facilities and discusses the benefits of metrics. ArcelorMittal provides examples from their experience measuring energy achievements. Measuring Energy Achievements (September 8, 2010) (1013.62 KB) More Documents & Publications "Just do it (replicate)" with Plans, Tools, and Resources Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study,

  16. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

  17. High frequency energy measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotlar, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described.

  18. Lighting Energy Conservation Measures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Deployment » Efficient Technologies & Products » Lighting Energy Conservation Measures Lighting Energy Conservation Measures Lighting Improvements Lighting technologies are constantly innovating and improving in cost and energy consumption. Lighting upgrades can be simple to install and immediately reduce energy consumption. Lighting Technologies Replace lighting with more efficient lamp types and lower wattages, where cost effective and without compromising light quality for

  19. Cement Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  20. Textiles Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  1. Transportation Equipment Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  2. Foundries Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  3. Fabricated Metals Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-19

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  4. Machinery Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  5. Petroleum Refining Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  6. Aluminum Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  7. Chemicals Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  8. Forest Products Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  9. All Manufacturing Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  10. Forest Products Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  11. Petroleum Refining Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  12. Textiles Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  13. Chemical Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  14. All Manufacturing Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  15. Aluminum Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  16. Cement Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  17. Foundries Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  18. Fabricated Metals Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  19. Transportation Equipment Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  20. MECS Fuel Oil Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    202-586-0018 URL: http:www.eia.govemeuconsumptionbriefsmecsmecsfueloiltables.html For questions about content, please contact the National Energy Information Center:...

  1. Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Biodegradable Materials | Department of Energy Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production from Biodegradable Materials Presentation by Jason Ren, University of Colorado Boulder, at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. bio_h2_workshop_ren.pdf (437.03 KB) More

  2. ARM - Measurement - Surface energy balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy balance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface energy balance The energy balance at the earth's surface between the net radiation and the sensible and latent heat fluxes and ground heat flux. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each

  3. Steam System Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: fixing steam leaks. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  4. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS ...

  5. Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE: Energy Conservation Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary | Department of Energy Contracts ENABLE: Energy Conservation Measures Summary Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE: Energy Conservation Measures Summary Presentation summarizes energy conservation measures that are offered through the Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE program. Download the ENABLE presentation. (46.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE Briefing Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and

  6. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.; Zhao, Qixun; Archer, Gordon L.

    2006-04-01

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  7. Franklin (Lynn) Orr | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest Products (2010 MECS) Forest Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321, 322) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Forest Products (127.9 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Forest Products Cement (2010 MECS) Transportation

    OGE Form 450, 5 CFR Part 2634, Subpart I U.S. Office of

  8. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the MEC end station of the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; SLAC, aff; Barbrel, B.; Gauthier, M.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Doppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P.; Zastrau, U.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2015-02-05

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station (MEC) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Savings Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Refrigeration Equipment Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Others pending approval Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Credits, Rebates & Savings Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy...

  13. Superior Energy Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superior Energy Performance logo This Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry defines the procedures that will be used to confirm conformance with the energy performance ...

  14. Food and Beverage Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  15. Iron and Steel Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  16. Glass and Fiber Glass Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  17. Plastics and Rubber Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  18. Computers, Electronics, and Appliances Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  19. Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for All Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 31-33) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: June 2015 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint All Manufacturing (111.63 KB) More Documents & Publications Cement (2010 MECS) Chemicals (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment

    511.1 (02-94) All Other

  20. Aluminum electroplating on steel from a fused bromide electrolyte - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alumina and Aluminum (2010 MECS) Alumina and Aluminum (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Alumina and Aluminum Sector (NAICS 3313) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Alumina and Aluminum (122.75 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products Innovation Portal

  1. Glass and Fiber Glass Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  2. Computers, Electronics, and Appliances Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  3. Plastics and Rubber Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  4. Iron and Steel Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  5. Food and Beverage Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  6. UN-Energy-Measuring Energy Access | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Network (UN-Energy) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website:...

  7. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projection...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer ...

  8. NREL: Technology Deployment - Net Zero Energy and Energy Security Measures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Being Replicated Across the Military Net Zero Energy and Energy Security Measures Being Replicated Across the Military News MCAS Miramar 'Flip the Switch' Ceremony Celebrates Renewable Energy Facility Energy Assurance Only Microgrid Away Publications Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar: Assessment and Recommendations Army Net Zero Energy Roadmap and Program Summary Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning DOE, NREL Help DOD Enhance

  9. Marine Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Energy Corporation Abbreviation: MEC Address: 1308 Waugh Drive PMB 465 Place: Houston, Texas Country: United States...

  10. Paleomagnetic Measurements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Over Core Stress Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis Rock Density X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Field Procedures One field method is to take small...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CustomOthers pending approval Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages...

  12. Measuring Standby Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products & Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Measuring Standby Power Measuring Standby Power Some devices consume electricity when they appear to be turned off. This power consumption is known as standby power and can be a significant contributor to product energy use. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62301 test procedure describes a method for measuring standby power use in appliances. This summary introduces the general approach to measuring standby power.

  13. Measuring Energy Efficiency Report in Html: Table of Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report: Measuring Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy Measuring Energy Efficiency In The United States' Economy: A Beginning Measuring Energy Efficiency in the United States'...

  14. Wind Measurement Buoy Advances Offshore Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Measurement Buoy Advances Offshore Wind Energy Wind Measurement Buoy Advances Offshore Wind Energy December 7, 2015 - 1:52pm Addthis Wind Measurement Buoy Advances Offshore Wind Energy Alana Duerr Alana Duerr Ph.D., Ocean Engineer (New West Technologies) Seen here at a visit to the Energy Department's headquarters in Washington D.C., the Axys WindSentinel buoy is now deployed at its final destination off the coast of New Jersey. Photo courtesy: U.S. Department of Energy. The United States

  15. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

  16. Labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Three papers are presented discussing the labor and energy impacts of energy-conservation measures, namely: Generation of the Industry/Occupation Wage Matrix and Related Matters, by Carole Green; Job Shifts from Energy Conservation (Salary Distribution Effects), by Robert A. Herendeen; and Energy and Labor Implication of Improving Thermal Integrity of New Houses, by John Joseph Nangle. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper.

  17. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  18. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 13-page document provides definitions and assumptions used in the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010)

  19. Measuring Income and Projecting Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2009-11-01

    Abstract: Energy is a key requirement for a healthy, productive life and a major driver of the emissions leading to an increasingly warm planet. The implications of a doubling and redoubling of per capita incomes over the remainder of this century for energy use are a critical input into understanding the magnitude of the carbon management problem. A substantial controversy about how the Special Report on Emssions Scenarios (SRES) measured income and the potential implications of how income was measured for long term levels of energy use is revisited again in the McKibbin, Pearce and Stegman article appearing elsewhere in this issue. The recent release of a new set of purchasing power estimates of national income, and the preparations for creating new scenarios to support the IPCCs fifth assessment highlight the importance of the issues which have arisen surrounding income and energy use. Comparing the 1993 and 2005 ICP results on Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) based measures of income reveals that not only do the 2005 ICP estimates share the same issue of common growth rates for real income as measured by PPP and US $, but the lack of coherence in the estimates of PPP incomes, especially for developing countries raises yet another obstacle to resolving the best way to measure income. Further, the common use of an income term to mediate energy demand (as in the Kaya identity) obscures an underlying reality about per capita energy demands, leading to unreasonable estimates of the impact of changing income measures and of the recent high GDP growth rates in India and China. Significant new research is required to create both a reasonable set of GDP growth rates and long term levels of energy use.

  20. Energy Savings Measure Packages: Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, S.; Booten, C.

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the US. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for given source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home. The dollar value of the maximum annual savings varies significantly by location but typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  1. Low-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback,more » net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  2. Energy Savings Measure Packages. Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Sean; Booten, Chuck

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the United States. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home; this typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  3. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; et al

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.71.71.7 cm3 lutetiumyttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.52.1 psmorefor an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.52.520 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 5911 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 545 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.less

  4. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; et al

    2015-04-14

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of datamore » normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.« less

  5. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; Wallace, Alex; Jastrow, Ulf; Kreis, Svea; Sorokin, Andrey A.; Tiedtke, Kai

    2015-04-14

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of data normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.

  6. NEMVP: North American energy measurement and verification protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This measurement and verification protocol discusses procedures that,when implemented, allow buyers, sellers, and financiers of energy projects to quantify energy conservation measure performance and savings.

  7. June 30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance: A GovernmentIndustry-Developed Protocol June 30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance: A Government...

  8. DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness May 21,...

  9. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects...

  10. White House Highlights New DOE Measures to Advance Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deployment and Increase Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy Highlights New DOE Measures to Advance Renewable Energy Deployment and Increase Energy Efficiency White House Highlights New DOE Measures to Advance Renewable Energy Deployment and Increase Energy Efficiency September 18, 2014 - 10:30am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 White House Highlights New DOE Measures to Advance Renewable Energy Deployment and Increase Energy Efficiency For more information, see the White House

  11. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  12. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit and Specifications

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit and Specifications Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit and Specifications Guide describes the Federal Energy Management Program Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit and Specifications. Download the assessment kit and specifications. (909.16 KB) More Documents & Publications Wireless Sensors Improve Data Center Efficiency Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and...

  15. Measuring energy efficiency: Opportunities from standardization and common metrics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Measuring energy efficiency: Opportunities from standardization and common metrics For 2016 EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By Stacy Angel, Energy Information Portfolio Analyst Carol White, Senior Energy Efficiency Analyst How is the importance of measuring energy efficiency changing? * The number of energy efficiency policies and programs is growing. * Common metrics help measure progress towards multiple objectives. * Clear metrics help consumers make informed energy

  16. Measuring the Resilience of Energy Distribution Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report provides a review of existing resilience metrics for electric, oil, and natural gas distribution systems. The report summarizes the concepts addressed by measures of resilience, describes a framework for organizing alternative metrics used to measure resilience of energy distribution systems, and reviews the state of metrics for resilience of such systems. The framework organized resilience metrics into five categories – system inputs, capacities, capabilities, performance and outcomes – and existing metrics were evaluated within the context of this framework. The report finds more metrics for the electricity system than for oil and gas and that the literature pays greater attention to metrics at the facility level. Also, there were many performance measures identified at the system and regional level and these metrics were determined to be relatively well developed. In comparison, outcome measures were identified at the system, regional and national levels, but they were judged to be relatively less well developed. To improve resilience metrics, the report recommends standardizing data on inputs and capacities at the facility and system levels; developing measures of capabilities at the system and regional levels; and improving understanding of how capabilities and performance translate to regional and national outcomes.

  17. Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Columbia University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications Website:...

  18. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the ``core`` (r/a < 0.85) and small (< 10--30 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the edge.

  19. Preparing for Project Implementation Measuring Energy Achievements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Achievements Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Agenda Seminar Series Overview ...

  20. Sandia Energy - Post-Processing and Analysis of Wake Measurements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post-Processing and Analysis of Wake Measurements Around a Scaled Turbine Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Post-Processing and Analysis of...

  1. Measurement and Verification Options for Federal Energy- and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Energy Management Program measurement and ... engineering analysis of measurements of the most critical parameter. Option B: Retrofit Isolation or System-Level ...

  2. Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to...

  3. Measuring Energy Poverty: Focusing on What Matters | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Topics: Policiesdeployment programs, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.ophi.org.ukwp-contentuploads...

  4. Scheduling-shutdown-2014-MEC v4 web.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue MEC Glenzer Optical-laser-only Glenzer Optical-laser-only Glenzer Albert Optical-laser-only Albert Oct 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21...

  5. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) ...

  6. Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data Evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is the collection of methods and processes used to assess the performance of energy efficiency activities so planned results can be achieved with greater certainty and future activities can be more effective. The main objectives of an EM&V process are to assess the performance of an energy efficiency program or

  7. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit Guide and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specification | Department of Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit Guide and Specification Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit Guide and Specification Guide describes the Federal Energy Management Program Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit and Specifications. dc_assessmentkit.pdf (909.16 KB) More Documents & Publications Wireless Sensors Improve Data Center Efficiency Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing

  8. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects Liaukus, C. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION RESIDENTIAL; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; BARA; BUILDING...

  9. June 30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance: A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government/Industry-Developed Protocol | Department of Energy 30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance: A Government/Industry-Developed Protocol June 30 Webinar: Measuring Energy Storage System Performance: A Government/Industry-Developed Protocol June 20, 2016 - 5:52pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Storage Systems Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia

  10. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) As our valued...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Residential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data 2006 Analysis & Reports Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing ...

  12. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  13. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Verification (M&V) | Department of Energy and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement

  14. Property:ElectricalMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Property Name ElectricalMeasurement Property Type String Description MHK Electrical & Power Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor Allows Values...

  15. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Type CommunityEnergyToolType Modeling Tool Cost Free User Interface Website, Other Website http:www.nrel.govapretrofitsindex.cfm Tool...

  16. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and...

  17. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

  18. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-05-14

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

  19. Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls This document provides a ...

  20. Water-saving Measures: Energy and Cost Savings Calculator | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Cost Savings Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Water-saving Measures: Energy and Cost Savings Calculator AgencyCompany Organization:...

  1. Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201), November 12, 2015.

  2. FEMP Releases New Training Course on Energy Conservation Measures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Course modules focus on four specific energy conservation measures (ECMs)-demand response, cogenerationCHP, irrigation efficiency improvements, and retro-commissioning-that are ...

  3. Solar Resource Measurements at FPL Energy … Equipment Only:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Number: CRD-08-283 CRADA Title: Solar Resource Measurements at FPL Energy - Equipment Only Joint Work ... solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. ...

  4. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit Guide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assesment Kit and Specifications. dcassessmentkit.pdf (909.16 KB) More Documents & Publications Wireless Sensors Improve Data ...

  5. Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurement and verification (M&V) activities help agencies confirm that legally and contractually required savings guarantees are met in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

  6. Heating and Cooling Energy Conservation Measures | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The installation of a stack economizer is estimated to have a 30F temperature rise on the inlet water which lowers heating energy, costs, and CO2 emissions. Replace Inefficient ...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1993 State Legislature updated the state energy code to the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC) and established a procedure to update the standard. Then in 1995, following consultation with an...

  8. Novel Photoconductive Decay Measurement System - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Photoconductive Decay Measurement System Colorado School of Mines Contact CSM About This Technology...

  9. Geothermal Properties Measurement Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measurement tool was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for geothermal heat pump (GHP) designers and installers to better determine the geothermal properties of a...

  10. Measurements of PM Traps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurements of PM Traps 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentantion: West Virginia University PDF icon 2004deerclark.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  11. Property:DisplacementMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    String Description MHK Displacement Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor & MHKInstrument Allows Values 3-axis (Displacement);2-axis (Displacement);1-axis...

  12. Property:BendingMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type String Description MHK Bending Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor & MHKInstrument Allows Values Angle (Bending);Strain (Bending);3-axis...

  13. Property:AirMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    String Description MHK Axial Load Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor & MHKInstrument Allows Values Barometric Pressure (Air);Precipitation (Air);Relative...

  14. Property:CurrentMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type String Description MHK Current Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor & MHKInstrument Allows Values Current Statistics (Current);Turbulence (Current);1D...

  15. Property:AxialMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    String Description MHK Axial Load Measurement Categories Used in FormTemplate MHKSensor & MHKInstrument Allows Values Strain (Axial);3-axis (Axial);2-axis (Axial);1-axis...

  16. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  17. Extrans - Permeation Measurement System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extrans - Permeation Measurement System Y-12 National Security Complex Contact Y12 About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fact Sheet (695 KB) PDF Document Publication Patent (156 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryThe Extrans Permeation Measurement System is a customizable system for testing the behavior and uniformity of polymers and other materials. The system can be used to determine permeation rates using variable temperatures, total pressures, differential pressures, and

  18. Performance Measurement of MEAs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Measurement of MEAs Performance Measurement of MEAs Presentation by Shyam S. Kocha at the October 2008 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting htmwg_oct08_kocha.pdf (549.55 KB) More Documents & Publications Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Preliminary Agenda: October 2008 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting Rotating Disk-Electrode Aqueous Electrolyte Accelerated Stress Tests for PGM Electrocatalyst/Support

  19. Measuring energy efficiency in the United States` economy: A beginning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    Energy efficiency is a vital component of the Nation`s energy strategy. One of the Department of Energy`s missions are to promote energy efficiency to help the Nation manage its energy resources. The ability to define and measure energy efficiency is essential to this objective. In the absence of consistent defensible measures, energy efficiency is a vague, subjective concept that engenders directionless speculation and confusion rather than insightful analysis. The task of defining and measuring energy efficiency and creating statistical measures as descriptors is a daunting one. This publication is not a final product, but is EIA`s first attempt to define and measure energy efficiency in a systematic and robust manner for each of the sectors and the United States economy as a whole. In this process, EIA has relied on discussions, customer reviews, in-house reviews, and seminars that have focused on energy efficiency in each of the sectors. EIA solicits the continued participation of its customers in further refining this work.

  20. Measuring and Managing Cleanroom Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschudi, William; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tenfang; Rumsey, Peter

    2005-11-15

    Combining high air-recirculation rates and energy-intensive processes, cleanrooms are 20 to 100 times as costly to operate on a per-square-foot basis as conventional commercial buildings. Additionally, they operate 24 hr a day, seven days a week, which means their electricity demand always is contributing to peak utility-system demand, an important fact given increasing reliance on time-dependent tariffs.

  1. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT

  2. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

  3. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  4. Structure of the Mecl Repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in Complex with the Cognate DNA Operator of mec

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safo,M.; Ko, T.; Musayev, F.; Zhao, Q.; Wang, A.; Archer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of {beta}-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Angstroms resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI-mec complex, but unlike the MecI-bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  5. SEE Action Webinar on Energy Efficiency Measure Cost Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action), this webinar will explain the importance of measure cost studies, review the current "state of the science" of measure cost development and estimation, and explore opportunities for future collaboration and advancement of measure cost research.

  6. A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Helcio; Atkinson, Barbara; Lekov, Alex

    2011-05-24

    When policy makers propose new policies, there is a need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures, to compare them to existing and alternative policies, and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. Such an approach should be able to represent in a single framework the particularities of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This report presents an integrated methodological framework to assess prospectively the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of energy efficiency policy measures. The framework builds on the premise that the comparative assessment of energy efficiency policy measures should (a) rely on a common set of primary data and parameters, (b) follow a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure, and (c) present results through a set of comparable indicators. This framework elaborates on models that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has used in support of its rulemakings on mandatory energy efficiency standards. In addition to a rigorous analysis of the impacts of mandatory standards, DOE compares the projected results of alternative policy measures to those projected to be achieved by the standards. The framework extends such an approach to provide a broad, generic methodology, with no geographic or sectoral limitations, that is useful for evaluating any type of equipment energy efficiency market intervention. The report concludes with a demonstration of how to use the framework to compare the impacts estimated for twelve policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the United States.

  7. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T.

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  8. Key energy efficiency measures signed into law by President Obama...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Key energy efficiency measures signed into law by President Obama Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 2...

  9. ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , EGsG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT DECEMBER 1979 EGG-R-003 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SHPACK PROPERTY Norton, Massachusetts DATE OF SURVEY: AUGUST 1979 C. M . BLUITT Project Scientist APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION ?4@ t!lz- T. P. Stuart, Manager Remote Sensing Sciences Department THE REMOTE SENSING. lA!ORATORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ____--- I(-__ ABSTRACT An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the

  10. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  11. Superior Energy Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry defines the procedures that will be used to confirm conformance with the energy performance level requirements of the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) Program. The Program has two paths. This document is structured to reflect those different paths.

  12. You Can't Manage Energy Use That You Don't Measure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You Can't Manage Energy Use That You Don't Measure You Can't Manage Energy Use That You Don't Measure December 7, 2009 - 7:30am Addthis John Lippert "You can't manage what you don't measure" is a common management adage. It applies well to energy as well. I think I do a decent job at restricting my energy usage at home. After all, I'm supposed to be an energy expert. But who would have thought that my plugged-in combination fax machine/photocopier/printer was consuming seven watts of

  13. ENERGY MEASUREMENTS EGG-10282-1063 UC-41

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    $ EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS EGG-10282-1063 UC-41 OCTOBER 1984 ii 23 THE REMOTE SENSING 1 i13 LAGORATO OPERATED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BY EG&G/EM AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY FOR *41Am CONTAMINATION IN TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DATE OF SURVEY: MAY 1984 --- -I, .--_--...- &, EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS EGG-10282-1063 OCTOBER 1984 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY FOR *41Am CONTAMINATION IN TONAWANDA, N E W YORK DATE OF SURVEY: M A Y 1984 H. W . Clark Project Scientist REVIEWED BY Nuclear

  14. Analysis of Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Measure Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.; Yee, S.; Brand, L.

    2013-09-01

    Through the Chicagoland Single Family Housing Characterization and Retrofit Prioritization report, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit research team characterized 15 housing types in the Chicagoland region based on assessor data, utility billing history, and available data from prior energy efficiency programs. Within these 15 groups, a subset showed the greatest opportunity for energy savings based on BEopt Version 1.1 modeling of potential energy efficiency package options and the percent of the housing stock represented by each group. In this project, collected field data from a whole-home program in Illinois are utilized to compare marketplace-installed measures to the energy saving optimal packages previously developed for the 15 housing types. Housing type, conditions, energy efficiency measures installed, and retrofit cost information were collected from 19 homes that participated in the Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program in 2012, representing eight of the characterized housing groups. Two were selected for further case study analysis to provide an illustration of the differences between optimal and actually installed measures. Taken together, these homes are representative of 34.8% of the Chicagoland residential building stock. In one instance, actual installed measures closely matched optimal recommended measures.

  15. Energy and Water Conservation Measures for Hanford (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, Douglas J.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2013-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed an energy and water evaluation of selected buildings on the Hanford Site during the months of May and June 2012. The audit was performed under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Sustainability Performance Office to identify key energy conservation measures (ECMs) and water conservation measures (WCMs). The evaluations consisted of on-site facility walk-throughs conducted by PNNL staff, interviews with building-operating personnel, and an examination of building designs and layouts. Information on 38 buildings was collected to develop a list of energy and water conservation measures. Table ES.1 is a summary of the ECMs, while table ES.2 is a summary of the WCMs.

  16. Near-equilibrium measurements of nonequilibrium free energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooks, Gavin

    2012-04-09

    A central endeavor of thermodynamics is the measurement of free energy changes. Regrettably, although we can measure the free energy of a system in thermodynamic equilibrium, typically all we can say about the free energy of a nonequilibrium ensemble is that it is larger than that of the same system at equilibrium. Herein, we derive a formally exact expression for the probability distribution of a driven system, which involves path ensemble averages of the work over trajectories of the time-reversed system. From this we find a simple near-equilibrium approximation for the free energy in terms of an excess mean time-reversed work, which can be experimentally measured on real systems. With analysis and computer simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our approximations for several simple models.

  17. Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability, Webinar Presentation by Arrelaine A. Dameron (7,247 KB) PDF Document Publication NREL's e-Ca Test: A Scalable, High-Sensitivity Water Permeation Measurement Methodology (511

  18. Renewable Energy and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.; Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Kats, G. H.

    1999-04-14

    The Renewables Subcommittee for the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) is developing a section of the IPMVP treating the special issues related to performance measurement of renewable energy systems. An industry consensus framework for measuring project benefits is important in realizing the promise of renewable energy. This work represents a voluntary, consensus-building process among sponsoring organizations from 21 countries and several disciplines. Measurement and Verification (M&V) can provide a common tool for standardization to support performance-based contracting, financing, and emissions trading. M&V can ensure that savings and generation requirements in energy projects will be achieved accurately and objectively. The protocol defines procedures that are consistently applicable to similar projects, internationally accepted, and reliable. Actual M&V project results can demonstrate success and provide developers, investors, lenders, and customers with more confidence in the value of future projects.

  19. Renewable energy and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.; Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Kats, G.H.

    1999-07-01

    The Renewables Subcommittee for the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) is developing a section of the IPMVP treating the special issues related to performance measurement of renewable energy systems. An industry consensus framework for measuring project benefits is important in realizing the promise of renewable energy. This work represents a voluntary, consensus-building process among sponsoring organizations from 21 countries and several disciplines. Measurement and Verification (M and V) can provide a common tool for standardization to support performance-based contracting, financing, and emissions trading. M and V can ensure that savings and generation requirements in energy projects will be achieved accurately and objectively. The protocol defines procedures that are consistently applicable to similar projects, internationally accepted, and reliable. Actual M and V project results can demonstrate success and provide developers, investors, lenders, and customers with more confidence in the value of future projects.

  20. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of U.S. households compared to piecemeal remodeling efforts. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team examines the improvement of a home’s energy performance in an opportunistic way by examining what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for energy efficiency upgrades to occur at the same time as remodeling proejcts. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home’s energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  1. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end, we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.

  2. Improved Method to Measure Glare and Reflected Solar Irradiance - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Early Stage R&D Early Stage R&D Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Method to Measure Glare and Reflected Solar Irradiance Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (767 KB) Solar glare from aerial view Solar glare from aerial view Typical solar glare Typical solar glare

  3. Priority mitigation measures in non-energy sector in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizina, S.V.; Pilifosova, O.V.; Gossen, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Fulfilling the Commitments on UN FCCC through the U.S. Country Studies Program, Kazakstan has developed the national GHG Inventory, vulnerability and adaptation assessment and estimated the possibility of mitigation measures in certain sectors. Next step is developing National Climate Change Action Plan. That process includes such major steps as setting priorities in mitigation measures and technologies, their comprehensive evaluation, preparation implementation strategies, developing the procedure of incorporation of the National Action Plan into other development plans and programs. This paper presents programs and measures that can reduce GHG emissions in non-energy sector. Measures in land-use change and forestry, agriculture and coal mining are considered. Current situation in non-energy sector of Kazakstan is discussed. The amount of GHG emissions reduction and cost analysis presented in this paper was developed with the use of IPCC recommendations.

  4. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: AligningManagement, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2007-07-01

    More than fifteen years after the launch of programs in theU.K. and U.S., industry still offers one of the largest opportunities forenergy savings worldwide. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimatesthe savings potential from cost-optimization of industrial motor-drivensystems alone at 7 percent of global electricity use. The U.S. Departmentof Energy (USDOE) Industrial Technologies Program estimates 7 percentsavings potential in total US industrial energy use through theapplication of proven best practice. Simple paybacks for these types ofprojects are frequently two years or less. The technology required toachieve these savings is widely available; the technical skills requiredto identify energy saving opportunities are known and transferable.Although programs like USDOE's Best Practices have been highlysuccessful, most plants, as supported by 2002 MECS data, remain eitherunaware or unmotivated to improve their energy efficiency--as evidencedby the 98 percent of US industrial facilities reporting to MECS say thatthey lack a full-time energy manager. With the renewed interest in energyefficiency worldwide and the emergence of carbon trading and newfinancial instruments such as white certificates1, there is a need tointroduce greater transparency into the way that industrial facilitiesidentify, develop, and document energy efficiency projects. Historically,industrial energy efficiency projects have been developed by plantengineers, frequently with assistance from consultants and/or supplierswith highly specialized technical skills. Under this scenario,implementation of energy efficiency improvements is dependent onindividuals. These individuals typically include "champions" within anindustrial facility or corporation, working in cooperation withconsultants or suppliers who have substantial knowledge based on years ofexperience. This approach is not easily understood by others without thisspecialized technical knowledge, penetrates the market fairly slowly

  5. IEA Policies and Measures Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Climate Change Topics: Policiesdeployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset...

  6. High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter 2004 Diesel ...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and...

  8. Energy Savings Modelling of Re-tuning Energy Conservation Measures in Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2014-10-20

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BASs capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This paper investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system re-tuning measures on a typical large office building, using the Department of Energys building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply-air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All the individual measures and combinations were simulated in 16 climate locations representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual total HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy

  9. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2013 the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) published the first set of protocols for determining energy savings from energy efficiency measures and programs.

  10. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  11. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures (April 2013)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In April 2013 the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) published the first set of protocols for determining energy savings from energy efficiency measures and programs.

  12. Superior Energy Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superior Energy Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry November 19, 2012 Table of Contents ©2012, The Regents of the University of California Notice: this manuscript has been authored by employees of the Regents of the University of California, and others, under Contract No DE-AC02-05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy, for the management and operation of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The United State Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up,

  13. Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and...

  14. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: References | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy References 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: References This five-page document provides the references to the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010) References for the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010) (265.96 KB) More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint References 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions and Assumptions User Experience Research Templates and Examples: Card

  15. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Scope | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Scope 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Scope This five-page document provides detailed descriptions of the manufacturing sectors examined in the Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010) Scope of the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (MECS 2010) (330.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Scope End-Use Sector Flowchart U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis

  16. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) Webinar.

  17. Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

  18. Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc

  19. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    In this study, to foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end,more » we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.« less

  20. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  1. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program announced the expansion of the Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures.

  2. Sub-Metering: Energy Savings Measurement and Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-19

    Presentation from the Save Energy Now LEADER Industrial Sustainability and Energy Management Showcase.

  3. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  4. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  5. ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kL2' . ",- - &j EGG0 ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report NRC-81 09 April 1981 . AN AERIAL RADIOLOGIC SURVEY OF THE STEPAN CHEMCIAL COMPANY AND SURROUNDING AREA MAYWOOD, N E W JERSEY DATE OF SURVEY: 26 JANUARY 1981 J.R. Mueller Project Director S.A. Gunn Project Scientist APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION W . John Tipton, Head Radiation Sciences Section This Document is UNCLASSIFIED G. P. Stobie Classification Officer This work was performed by EG&G for the United States Nuclear

  6. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulationsmore » to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).« less

  7. Formaldehyde measurements in five new unoccupied energy efficient manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.; Onisko, S.A.

    1986-11-01

    Week-long integrated formaldehyde levels were measured over eight weeks in five new unoccupied energy efficient manufactured homes. These homes were constructed to the specifications set forth in the Model Conservation Standards (MCS) established by the Northwest Power Planning Council for site-built homes. The MCS standards exceed the Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) standards that currently apply to manufactured homes nationwide. Two of the homes were located at Richland, Washington, and three homes were located at Vancouver, Washington. Among other features of the MCS, the homes are equipped with air-to-air heat exchangers (AAHX) to supply additional fresh air ventilation. The first four weeks of testing were conducted with the AAHX off and the second four-week measurement period was conducted with the AAHX continuously on the HI setting. Formaldehyde levels ranged from 0.047 ppM the fifth week of the testing in a double wide home (with the AAHX turned on) to 0.164 ppM in the single wide home in the first week of measurements with the AAHX off. At no time did the formaldehyde levels exceed 0.4 ppM, the HUD targeted indoor level based on HUD codes for formaldehyde emissions from plywood and particle board building materials used in the homes. There was no strong correlation between formaldehyde levels and the measured air exchange rate. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Customer Feedback during Development of 1998 MECS: Mail/Electronic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and its composition (by fuel type) in China; - commercial and industrial energy management market data, specifically in software market; - energy consumption in health,...

  9. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  10. High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating Engine PM Emissions High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating ...