Sample records for measuring physical conditions

  1. Fidelity of Physical Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between measurements and physical quantities) is proposed as a quantitative measure of the quality of physical measurements. The fidelity does not depend on the true value of unknown physical quantities (as does the Fisher information) and it allows for the role of prior information in the measurement process. The fidelity is general enough to allow a natural comparison of the quality of classical and quantum measurements. As an example, the fidelity is used to compare the quality of measurements made by a classical and a quantum Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  2. Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision,4newsSolarrd Physical Market

  3. Computing Physical Invariant Measures Gary Froyland \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    Computing Physical Invariant Measures Gary Froyland \\Lambda Department of Mathematical Engineering of the long term distribution of most orbits of our system (M; T ). The computational techniques we present situation, our method provides an automatic way to reconstruct the dynamics. A. Physical Invariant Measures

  4. Dynamic measurements of the nonlinear elastic parameter A in rock under varying conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saturation. INDEX TERMS: 5102 Physical Properties of Rocks: Acoustic properties; 5112 Physical Properties of Rocks: Microstructure; 5199 Physical Properties of Rocks: General or miscellaneous; 9810 GeneralDynamic measurements of the nonlinear elastic parameter A in rock under varying conditions Paul A

  5. Building an entanglement measure on physical ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Teresi; A. Napoli; A. Messina

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce on physical grounds a new measure of multipartite entanglement for pure states. The function we define is discriminant and monotone under LOCC and moreover can be expressed in terms of observables of the system.

  6. Measured Crawlspace Conditions Under Manufactured Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beal, D.; Chasar, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was or whether the ground cover completely covered the ground. Hurricane Jeanne destroyed the test configuration before air tightness measurements could be taken. However, we believe these crawlspaces were typical of poorly vented crawls one might find under...

  7. Doctoral Thesis in Physics Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    of propagation models Juan Wu Particle and Astroparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Royal Institute such as dark matter. To understand cosmic ray accel- eration and propagation mechanisms, accurate measurements

  8. Methods for improved forewarning of condition changes in monitoring physical processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention teaches further improvements in methods for forewarning of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves objective determination of a forewarning threshold (U.sub.FW), together with a failure-onset threshold (U.sub.FAIL) corresponding to a normalized value of a composite measure (C) of dissimilarity; and providing a visual or audible indication to a human observer of failure forewarning and/or failure onset. Another improvement relates to symbolization of the data according the binary numbers representing the slope between adjacent data points. Another improvement relates to adding measures of dissimilarity based on state-to-state dynamical changes of the system. And still another improvement relates to using a Shannon entropy as the measure of condition change in lieu of a connected or unconnected phase space.

  9. Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Model Predictions versus Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Vaden

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is performed in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by electrochemically separating uranium from the fission products and structural materials in a vessel called an electrorefiner (ER). To continue processing without waiting for sample analyses to assess process conditions, an ER process model predicts the composition of the ER inventory and effluent streams via multicomponent, multi-phase chemical equilibrium for chemical reactions and a numerical solution to differential equations for electro-chemical transport. The results of the process model were compared to the electrorefiner measured data.

  10. Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation -1 School of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation - 1 School of Physics and Astronomy An Introduction to Radio Interferometry and The Measurement Equation Formalism Pedagogical Seminar Louise M. Ker March 2010 Abstract The next generation of radio telescopes, such as LOFAR, e-Merlin, ASKAP, MeerKat and even- tually

  11. A unified physical boundary condition for massless fields of arbitrary spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Stokes; Robert Bennett

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Boundary conditions for the Maxwell and Dirac fields at material surfaces are widely-used and physically well-motivated, but do not appear to have been generalised to deal with higher spin fields. A consequence of this is that calculations of, for example, Casimir forces associated with higher spin fields always select some arbitrary mathematical boundary conditions, rather than those which are physically motivated. Here, we use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified treatment of the boundary conditions routinely employed in the treatment of spin-1/2 and spin-1 fields. We then use this unification to obtain a completely new boundary condition that can be applied to massless fields of any spin, including the spin-2 graviton, and its supersymmetric partner the spin-3/2 gravitino. We demonstrate one important consequence of our generalisation, which is that periodic boundary conditions cannot be applied to any physically-confined fermionic field.

  12. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  13. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters were essentially the same for the salt grout without admixture. When Daratard 17 was added, the Bingham Plastic yield stress increased for the 10 minute mix. The simulant salt used in this task had similar physical properties of the Tank 50 3Q13 salt grout and is recommended for future use, if the salt solution in Tank 50 does not change. The design basis physical properties used to size the pumps and mixers at SPF were obtained from DPST-85-312. The grouts characterized in this report are bounded by the design basis density and Bingham Plastic yield stress. The opposite is true for the plastic viscosity. Steady state pressure drop calculations were performed for the design basis values using the flow rate for the clean cap and salt grouts and they bound the pressure drop of the grouts characterized in this report. A comparison of the lab prepared samples to PI ProcessBook data, specifically average pressure drop, indicate that the lab prepared samples are more viscous in nature than what is processed in the facility. This difference could be due to the applied shear rates which could be lower in the lab as compared to the facility and that fact the SPF added flush water, making this comparison more difficult. A perfunctory review of the PI ProcessBook data was discussed. It may be possible that the frequency that the distributed control system alters the grout pump speed to maintain grout hopper volume can negatively affect the efficiency of the grout pump.

  14. Algorithmic randomness, physical entropy, measurements, and the second law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, W.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithmic information content is equal to the size -- in the number of bits -- of the shortest program for a universal Turing machine which can reproduce a state of a physical system. In contrast to the statistical Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy, which measures ignorance, the algorithmic information content is a measure of the available information. It is defined without a recourse to probabilities and can be regarded as a measure of randomness of a definite microstate. I suggest that the physical entropy S -- that is, the quantity which determines the amount of the work {Delta}W which can be extracted in the cyclic isothermal expansion process through the equation {Delta}W = k{sub B}T{Delta}S -- is a sum of two contributions: the mission information measured by the usual statistical entropy and the known randomness measured by the algorithmic information content. The sum of these two contributions is a constant of motion'' in the process of a dissipation less measurement on an equilibrium ensemble. This conservation under a measurement, which can be traced back to the noiseless coding theorem of Shannon, is necessary to rule out existence of a successful Maxwell's demon. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension at permeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internal geophysics (Physics of Earth's interior) Jump conditions and dynamic surface tension of momentum across the interface, a possibly anisotropic surface tension and terms including an inter- face equals the jump of pressure; and in the presence of surface tension defined as a capillary action due

  16. Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

  17. Quantum cosmological solutions: their dependence on the choice of gauge conditions and physical interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Shestakova

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In "extended phase space" approach to quantum geometrodynamics numerical solutions to Schrodinger equation corresponding to various choice of gauge conditions are obtained for the simplest isotropic model. The "extended phase space" approach belongs to those appeared in the last decade in which, as a result of fixing a reference frame, the Wheeler - DeWitt static picture of the world is replaced by evolutionary quantum geometrodynamics. Some aspects of this approach were discussed at two previous PIRT meetings. We are interested in the part of the wave function depending on physical degrees of freedom. Three gauge conditions having a clear physical meaning are considered. They are the conformal time gauge, the gauge producing the appearance of Lambda-term in the Einstein equations, and the one covering the two previous cases as asymptotic limits. The interpretation and discussion of the obtained solutions is given.

  18. Model Based Sensor System for Temperature Measurement in R744 Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitz, Sven; Schneider, Peter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal is the development of a novel principle for the temperature acquisition of refrigerants in CO2 air conditioning systems. The new approach is based on measuring the temperature inside a pressure sensor, which is also needed in the system. On the basis of simulative investigations of different mounting conditions functional relations between measured and medium temperature will be derived.

  19. Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is described to measure approximate real-world air conditioning fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  20. Parametrization for chemical freeze-out conditions from net-charge fluctuations measured at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bluhm; P. Alba; W. Alberico; R. Bellwied; V. Mantovani Sarti; M. Nahrgang; C. Ratti

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss details of our thermal model applied to extract chemical freeze-out conditions from fluctuations in the net-electric charge and net-proton number measured at RHIC. A parametrization for these conditions as a function of the beam energy is given.

  1. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AROUND 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS. I. AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandian, J. D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M., E-mail: jagadheep@iist.ac.in [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz are known to be tracers of high-mass star formation in our Galaxy. In this paper, we study the large-scale physical conditions in the star-forming clumps/cores associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers using observations of the (1, 1), (2, 2), and (3, 3) inversion transitions of ammonia with the Effelsberg telescope. The gas kinetic temperature is found to be higher than in infrared dark clouds, highlighting the relatively evolved nature of the maser sources. Other than a weak correlation between maser luminosity and the ammonia line width, we do not find any differences between low- and high-luminosity methanol masers.

  2. New measurement capability measures semiconductor minority-carrier lifetimes in conditions that simulate thin-film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that simulate thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing environments. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL of conditions in a thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing line. NREL's work in recent years has demonstrated system. The system, shown below, couples femtosecond laser pulses with optical fibers while avoiding

  3. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN A CORONAL MASS EJECTION FROM HINODE, STEREO, AND SOHO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Raymond, J. C.; Miralles, M. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hara, H. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we analyze multiwavelength observations from Hinode, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and STEREO of the early phases of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We use Hinode/EIS and SOHO/UVCS high-resolution spectra to measure the physical properties of the CME ejecta as a function of time at 1.1 and 1.9 solar radii. Hinode/XRT images are used in combination with EIS spectra to constrain the high temperature plasma properties of the ejecta. SECCHI/EUVI, SECCHI/COR 1, SOHO/EIT, and SOHO/LASCO images are used to measure the CME trajectory, velocity, and acceleration. The combination of measurements of plane of the sky velocities from two different directions allows us to determine the total velocity of the CME plasma up to 5 solar radii. Plasma properties, dynamical status, thermal structure, and brightness distributions are used to constrain the energy content of the CME plasma and to determine the heating rate. We find that the heating is larger than the kinetic energy, and compare it to theoretical predictions from models of CME plasma heating and acceleration.

  4. Energy Consumption Measuring and Diagnostic Analysis of Air-conditioning Water System in a Hotel Building in Harbin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces an air-conditioning water system in a hotel building in Harbin, finishes its air-conditioning energy consumption measurement in summer conditions, and presents an estimation index of performance of chiller, pump and motor...

  5. The Physical Conditions in a Pre Super Star Cluster Molecular Cloud in the Antennae Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, K E; Indebetouw, R; Brogan, C L; Whitmore, B C; Hibbard, J; Sheth, K; Evans, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the physical conditions in an extreme molecular cloud in the Antennae merging galaxies. This cloud has properties consistant with those required to form a globular cluster. We have obtained ALMA CO and 870$\\mu$m observations of the Antennae galaxy system with $\\sim 0".5$ resolution. This cloud stands out in the data with a radius of $\\lesssim 24$~pc and mass of $>5\\times 10^6$~M$_\\odot$. The cloud appears capable of forming a globular cluster, but the lack of associated thermal radio emission indicates that star formation has not yet altered the environment. The lack of thermal radio emission places the cloud in an early stage of evolution, which we expect to be short-lived ($\\lesssim 1$~Myr) and thus rare. Given its mass and kinetic energy, for the cloud to be confined (as its appearance strongly suggests) it must be subject to an external pressure of P/$k_B \\gtrsim 10^8$~K~cm$^{-3}$ -- 10,000 times higher than typical interstellar pressure. This would support theories that high pre...

  6. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Stephanie M., E-mail: Stephanie.Leon@uth.tmc.edu; Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Brateman, Libby F. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: That scattered radiation negatively impacts the quality of medical radiographic imaging is well known. In mammography, even slight amounts of scatter reduce the high contrast required for subtle soft-tissue imaging. In current clinical mammography, image contrast is partially improved by use of an antiscatter grid. This form of scatter rejection comes with a sizeable dose penalty related to the concomitant elimination of valuable primary radiation. Digital mammography allows the use of image processing as a method of scatter correction that might avoid effects that negatively impact primary radiation, while potentially providing more contrast improvement than is currently possible with a grid. For this approach to be feasible, a detailed characterization of the scatter is needed. Previous research has modeled scatter as a constant background that serves as a DC bias across the imaging surface. The goal of this study was to provide a more substantive data set for characterizing the spatially-variant features of scatter radiation at the image detector of modern mammography units. Methods: This data set was acquired from a model of the radiation beam as a matrix of very narrow rays or pencil beams. As each pencil beam penetrates tissue, the pencil widens in a predictable manner due to the production of scatter. The resultant spreading of the pencil beam at the detector surface can be characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were calculated from measurements obtained using the beam stop method. Two digital mammography units were utilized, and the SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and presence or absence of a grid. These values were then used to generate general equations allowing the SF and MRE to be calculated for any combination of the above parameters. Results: With a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of about 0.05 to a maximum of about 0.16, and the MRE ranged from about 3 to 13 mm. Without a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of 0.25 to a maximum of 0.52, and the MRE ranged from about 20 to 45 mm. The SF with a grid demonstrated a mild dependence on target/filter combination and kV, whereas the SF without a grid was independent of these factors. The MRE demonstrated a complex relationship as a function of kV, with notable difference among target/filter combinations. The primary source of change in both the SF and MRE was phantom thickness. Conclusions: Because breast tissue varies spatially in physical density and elemental content, the effective thickness of breast tissue varies spatially across the imaging field, resulting in a spatially-variant scatter distribution in the imaging field. The data generated in this study can be used to characterize the scatter contribution on a point-by-point basis, for a variety of different techniques.

  7. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, Reynolds stress anisotropy and two-dimensional density and velocity variance spectra, hypothetical chemical product formation measures, other local and global mixing parameters, and the statistical composition of mixed fluid.

  8. COMMENTS ON STRUCTURAL CONDITION ANALYSIS BASED ON STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON TRIPOD MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    depth of 50 m. Bigger size wind turbines are now designed in order to produce more electrical power thanCOMMENTS ON STRUCTURAL CONDITION ANALYSIS BASED ON STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON TRIPOD MODEL S. Opoka1, M strain can be valuable indicator of such changes. KEYWORDS : offshore support structure, wind turbine

  9. Influence of physical parameters and operating conditions for structural integrity of mechanical system subjected to squeal noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the static load and circular wave front lines for the ramp loading. Introduction Disc brake systems-linear vibrations, acoustic radiation, brake squeal, friction Abstract. This work proposes to study the effects of physical parameters and loading conditions on both dynamic and acoustic responses of a brake system

  10. Non-Mandatory Appendix C to 1910.900: Physical Work Activities and Conditions and the Ergonomic Risk Factors that may be Present.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choobineh, Fred

    Non-Mandatory Appendix C to §1910.900: Physical Work Activities and Conditions and the Ergonomic Risk Factors that may be Present. PHYSICAL WORK ACTIVITIES AND CONDITIONS ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS ACTIVITIES AND CONDITIONS ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS THAT MAY BE PRESENT (10) Workstation edges or objects press

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  12. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  13. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM); Fehler, Michael C. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Phillips, W. Scott (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  14. Reactor Measurement of theta_12; Principles, Accuracies and Physics Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Minakata; H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss reactor measurement of \\theta_{12} which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum in the absence of oscillation. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be \\simeq (50-70) km x [8 x 10^{-5} eV^2/\\Delta m^2_{21}], which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination. To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of \\sim 100 km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake, 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 4% in the experiment, we find that sin^2{\\theta_{12}} can be determined to the accuracy of \\simeq 2% (\\simeq 3%), at 68.27% CL for 1 degree of freedom, for 60 GW_th kton yr (20 GW_th kton yr) operation. We also discuss implications of such an accurate measurement of \\theta_{12}.

  15. arXiv:physics/000908727Sep2000 MEASURING AND CONTROLLING ENERGY SPREAD IN CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arXiv:physics/000908727Sep2000 MEASURING AND CONTROLLING ENERGY SPREAD IN CEBAF G. A. Krafft, J spread from a CEBAF-type machine to be relatively small; the measured energy spread from CEBAF at 4 Ge, the various subsystems contributing to the energy spread of a CEBAF-type accel- erator are reviewed, as well

  16. Measurements of Fundamental Fluid Physics of SNF Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Mc Creery, Glenn Ernest; McEligot, Donald Marinus

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the University of Idaho, Ohio State University and Clarksean Associates, this research program has the long-term goal to develop reliable predictive techniques for the energy, mass and momentum transfer plus chemical reactions in drying / passivation (surface oxidation) operations in the transfer and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from wet to dry storage. Such techniques are needed to assist in design of future transfer and storage systems, prediction of the performance of existing and proposed systems and safety (re)evaluation of systems as necessary at later dates. Many fuel element geometries and configurations are accommodated in the storage of spent nuclear fuel. Consequently, there is no one generic fuel element / assembly, storage basket or canister and, therefore, no single generic fuel storage configuration. One can, however, identify generic flow phenomena or processes which may be present during drying or passivation in SNF canisters. The objective of the INEEL tasks was to obtain fundamental measurements of these flow processes in appropriate parameter ranges.

  17. Reactor Measurement of theta_12; Principles, Accuracies and Physics Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minakata, H; Teves, W J C; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss reactor measurement of $\\theta_{12}$ which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be $\\simeq (50-60)$ km $\\times[ 8.2 \\times 10^{-5} \\text{eV}^2/\\Delta m^2_{21}]$,which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination.To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of $\\sim 100$ km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 2% in the experime...

  18. Entropy Production and Equilibrium Conditions in General-Covariant Continuum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Muschik; Horst-Heino v. Borzeszkowski

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting out with an entropy identity, the entropy flux, the entropy production and the corresponding Gibbs and Gibbs-Duhem equations of general-covariant conti\\-nuum thermodynamics are established. Non-dissipative materials and equilibria are investigated. It is proved that equilibrium conditions only put on material properties cannot generate equilibria, rather additionally, the Killing property of the 4-temperature is a necessary condition for space-times in which equilibria are possible.

  19. Assessing Long-Term Wind Conditions by Combining Different Measure-Correlate-Predict Algorithms: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Messac, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper significantly advances the hybrid measure-correlate-predict (MCP) methodology, enabling it to account for variations of both wind speed and direction. The advanced hybrid MCP method uses the recorded data of multiple reference stations to estimate the long-term wind condition at a target wind plant site. The results show that the accuracy of the hybrid MCP method is highly sensitive to the combination of the individual MCP algorithms and reference stations. It was also found that the best combination of MCP algorithms varies based on the length of the correlation period.

  20. Mass changes in NSTX Surface Layers with Li Conditioning as Measured by Quartz Microbalances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.H. Skinner, H.W. Kugel, A. L. Roquemore, PS. Krstic and A. Beste

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retention, lithium deposition, and the stability of thick deposited layers were measured by three quartz crystal microbalances (QMB) deployed in plasma shadowed areas at the upper and lower divertor and outboard midplane in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Deposition of 185 {micro}/g/cm{sup 2} over 3 months in 2007 was measured by a QMB at the lower divertor while a QMB on the upper divertor, that was shadowed from the evaporator, received an order of magnitude less deposition. During helium glow discharge conditioning both neutral gas collisions and the ionization and subsequent drift of Li{sup +} interrupted the lithium deposition on the lower divertor. We present calculations of the relevant mean free paths. Occasionally strong variations in the QMB frequency were observed of thick lithium films suggesting relaxation of mechanical stress and/or flaking or peeling of the deposited layers.

  1. Formalism for Simulation-based Optimization of Measurement Errors in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuehong Xie

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Miminizing errors of the physical parameters of interest should be the ultimate goal of any event selection optimization in high energy physics data analysis involving parameter determination. Quick and reliable error estimation is a crucial ingredient for realizing this goal. In this paper we derive a formalism for direct evaluation of measurement errors using the signal probability density function and large fully simulated signal and background samples without need for data fitting and background modelling. We illustrate the elegance of the formalism in the case of event selection optimization for CP violation measurement in B decays. The implication of this formalism on choosing event variables for data analysis is discussed.

  2. MAR-CPS: Measurable Augmented Reality for Prototyping Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    MAR-CPS: Measurable Augmented Reality for Prototyping Cyber-Physical Systems Shayegan Omidshafiei in CPSs, hardware-in-the-loop experiments are an essential step for transitioning from simulations to real in the Aerospace Controls Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This system, referred to as MAR-CPS

  3. Statistics of Met-Ocean Conditions Between West and Central Gulf of Mexico Based on Field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Lin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistics of met-ocean conditions including wind, current and wave at the location between west and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are derived based on about three year of field measurements. Two-parameter Weibull distribution has been employed...

  4. A test platform for measuring the energy efficiency of AC induction motors under various loading conditions and control schemes/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granata, John A. (John Anthony)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test platform was developed to measure and compare the energy efficiency of an AC induction motor under steady-state and cyclical loading conditions while operating in both a constant speed mode and while performing speed ...

  5. Measurements near the Atmospheric Surface Flux Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Ola

    Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10Measurements near the Atmospheric Surface Flux Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget P. Ola G. Persson,1 Christopher W. Fairall,2 Edgar L. Andreas,3 Peter S. Guest,4

  6. Atmospheric effects in astroparticle physics experiments and the challenge of ever greater precision in measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Louedec

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Astroparticle physics and cosmology allow us to scan the universe through multiple messengers. It is the combination of these probes that improves our understanding of the universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. Unlike other areas in science, research in astroparticle physics has a real originality in detection techniques, in infrastructure locations, and in the observed physical phenomenon that is not created directly by humans. It is these features that make the minimisation of statistical and systematic errors a perpetual challenge. In all these projects, the environment is turned into a detector medium or a target. The atmosphere is probably the environment component the most common in astroparticle physics and requires a continuous monitoring of its properties to minimise as much as possible the systematic uncertainties associated. This paper introduces the different atmospheric effects to take into account in astroparticle physics measurements and provides a non-exhaustive list of techniques and instruments to monitor the different elements composing the atmosphere. A discussion on the close link between astroparticle physics and Earth sciences ends this paper.

  7. On the compact HII galaxy UM 408 as seen by GMOS-IFU: Physical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagos, Patricio; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Carrasco, Eleazar R; Cuisinier, Francois; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Integral Field Unit GMOS-IFU data of the compact HII galaxy UM408, obtained at Gemini South telescope, in order to derive the spatial distribution of emission lines and line ratios, kinematics, plasma parameters, and oxygen abundances as well the integrated properties over an area of 3"x4".4(~750x1100 pc) located in the central part of the galaxy. The starburst in this area is resolved into two giant regions of ~375 and 250pc diameter, respectively. The ages of these two regions, estimated using Hb equivalent widths, suggest that they are coeval events of ~5Myr with stellar masses of ~10^4M_o. We have also used [OIII]/Hb and [SII]/Ha ratio maps to explore the excitation mechanisms in this galaxy. The Ha emission line was used to measure the radial velocity and velocity dispersion. We derived an integrated oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)=7.87 summing over all spaxels in our field of view. An average value of 12+log(O/H)=7.77 and a difference of D(O/H)=0.47 between the minimum and maximum values (7.5...

  8. Physics of collisionless scrape-off-layer plasma during normal and off-normal Tokamak operating conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a collisionless scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma in tokamak reactors is being studied to define the electron distribution function and the corresponding sheath potential between the divertor plate and the edge plasma. The collisionless model is shown to be valid during the thermal phase of a plasma disruption, as well as during the newly desired low-recycling normal phase of operation with low-density, high-temperature, edge plasma conditions. An analytical solution is developed by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for electron distribution and balance in the SOL. The solution is in good agreement with numerical studies using Monte-Carlo methods. The analytical solutions provide an insight to the role of different physical and geometrical processes in a collisionless SOL during disruptions and during the enhanced phase of normal operation over a wide range of parameters.

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53,NUMBER 1 Measurement of the mass of the T lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53,NUMBER 1 Measurement of the mass of the T lepton 1JANUARY 1996 J. Z,4 .I. Chen,5 S. J. Chen,l S. M. Chen,l Y. Chen,' Y. B. Chen,' Y. Q. Chen,' B. S. Cheng,' R. F. Cowan,e H. C. Cu&l X. Z. Cui,' H. L. Ding,' Z. Z. Du,' W. Dunwoodie,e X. L. Fan,' J. Fang, 1 C. S. Gao,' M

  10. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Making Measurements (3/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This third lecture discusses techniques important for analyses making a measurement (e.g. determining a cross section or a particle property such as its mass or lifetime) using some CDF top-quark analyses as specific examples. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  11. Non-Invasive Diagnostics for Measuring Physical Properties and Processes in High Level Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Powell; David Pfund

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research demonstrated the usefulness of tomographic techniques for determining the physical properties of slurry suspensions. Of particular interest was the measurement of the viscosity of suspensions in complex liquids and modeling these. We undertook a long rage program that used two techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonic pulsed Doppler velocimetry. Our laboratory originally developed both of these for the measurement of viscosity of complex liquids and suspensions. We have shown that the relationship between shear viscosity and shear rate can be determined over a wide range of shear rates from a single measurement. We have also demonstrated these techniques for many non-Newtonian fluids which demonstrate highly shear thinning behavior. This technique was extended to determine the yield stress with systems of interacting particles. To model complex slurries that may be found in wastes applications, we have also used complex slurries that are found in industrial applications

  12. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  13. A multi-physics, integrated approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    porosity are obtained via active gamma ray density tools. Porosity estimates are subsequently used together with resistivity measurements to provide estimates of in- situ water saturation. Formation tester measurements of multi-physics borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data. The objective is to estimate in-situ

  14. What Is a Good Linear Finite Element? Interpolation, Conditioning, Anisotropy, and Quality Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    -9875170, CMS-9980063, CCR-0204377, and EIA- 9802069, and in part by a gift from the Okawa Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 6.3 A Brief Survey of Quality Measures

  15. Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agency’s Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

  16. Effects of proton-exchange membrane fuel-cell operating conditions on charge transfer resistances measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaron, Doug S [ORNL; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are highly dependent on operating conditions, such as humidity and temperature. This study employs electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to measure the effects of operating parameters on internal proton and electron transport resistance mechanisms in the PEMFC. Current-density experiments have been performed to measure the power production in a 25 cm{sup 2} Nafion 117 PEMFC at varying operating conditions. These experiments have shown that low humidity and low temperature contribute to decreased power production. EIS is currently employed to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in power production by calculating the specific resistances at various regions in the PEMFC. Experiments are performed at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C, feed humidities from 20 to 98%, and air stoichiometric ratios from 1.33 to 2.67. In all experiments, the hydrogen feed stoichiometric ratio was approximately 4.0. EIS is used to identify which transport steps limit the power production of the PEMFC over these ranges of conditions. The experimental data are analyzed via comparison to equivalent circuit models (ECMs), a technique that uses an electrical circuit to represent the electrochemical and transport properties of the PEMFC. These studies will aid in designing fuel cells that are more tolerant to wide-ranging operating conditions. In addition, optimal operating conditions for PEMFC operation can be identified.

  17. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1 1, Shiraki, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 919-1279 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S. [Univ. of Aizu, Tsuruga, Ikki-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu-shi, Fukushima-ken, 965-8580 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  18. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science answers questions

  19. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science answers

  20. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Nonturbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; J. R. Wolf; K. P. Nolan; E. J. Walsh; R. J. Volino

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  1. Reactor Physics Measurements and Benchmark Specifications for Oak Ridge Highly Enriched Uranium Sphere (ORSphere)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an effort to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. Additionally, various material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, the delayed neutron fraction, the prompt neutron decay constant, relative fission density, and relative neutron importance were all measured. The critical assembly, material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were all evaluated as benchmark experiment measurements. The reactor physics measurements are the focus of this paper; although for clarity the critical assembly benchmark specifications are briefly discussed.

  2. Radio Frequency Phototube, Optical Clock and Precise Measurements in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amur Margaryan

    2009-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new experimental program of novel systematic studies of light hypernuclei using pionic decay was established at JLab (Study of Light Hypernuclei by Pionic Decay at JLab, JLab Experiment PR-08-012). The highlights of the proposed program include high precision measurements of binding energies of hypernuclei by using a high resolution pion spectrometer, HpiS. The average values of binding energies will be determined within an accuracy of ~10 keV or better. Therefore, the crucial point of this program is an absolute calibration of the HpiS with accuracy 10E-4 or better. The merging of continuous wave laser-based precision optical-frequency metrology with mode-locked ultrafast lasers has led to precision control of the visible frequency spectrum produced by mode-locked lasers. Such a phase-controlled mode-locked laser forms the foundation of an optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb (OFC) generator, with a regular comb of sharp lines with well defined frequencies. Combination of this technique with a recently developed radio frequency (RF) phototube results in a new tool for precision time measurement. We are proposing a new time-of-flight (TOF) system based on an RF phototube and OFC technique. The proposed TOF system achieves 10 fs instability level and opens new possibilities for precise measurements in nuclear physics such as an absolute calibration of magnetic spectrometers within accuracy 10E-4 - 10E-5.

  3. Reactor Physics Measurements and Benchmark Specifications for Oak Ridge Highly Enriched Uranium Sphere (ORSphere)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an effort to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with themore »GODIVA I experiments. Additionally, various material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, the delayed neutron fraction, the prompt neutron decay constant, relative fission density, and relative neutron importance were all measured. The critical assembly, material reactivity worths, the surface material worth coefficient, and the delayed neutron fraction were all evaluated as benchmark experiment measurements. The reactor physics measurements are the focus of this paper; although for clarity the critical assembly benchmark specifications are briefly discussed.« less

  4. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5and PM10mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regional sources are characterized by pollutionmore »transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  5. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision,4newsSolarrdPhysicistsPhysics

  6. Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL ELECTRIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL pertur- bations by sheath accumulation. Non-intrusive mea- surements of the electric fields through for the non- perturbative measurement of the axial electric fields in glow discharges. The A `n, + X I&+ (4

  7. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

  8. ORSPHERE: PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files” (Reference 1). While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0.0001 inches), masses (±0.01 g), and material data. The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. Two, correlated spheres were evaluated and judged to be acceptable as criticality benchmark experiments. This evaluation is given in HEU-MET-FAST-100. The second, smaller sphere was used for additional reactor physics measurements. Worth measurements (Reference 1, 2, 3 and 4), the delayed neutron fraction (Reference 3, 4 and 5) and surface material worth coefficient (Reference 1 and 2) are all measured and judged to be acceptable as benchmark data. The prompt neutron decay (Reference 6), relative fission density (Reference 7) and relative neutron importance (Reference 7) were measured, but are not evaluated. Information for the evaluation was compiled from References 1 through 7, the experimental logbooks 8 and 9 ; additional drawings and notes provided by the experimenter; and communication with the lead experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  9. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Roger J. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B{sub pol} diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and B{sub ||} along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n{sub e}B{sub ||} product and higher n{sub e} and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  10. Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobos, Douglas Russell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. 6 mm LD. Teflon tubing (Cole Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL) at a rate of 0. 5 L/min before reaching the 100T. Wind data from the sonic anemometer were output 123 ms after wind velocity was measured. This delay combined with other... proper separation of updrafls and downdrafts (McInnes et al. 1998). Afler separation, the samples were filtered (Acro 50, Gelman Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI) before being routed through 12 mm I. D. Bev IV tubing (Cole Parmer Instrument Company...

  11. Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

  12. The AMS Measurements and Its Applications in Nuclear Physics at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Shan; Shen Hongtao; He Ming; Dong Kejun; He Guozhu; Wang Xianggao; Yuan Jian; Wang Wei; Wu Shaoyong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-80, Beijing 102413 (China); Ruan Xiangdong; Wu Weimin [College of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), initiated in late 1970s at McMaster university based on the accelerator and detector technique, has long been applied in the studies on archaeology, geology, and cosmology, as a powerful tool for isotope dating. The advantages of AMS in the analysis of rare nuclides by direct counting of the atoms, small sample size and relatively free from the interferences of molecular ions have been well documented. This paper emphasizes that AMS can not only be used for archaeology, geology, environment, biology and so on, but also served as a unique tool for nuclear physics research. In this paper, the determination of the half-lives of {sup 79}Se, the measurements of the cross-sections of {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92g}Nb and {sup 238}U(n,3n){sup 236}U reactions, the detection and determination of ultratrace impurities in neutrino detector materials, and the measurement of the fission product nuclide {sup 126}Sn, are to be introduced, as some of examples of AMS applications in nuclear research conducted in AMS lab of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Searching for superheavy nuclides by using AMS is being planned.

  13. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedt, J.-M [SENSeOR, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France); Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  14. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. (A. Ahistrom Corp., Varkaus (Finland)); Hupa, M. (Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

  15. Radiological Survey of Contaminated Installations of Research Reactor before Dismantling in High Dose Conditions with Complex for Remote Measurements of Radioactivity - 12069

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovich, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Lemus, Alexey; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the research reactors MR (Testing Reactor) and RFT (Reactor of Physics and Technology) has recently been initiated in the National Research Center (NRC) 'Kurchatov institute', Moscow. These research reactors have a long history and many installations - nine loop facilities for experiments with different kinds of fuel. When decommissioning nuclear facilities it is necessary to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination in the rooms and at the equipment at high levels of background radiation. At 'Kurchatov Institute' some special remote control measuring systems were developed and they are applied during dismantling of the reactors MR and RFT. For a survey of high-level objects a radiometric system mounted on the robotic Brokk vehicle is used. This system has two (4? and collimated) dose meters and a high resolution video camera. Maximum measured dose rate for this system is ?8.5 Sv/h. To determine the composition of contaminants, a portable spectrometric system is used. It is a remotely controlled, collimated detector for scanning the distribution of radioactive contamination. To obtain a detailed distribution of contamination a remote-controlled gamma camera is applied. For work at highly contaminated premises with non-uniform background radiation, another camera is equipped with rotating coded mask (coded aperture imaging). As a result, a new system of instruments for remote radioactivity measurements with wide range of sensitivity and angular resolution was developed. The experience and results of measurements in different areas of the reactor and at its loop installations, with emphasis on the radioactive survey of highly-contaminated samples, are presented. These activities are conducted under the Federal Program for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of Russia. Adaptation of complex remote measurements of radioactivity and survey of contaminated installations of research reactor before dismantling in high dose conditions has proven successful. The radioactivity measuring devices for operation at high, non-uniform dose background were tested in the field and a new data of measurement of contamination distribution in the premises and installations were obtained. (authors)

  16. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  17. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  18. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these experiments were of particular importance because they provide extensive information which can be directly applied to the design of large LMFBR’s. It should be recognized that the data presented in the initial report were evaluated only to the extent necessary to ensure that adequate data were obtained. Later reports provided further interpretation and detailed comparisons with prediction techniques. The conclusion of the isothermal physics measurements was that the FFTF nuclear characteristics were essentially as designed and all safety requirements were satisfied. From a nuclear point of view, the FFTF was qualified to proceed into power operation mode. The FFTF was completed in 1978 and first achieved criticality on February 9, 1980. Upon completion of the isothermal physics and reactor characterization programs, the FFTF operated for ten years from April 1982 to April 1992. Reactor operations of the FFTF were terminated and the reactor facility was then defueled, deactivated, and placed into cold standby condition. Deactivation of the reactor was put on hold from 1996 to 2000 while the U.S. Department of Energy examined alternative uses for the FFTF but then announced the permanent deactivation of the FFTF in December 2001. Its core support basket was later drilled in May 2005, so as to remove all remaining sodium coolant. On April 17, 2006, the American Nuclear Society designated the FFTF as a “National Nuclear Historic Landmark”.

  19. ARM - Measurement - Surface condition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse

  20. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as possible improvements. Only one of these modifications provided improved results. This modification requires measuring the duct pressure relative to the house at either every pressure station within the Delta-Q test or at the extremes of the house pressure range involved in the Delta-Q test. If the pressures are only measured at the extremes, then calculated pressures at the other pressure stations are obtained via interpolation. Using these pressures reduced the bias in the Delta-Q test by about one-third.

  1. An evaluation of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term exposure levels of benzene under field conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Mark Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring I (OVMI) Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term benzene exposures under field conditions. In general, a diffusive badge is a device which...

  2. Measured Impact on Space Conditioning Energy Use in a Residence Due to Operating a Heat Pump Water Heater inside the Conditioned Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on space conditioning energy use due to operating a heat pump water heater (HPWH) inside the conditioned space is analyzed based on 2010-2011 data from a research house with simulated occupancy and hot water use controls. The 2700 ft2 (345 m2) house is located in Oak Ridge, TN (mixed-humid climate) and is equipped with a 50 gallon (189 l) HPWH that provided approximately 55 gallons/d (208 l/d) of hot water at 120 F (46 C) to the house during the test period. The HPWH has been operated every other week from December 2010 through November 2011 in two modes; a heat pump only mode, and a standard mode that utilizes 15355 Btu/hr (4500 W) resistance heating elements. The energy consumption of the air-source heat pump (ASHP) that provides space conditioning for the house is compared for the two HPWH operating modes with weather effects taken into account. Impacts during the heating and cooling seasons are compared.

  3. The application of size- resolved hygroscopicity measurements to understand the physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santarpia, Joshua Lee

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF SIZE-RESOLVED HYGROSCOPICITY MEASUREMENTS TO UNDERSTANDING THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved...

  4. Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

  5. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUD CORE DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) IN CORONA AUSTRALIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.; Whittet, D. C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)] [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Harju, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500, Piikkioe (Finland)] [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500, Piikkioe (Finland); Juvela, M.; Sipilae, O. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)] [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Hotzel, S., E-mail: hardee@rpi.edu [Observatory, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1, 1-0) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct comparison to the dust component of the cloud core and provide evidence for gas phase depletion of CO at the highest extinctions. The dust color temperature in the core calculated from Herschel maps ranges from roughly 10.7 to 14.0 K. This range agrees with the previous determinations from Infrared Space Observatory and Planck observations. The column density profile of the core can be fitted with a Plummer-like density distribution approaching n(r) {approx} r {sup -2} at large distances. The core structure deviates clearly from a critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Instead, the core appears to be gravitationally bound and to lack thermal and turbulent support against the pressure of the surrounding low-density material: it may therefore be in the process of slow contraction. We test two chemical models and find that a steady-state depletion model agrees with the observed C{sup 18}O column density profile and the observed N(C{sup 18}O) versus A{sub V} relationship.

  6. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison to physical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Stephanie M., E-mail: Stephanie.Leon@uth.tmc.edu; Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Brateman, Libby F. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the goal of verifying previously published physical measurements characterizing scatter as a function of apparent thickness. A secondary goal was to provide a way of determining what effect tissue glandularity might have on the scatter characteristics of breast tissue. The overall reason for characterizing mammography scatter in this research is the application of these data to an image processing-based scatter-correction program. Methods: MCNPX was used to simulate scatter from an infinitesimal pencil beam using typical mammography geometries and techniques. The spreading of the pencil beam was characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and the presence or absence of a grid. The SF was determined by separating scatter and primary by the angle of incidence on the detector, then finding the ratio of the measured scatter to the total number of detected events. The accuracy of the MRE was determined by placing ring-shaped tallies around the impulse and fitting those data to the point-spread function (PSF) equation using the value for MRE derived from the physical measurements. The goodness-of-fit was determined for each data set as a means of assessing the accuracy of the physical MRE data. The effect of breast glandularity on the SF, MRE, and apparent tissue thickness was also considered for a limited number of techniques. Results: The agreement between the physical measurements and the results of the Monte Carlo simulations was assessed. With a grid, the SFs ranged from 0.065 to 0.089, with absolute differences between the measured and simulated SFs averaging 0.02. Without a grid, the range was 0.28–0.51, with absolute differences averaging ?0.01. The goodness-of-fit values comparing the Monte Carlo data to the PSF from the physical measurements ranged from 0.96 to 1.00 with a grid and 0.65 to 0.86 without a grid. Analysis of the data suggested that the nongrid data could be better described by a biexponential function than the single exponential used here. The simulations assessing the effect of breast composition on SF and MRE showed only a slight impact on these quantities. When compared to a mix of 50% glandular/50% adipose tissue, the impact of substituting adipose or glandular breast compositions on the apparent thickness of the tissue was about 5%. Conclusions: The findings show agreement between the physical measurements published previously and the Monte Carlo simulations presented here; the resulting data can therefore be used more confidently for an application such as image processing-based scatter correction. The findings also suggest that breast composition does not have a major impact on the scatter characteristics of breast tissue. Application of the scatter data to the development of a scatter-correction software program can be simplified by ignoring the variations in density among breast tissues.

  7. Comparison of 13CO Line and Far-Infrared Continuum Emission as a Diagnostic of Dust and Molecular Gas Physical Conditions: III. Systematic Effects and Scientific Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Wall

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Far-infrared continuum data from the {\\it COBE}/{\\it DIRBE} instrument were combined with Nagoya 4-m $\\cOone$ spectral line data to infer the multiparsec-scale physical conditions in the Orion$ $A and B molecular clouds, using 140$\\um$/240$\\um$ dust color temperatures and the 240$\\um$/$\\cOone$ intensity ratios. In theory, the ratio of far-IR, submillimeter, or millimeter continuum to that of a $\\cO$ (or $\\Co$) rotational line can place reliable upper limits on the temperature of the dust and molecular gas on multi-parsec scales; on such scales, both the line and continuum emission are optically thin, resulting in a continuum-to-line ratio that suffers no loss of temperature sensitivity in the high-temperature limit as occurs for ratios of CO rotational lines or ratios of continuum emission in different wavelength bands. Two-component models fit the Orion data best, where one has a fixed-temperature and the other has a spatially varying temperature. The former represents gas and dust towards the surface of the clouds that are heated primarily by a very large-scale (i.e. $\\sim 1 $kpc) interstellar radiation field. The latter represents gas and dust at greater depths into the clouds and are shielded from this interstellar radiation field and heated by local stars. The inferred physical conditions are consistent with those determined from previously observed maps of $\\COone$ and $\\Jtwo$ that cover the entire Orion$ $A and B molecular clouds. The models require that the dust-gas temperature difference is 0$\\pm 2 $K. If this surprising result applies to much of the Galactic ISM, except in unusual regions such as the Galactic Center, then there are a number implications.

  8. Title of Dissertation: STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF MEASUREMENT AND UNCERTAINTY IN THE PHYSICS LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF MEASUREMENT AND UNCERTAINTY Lippmann, Doctor of Philosophy, 2003 Dissertation directed by: Professor Edward F. Redish Department CONSTRUCTION, UNDERLYING CONCEPTS, AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS by Rebecca Faith Lippmann Dissertation submitted

  9. Tar sand extraction by steam stimulation and steam drive: measurement of physical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linberg, W.R.

    1980-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the following thermophysical properties of Utah tar sands is in progress: thermal conductivity, specific heat relative permeability, and viscosity (of the recovered bitumen). During the report period (October 1, 1978 to November 1, 1979), experimental procedures have been developed and a basic data set has been measured. Additionally, standard core analysis has been performed for four drill sites in the Asphalt Ridge, Utah area.

  10. Probe of New Physics using Precision Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Aboubrahim; Tarek Ibrahim; Pran Nath

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the electron is determined experimentally with an accuracy of $2.8\\times 10^{-13}$ and the uncertainty may decrease by an order of magnitude in the future. While the current data is in excellent agreement with the standard model, the possible future improvement in the error in $\\Delta a_e= a_e^{\\text{exp}}- a_e^{\\text{theory}}$ has recently drawn interest in the electron anomalous magnetic moment as a possible probe of new physics beyond the standard model. In this work we give an analysis of such physics in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a vector multiplet. In the extended model the electroweak contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron include loop diagrams involving in addition to the exchange of W and Z, the exchange of charginos, sneutrinos and mirror sneutrinos, and the exchange of neutralinos, sleptons and mirror sleptons. The analysis shows that a contribution to the electron magnetic moment much larger than expected by $m_e^2/m_\\mu^2$ scaling of the deviation of the muon anomalous magnetic moment over the standard model prediction, i.e., $\\Delta a_\\mu = 3 \\times 10^{-9}$ as given by the Brookhaven experiment, can be gotten within the MSSM extension. Effects of CP violating phases in the extended MSSM model on the corrections to the supersymmetric electroweak contributions to $a_e$ are also investigated. The analysis points to the possibility of detection of new physics effects with modest improvement on the error in $\\Delta a_e= a_e^{\\text{exp}} - a_e^{\\text{theory}}$.

  11. Physical measurements of the mohair fleece as related to age, location and season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Howard Orrell

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEW OF LITERATURE No research has been done in Texas since 1935 to de- termine the effects of age, season of shearing or loca- tion where grown on the physical fleece characteris- tics of the Angora goat. Lush and Jones (1924. ) and Jones et al.... (1935) reported results of detailed studies on the effect oi' age, fertility and sex, length and fineness of locks, clean weight of fleece and type of locks in mohair production. Due to many years of selec- tive breeding, it is probable that the type...

  12. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  13. Measuring the impact of an instructional laboratory on the learning of introductory physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieman, Carl

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the impact of taking an associated lab course on the scores on final exam questions in two large introductory physics courses. Approximately a third of the students who completed each course also took an accompanying instructional lab course. The lab courses were fairly conventional, although they focused on supporting the mastery of a subset of the introductory physics topics covered in the associated course. Performance between students who did and did not take the lab course was compared using final exam questions from the associated courses that related to concepts from the lab courses. The population of students who took the lab in each case was somewhat different from those who did not enroll in the lab course in terms of background and major. Those differences were taken into account by normalizing their performance on the lab-related questions with scores on the exam questions that did not involve material covered in the lab. When normalized in this way, the average score on lab-relat...

  14. Top Quark Physics: Future Measurements R. Frey, D. Gerdes, J. Jaros, S. Vejcik, E. Berger, R. S. Chivukula, F. Cuypers, P. Drell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Raymond E.

    Top Quark Physics: Future Measurements R. Frey, D. Gerdes, J. Jaros, S. Vejcik, E. Berger, R. S discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize mea­ surements of the top quark's mass

  15. Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions in South Florida and its possible impacts on the number of Asthma cases: Five years of correlations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions, wind speed and direction), and air quality indicators (ozone O3 and particulate matter PM2.5) are presented in this study. Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter have been both important triggers of asthma

  16. METHOD FOR SIMULTANEOUS 90SR AND 137CS IN-VIVO MEASUREMENTS OF SMALL ANIMALS AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA DEVELOPED FOR THE CONDITIONS OF THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To perform in vivo simultaneous measurements of the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs content in the bodies of animals living in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ), an appropriate method and equipment were developed and installed in a mobile gamma beta spectrometry laboratory. This technique was designed for animals of relatively small sizes (up to 50 g). The {sup 90}Sr content is measured by a beta spectrometer with a 0.1 mm thick scintillation plastic detector. The spectrum processing takes into account the fact that the measured object is 'thick-layered' and contains a comparable quantity of {sup 137}Cs, which is a characteristic condition of the ChEZ. The {sup 137}Cs content is measured by a NaI scintillation detector that is part of the combined gamma beta spectrometry system. For environmental research performed in the ChEZ, the advantages of this method and equipment (rapid measurements, capability to measure live animals directly in their habitat, and the capability of simultaneous {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs measurements) far outweigh the existing limitations (considerations must be made for background radiation and the animal size, skeletal shape and body mass). The accuracy of these in vivo measurements is shown to be consistent with standard spectrometric and radiochemical methods. Apart from the in vivo measurements, the proposed methodology, after a very simple upgrade that is also described in the article, works even more accurately with samples of other media, such as soil and plants.

  17. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the U.S. Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L. [ed.] [comp.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McLane, V. [ed.] [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the Us and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  18. Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

  19. Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow and Inclined Wellbore Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 30975 Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow, 163245 SPEUT. Abstract Pressure drop prediction in pipes is an old petroleum engineering problem. There is a long history of attempts to develop empirical correlations to predict the pressure drop in pipes. Some

  20. Comparison of 13CO Line and Far-Infrared Continuum Emission as a Diagnostic of Dust and Molecular Gas Physical Conditions: I. Motivation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Wall

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining temperatures in molecular clouds from ratios of CO rotational lines or from ratios of continuum emission in different wavelength bands suffers from reduced temperature sensitivity in the high-temperature limit. In theory, the ratio of far-IR, submillimeter, or millimeter continuum to that of a 13CO (or C18O) rotational line can place reliable upper limits on the temperature of the dust and molecular gas. Consequently, far-infrared continuum data from the {\\it COBE}/{\\it DIRBE} instrument and Nagoya 4-m $\\cOone$ spectral line data were used to plot 240$\\um$/13CO J=1-0 intensity ratios against 140$\\um$/240$\\um$ dust color temperatures, allowing us to constrain the multiparsec-scale physical conditions in the Orion$ $A and B molecular clouds. The best-fitting models to the Orion clouds consist of two components: a component near the surface of the clouds that is heated primarily by a very large-scale (i.e. $\\sim 1 $kpc) interstellar radiation field and a component deeper within the clouds. The former has a fixed temperature and the latter has a range of temperatures that varies from one sightline to another. The models require a dust-gas temperature difference of 0$\\pm 2 $K and suggest that 40-50% of the Orion clouds are in the form of dust and gas with temperatures between 3 and 10$ $K. These results have a number implications that are discussed in detail in later papers. These include stronger dust-gas thermal coupling and higher Galactic-scale molecular gas temperatures than are usually accepted, an improved explanation for the N(H$_2$)/I(CO) conversion factor, and ruling out one dust grain alignment mechanism.

  1. Security Conditions

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice ensures that DOE uniformly meets the requirements of the Homeland Security Advisory System outlined in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-3, Threat Conditions and Associated Protective Measures, dated 3-11-02, and provides responses specified in Presidential Decision Directive 39, U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism (U), dated 6-21-95. It cancels DOE N 473.8, Security Conditions, dated 8-7-02. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels DOE N 473.8

  2. MEASUREMENT AND BASIC PHYSICS COMMITTEE OF THE U.S. CROSS-SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, ANNUAL REPORT 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH,D.L.; MCLANE,V.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. Its main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF, as well as periodic modifications and updates to the file, are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the US Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the US nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the US and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  3. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  4. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to measurements.Conclusions: Lateral penumbra of uniform scanning proton beams depends on air gap, proton range, compensator thickness, and depth, whereas lateral penumbra is not dependent on modulation. The XiO TPS typically overpredicted lateral penumbra compared to measurements, within 1 mm for most cases, but the difference could be up to 2.5 mm at a deep depth and large air gap.

  5. In-situ microscale through-silicon via strain measurements by synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction exploring the physics behind data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xi [The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Thadesar, Paragkumar A.; Oh, Hanju; Bakir, Muhannad S. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Taylor, Christine L.; Sitaraman, Suresh K. [The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ microscale thermomechanical strain measurements have been performed in combination with synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction to understand the fundamental cause of failures in microelectronics devices with through-silicon vias. The physics behind the raster scan and data analysis of the measured strain distribution maps is explored utilizing the energies of indexed reflections from the measured data and applying them for beam intensity analysis and effective penetration depth determination. Moreover, a statistical analysis is performed for the beam intensity and strain distributions along the beam penetration path to account for the factors affecting peak search and strain refinement procedure.

  6. Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 59, No. 2, August 2011, pp. 16491653 Fission Physics and Cross Section Measurements with a Lead Slowing down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    and Cross Section Measurements with a Lead Slowing down Spectrometer Y. Danon, R. Block (emeritus), J) A Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) provides a high neutron flux environment that en- ables to be adjusted. PACS numbers: 25.40.-h, 25.85.Ec Keywords: ND2010, Nuclear data, Lead slowing down spectrometer

  7. Objectively measured sedentary time, physical activity and kidney function in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, V. Y. W.; Brage, S.; Ekelund, U.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during the day, which might lead to misclassification of sleep time as sedentary time and vice versa. Also, participants may mis-report sleep duration. A more precise measure of sleep duration, such as polysomnography recording biophysiological changes... physical activity and kidney function over four-years in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Individuals (120 women and 206 men) participating in the ADDITION-Plus trial underwent assessment of sedentary time (SED-time), time spent in moderate...

  8. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: fuel temperature measurements under imposed dry storage conditions (I kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spent fuel assembly temperature test under imposed dry storage conditions was conducted at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site in support of spent fuel dry storage technology development. This document presents the test data and results obtained from an approximately 1.0 kW decay heat level PWR spent fuel assembly. A spent fuel test apparatus was designed to utilize a representative stainless steel spent fuel canister, a canister lid containing internal temperature instrumentation to measure fuel cladding temperatures, and a carbon steel liner that encloses the canister and lid. Electrical heaters along the liner length, on the lid, and below the canister are used to impose dry storage canister temperature profiles. Temperature instrumentation is provided on the liner and canister. The liner and canister are supported by a test stand in one of the large hot cells (West Process Cell) inside E-MAD. Fuel temperature measurements have been performed using imposed canister temperature profiles from the electrically heated and spent fuel drywell tests being conducted at E-MAD as well as for four constant canister temperature profiles, each with a vacuum, helium and air backfill. Computer models have been utilized in conjunction with the test to predict the thermal response of the fuel cladding. Computer predictions are presented, and they show good agreement with the test data.

  9. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  10. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  11. Physical properties of SRC-I slurries under preheater conditions. Final report. [300 to 728/sup 0/K; 150, 1000, and 2500 psig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.D.; Gibson, M.R.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant Project, rheological and density measurements have been made on recycle solvent made from Kentucky No. 9 coal and on slurries of recycle solvent and Kentucky No. 9 coal at a 1.6 solvent/coal ratio. The measurements were taken at temperatures of 300 to 728/sup 0/K (80 to 850/sup 0/F) and pressures of atmospheric, 1.14 MPa (150 psig), 7.00 MPa (1000 psig), and 17.34 MPa (2500 psig). These calculations are required for preheater and feed pump design of coal demonstration plants and, in particular, by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) for the SRC-I demonstration plant design effort. The determinations were made in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Coal Liquids Flow System (CLFS).

  12. Comparison of 13CO Line and Far-Infrared Continuum Emission as a Diagnostic of Dust and Molecular Gas Physical Conditions: II. The Simulations: Testing the Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Wall

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability of modeling the far-IR continuum to 13CO J=1-0 spectral line ratios applied to the Orion clouds (Wall 2006) is tested by applying the models to simulated data. The two-component models are found to give the dust-gas temperature difference, $\\DT$, to within 1 or 2$ $K. However, other parameters like the column density per velocity interval and the gas density can be wrong by an order of magnitude or more. In particular, the density can be systematically underestimated by an order of magnitude or more. The overall mass of the clouds is estimated correctly to within a few percent. The one-component models estimate the column density per velocity interval and density within factors of 2 or 3, but their estimates of $\\DT$ can be wrong by 20$ $K. They also underestimate the mass of the clouds by 40-50%. These results may permit us to reliably constrain estimates of the Orion clouds' physical parameters, based on the real observations of the far-IR continuum and 13CO J=1-0 spectral line. Nevertheless, other systematics must be treated first. These include the effects of background/foreground subtraction, effects of the HI component of the ISM, and others. These will be discussed in a future paper (Wall 2006a).

  13. Twilight for the energy conditions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Twilight for the energy conditions? Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (CAB, Madrid) Marcel Grossmann 9 Roma July 2000 #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general relativity per- mit one to deduce very powerful and general theorems. However, the energy conditions are now

  14. Energy conditions and their implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Energy conditions and their implications Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (Los Alamos) Midwest Relativity 9 November 1999. #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general- itational #12;elds and cosmological geometries. However, the energy conditions are beginning to look a lot

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014607 (2010) Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    , and Nuclear Engineering, NES 1-25, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA 2 Los Alamos National Lab, Los; published 19 January 2010) A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are necessary for accurate, detailed neutronics calculations for new

  16. BAR-CODE BASED WEIGHT MEASUREMENT STATION FOR PHYSICAL INVENTORY TAKING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTAINERS AT THE MINING AND CHEMICAL COMBINE RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING PLANT NEAR KRASNOYARSK, SIBERIA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUDA,S.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the technical tasks being implemented to computerize the physical inventory taking (PIT) at the Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK) radiochemical plant under the US/Russian cooperative nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) program. Under the MPC and A program, Lab-to-Lab task agreements with GKhK were negotiated that involved computerized equipment for item verification and confirmatory measurement of the Pu containers. Tasks under Phase I cover the work for demonstrating the plan and procedures for carrying out the comparison of the Pu container identification on the container with the computerized inventory records. In addition to the records validation, the verification procedures include the application of bar codes and bar coded TIDs to the Pu containers. Phase II involves the verification of the Pu content. A plan and procedures are being written for carrying out confirmatory measurements on the Pu containers.

  17. Topological Performance Measures as Surrogates for Physical Flow Models for Risk and Vulnerability Analysis for Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaRocca, Sarah; Hassel, Henrik; Guikema, Seth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructure systems must be both robust and resilient in order to ensure the functioning of society. To improve the performance of such systems, we often use risk and vulnerability analysis to find and address system weaknesses. A critical component of such analyses is the ability to accurately determine the negative consequences of various types of failures in the system. Numerous mathematical and simulation models exist which can be used to this end. However, there are relatively few studies comparing the implications of using different modeling approaches in the context of comprehensive risk analysis of critical infrastructures. Thus in this paper, we suggest a classification of these models, which span from simple topologically-oriented models to advanced physical flow-based models. Here, we focus on electric power systems and present a study aimed at understanding the tradeoffs between simplicity and fidelity in models used in the context of risk analysis. Specifically, the purpose of this pa...

  18. Physics Division: Subatomic Physics Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subatomic Physics Physics home Subatomic Physics Site Home About Us Groups Applied Modern Physics, P-21 Neutron Science and Technology, P-23 Plasma Physics, P-24 Subatomic...

  19. Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

  20. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  1. Effect of test conditions and sample configuration on the AMTEC electrode/electrolyte characteristics measurements in the Sodium Exposure Test Cell experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azimov, Ulughbek Bakhadirovich

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %) on the measurements at typical AMTEC operating temperatures. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and controlled potential current-voltage curves (iV curves) techniques were used to determine these characteristics....

  2. Measurement of the rotational distribution for the OD product from the reaction ND3 D2O~ND4 OD under translationally thermal conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Measurement of the rotational distribution for the OD product from the reaction ND3 D2O~ND4 OD The state-to-state ion-molecule reaction ND3 2 1 D2OND4 OD(v 0,N) is investigated. A slowly flowing, 2 product buildup, the rotational distribution of the OD(v 0) product is measured by recording the OD A2 X2

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 20300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 20300 General Physics Designation: Required Undergraduate Catalog description: For majors in the life sciences (biology, medicine, dentistry, psychology, physical therapy) and for liberal arts students. Fundamental ideas and laws of physics from mechanics to modern

  4. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32100 Modern Physics for Engineers Designation to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students

  5. Final Report: Measurements of Core Conditions, Implosion Symmetry, and Anomaloes Acceleration Mechanisms on Omega through Charged Particle Spectroscopy, November 1, 1997 - December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrasso, R.; Li, C.K.

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This work concerns the first spectroscopic measurements of energetic charged particles on Omega. Individual line profiles include D-3He protons (14.7 MeV) and alphas (3.6 MeV), D-T alphas (3.5 MeV), D-D protons (3.0 MeV), and D-D tutons (1.0 MeV)

  6. A Resilient Condition Assessment Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An architecture and supporting methods are presented for the implementation of a resilient condition assessment monitoring system that can adaptively accommodate both cyber and physical anomalies to a monitored system under observation. In particular, the architecture includes three layers: information, assessment, and sensor selection. The information layer estimates probability distributions of process variables based on sensor measurements and assessments of the quality of sensor data. Based on these estimates, the assessment layer then employs probabilistic reasoning methods to assess the plant health. The sensor selection layer selects sensors so that assessments of the plant condition can be made within desired time periods. Resilient features of the developed system are then illustrated by simulations of a simplified power plant model, where a large portion of the sensors are under attack.

  7. 2300 SYSTEM Conditioning Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    2300 SYSTEM Signal Conditioning Amplifier 2310 Instruction Manual Vishay Micro-Measurements P date of shipment. Coverage of computers, cameras, rechargeable batteries, and similar items, sold on non-rechargeable batteries and similar consumable items is limited to the delivery of goods free from

  8. Greg Nelson traveled to the Institute of Physics in Zagreb, Croatia, for a seven week period in the summer of 2005. His research plan was to measure the thermopower and resistivity at low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freericks, Jim

    Greg Nelson traveled to the Institute of Physics in Zagreb, Croatia, for a seven week period corresponded to TaxN with x=.5, .6, .7, .8, 1. When in Croatia, he worked directly with Dr. Miroslav Ocko resistivity(triangles) and resistivity at 4.2 K(squares), with open symbols showing measurements from Croatia

  9. These guidelines were approved in June 2011 by the Williams College Board of Trustees. In 1991, the College's physical plant measured 1.9 million square feet; by 2007 it had grown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    These guidelines were approved in June 2011 by the Williams College Board of Trustees. Background In 1991, the College's physical plant measured 1.9 million square feet; by 2007 it had grown about 24 projects support emissions reduction goals. About the Building Guidelines These guidelines address

  10. Building America Webinar: Retrofitting Central Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: Retrofitting Central Space Conditioning Strategies for Multifamily Buildings - Steam Systems, Retrofit Measure Packages, Hydronic Systems Building America Webinar:...

  11. Measurement of porosity in a composite high explosive as a function of pressing conditions by ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mang, Joseph Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hjelm, Rex P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) with contrast variation to measure the porosity (voids and binder-filled regions) in a composite high explosive, PBX 9501, formulated with a deuterated binder. Little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 10,000 and 29,000 psi at 90 C. Five samples were prepared at each pressure that differed in the fraction of deuterated binder, facilitating variation of the neutron scattering length density contrast ({Delta}{rho}) and thus, the resolution of microstructural details. The sample composition was determined by calculation of the Porod Invariant as a function of {Delta}{rho} and compared with compositional estimates obtained from the bulk sample density. Structural modeling of the USANS data, at different levels of contrast, assuming both spherical and cylindrical morphologies, allowed the mean size and size distribution of voids and binder-filled regions to be determined. A decrease in the mean diameter of binder-filled regions was found with increasing pressing intensity, while the mean void diameter showed no significant change.

  12. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  13. @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

  14. Mineralogy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Jinfu (CIW)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 85, 043820 (2012) Absolute measurement of the transient optical nonlinearity in N2, O2, N2O, and Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    harmonic generation and attosecond physics [1], femtosecond filamentation [2], and pulse compression [3 by a time-domain Raman response function R(t). The total nonlinear index of refraction, to second order

  16. Physics at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grahame A. Blair

    2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics at a 500-800 GeV electron positron linear collider, TESLA, is reviewed. The machine parameters that impact directly on the physics are discussed and a few key performance goals for a detector at TESLA are given. Emphasis is placed on precision measurements in the Higgs and top sectors and on extrapolation to high energy scales in the supersymmetric scenario.

  17. Physics 554 Astronomy 510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Physics 554 Astronomy 510 Nuclear Astrophysics Winter 2004 Chapter 1 Big Bang Nucleosynthesis 1 universe comes from nuclear physics, the elemental abundances we can measure on the sun's surface by mass are 1 H 0.75 4 He 0.25 We will see that these elements owe their abundances primarily to nuclear

  18. Tevatron top physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeannine Wagner-Kuhr; for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of the most recent results on top quark physics obtained at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, is presented. Measurements of the top pair and single top quark production cross sections, the investigation of top quark decay properties, the precision measurement of the top quark mass as well as searches for physics beyond the standard model are discussed.

  19. Energy conditions and supernovae observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, C.P. 1641, 59072-970 Natal - RN (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Reboucas, M. J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general relativity, the energy conditions are invoked to restrict general energy-momentum tensors T{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} on physical grounds. We show that in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) approach to cosmological modeling where the equation of state of the cosmological fluid is unknown, the energy conditions provide model-independent bounds on the behavior of the distance modulus of cosmic sources as a function of the redshift. We use both the gold and the legacy samples of current type Ia supenovae to carry out a model-independent analysis of the energy conditions violation in the context of standard cosmology.

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 42200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 42200 Biophysics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog and membranes. In depth study of the physical basis of selected systems including vision, nerve transmission. Prerequisites: Prereq.: 1 yr. of Math, 1 yr. of Physics (elective for Physics Majors and Biomedical Engineering

  1. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32300 Quantum Mechanics for Engineers Designation: required for Physics majors in the Applied Physics Option Undergraduate Catalog description: Basic experiments, wave: Physics 20700 and 20800, Math 39100 and Math 39200 Textbook and other suggested material: Scherrer

  2. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  3. Top Physics at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Seong Moon

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb$^{-1}$ of $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  4. Top Physics at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Barisonzi

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider LHC is a top quark factory: due to its high design luminosity, LHC will produce about 200 millions of top quarks per year of operation. The large amount of data will allow to study with great precision the properties of the top quark, most notably cross-section, mass and spin. The Top Physics Working Group has been set up at the ATLAS experiment, to evaluate the precision reach of physics measurements in the top sector, and to study the systematic effects of the ATLAS detector on such measurements. This reports give an overview of the main activities of the ATLAS Top Physics Working Group in 2004.

  5. Accelerator structure bead pull measurement at SLAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, J R; Miller, R H; Wang, J W

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave measurement and tuning of accelerator structures are important issues for the current and next generation of high energy physics machines. Application of these measurements both before and after high power processing can reveal information about the structure but may be misinterpreted if measurement conditions are not carefully controlled. For this reason extensive studies to characterize the microwave measurements at have been made at SLAC. For the beadpull a reproducible measurement of less than 1 degree of phase accuracy in total phase drift is needed in order to resolve issues such as phase changes due to structure damage during high power testing. Factors contributing to measurement errors include temperature drift, mechanical vibration, and limitations of measurement equipment such as the network analyzer. Results of this continuing effort will be presented.

  6. Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 55, No. 4, October 2009, pp. 13891393 Measurements of the Neutron Scattering Spectrum from 238

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    of the Neutron Scattering Spectrum from 238 U and Comparison of the Results with a Calculation at the 36.68-e, in final form 22 July 2009) Neutrons elastically scattered from 238 U were measured in the neutron energy neutrons were measured at 25.5 m from the U sample by using a 6 Li detector, and the scattering direction

  7. Physics of advanced tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, T.S.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy replacement time, {tau}{sub E}, and the plasma pressure or beta, {beta}{sub T} = 2 {micro}{sub 0}

    /B{sup 2} can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self-driven, bootstrap current fraction. Significant recent progress has been made in experimentally achieving these high performance regimes and in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. Three operational scenarios have demonstrated potential for steady state high performance, the radiative improved (RI) mode, the high internal inductance or high {ell}{sub i} scenario, and the negative central magnetic shear, NCS (or reversed shear, RS) scenario. In a large number of tokamaks, reduced ion thermal transport to near neoclassical values, and reduced particle transport have been observed in the region of negative or very low magnetic shear: the transport reduction is consistent with stabilization of microturbulence by sheared E x B flow. There is strong temporal and spatial correlation between the increased sheared E x B flow, the reduction in the measured turbulence, and the reduction in transport. The DIII-D tokamak, the JET tokamak and the JT-60U tokamak have all observed significant increases in plasma performance in the NCS operational regime. Strong plasma shaping and broad pressure profiles, provided by the H-mode edge, allow high beta operation, consistent with theoretical predictions; and normalized beta values up to {beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {equivalent_to} {beta}{sub N} {approximately} 4.5%-m-T/MA simultaneously with confinement enhancement over L-mode scaling, H = {tau}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approximately} 4, have been achieved in the DIII-D tokamak. In the JT-60U tokamak, deuterium discharges with negative central magnetic shear, NCS, have reached equivalent break-even conditions, Q{sub DT} (equiv) = 1.

  8. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  9. Conditions for successful data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre J. Chorin; Matthias Morzfeld

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, using idealized models, that numerical data assimilation can be successful only if an effective dimension of the problem is not excessive. This effective dimension depends on the noise in the model and the data, and in physically reasonable problems it can be moderate even when the number of variables is huge. We then analyze several data assimilation algorithms, including particle filters and variational methods. We show that well-designed particle filters can solve most of those data assimilation problems that can be solved in principle, and compare the conditions under which variational methods can succeed to the conditions required of particle filters. We also discuss the limitations of our analysis.

  10. Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerrold Franklin

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Green's functions for Neumann boundary conditions have been considered in Math Physics and Electromagnetism textbooks, but special constraints and other properties required for Neumann boundary conditions have generally not been noticed or treated correctly. In this paper, we derive an appropriate Neumann Green's function with these constraints and properties incorporated.

  11. Physical Consequences of a Momenta-Transfering Particle Theory of Induced Gravity and New Measurements Indicating Variation from Inverse Square Law at Length Scale of .1 mm: Statistical Time Properties of Gravitational Interaction and Analysis Thereof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Christopher Vezzoli

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents physical consequences of our theory of induced gravity (Ref.1) regarding: 1) the requirement to consider shape and materials properties when calculating graviton cross section collision area; 2) use of Special Relativity; 3) implications regarding the shape of cosmos; 4) comparison to explanations using General Relativity; 5) properties of black holes; 6) relationship to the strong force and the theorized Higgs boson; 7) the possible origin of magnetic attraction; 8) new measurements showing variation from gravitational inverse square behavior at length scales of 0.1 mm and relationship to the Cosmological constant, and proof of the statistical time properties of the gravitational interaction.

  12. Physics of top

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -P. Yuan

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I will briefly review the physics of top quark at high energy colliders. A new discovery of single-top event at the Fermilab Tevatron is expected. At the CERN Large Hadron Collider, detailed top quark properties can be measured and new physics ideas in which top quark plays a special role can be tested. I will also discuss a few phenomenological methods for analyzing experimental data to study top quark interactions.

  13. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

  14. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

  15. A Primer on Energy Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Curiel

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy condition, in the context of a wide class of spacetime theories (including general relativity), is, crudely speaking, a relation one demands the stress-energy tensor of matter satisfy in order to try to capture the idea that "energy should be positive". The remarkable fact I will discuss in this paper is that such simple, general, almost trivial seeming propositions have profound and far-reaching import for our understanding of the structure of relativistic spacetimes. It is therefore especially surprising when one also learns that we have no clear understanding of the nature of these conditions, what theoretical status they have with respect to fundamental physics, what epistemic status they may have, when we should and should not expect them to be satisfied, and even in many cases how they and their consequences should be interpreted physically. Or so I shall argue, by a detailed analysis of the technical and conceptual character of all the standard conditions used in physics today, including examination of their consequences and the circumstances in which they are believed to be violated.

  16. Physical protection philosophy and techniques in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufva, B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circumstances for the protection of nuclear power plants are special in Sweden. A very important factor is that armed guards at the facilities are alien to the Swedish society. They do not use them. The Swedish concept of physical protection accepts that the aggressor will get into the facility. With this in mind, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has established the policy that administrative, technical, and organizational measures will be directed toward preventing an aggressor from damaging the reactor, even if he has occupied the facility. In addition, the best conditions possible shall be established for the operator and the police to reoccupy the plant. The author believes this policy is different from that of many other countries. Therefore, he focusses on the Swedish philosophy and techniques for the physical protection of nuclear power plants.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 ±20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico’s Megapolis.

  18. Top Threshold Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre H. Hoang

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Running a future Linear Collider at the top pair threshold allows for precise measurements of the mass, the widths and the couplings of the top quark. I give a nontechnical review on recent theoretical developments and the theory status in top threshold physics concerning QCD corrections and top quark finite lifetime and electroweak effects. I also discuss threshold physics in the context of measurements of the top Yukawa coupling from $e^+e^-\\to t\\bar t H$ and of squark pair production.

  19. Energy conditions and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, J. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, C.P. 1641, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pires, N. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, C.P. 1641, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Reboucas, M. J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general relativity, the energy conditions are invoked to restrict general energy-momentum tensors T{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} in different frameworks, and to derive general results that hold in a variety of general contexts on physical grounds. We show that in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) approach, where the equation of state of the cosmological fluid is unknown, the energy conditions provide model-independent bounds on the behavior of the distance modulus of cosmic sources as a function of the redshift for any spatial curvature. We use the most recent type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observations, which include the new Hubble Space Telescope SNe Ia events, to carry out a model-independent analysis of the energy conditions violation in the context of the standard cosmology. We show that both the null (NEC), weak (WEC), and dominant (DEC) conditions, which are associated with the existence of the so-called phantom fields, seem to have been violated only recently (z < or approx. 0.2), whereas the condition for attractive gravity, i.e., the strong energy condition (SEC) was first violated billions of years ago, at z > or approx. 1.

  20. Joint measurability, steering and entropic uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. S. Karthik; A. R. Usha Devi; A. K. Rajagopal

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of incompatibility of measurements in quantum theory is in stark contrast with the corresponding classical perspective, where all physical observables are jointly measurable. It is of interest to examine if the results of two or more measurements in the quantum scenario can be perceived from a classical point of view or they still exhibit non-classical features. Clearly, commuting observables can be measured jointly using projective measurements and their statistical outcomes can be discerned classically. However, such simple minded association of compatibility of measurements with commutativity turns out to be limited in an extended framework, where the usual notion of sharp projective valued measurements of self adjoint observables gets broadened to include unsharp measurements of generalized observables constituting positive operator valued measures (POVM). There is a surge of research activity recently towards gaining new physical insights on the emergence of classical behavior via joint measurability of unsharp observables. Here, we explore the entropic uncertainty relation for a pair of discrete observables (of Alice's system) when an entangled quantum memory of Bob is restricted to record outcomes of jointly measurable POVMs only. Within the joint measurability regime, the sum of entropies associated with Alice's measurement outcomes - conditioned by the results registered at Bob's end - are constrained to obey an entropic steering inequality. In this case, Bob's non-steerability reflects itself as his inability in predicting the outcomes of Alice's pair of non-commuting observables with better precision, even when they share an entangled state. As a further consequence, the quantum advantage envisaged for the construction of security proofs in key distribution is lost, when Bob's measurements are restricted to the joint measurability regime.

  1. Electroweak physics: measurement of w gamma and z gamma production in pp-bar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model predictions for W{gamma} and Z{gamma} production are tested using an integrated luminosity of 200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured by selecting leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons, and photons with transverse energy E{sub T} > 7 GeV that are well separated from leptons. The production cross sections and kinematic distributions for the W{gamma} and Z{gamma} data are compared to SM predictions.

  2. Top Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erich W. Varnes

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the current experimental status of the top quark sector of the standard model. The measurements summarized include searches for electroweak single top production, the latest results on the ttbar production cross section, and searches for new physics in top quark production and decay. In addition, the recent measurement of the top quark mass to a precision of 0.7% is highlighted

  3. Jet Physics at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwar Bhatti; Don Lincoln

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jets have been used to verify the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), measure the structure of the proton and to search for the physics beyond the Standard Model. In this article, we review the current status of jet physics at the Tevatron, a sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV p-pbar collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We report on recent measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section and the results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model using jets. Dijet production measurements are also reported.

  4. LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the intensity frontier On the trail of one of the greatest mysteries in physics, researchers on the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) seek to discover why...

  5. Constraining the Physical Conditions in the Jets of Gamma-Ray Flaring Blazars using Centimeter-Band Polarimetry and Radiative Transfer Simulations. I. Data and Models for 0420-014, OJ 287, and 1156+295

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Latimer, G E; Hovatta, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate parsec-scale jet flow conditions during GeV gamma-ray flares detected by the Fermi Large Angle Telescope, we obtained centimeter-band total flux density and linear polarization monitoring observations from 2009.5 through 2012.5 with the 26-meter Michigan radio telescope for a sample of core-dominated blazars. We use these data to constrain radiative transfer simulations incorporating propagating shocks oriented at an arbitrary angle to the flow direction in order to set limits on the jet flow and shock parameters during flares temporally associated with gamma-ray flares in 0420-014, OJ 287, and 1156+295; these AGN exhibited the expected signature of shocks in the linear polarization data. Both the number of shocks comprising an individual radio outburst (3-4) and the range of the compression ratios of the individual shocks (0.5-0.8) are similar in all three sources; the shocks are found to be forward-moving with respect to the flow. While simulations incorporating transverse shocks provide good...

  6. Condition assessment of nonlinear processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Gailey, Paul C. (Athens, OH); Protopopescu, Vladimir A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is presented a reliable technique for measuring condition change in nonlinear data such as brain waves. The nonlinear data is filtered and discretized into windowed data sets. The system dynamics within each data set is represented by a sequence of connected phase-space points, and for each data set a distribution function is derived. New metrics are introduced that evaluate the distance between distribution functions. The metrics are properly renormalized to provide robust and sensitive relative measures of condition change. As an example, these measures can be used on EEG data, to provide timely discrimination between normal, preseizure, seizure, and post-seizure states in epileptic patients. Apparatus utilizing hardware or software to perform the method and provide an indicative output is also disclosed.

  7. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 35400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    , electromagnetic waves in vacuum and in matter, guided waves ­ transmission lines and waveguides, electromagnetic-varying sources 7. calculate the electromagnetic radiation fields and power emitted for electric dipole sources 8DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 35400 Electricity and Magnetism II Designation

  8. High Pt Jet Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Martinez

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, a comprehensive review of the main aspects of high $\\pt$ jet physics in Run II at the Tevatron is presented. Recent measurements on inclusive jet production are discussed using different jet algorithms and covering a wide region of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. Several measurements, sensitive to a proper description of soft gluon radiation and the underlying event in hadron collisions, are shown. Finally, high $\\pt$ prompt photon measurements and studies on the production of electroweak bosons in association with jets in the final state are discussed.

  9. Validating Energy Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.; Thomas, D.

    Energy measurements play a very important role in a detailed energy analysis. The role is more important in industrial processes where wide variations of process conditions exist. Valid energy measurements make the decision making process easier...

  10. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a hierarchy problem? Are there new physical principles at the TeV scale? Is the Higgs boson a fundamental particle or composite, like a pion? What is the final state of...

  11. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of...

  12. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but considered feasible following a realistic future R&D program.

  13. Physical Vacuum in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although experiments carried out by Jain et al. showed that the Cooper pairs obey the strong equivalence principle, The measurement of the Cooper pairs inertial mass by Tate et al. revealed an anomalous excess of mass. In the present paper we interpret these experimental results in the framework of an electromagnetic model of dark energy for the superconductors' vacuum. We argue that this physical vacuum is associated with a preferred frame. Ultimately from the conservation of energy for Cooper pairs we derive a model for a variable vacuum speed of light in the superconductors physical vacuum in relation with a possible breaking of the weak equivalence principle for Cooper pairs.

  14. Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ying-Fei

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Physical Impedance: Overview. Significance in agriculture. Morphological changes of cmp roots in response to physical impedance Plant hormones and physical hnpedance. Ca2+, Sitpud Transduction and Physical Impedance. . . . . III MATERIALS AND METHODS.... , 1994; Allen and Tiwari 1991) and calsequestrin (Chou et al. , 1989; Krause et al. , 1989). CHAPTER IH MATERIALS AND METHODS Germination and Growth Conditions Plant material Maize (Zea mays L. ) cv TX 5855 was used as the research material. Seeds...

  15. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    387 Colliders, accelerator physics of Coverage Color octet50, 974 Accelerator physics offor non-accelerator physics . . . . . . . . . 368 Number

  16. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium on Accelerator Physics (1994). "The Development ofcolliders", Accelerator Physics at the Superconducting Superaccelerators, accelerator physics, linear colliders, heavy

  17. Essay Review Physics from Fisher Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavis, David

    that the physics would not be there without the measurement is di cult to say. It is, of course, a standard part

  18. The Extreme Physics Explorer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Elvis

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Some tests of fundamental physics - the equation of state at supra-nuclear densities, the metric in strong gravity, the effect of magnetic fields above the quantum critical value - can only be measured using compact astrophysical objects: neutron stars and black holes. The Extreme Physics Explorer is a modest sized (~500 kg) mission that would carry a high resolution (R ~300) X-ray spectrometer and a sensitive X-ray polarimeter, both with high time resolution (~5 ?s) capability, at the focus of a large area (~5 sq.m), low resolution (HPD~1 arcmin) X-ray mirror. This instrumentation would enable new classes of tests of fundamental physics using neutron stars and black holes as cosmic laboratories.

  19. Planetary Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An error

  20. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An

  1. Physics 15030401 Special Topics in Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Randy

    Physics 15­030­401 Special Topics in Modern Physics Probability and Statistics for Physics Randy Johnson Summer, '96 Text Bevington and Robinson, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Physics. Eardie, Drijard, James, Roos, and Sadoulet, Statistical Methods in Experimental Physics. Roe

  2. From Neuman to Dirichlet boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, B.; Sazdovic, B. [Institute of Physics, 11001 Belgrade, P.O.Box 57 (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dirichlet boundary conditions for the end-point of the open string define Dp-brane. It is parameterized by the rest of coordinates, with Neuman boundary conditions. The relations between background fields can produce the local gauge symmetries of the world-sheet action. After gauge fixing, some Neuman boundary conditions turn into the Dirichlet ones, decreasing the number of Dp-brane dimensions. The physical Dp-brane is gauge invariant part of the initial one. The gauge invariant coordinates are expressed as linear combinations of the effective coordinates and momenta. This fact explains the origin of non-commutativity and the existence of commutative Dp-brane coordinates.

  3. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.E. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on top physics results using a 100 pb{sup -1} data sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We have identified top signals in a variety of decay channels, and used these channels to extract a measurement of the top mass and production cross section. A subset of the data (67 pb{sup -1}) is used to determine M{sub top} = 176 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 10(syst) and {sigma}(tt) = 7.6 {sub -2.0}{sup +2.4} pb. We present studies of the kinematics of t{bar t} events and extract the first direct measurement of V{sub tb}. Finally, we indicate prospects for future study of top physics at the Tevatron.

  4. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Fengpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Herve; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Goger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cecile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Mollenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M; McDonough, William F; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Bjorn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frederic; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical cor...

  5. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  6. Electroweak measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidoti, A.; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present some recent measurements on electroweak physics using data collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton anti-proton collider ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) at Fermilab.

  7. Measuring Physical Properties of Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Cortney Mittelsteadt of Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC, at the DOE High Temperature Membrane Working Group held September 14, 2006.

  8. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykken, J D

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  9. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Lykken

    2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  10. Measurement-Measurement-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jaehoon "Paul"

    Internet Measurement- System A Measurement- System B Control System GPS Satellite GPS Satellite GPS Receiver GPS Receiver 2) measurement 3) data1) command Methodology for One-way IP Performance Measurement This paper proposes a methodology for measurement of one-way IP performance metrics such as one-way delay

  11. Blind Analysis in Particle Physics Aaron Roodman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Blind Analysis in Particle Physics Aaron Roodman Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94025, USA A review of the blind analysis technique, as used in particle physics measurements, is presented. The history of blind analyses in physics is briefly discussed. Next the dangers of experimenter

  12. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  13. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  14. Running Boundary Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Ohya; Makoto Sakamoto; Motoi Tachibana

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we argue that boundary condition may run with energy scale. As an illustrative example, we consider one-dimensional quantum mechanics for a spinless particle that freely propagates in the bulk yet interacts only at the origin. In this setting we find the renormalization group flow of U(2) family of boundary conditions exactly. We show that the well-known scale-independent subfamily of boundary conditions are realized as fixed points. We also discuss the duality between two distinct boundary conditions from the renormalization group point of view. Generalizations to conformal mechanics and quantum graph are also discussed.

  15. On Estimating Conditional Conservatism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Ray

    The concept of conditional conservatism (asymmetric earnings timeliness) has provided new insight into financial reporting and stimulated considerable research since Basu (1997). Patatoukas and Thomas (2011) report bias ...

  16. Graph-theoretic analysis of discrete-phase-space states for condition change detection and quantification of information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as machine/structural failure or events from brain/heart wave data stroke. By monitoring the data, and determining what values are indicative of a failure forewarning, one can provide adequate notice of the impending failure in order to take preventive measures. This disclosure teaches a computer-based method to convert dynamical numeric data representing physical objects (unstructured data) into discrete-phase-space states, and hence into a graph (structured data) for extraction of condition change.

  17. Physics and chemistry of gas in discs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilling, Ian

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Protoplanetary discs set the initial conditions for planet formation. By combining observations with detailed modelling, it is possible to constrain the physics and chemistry in such discs. I have used the detailed ...

  18. Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Environucleonics Lab 1 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 PHY 4820 Medical Physics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro. Chemistry I Lab 1 CHE 1102 Intro

  19. Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Electromagnetic Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics.) taken Grade PHY 4620 Optics 4 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 4730 Analog Circuits 3 PHY 4640 Quantum

  20. 314 Department of Physics Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    314 Department of Physics Department of Physics Physics, one of the basic sciences, has its origin led to the detailed understanding of a remarkable variety of physical phenomena. Our knowledge now comprehension of the physical world forms an impressive part of the intellectual and cultural heritage of our

  1. Large deviations for many Brownian bridges with symmetrised initial-terminal condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Adams; Wolfgang König

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider a large system of $N$ Brownian motions in $\\mathbb{R}^d$ with some non-degenerate initial measure on some fixed time interval $[0,\\beta]$ with symmetrised initial-terminal condition. That is, for any $i$, the terminal location of the $i$-th motion is affixed to the initial point of the $\\sigma(i)$-th motion, where $\\sigma$ is a uniformly distributed random permutation of $1,...,N$. Such systems play an important role in quantum physics in the description of Boson systems at positive temperature $1/\\beta$. In this paper, we describe the large-N behaviour of the empirical path measure (the mean of the Dirac measures in the $N$ paths) and of the mean of the normalised occupation measures of the $N$ motions in terms of large deviations principles. The rate functions are given as variational formulas involving certain entropies and Fenchel-Legendre transforms. Consequences are drawn for asymptotic independence statements and laws of large numbers. In the special case related to quantum physics, our rate function for the occupation measures turns out to be equal to the well-known Donsker-Varadhan rate function for the occupation measures of one motion in the limit of diverging time. This enables us to prove a simple formula for the large-N asymptotic of the symmetrised trace of ${\\rm e}^{-\\beta \\mathcal{H}_N}$, where $\\mathcal{H}_N$ is an $N$-particle Hamilton operator in a trap.

  2. Thermovote: Participatory Sensing for Efficient Building HVAC Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Thermovote: Participatory Sensing for Efficient Building HVAC Conditioning Varick L. Erickson, Measurement, Performance Keywords HVAC conditioning, PMV, thermal comfort, phones 1 Introduction Recently goal, the service that HVAC systems provide is arguably more important than reducing energy. Before we

  3. January 2010 Physics 3300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    1 January 2010 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Instructor: Brad de Young Physics and Physical Oceanography Memorial University, bdeyoung@mun.ca Room C-3000 737-8738 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography deals with the physics of the processes in the ocean, providing an integrating view

  4. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  5. Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudyingFebruary PhotonsPhysical Sciences

  6. Top quark physics at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karolos Potamianos

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  7. Top quark physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions analyzed by the CDF collaboration. The large number of top quark events analyzed, of the order of several thousands, allows stringent checks of the standard model predictions. Also, the top quark is widely believed to be a window to new physics. We present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  8. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics - “Neutrino’Kim, Fundamentals of Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Fermi”, CLII Course “Neutrino Physics”, 23 July-2 August

  9. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics - “Neutrino’Kim, Fundamentals of Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Fermi”, CLII Course “Neutrino Physics”, 23 July-2 August

  10. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for non-accelerator physics . . . . . . . . . 328 ParticleColliders, accelerator physics of Coupling between matterdetectors for non-accelerator physics (Figure 29.5) . . .

  11. THE PHYSICS TEACHER N Vol. 41, February 2003 DOI: 10.1119/1.1542051 113 s physics instructors, we enjoy access to a va-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    THE PHYSICS TEACHER N Vol. 41, February 2003 DOI: 10.1119/1.1542051 113 A s physics instructors, we- based laboratory curricula such as Physics by Inquiry1 and Workshop Physics.2 Unfortunately, such materials are often tested in conditions unattainable in intro- ductory physics courses. In particular

  12. A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the program was to develop correlations to predict physical properties within requirements of engineering precision from a knowledge of pulping conditions and of kraft black liquor composition, if possible. These correlations were to include those relating thermodynamic properties to pulping conditions and liquor composition. The basic premise upon which the research was based is the premise that black liquor behaves as a polymer solution. This premise has proven to be true, and has been used successfully in developing data reduction methods and in interpreting results. A three phase effort involving pulping, analysis of liquor composition, and measurement of liquor properties was conducted.

  13. Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Botella, I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  14. Conditional data watchpoint management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdick, Dean Joseph (Austin, TX); Vaidyanathan, Basu (Austin, TX)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system and computer program product for managing a conditional data watchpoint in a set of instructions being traced is shown in accordance with illustrative embodiments. In one particular embodiment, the method comprises initializing a conditional data watchpoint and determining the watchpoint has been encountered. Upon that determination, examining a current instruction context associated with the encountered watchpoint prior to completion of the current instruction execution, further determining a first action responsive to a positive context examination; otherwise, determining a second action.

  15. air conditioning equipments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    introducing or upgrading... analyses using BEMS data, ?) additional actual measurement data analyses and ?) HVAC system simulations using LCEM tool. The detailed air-conditioned...

  16. air conditioning equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    introducing or upgrading... analyses using BEMS data, ?) additional actual measurement data analyses and ?) HVAC system simulations using LCEM tool. The detailed air-conditioned...

  17. Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    heaters are examples of TCLs. They use local hysteresis control to maintain either air or water units and water heaters is developed in [7] using detailed physical models. In all the aforementioned for a large fraction of electric demand. HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and air conditioning) systems and water

  18. Microfluidics: The no-slip boundary condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga; Michael P. Brenner; Howard A. Stone

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The no-slip boundary condition at a solid-liquid interface is at the center of our understanding of fluid mechanics. However, this condition is an assumption that cannot be derived from first principles and could, in theory, be violated. We present a review of recent experimental, numerical and theoretical investigations on the subject. The physical picture that emerges is that of a complex behavior at a liquid/solid interface, involving an interplay of many physico-chemical parameters, including wetting, shear rate, pressure, surface charge, surface roughness, impurities and dissolved gas.

  19. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  20. Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

  1. Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography · Instructor: Dr. Iakov Afanassiev · Office: Physics C-4065 · email: yakov@physics.mun.ca · Course Times: TBD Room TBD · Office Hours: unlimited · Web Page: http://www.physics

  2. Past and future conditions for polar stratospheric cloud formation simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    . In the future, radiative cooling in the Arctic winter due to climate change is more than compensated by an inPast and future conditions for polar stratospheric cloud formation simulated by the Canadian Middle Chemistry and Physics Past and future conditions for polar stratospheric cloud formation simulated

  3. Spheromak Physics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The spheromak is a Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) configuration, which is a leading alternative to the tokamak. It has a simple geometry which offers an opportunity to achieve the promise of fusion energy if the physics of confinement, current drive, and pressure holding capability extrapolate favorably to a reactor. Recent changes in the US MFE program, taken in response to budget constraints and programmatic directions from Congress, include a revitalization of an experimental alternative concept effort. Detailed studies of the spheromak were consequently undertaken to examine the major physics issues which need to be resolved to advance it as a fusion plasma, the optimum configuration for an advanced experiment, and its potential as a reactor. As a result of this study, we conclude that it is important to evaluate several physics issues experimentally. Such an experiment might be appropriately be named the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). It would address several critical issues, the solution to which will provide the physics basis to enable an advanced experiment. The specific scientific goals of SSPX would be to: * Demonstrate that electron and ion temperatures of a few hundred electron volts can be achieved in a steady-state spheromak plasma sustained by a magnetic dynamo (``helicity injection``). * Relate energy confinement quantitatively to the magnetic turbulence accompanying the dynamo and use this knowledge to optimize performance. * Measure the magnetic field profiles and magnetic turbulence in the plasma and relate these to the science of the magnetic dynamo which drives the current in the plasma. * Examine experimentally the pressure holding capability (``beta limit``) of the spheromak. * Understand the initial phases of the transition of the plasma from an equilibrium supported by a magnetic-flux conserving wall to one supported by external coils. These goals could be achieved in an experiment with duration of a few milliseconds, and can consequently be addressed at a relatively low cost. There are additional goals which would be addressed in a larger, follow-up experiment, the Advanced Spheromak Physics Experiment. These include the achievement of temperatures in the multi-kev range, the control of low mode-number instabilities (perhaps with a feedback system), and the technology of long-pulse current drive. This document reviews past work in the field and describes a number of new results. Recent publications which complement this report are also referenced. These publications also describe the characteristics of an experiment to examine the important spheromak physics issues.

  4. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State University; Adams, Todd [Florida State University; Askew, Andrew [Florida State University; Berg, Bernd [Florida State University; Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State University; Okui, Takemichi [Florida State University; Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State University; Reina, Laura [Florida State University; Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  5. Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma University of Rochester inter- action commonly form the physical interface by which we connect to the digital cyber-world. Because these devices bridge the physical and the electronic worlds, elegant and effective solutions

  6. Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4640 Quantum Mechanics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics & Engineering 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro

  7. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics, and many of the problems. We also thank our fellow physics teachers at both schools for their immense help

  8. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    #12;People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics, and many of the problems. We also thank our fellow physics teachers at both schools for their immense help

  9. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Niki Saoulidou

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  10. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    of students (from physics, engineering physics, elec- trical engineering, nuclear engineering and other un;PREFACE Plasma physics is a relatively new branch of physics that became a mature science over the last). Thus, plasma physics has developed in large part as a branch of applied or engineering physics

  11. Recent physics results from CDF and D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evelyn Thomson

    2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent physics results from CDF and D0 on heavy flavor physics, electroweak precision measurements, top physics, QCD and searches for new physics are discussed. The results are based on approximately 140 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2003.

  12. Permeation, Diffusion, Solubility Measurements: Results and Issues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solubility Measurements: Results and Issues Research Objectives: To understand the hydrogen transport behavior Under conditions relevant to hydrogen delivery infrastructure...

  13. The Physics of Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alexander Bais; J. Doyne Farmer

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review of the interface between (theoretical) physics and information for non-experts. The origin of information as related to the notion of entropy is described, first in the context of thermodynamics then in the context of statistical mechanics. A close examination of the foundations of statistical mechanics and the need to reconcile the probabilistic and deterministic views of the world leads us to a discussion of chaotic dynamics, where information plays a crucial role in quantifying predictability. We then discuss a variety of fundamental issues that emerge in defining information and how one must exercise care in discussing concepts such as order, disorder, and incomplete knowledge. We also discuss an alternative form of entropy and its possible relevance for nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In the final part of the paper we discuss how quantum mechanics gives rise to the very different concept of quantum information. Entirely new possibilities for information storage and computation are possible due to the massive parallel processing inherent in quantum mechanics. We also point out how entropy can be extended to apply to quantum mechanics to provide a useful measurement for quantum entanglement. Finally we make a small excursion to the interface betweeen quantum theory and general relativity, where one is confronted with an "ultimate information paradox" posed by the physics of Black Holes. In this review we have limited ourselves; not all relevant topics that touch on physics and information could be covered.

  14. Graduate Studies Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabry, Frederic

    Graduate Studies in Physics Department of Physics Ernest Rutherford Physics Building Mc - 8434 Email: secretariat@physics.mcgill.ca Web: http://www.physics.mcgill.ca McGill Physics 2011 ­ 2012 mot de bienvenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Challenge of Physics

  15. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton`s Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  16. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  17. Top Physics at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. de Jong

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC will be a top quark factory. In this note, the central role of the top quark for LHC physics will be discussed, and an overview will be given of the studies of top quark properties in preparation, with an emphasis on the systematic uncertainties that will dominate most measurements.

  18. Department of Physics Seminar (UNI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    of the reactivity of nuclear reactors is pre- sented. The theory of reactor kinetics is summarized with key problems measurement methods for power reactors. #12;Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Nuclear physics basics 3 2.1 Nuclear a considerable ammount of energy. A nuclear reactor (if we seek the simplest explanation) is sought to be as much

  19. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Walter

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It's been a remarkable decade in neutrino physics. Ten years ago this summer, at the 1998 neutrino conference in Takayama, the Super-Kamiokande collaboration reported the observation of neutrinos changing flavor, thereby establishing the existence of neutrino mass. A few years later, the SNO experiment solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem demonstrating that it too was due to neutrino oscillation. Just a few years after that, these effects were confirmed and the oscillation parameters were measured with man-made neutrino sources. Now, just in this last year, the same neutrinos which were the source of the 30 year old solar neutrino problem were measured for the first time in a real-time experiment. In this talk, I will explain how a set of experiments, especially ones in the last few years, have established a consistent framework of neutrino physics and also explain some outstanding questions. Finally, I will cover how a set of upcoming experiments hope to address these questions in the coming decade.

  1. 8.05 Quantum Physics II, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Krishna, 1965-

    Together 8.05 and 8.06 cover quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. General formalism of quantum mechanics: states, operators, Dirac notation, representations, measurement theory. Harmonic oscillator: ...

  2. Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S. (Dahlonega, GA); Morris, Shelby J. (Hampton, VA); Masakowski, Daniel D. (Worcester, MA); Wong, Ching Ping (Duluth, GA); Luo, Shijian (Boise, ID)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of an age sensor made of a conductive matrix or composite disposed in a polymeric structure such as an electrical cable. The conductive matrix comprises a base polymer and conductive filler. The method includes communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and correlating resistivity of the conductive matrix of the polymeric structure with resistivity of an accelerated-aged conductive composite.

  3. Physical transformations between quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zejun Huang; Chi-Kwong Li; Edward Poon; Nung-Sing Sze

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Given two sets of quantum states {A_1, ..., A_k} and {B_1, ..., B_k}, represented as sets of density matrices, necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of a physical transformation T, represented as a trace-preserving completely positive map, such that T(A_i) = B_i for i = 1, ..., k. General completely positive maps without the trace-preserving requirement, and unital completely positive maps transforming the states are also considered.

  4. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  5. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  6. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  7. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  8. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERNPPE/95172

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERN­PPE/95­172 24 November 1995 A Combination of Preliminary LEP Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model \\Lambda The LEP Collaborations Experiments to the 1995 International Europhysics Conference on High­Energy Physics, 27/7 to 2

  9. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over-constraints of the unitarity triangle through multiple measurements of all angles and sides. This report extends and updates the studies presented in both the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. Together, these three documents detail the Physics case of the SuperB Project.

  10. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  11. Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice 1. GENERAL CONDITIONS Members of staff are subject. Modern Apprentices are required under this agreement to undertake training, attend courses and carry out

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics...

  13. LANL | Physics | LDRD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    directed research and development funding at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Physics Division, as the major source of innovation in experimental physical science at Los...

  14. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  15. Nuclear Physics: Recent Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics:...

  16. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  17. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns...

  18. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  19. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  20. Jet physics in ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Loizides

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This work aims at the performance of the ALICE detector for the measurement of high-energy jets at mid-pseudo-rapidity in ultra-relativistic nucleus--nucleus collisions at LHC and their potential for the characterization of the partonic matter created in these collisions. In our approach, jets at high energy with E_{T}>50 GeV are reconstructed with a cone jet finder, as typically done for jet measurements in hadronic collisions. Within the ALICE framework we study its capabilities of measuring high-energy jets and quantify obtainable rates and the quality of reconstruction, both, in proton--proton and in lead--lead collisions at LHC conditions. In particular, we address whether modification of the jet fragmentation in the charged-particle sector can be detected within the high particle-multiplicity environment of the central lead--lead collisions. We comparatively treat these topics in view of an EMCAL proposed to complete the central ALICE tracking detectors. The main activities concerning the thesis are the following: a) Determination of the potential for exclusive jet measurements in ALICE. b) Determination of jet rates that can be acquired with the ALICE setup. c) Development of a parton-energy loss model. d) Simulation and study of the energy-loss effect on jet properties.

  1. advanced distributed measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the in situ water distribution within the gas 69 MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN Physics Websites Summary: MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL...

  2. Drag coefficient for the air-sea exchange in hurricane conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbraikh, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical model is proposed for prediction of the non-monotonic drag coefficient variation with the neutral stability 10-m wind speed, U10. The model is based upon measurements of the foam coverage fraction and characteristic size of foam bubbles with U10, and on the drag coefficient approximation by the linearly weighted averaging over alternating foam-free and foam-covered portions of the ocean surface. The obtained drag coefficient is in fair agreement with that obtained by field measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in Powell et al. (Nature, 2003) which discover reduction of the sea-surface drag with U10 rising to hurricane conditions.

  3. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for...

  4. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental set­up und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  5. Top Quark Physics at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Deliot; Douglas Glenzinski

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the field of top-quark physics with an emphasis on experimental techniques. The role of the top quark in the Standard Model of particle physics is summarized and the basic phenomenology of top-quark production and decay is introduced. We discuss how contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model could affect top-quark properties or event samples. The many measurements made at the Fermilab Tevatron, which test the Standard Model predictions or probe for direct evidence of new physics using the top-quark event samples, are reviewed here.

  6. Review of Particle Physics, 2004-2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidelman, Simon; Olive, Keith A; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Amsler, Claude; Asner, David M; Babu, K S; Barnett, Richard Michael; Beringer, J; Burchat, Patricia R; Carone, Christopher D; Caso, Carlo; Conforto, Gianni; Dahl, Orin; D'Ambrosio, G; Doser, Michael; Feng, Jonathan L; Gherghetta, Tony; Gibbons, Lawrence; Goodman, Maury; Grab, C; Groom, Donald E; Gurtu, Atul; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Hikasa, Ken Ichi; Honscheid, Klaus; Jawahery, Hassan; Kolda, Christopher; Kwon Young Joon; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Manohar, Aneesh Vasant; March-Russell, John David; Masoni, Alberto; Miquel, Ramon; Mönig, Klaus; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kenzo; Navas, Sergio; Pape, Luc; Patrignani, Claudia; Piepke, Andreas; Raffelt, Georg G; Roos, Matts; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Terning, John; Törnqvist, N A; Trippe, Thomas G; Vogel, Petr; Wohl, Charles G; Workman, Ronald L; Yao Wei Ming; Zyla, Piotr; Armstrong, Betty; Gee, Paul S; Harper, Gail; Lugovsky, Kirill Slava; Lugovsky, S B; Lugovsky, V S; Rom, A; Artuso, Marina; Barberio, Elisabetta; Battaglia, Marco; Bichsel, H; Biebel, Otmar; Bloch, Philippe; Cahn, Robert N; Casper, D; Cattai, Ariella; Chivukula, R Sekhar; Cowan, Glen; Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume; Desler, Kai; Dobbs, M A; Drees, Manuel; Edwards, A; Edwards, Donald A; Elvira, V D; Erler, Jens; Ezhela, Vladimir V; Fetscher, Wulf; Fields, B D; Foster, Brian; Froidevaux, Daniel; Fukugita, Masataka; Gaisser, Thomas K; Garren, Lynn; Gerber, Hans Jürg; Gerbier, G; Gilman, Frederick J; Haber, Howard E; Hagmann, Christian; Hewett, Joanne L; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hogan, Craig J; Höhler, Gerhard; Igo-Kemenes, Peter Miklos; Jackson, John David; Johnson, Kurtis F; Karlen, Dean A; Kayser, Boris; Kirkby, D; Klein, Spencer R; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Knowles, Ian G; Kreitz, Pat; Kuyanov, Yu V; Lahav, O; Langacker, Paul; Liddle, Andrew R; Littenberg, Laurence S; Manley, D Mark; Narain, M; Nason, Paolo; Nir, Yosef; Peacock, John A; Quinn, Helen R; Raby, Stuart A; Ratcliff, B N; Razuvaev, E A; Renk, Burkhard; Rolandi, Luigi; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenberg, Leslie J; Sachrajda, Christopher T C; Sakai, Y; Sanda, A I; Sarkar, S; Schmitt, Michael; Schneider, Olivier; Scott, Douglas; Seligman, William G; Shaevitz, Michael H; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn; Smoot, George F; Spanier, Stefan; Spieler, Helmuth; Spooner, N J C; Srednicki, Mark A; Stahl, Achim; Stanev, Todor; Suzuki, Mahiko; Tkachenko, N P; Trilling, George H; Valencia, German; Van Bibber, Karl; Vincter, Manuella G; Ward, D R; Webber, Bryan R; Whalley, Michael; Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Womersley, John William; Woody, Craig L; Zenin, O V; Zhu Ren Yuan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Review of Particle Physics and the abbreviated version, the Particle Physics Booklet, are reviews of the field of Particle Physics. This complete Review includes a compilation/evaluation of data on particle properties, called the "Particle Listings". These Listings include 1726 new measurements from 512 papers, in addition to the 20200 measurements from 5903 papers that first appeared in previous editions. The Review and the Booklet are published in even numbered years. This edition is an updating through December 2003 (and, in some areas, well into 2004).

  7. Top physics at LHC with ttbar events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hubaut

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The new CERN proton-proton collider, the LHC, is about to start in 2007 its data taking. Millions of top quarks will be available out of these data, allowing to perform a wide range of precision measurements and searches for new physics. An overview of the planned top physics program accessible with ttbar events is given for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. A particular emphasis is put on the precision measurements of the top mass, top polarization and searches for new physics in top production and decay.

  8. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Gorringe; D. W. Hertzog

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiments. Another focus is the uncommonly broad and topical range of questions in atomic, nuclear and particle physics that such experiments explore.

  9. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorringe, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiment...

  10. Fishing for new physics with massive neutral dibosons: measurements of ZZ production cross section and the search for invisible Higgs boson decays beyond the Standard Model with the CMS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chasco, Matthew Ervin

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory describing the fundamental interactions and properties of subatomic particles. A key feature is its ability to explain particle mass through the Higgs mechanism, and a by-product of this mechanism is the Higgs boson. The discovery of the Higgs boson, in 2012 at CERN, completed the Standard Model particle zoo, but observed phenomena, like dark matter, remain unexplained. The analyses presented explore proton-proton collison events resulting in a Z boson plus missing transverse energy (MET). The motivation for this is to investigate two processes: Standard Model (SM) ZZ production, and beyond Standard Model (BSM) ZH production, in particular the ZZ ? ?+????¯ and ZH ? ?+?? + Hinv channels. The place-holder Hinv is for all Higgs boson decay modes resulting in undetected “invisible” particles, which may branch to new physics, like dark matter particles. The data used are from Run 1 (2011–2012) of CMS, where proton-proton collisions at 7 Te...

  11. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  12. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in evaluating the post-closure performance of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) in relation to waste form degradation.

  13. An Introduction to Statistical Issues and Methods in Metrology for Physical Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    An Introduction to Statistical Issues and Methods in Metrology for Physical Science and Engineering (Ohio) August 5, 2011 Abstract Statistical science and physical metrology are inextricably intertwined of Measurement/Metrology . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2 Probability and Statistics and Measurement

  14. PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011 Instructor: Stephanie Magleby (sam25@physics.byu.edu) Office Hours: MWF 2 -3 pm, N311 ESC Office Phone (physics): 422-7056 Office Phone (engineering): 422-8319 TA: Corbin Jacobs [corbinjacobs@gmail.com] Email Corbin with any reading quiz questions or Mastering Physics issues

  15. Multipartite distribution property of one way discord beyond measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si-Yuan Liu; Yu-Ran Zhang; Wen-Li Yang; Heng Fan

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the distribution property of one way discord in multipartite system by introducing the concept of polygamy deficit for one way discord. The difference between one way discord and quantum discord is analogue to the difference between entanglement of assistance and entanglement of formation. For tripartite pure states, two kinds of polygamy deficits are presented with the equivalent expressions and physical interpretations regardless of measurement. For four-partite pure states, we provide a condition which makes one way discord polygamy being satisfied. Those results can be applicable to multipartite quantum systems and are complementary to our understanding of the shareability of quantum correlations.

  16. Condition Monitoring of Cables Task 3 Report: Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaran, M.; Lofaro, R.; na

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 20 years the NRC has sponsored research studying electric cable aging degradation, condition monitoring, and environmental qualification testing practices for electric cables used in nuclear power plants. This report summarizes several of the most effective and commonly used condition monitoring techniques available to detect damage and measure the extent of degradation in electric cable insulation. The technical basis for each technique is summarized, along with its application, trendability of test data, ease of performing the technique, advantages and limitations, and the usefulness of the test results to characterize and assess the condition of electric cables.

  17. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  18. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, Bernard P. (McMurray, PA); Becse, Imre (Washington, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  19. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  20. Physics 151 Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    and Engineers with Modern PhysicsScientists and Engineers with Modern Physics Read: Chapters 1 & 2 (sections 2Page 1 Physics 151 ­ Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1 Physics 207, Sections: 301/601Physics 207, Sections: 301/601 ­­ 314/614314/614 General Physics IGeneral Physics I MichaelMichael Winokur

  1. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micromechanical transducers such as cantilevers for AFM often rely on optical readout methods that require illumination of a specific region of the microstructure. Here we explore and exploit the diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modeling cantilever bending measurement techniques. The illumination of a cantilever end causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photodetector that significantly affects the calibration of the signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). Conditions for optimized linear signals that avoid detection artifacts conflict with small numerical aperture illumination and narrow cantilevers which are softer and therefore more sensitive. Embracing diffraction patterns as a physical measurable allows a richer detection technique that decouples measurements of tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the alignment of illumination and detector. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically releva...

  2. Quantum Theory Allows Measurement of Non-Hermitian Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun Kumar Pati; Uttam Singh; Urbasi Sinha

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum theory, a physical observable is represented by a Hermitian operator as it admits real eigenvalues. This stems from the fact that any measuring apparatus that is supposed to measure a physical observable will always yield a real number. However, reality of eigenvalue of some operator does not mean that it is necessarily Hermitian. There are examples of non-Hermitian operators which may admit real eigenvalues under some symmetry conditions. One may wonder if there is any way to measure a non-Hermitian operator, for example, the average of a non-Hermitian operator in a quantum state. We show that quantum theory allows direct measurement of any non-Hermitian operator via the weak measurement. The average of a non-Hermitian operator in a pure state is a complex multiple of the weak value of the positive semi-definite part of the non-Hermitian operator. We also prove a new uncertainty relation for any two non-Hermitian operators and illustrate this for the creation and annihilation operators, and the Kraus operators.

  3. Nonequilibrium Markov processes conditioned on large deviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Chetrite; Hugo Touchette

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of conditioning a Markov process on a rare event and of representing this conditioned process by a conditioning-free process, called the effective or driven process. The basic assumption is that the rare event used in the conditioning is a large deviation-type event, characterized by a convex rate function. Under this assumption, we construct the driven process via a generalization of Doob's $h$-transform, used in the context of bridge processes, and show that this process is equivalent to the conditioned process in the long-time limit. The notion of equivalence that we consider is based on the logarithmic equivalence of path measures and implies that the two processes have the same typical states. In constructing the driven process, we also prove equivalence with the so-called exponential tilting of the Markov process, which is used with importance sampling to simulate rare events, and which gives rise, from the point of view of statistical mechanics, to a nonequilibrium version of the canonical ensemble. Other links between our results and the topics of bridge processes, quasi-stationary distributions, stochastic control, and conditional limit theorems are mentioned.

  4. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.

    1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a wide variety of laboratory analyses during the past quarter. As with most of the work we performed during the previous quarter, our recent efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the cohesivity and tensile strength of powders. We also continued our analyses of dust cake ashes that have had the soluble compounds leached from their particle surfaces by repeated washings with water. Our analyses of leached and unleached dust cake ashes continued to provide some interesting insights into effects that compounds adsorbed on surfaces of ash particles can have on bulk ash behavior. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and on surface chemistry. Our measurements of tensile strength show, that for many of the samples we have analyzed a relative minimum in tensile strength exists for samples conditioned and tested at about 30% relative humidity. In our examinations of the effects of water conditioning on sample cohesivity, we determined that in the absence of absorption of water into the interior of the particles, cohesivity usually increases sharply when environments having relative humidities above 75% are used to condition and test the samples. Plans are under way to condition selected samples with (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]SO[sub 4], NH[sub 4]HSO[sub 4], CaCl[sub 2], organosiloxane, and SO[sub 3]. Pending approval, we will begin these conditioning experiments, and subsequent analyses of the conditioned samples.

  5. Supersymmetry in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    These lectures give a general introduction to supersymmetry, emphasizing its application to models of elementary particle physics at the 100 GeV energy scale. I discuss the following topics: the construction of supersymmetric Lagrangians with scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons, the structure and mass spectrum of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the measurement of the parameters of the MSSM at high-energy colliders, and the solutions that the MSSM gives to the problems of electroweak symmetry breaking and dark matter.

  6. B-physics results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This review summarizes the most important results in B physics obtained at the Tevatron. They include the discovery of the new B hadrons, the measurement of their masses and lifetimes, the measurement of the oscillation frequency of $\\Bs$ meson, the search for its rare decay $\\Bs \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, and the study of the CP asymmetry in decays and mixing of $B$ mesons.

  7. Physics with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharlov, Yu. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ALICE experiment at LHC collects data in pp collisions at 1497-1 = 0.9, 2.76, and 7 TeV and in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV. Highlights of the detector performance and an overview of experimental results measured with ALICE in pp and AA collisions are presented in this paper. Physics with protonproton collisions is focused on hadron spectroscopy at low and moderate p{sub t}. Measurements with lead-lead collisions are shown in comparison with those in pp collisions, and the properties of hot quark matter are discussed.

  8. Semiclassical energy conditions and wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prado Martin-Moruno

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the nonlinear energy conditions and their quantum extensions. These new energy conditions behave much better than the usual pointwise energy conditions in the presence of semiclassical quantum effects. Analogous quantum extensions for the linear energy conditions are not always satisfied as one enters the quantum realm, but they can be used to constrain the violation of the classical conditions. Thus, the existence of wormholes supported by a fluid which violates the null energy condition in a controlled way is of particular interest.

  9. Master of Science project in computational material physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellsing, Bo

    Master of Science project in computational material physics (posted 2013-05-13) Plasmarons exists ! (figure to the right) also for this system. Project To predicting the so far not measured in computational material science. You have taken the courses in Quantum physics, Solid state physics

  10. DISSERTATION QUANTUM EFFICIENCY AS A DEVICE-PHYSICS INTERPRETATION TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION QUANTUM EFFICIENCY AS A DEVICE-PHYSICS INTERPRETATION TOOL FOR THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS;#12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION QUANTUM EFFICIENCY AS A DEVICE-PHYSICS INTERPRETATION TOOL FOR THIN-FILM SOLAR. This dissertation will focus on the use of quantum-efficiency (QE) measurements to deduce the device physics of thin

  11. Research in Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenitz, Jerome [The University of Alabama

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

  12. Has Hawking radiation been measured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Unruh

    2014-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted. This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems. The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, which is the Hawking process, is completely determined by measurements of the classical parameters of a linear physical system. The experiment conducted in 2010 fulfills all of these requirements, and is thus a true measurement of Hawking radiation.

  13. PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facilities 1. Effects of energetic -particles 2. Self-heating 3. Physics of reactor-scale plasmas · Examples towards instability. · Interacts with (m,n) = (1,1) modes - sawteeth & fishbones 2. Self-Heating Workshop 4 May 2000 #12;PHYSICS INACCESSABLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES: PARTICLES AND SELF-HEATING / THERMAL

  14. DOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Slovenia is producing a significant share of its electricity in nuclear power plant. The doctoral programme of nuclear engineering stems from the requirements of the Nuclear power plant Krsko, Slovenian Nuclear SafetyDOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS, Module NUCLEAR ENGINEERING

  15. What physics and astronomy courses Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Essentials What physics and astronomy courses are there? MPhys Astrophysics Physics Physics (research placement) Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics BSc Physics Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics Foundation year for UK and EU students Physics and Astronomy degrees (with a foundation

  16. Research in: Experimental Photonuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    & Phenomenology Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology Accelerator Physics Health Physics #12;Experimental Photonuclear cryptography #12;Accelerator Physics Dallin, CLS Staff Particle Accelerator Design · Beam Optics · RF systemsResearch in: Experimental Photonuclear Physics Quantum Entanglement Particle Physics Theory

  17. Condition Monitoring System for Reinforced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    containing dissolved ionic species such as chlorides. Since concrete is a porous material, with timeCondition Monitoring System for Reinforced Concrete Structures PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES: Patent pending concrete condition monitoring system providing `real-time' information on temperature

  18. Signal conditioning circuitry design for instrumentation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Cory A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the current progress in the design, implementation, and validation of the signal conditioning circuitry used in a measurement instrumentation system. The purpose of this text is to document the current progress of a particular design in signal conditioning circuitry in an instrumentation system. The input of the signal conditioning circuitry comes from a piezoresistive transducer and the output will be fed to a 250 ksps, 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with an input range of 0-5 V. It is assumed that the maximum differential voltage amplitude input from the sensor is 20 mV with an unknown, but presumably high, sensor bandwidth. This text focuses on a specific design; however, the theory is presented in such a way that this text can be used as a basis for future designs.

  19. Electrical condition monitoring method for polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Jr. Kenneth S. (Dahlonega, GA); Morris, Shelby J. (Hampton, VA); Masakowski, Daniel D. (Worcester, MA); Wong, Ching Ping (Duluth, GA); Luo, Shijian (Boise, ID)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical condition monitoring method utilizes measurement of electrical resistivity of a conductive composite degradation sensor to monitor environmentally induced degradation of a polymeric product such as insulated wire and cable. The degradation sensor comprises a polymeric matrix and conductive filler. The polymeric matrix may be a polymer used in the product, or it may be a polymer with degradation properties similar to that of a polymer used in the product. The method comprises a means for communicating the resistivity to a measuring instrument and a means to correlate resistivity of the degradation sensor with environmentally induced degradation of the product.

  20. When Does Aid Conditionality Work?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montinola, Gabriella R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005, the Group of Eight (G8) nations committed to increaseprogram conditions. Given the G8 industrialized nations’

  1. TTProblem A Air Conditioning Machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    TTProblem A Air Conditioning Machinery Input file: ducts.in You are a technician for the Air Conditioning Machinery company (ACM). Unfortunately, when you arrive at a customer site to install some air conditioning ducts, you discover that you are running low on supplies. You have only six duct segments

  2. PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    of each year by the Superintendent for Building Maintenance and Construction Work Control, Director of the craftspeople under their control and related operation costs for the following specific Physical Plant shops) Superintendent of Heating and Air Conditioning (a) Electronic Maintenance (b) HVAC (c) Insulation/Asbestos

  3. Magnitude and determinants of change in objectively-measured physical activity, sedentary time and sleep duration from ages 15 to 17.5y in UK adolescents: the ROOTS study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Paul J.; Wijndaele, Katrien; Corder, Kirsten; Westgate, Kate; Ridgway, Charlotte L.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Dunn, Valerie; Goodyer, Ian; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , Faith MS, Allison DB, Gallagher D, Chiumello G, Heymsfield SB. Body mass index as a measure of adiposity among children and adolescents: a validation study. J Pediatr. 1998;132:204–10. 53. Foster BJ, Platt RW, Zemel BS. Development and validation of a...

  4. Acetone Photophysics at ear Critical to Supercritical Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    from liquid to gas. Rather, the fuel behaves as a single homogeneous supercritical fluid that exhibits the physical and chemical interactions of the fluid, e.g., jet breakup and eventual mixing of fuel and oxidizer conditions with 266 nm excitation, motivated by an interest in using acetone to study transcritical fuel

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    , environmental radiation, noise, acustics, infra sound, natural radioactivity, solar energy, polarized lightENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS LABORATORY PRACTICES #12;Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Enviromental Physics Methods Laboratory Practices #12;Eötvös Loránd University Faculty of Science ENVIRONMENTAL

  6. Evaluation of Physics Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    1 Evaluation of Physics Research Eindhoven University of Technology 1996-2003 April 2006 #12;2 3........................................................................................................................................................... 11 Individual Programme Evaluation Eindhoven University of Technology (RU) in September 2004 ­ and Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TUE) decided to have their physics

  7. Particle Physics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward W. Kolb

    1994-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Lectures presented at the 42nd Scottish Universities Summer School in Physics, St. Andrews, Scotland, August 1993.

  8. Introduction to Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, Edgar Casimiro [Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias Campus Leon, Loma del Bosque 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150 Leon (Mexico) and Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense, 22, C.P. 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a basic introduction to the physics of the neutrino, with emphasis on experimental results and developments.

  9. Energy conditions, traversable wormholes and dust shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco S. N. Lobo

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Firstly, we review the pointwise and averaged energy conditions, the quantum inequality and the notion of the ``volume integral quantifier'', which provides a measure of the ``total amount'' of energy condition violating matter. Secondly, we present a specific metric of a spherically symmetric traversable wormhole in the presence of a generic cosmological constant, verifying that the null and the averaged null energy conditions are violated, as was to be expected. Thirdly, a pressureless dust shell is constructed around the interior wormhole spacetime by matching the latter geometry to a unique vacuum exterior solution. In order to further minimize the usage of exotic matter, we then find regions where the surface energy density is positive, thereby satisfying all of the energy conditions at the junction surface. An equation governing the behavior of the radial pressure across the junction surface is also deduced. Lastly, taking advantage of the construction, specific dimensions of the wormhole, namely, the throat radius and the junction interface radius, and estimates of the total traversal time and maximum velocity of an observer journeying through the wormhole, are also found by imposing the traversability conditions.

  10. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Carl [Univ of South Carolina; Mishra, Sanjib R. [Univ of South Carolina; Petti, Roberto [Univ of South Carolina; Purohit, Milind V. [Univ of South Carolina

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment, which collected data at SLAC until 2008. They continued to analyze the voluminous BaBar data with an emphasis on precision tests of Quantum Chromodynamics and on properties of the "eta_B," a bottom quark paired in a meson with a strange quark. The ATLAS experiment became the principal research focus for Purohit. One of the world's largest pieces of scientific equipment, ATLAS observes particle collisions at the highest-energy particle accelerator ever built, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Our efforts on ATLAS included participation in the commissioning, calibration, and installation of components called "CSCs". The unprecedented energy of 14 TeV enabled the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to declare discovery of the famous Higgs particle in 2012.

  11. PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kleer, Johan

    PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE C BIBLIOGRAPHY D. G. Bobrow and R J. Hayes, eds., Artif. Intell. 24," in Gentner and Stevens, 1983, pp. 155--190. J. de Kleer and J. S. Brown "A Qualitative Physics Based.J., 1983. P. Hayes, "The Naive Physics Manifesto," in Hobbs and Moore, 1985, pp 1--36 J R Hobbs and R C

  12. in Condensed Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master in Condensed Matter Physics ­ Master académique #12;2 #12;3 Students at the University. Condensed matter physics is about explaining and predicting the relationship between the atomic, and broad education in the field of condensed matter physics · introduce you to current research topics

  13. Programs of Study Physics Undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    ) and Modern Physics (PY 354) OR General Physics (PY 211, 212) and Elementary Modern Physics (PY 313); MethodsBU Physics Programs of Study Physics Undergraduate The undergraduate physics program at BU gives for the concentration in physics, as well as joint concentrations with astronomy, philosophy, and other College of Arts

  14. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  15. Lookback time bounds from energy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, J. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica C.P. 1641, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Reboucas, M. J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pires, N. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica C.P. 1641, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general relativity, the energy conditions are invoked to restrict general energy-momentum tensors on physical grounds. We show that in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) approach to cosmological modeling, where the energy and matter components of the cosmic fluid are unknown, the energy conditions provide model-independent bounds on the behavior of the lookback time of cosmic sources as a function of the redshift for any value of the spatial curvature. We derive and confront such bounds with a lookback time sample which is built from the age estimates of 32 galaxies lying in the interval 0.11 < or approx. z < or approx. 1.84 and by assuming the total expanding age of the Universe to be 13.7{+-}0.2 Gyr, as obtained from current cosmic microwave background experiments. In agreement with previous results, we show that all energy conditions seem to have been violated at some point of the recent past of cosmic evolution.

  16. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Bush, P.V.

    1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is divided into four tasks. The Management Plan was developed in task 1. Task 2, Evaluation of Mechanisms in FGD Sorbent and Ash Interactions, focuses on the characteristics of binary mixtures of these distinct powders. Task 3, Evaluation of Mechanisms in Conditioning Agents and Ash, is designed to examine the effects of various conditioning agents on fine ash particles to determine the mechanisms by which these agents alter the physical properties of the ash. Tasks 2 and 3 began with an extensive literature search and the assembly of existing theories. This phase of the project is now complete. During the past quarter, initial preparations of laboratory equipment for laboratory testing have been made. A plan for initial laboratory tests has been submitted to the Project Manager for review. Laboratory testing will commence once these laboratory plans have been formally approved. The results of the work performed under task 2 and 3 will be included in a Flue Gas Conditioning Model that will be issued under task 4. The Final Report for the project will also be prepared under task 4.

  17. Efficiency measurements of TPV cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broman, L.; Jarefors, K. [Solar Energy Research Center, Hoegskolan Dalarna, S-781 88 Borlaenge (Sweden); Marks, J. [Department of Operational Efficiency, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7060, S-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Wanlass, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 (United States of America)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring TPV cell efficiencies at different radiation intensities and for different graybody emitter temperatures has been constructed. The apparatus has been used for measuring V-I characteristics, efficiencies and fill factors for several InGaAs TPV cells. Measured results are used to determine how cells may function together with edge filters, and those results are compared with theory. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Spin Physics at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schill; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The COMPASS experiment is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS using muon and hadron beams for the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon and hadron spectroscopy. The main objective of the muon physics program is the study of the spin of the nucleon in terms of its constituents, quarks and gluons. COMPASS has accumulated data during 6 years scattering polarized muons off a longitudinally or a transversely polarized deuteron (6LiD) or proton (NH3) target. Results for the gluon polarization are obtained from longitudinal double spin cross section asymmetries using two different channels, open charm production and high transverse momentum hadron pairs, both proceeding through the photon-gluon fusion process. Also, the longitudinal spin structure functions of the proton and the deuteron were measured in parallel as well as the helicity distributions for the three lightest quark flavors. With a transversely polarized target, results were obtained with proton and deuteron targets for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons as well as for identified kaons and pions. The Collins asymmetry is sensitive to the transverse spin structure of the nucleon, while the Sivers asymmetry reflects correlations between the quark transverse momentum and the nucleon spin. Recently, a new proposal for the COMPASS II experiment was accepted by the CERN SPS which includes two new topics: Exclusive reactions like DVCS and DVMP using the muon beam and a hydrogen target to study generalized parton distributions and Drell-Yan measurements using a pion beam and a polarized NH3 target to study transverse momentum dependent distributions.

  19. The Broad Line Region of AGN: Kinematics and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Popovic

    2006-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a discussion of kinematics and physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) is given. The possible physical conditions in the BLR and problems in determination of the physical parameters (electron temperature and density) are considered. Moreover, one analyses the geometry of the BLR and the probability that (at least) a fraction of the radiation in the Broad Emission Lines (BELs) originates from a relativistic accretion disk.

  20. Transversity Measurements at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPASS Collaboration; C. Schill

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of transverse spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. From the analysis of the 2002-2004 data, new results for the transverse target spin asymmetry of z-ordered identified pion and kaon pairs are presented. In addition, a first result for the transverse target spin asymmetry of exclusively produced rho^0 mesons on the deuteron is shown.

  1. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynier, Yvan (Meylan, FR); Yazami, Rachid (Los Angeles, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  2. Primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christel Johanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Brief History of and Introduction to Neutrino Physics . 13Nucleosynthesis and Neutrino Physics A dissertationdensity depend on new neutrino physics in di?erent ways. In

  3. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group report: Neutrino physics Acknowledgements TheWorking group report: Neutrino physics Coordinators: SANDHYAthe report of the neutrino physics working group at WHEPP-X.

  4. Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics A.M. Sessler OctoberSOME FRONTIERS OF ACCELERATOR PHYSICS* Andrew M. Sessleris Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics and it is most

  5. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2012 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2012 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2012 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students of physics, math, sciences and engineering. Principles learned in Physics 303 are applied here to understand

  6. atmospheric pressure measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric conditions. Our module is capable of measuring temperature, pressure, wind speed, and particle concentration. The module will take measurements every minute and the...

  7. Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    of probabilistic belief revising, most research focuses on revising a single probabilistic distribution [5, 1, 8, 4Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs Anbu Yue 1 and Weiru Liu 1 Abstract. In this paper, we present a revision strategy of revis- ing

  8. Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma Electrical and Computer, NY 14627-0126 ABSTRACT Imaging devices operate at the physical interfaces corresponding to image capture and reproduction. The combi- nation of physical insight and mathematical signal processing tools

  9. Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Applied Physics Letters Astronomy & Astrophysics Astronomy and Astrophysics Review Astrophysical Journal European Physical Journal D. Atomic, Molecular

  10. Physics at COSY-Juelich

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroeher, Hans [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    COSY, a storage and cooler synchrotron, which is fed by an injector cyclotron, is operated at Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). It provides phase space cooled polarized or unpolarized beams of protons and deuterons with momenta between 0.3 and 3.7 GeV/c for internal experiments and to external target stations. The major experimental facilities, used for the ongoing physics program, are ANKE and WASA (internal) and TOF (external). A new internal target station to investigate polarization build-up by spin-filtering (PAX) has recently been commissioned. COSY is the machine for hadron spin physics on a world-wide scale, which is also used for tests in conjunction with plans to build a dedicated storage ring for electric dipole moment (EDM) measurements of proton, deuteron and {sup 3}He. In this contribution recent results as well as future plans are summarized.

  11. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  12. Conditional entropy of ordinal patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton M. Unakafov; Karsten Keller

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate a quantity called conditional entropy of ordinal patterns, akin to the permutation entropy. The conditional entropy of ordinal patterns describes the average diversity of the ordinal patterns succeeding a given ordinal pattern. We observe that this quantity provides a good estimation of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy in many cases. In particular, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns of a finite order coincides with the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for periodic dynamics and for Markov shifts over a binary alphabet. Finally, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns is computationally simple and thus can be well applied to real-world data.

  13. Top-Quark Physics Results From LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Fiorini

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The top-quark is a fundamental element of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We review the current status of the top-quark measurements performed by ATLAS and CMS experiments in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV by presenting the recent results of the top-quark production rates, top mass measurements and additional top quark properties. We will also describe the recent searches for physics beyond the Standard Model in the top-quark sector.

  14. Conditions for detecting CP violation via neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alicja Joniec; Marek Zralek

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay data together with information on the absolute neutrino masses obtained from the future KATRIN experiment and/or astrophysical measurements give a chance to find CP violation in the lepton sector with Majorana neutrinos. We derive and discuss necessary conditions which make discovery of such CP violation possible for the future neutrino oscillation and mass measurements data.

  15. Conditions for detecting CP violation via neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joniec, A.; Zralek, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay data, together with information on the absolute neutrino masses obtained from the future KATRIN experiment and/or astrophysical measurements, provide a chance to find CP violation in the lepton sector with Majorana neutrinos. We derive and discuss necessary conditions which make discovery of such CP violation possible for the future neutrino oscillation and mass measurements data.

  16. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

  17. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

  18. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. This study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Chapter 2 will deal with kinetic theory, which is the simplest of all formalisms for studying systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the laws it obeys provide

  19. EMIT: explicit modeling of interactive-engagement techniques for physics graduate teaching assistants and the impact on instruction and student performance in calculus-based physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezrailson, Cathy Mariotti

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study measures the effect of a model of explicit instruction (EMIT) on the: 1) physics graduate teaching assistants? adherence to reformed teaching methods, 2) impact of the instructional model on GTAs? beliefs about the nature of physics...

  20. UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC 2012 #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC · Conclusion #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC

  1. Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences Program Assessment Coordinator Michael Pravica pravica@physics.unlv.edu 895-1723 Five-Year Implementation Dates (2010 for physics at the graduate level 4. understand statistical physics at the graduate level 5. perform

  2. 3.September.2014 Physics 3340

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    ) Atmospheric structure and climate Solar input, radiation balance, environmental spectroscopy, ozone layers, CO3.September.2014 Physics 3340 Principles of Environmental Physics Instructor: Brad de Young Physics % Final examination 40 % #12;Course outline people (1) Environmental physics Introduction and background

  3. 4.September.2013 Physics 3340

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    (2) Atmospheric structure and climate Solar input, radiation balance, environmental spectroscopy4.September.2013 Physics 3340 Principles of Environmental Physics Instructor: Brad de Young Physics environmental physics will mean exploring the terrestrial environment through the understanding provided

  4. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  5. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  6. Physics of Cancer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science

  7. Plasma physics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics OursourcesEdgephysics Subscribe

  8. Astroparticle Physics with AMS02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behcet Alpat

    2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS02) experiment will be installed in 2009 on the International Space Station (ISS) for an operational period of at least three years. The purpose of AMS02 experiment is to perform accurate, high statistics, long duration measurements in space of charged cosmic rays in rigidity range from 1 GV to 3 TV and of high energy photons up to few hundred of GeV. In this work we will discuss the experimental details and the physics capabilities of AMS02 on ISS.

  9. Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  10. Platform Based Design for Automotive Sensor Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanucci, L; Iozzi, F; Marino, C; Rocchi, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a general architecture suitable to interface several kinds of sensors for automotive applications is presented. A platform based design approach is pursued to improve system performance while minimizing time-to-market.. The platform is composed by an analog front-end and a digital section. The latter is based on a microcontroller core (8051 IP by Oregano) plus a set of dedicated hardware dedicated to the complex signal processing required for sensor conditioning. The microcontroller handles also the communication with external devices (as a PC) for data output and fast prototyping. A case study is presented concerning the conditioning of a Gyro yaw rate sensor for automotive applications. Measured performance results outperform current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

  11. > MSU Catalog Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    > MSU Catalog Physics Department of Physics http://www.physics.montana.edu/ The physics curriculum and concepts related to the physical world surrounding us. Using this broad base, which stresses fundamentals into jobs in education, industry, government, or business. The Department of Physics offers graduate work

  12. LANL | Physics | Active Interrogation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting terrorist nuclear devices, 2011 Detonation of a terrorist nuclear device in a major city would have...

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Operations personnel, and to various experimental instrument specialists in the Physics Division. The PAC members will review each proposal for scientific merit and...

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it is expected that the research program will evolve to take full advantage of new physics opportunities with a suitable suite of experimental equipment. Significant work has...

  15. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  16. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman:...

  17. Courses on Beam Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the...

  18. Physical Protection Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplements DOE O 473.1, by establishing requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels: DOE M 5632.1C-1

  19. Physics of viral shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruinsma, RF; Bruinsma, RF; Klug, WS

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constitute minimum free energy states but they typically areshells must have different energies so T = 7 shells shouldof thermodynamics, the Gibbs free energy of Physics of Viral

  20. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICSmore »can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  1. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at the Large Helical Device. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide profile measurements of the local emissivity, temperature, and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example, geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  2. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pablant, N. A. [PPPL; Bell, R. E. [PPPL; Bitter, M. [PPPL; Delgado-Aparicio, L. [PPPL; Hill, K. W. [PPPL; Lazerson, S. [PPPL; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu, Japan

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  3. Importance of Design Conditions for Sizing Air-Conditioning Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaban, N.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Suri, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design conditions based on the meteorological data collected at two weather stations located less than 10 km away from each other within Kuwait City are presented for dry-bulb temperature (DBT) and web-bulb temperature (WBT) prioritization...

  4. In brief: BEC to basics Despite the enormous success of modern physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Nature Publishing Group 2002 In brief: BEC to basics Despite the enormous success of modern physical theory in describing the Universe, physicists still strive to prove physics wrong. At a fundamental level, this requires measuring physical constants such as the fine-structure constant, (a measure

  5. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

  6. Physics 129 Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , homework solutions, handouts and announcements will be posted at my course web site: http://scipp.ucsc.edu/daw/phys129/enrolled This web site is password protected. The username and password will be announced materials will be distributed on the web site above. Nine texts on nuclear and particle physics, all

  7. Measuring the Boltzmann constant by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy of ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejri, S; Kozlova, O; Ayari, C; Tokunaga, Sean; Chardonnet, C; Briaudeau, S; Darquié, B; Rohart, F; Daussy, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our ongoing effort to measure the Boltzmann constant, $k_B,$ using the Doppler broadening technique on ammonia. This paper presents some of the improvements made to the mid-infrared spectrometer including the use of a phase-stabilized quantum cascade laser, a lineshape analysis based on a refined physical model and an improved fitting program 2 increasing the confidence in our estimates of the relevant molecular parameters, and a first evaluation of the saturation parameter and its impact on the measurement of k B. A summary of the systematic effects contributing to the measurement is given and the optimal experimental conditions for mitigating those effects in order to reach a competitive measurement of $k_B$ at a part per million accuracy level are outlined.

  8. Measuring the Boltzmann constant by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy of ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mejri; Papa Sow; O. Kozlova; C. Ayari; Sean Tokunaga; C. Chardonnet; S. Briaudeau; B. Darquié; F. Rohart; C. Daussy

    2015-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our ongoing effort to measure the Boltzmann constant, $k_B,$ using the Doppler broadening technique on ammonia. This paper presents some of the improvements made to the mid-infrared spectrometer including the use of a phase-stabilized quantum cascade laser, a lineshape analysis based on a refined physical model and an improved fitting program 2 increasing the confidence in our estimates of the relevant molecular parameters, and a first evaluation of the saturation parameter and its impact on the measurement of k B. A summary of the systematic effects contributing to the measurement is given and the optimal experimental conditions for mitigating those effects in order to reach a competitive measurement of $k_B$ at a part per million accuracy level are outlined.

  9. Operational Discord Measure for Gaussian States with Gaussian Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh Rahimi-Keshari; Timothy C. Ralph; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an operational discord-type measure for quantifying nonclassical correlations in bipartite Gaussian states based on using Gaussian measurements. We refer to this measure as operational Gaussian discord (OGD). It is defined as the difference between the entropies of two conditional probability distributions associated to one subsystem, which are obtained by performing optimal local and joint Gaussian measurements. We demonstrate the operational significance of this measure in terms of a Gaussian quantum protocol for extracting maximal information about an encoded classical signal. As examples, we calculate OGD for several Gaussian states in the standard form.

  10. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

  11. FROM PHYSICS TO PHYSICALISM a version of this paper is published in Physicalism and its Discontents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewer, Barry

    FROM PHYSICS TO PHYSICALISM a version of this paper is published in Physicalism and its Discontents be informed by science advocate physicalism in place of materialism. Physicalism claims that all facts obtain- of completed fundamental physics. Later I will discuss a more precise formulation. But not all contemporary

  12. About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is intended" physics and engineering. "Applied" is distinguished from "pure" by a subtle combination of factors not be designing something in particular, but rather is using physics or conducting physics research with the aim

  13. Physics 141 & Physics 153 Laboratory Schedule -Physics 141 & 153 -Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Physics 141 & Physics 153 i Laboratory Schedule - Physics 141 & 153 - Spring 2008 Monday Tuesday ­ No Labs! #12;Physics 141 & Physics 153 ii Lab Instructor Information Name: Office: Phone: Email: Mailbox: · Write your lab instructor's name on it · Give it to Theresa Sis, Main Physics Office, 116 Brace Lab

  14. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2011 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2011 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2011 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students.com Classes: MWF, 12:10-13:00 pm, Webster B11. Required text: Modern Physics, Randy Harris (Pearson, 2nd

  15. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2010 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2010 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2010 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students, 12:10-13:00 pm, Webster B11. Required text: Modern Physics, Randy Harris (Pearson, 2nd edition, 2008

  16. Transverse Spin Physics at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Schill; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of transverse spin and transverse momentum effects in deep inelastic scattering is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS collaboration. Three channels have been analyzed at COMPASS to access the transversity distribution function: The azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, involving the Collins fragmentation function, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, involving the two-hadron interference fragmentation function, and the measurement of the transverse polarization of Lambda hyperons in the final state. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering give important information on the inner structure of the nucleon as well, and can be used to estimate both the quark transverse momentum k_T in an unpolarized nucleon and to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. COMPASS has measured these asymmetries using spin-averaged 6LiD data.

  17. CLICdp Overview: Overview of physics potential at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon Levy; for the CLICdp collaboration

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    CLICdp, the CLIC detector and physics study, is an international collaboration presently composed of 23 institutions. The collaboration is addressing detector and physics issues for the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a high-energy electron-positron accelerator which is one of the options for the next collider to be built at CERN. Precision physics under challenging beam and background conditions is the key theme for the CLIC detector studies. This leads to a number of cutting-edge R&D activities within CLICdp. The talk includes a brief introduction to CLIC, accelerator and detectors, hardware R&D as well as physics studies at CLIC.

  18. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  19. PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

  20. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia Thom

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision studies of top quark properties are a primary goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Marking the first stages of this program, the CDF collaboration presents recent results on top pair production cross section, single top physics and top mass, using between 109 and 200 pb{sup -1} of Run II data.

  1. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  2. Weak value measurement with an incoherent measuring device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Cho; Hyang-Tag Lim; Young-Sik Ra; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Aharonov-Albert-Vaidman (AAV) weak measurement, it is assumed that the measuring device or the pointer is in a quantum mechanical pure state. In reality, however, it is often not the case. In this paper, we generalize the AAV weak measurement scheme to include more generalized situations in which the measuring device is in a mixed state. We also report an optical implementation of the weak value measurement in which the incoherent pointer is realized with the pseudo-thermal light. The theoretical and experimental results show that the measuring device under the influence of partial decoherence could still be used for amplified detection of minute physical changes and are applicable for implementing the weak value measurement for massive particles.

  3. Energetic materials at extreme conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, David Iain Archibald

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to effectively model the behaviour of energetic materials under operational conditions it is essential to obtain detailed structural information for these compounds at elevated temperature and/or pressures. The ...

  4. Desire, belief, and conditional belief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etlin, David Jeffrey

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the logics of value and conditionals, and the question of whether they should be given cognitivist analyses. Emotivist theories treat value judgments as expressions of desire, rather than beliefs ...

  5. Searches for physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Roche, Willem T H van Oers, Ross D Young

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab has now demonstrated ablility to test the fundamental symmetries of nature, and thereby probe for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Here we review the tremendous advances in precision parity-violation measurements with CEBAF that enable searches for new physics. This has been demonstrated with a determination of the weak charge of the proton, which is found to be in agreement with the prediction of the standard electroweak theory, and at a precision that rules out relevant new physics to the TeV scale. We also review the planned future experiments which aim to further test the electroweak theory at Jefferson Lab, including a further improvement on the proton weak charge, an ultra-precise Møller measurement, and a probe of the axial quark charges in PVDIS.

  6. Protein Folding as a Physical Stochastic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerson Huang

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We model protein folding as a physical stochastic process as follows. The unfolded protein chain is treated as a random coil described by SAW (self-avoiding walk). Folding is induced by hydrophobic forces and other interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, which can be taken into account by imposing conditions on SAW. The resulting model is termed CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk. Conceptually, the mathematical basis is a generalized Langevin equation. In practice, the model is implemented on a computer by combining SAW and Monte Carlo. To illustrate the flexibility and capabilities of the model, we consider a number of examples, including folding pathways, elastic properties, helix formation, and collective modes.

  7. Elementary Particle Physics at Baylor (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmann, J.R.

    2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Baylor University Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) group on the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment from August 15, 2005 to May 31, 2012. Led by the Principal Investigator (Dr. Jay R. Dittmann), the Baylor HEP group has actively pursued a variety of cutting-edge measurements from proton-antiproton collisions at the energy frontier.

  8. Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on criteria air contaminants, water use, land use, greenhouse gas emissions and solid waste disposal and population growth, impose the physical limits and then simulate household and firm responses to policy and assess the resulting implications for liveability in the region. I measure liveability using 24

  9. On the mathematical modelling of measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Barzilai

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The operations of linear algebra, calculus, and statistics are routinely applied to measurement scales but certain mathematical conditions must be satisfied in order for these operations to be applicable. We call attention to the conditions that lead to construction of measurement scales that enable these operations.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on B physics at hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, P. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Mishra, C.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)] [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Measurement of Angle {alpha}; Measurement of Angle {beta}; Measurement of Angle {gamma}; Other B Physics; Theory of Heavy Flavors; Charged Particle Tracking and Vertexing; e and {gamma} Detection; Muon Detection; Hadron ID; Electronics, DAQ, and Computing; and Machine Detector Interface. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the in Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. High School Physics Teachers Summer Physics Education Research Position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    High School Physics Teachers Summer Physics Education Research Position The Department of Physics's Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This effort is intended to enhance high school physics and lecture demonstrations, or other pedagogical components, or to allow participation in current physics

  12. M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 for later reference. 1. understanding of a variety of fields of physics at the graduate level 2. performance of a physics research project suitable for a masters thesis 3. ability to communicate scientific research

  13. A fibre optic sensor for the in situ determination of rock physical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinsch, Thomas; Milsch, Harald; Bremer, Kort; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel; Lochmann, Steffen; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2012.06.011

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the behaviour of rocks under changing load or temperature conditions, the determination of physical parameters like pore pressure or temperature within the pore space is essential. Within this study, the implementation of a novel fibre optic point sensor for pressure and temperature determination into a high pressure / high temperature triaxial cell is presented. For the first time, pressure was measured directly within the pore space of a Flechtinger sandstone specimen during a hydrostatic compression test at up to 70 MPa. The sensor used within this study consists of a miniature all-silica fibre optic Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (EFPI) sensor which has an embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) reference sensor element to determine temperature and pressure directly at the point of measurement.

  14. The Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Woosley; H. -T. Janka

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae are nature's grandest explosions and an astrophysical laboratory in which unique conditions exist that are not achievable on Earth. They are also the furnaces in which most of the elements heavier than carbon have been forged. Scientists have argued for decades about the physical mechanism responsible for these explosions. It is clear that the ultimate energy source is gravity, but the relative roles of neutrinos, fluid instabilities, rotation and magnetic fields continue to be debated.

  15. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  16. Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. F. Cowen; T. DeYoung; D. Grant; D. A. Dwyer; S. R. Klein; K. B. Luk; D. R. Williams; for the IceCube/PINGU Collaboration

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed PINGU experiment to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy is presented, in the context of long-range planning by the U.S. nuclear physics community.

  17. ac magnetization measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 86 SQUID MEASUREMENTS OF MAGNETIC VORTICES IN VERY UNDERDOPED Physics Websites...

  18. automatic noninvasive measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86 An automatic method to detect defaults in the measurement chain of a sound level meter, used for Physics Websites Summary: Roger Hennequin, 78197 Trappes Cedex, France...

  19. Conditioned changes in pain reactivity: conditioned stimuli elicit hypoalgesia under a wide range of test conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illich, Paul Anthony

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioned hypoalgesia, two recent reports suggest that a conditioned stimulus (CS) which has been paired with an aversive event may sometimes produce an increase in pain reactivity, or "hyperalgesia" rather than hypoalgesia (Davis & Henderson, 1985...-Evans hooded rats) (Davis & Henderson, 1985; Lysle & Fowler, 1988). Currently, it is not clear what determines whether a stimulus which has been paired with an aversive event will elicit either an increase or decrease in pain reactivity. In the present...

  20. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mark Samuel

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

  1. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; /SLAC; Lee, R.W.; /LLNL, Livermore; Nagler, B.; /Rutherford; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC; ,

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS an X-ray instrument that will complement the initial instrument suite included in the LCLS construction and the LUSI Major Item of Equipment (MIE) Instruments. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation must be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The MEC concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the MEC instrument has been identified as meeting one of the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community. The primary purpose of the MEC instrument is to create High Energy Density (HED) matter and measure its physical properties. There are three primary elements of the MEC instrument: (A) Optical laser drivers that will create HED states by irradiation in several ways and provide diagnostics capability; (B) The LCLS x-ray free electron laser, which will provide the unique capability to create, probe and selectively pump HED states; and, (C) A suite of diagnostic devices required to observe the evolution of the HED state. These elements when combined in the MEC instrument meet the 'Mission Need' as defined in CD-0. For the purposes of the description we separate the types of experiments to be performed into three categories: (1) High pressure: Here we are interested in the generation of high pressure using the optical lasers to irradiate a surface that ablates and drives a pressure wave into a sample, similar to a piston. The pressures that can be reached exceed 1 Mbar and the properties of interest are for example, the reflectivity, conductivity, opacity as well as the changes driven by the pressure wave on, e.g., condensed matter structure. These phenomena will be studied by means of diffraction measurements, measurements of the pressure wave characteristics, in situ probing by

  2. Measurements of F 2 from CCFR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;#22;-Fe di#11;erential cross sections. The extraction is performed in a physics model independent (PMI, is higher than current theoretical predictions. The ratio of the F2 (PMI) values measured in #23 by extracting the #23; #22; structure functions in a physics model independent (PMI) way. We also re- port

  3. Physics | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our sciencePhysics of Intrinsic

  4. Playing games in quantum mechanical settings: A necessary and sufficient condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Shimamura; Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of recent studies have focused on novel features in game theory when the games are played using quantum mechanical toolbox (entanglement, unitary operators, measurement). Researchers have concentrated in two-player-two strategy, 2x2, dilemma containing classical games, and transferred them into quantum realm showing that in quantum pure strategies dilemmas in such games can be resolved if entanglement is distributed between the players armed with quantum operations. Moreover, it became clear that the players receive the highest sum of payoffs available in the game, which are otherwise impossible in classical pure strategies. Encouraged by the observation of rich dynamics of physical systems with many interacting parties and the power of entanglement in quantum versions of 2x2 games, it became generally accepted that quantum versions can be easily extended to N-player situations by simply allowing N-partite entangled states. In this article, however, we show that this is not generally true because the reproducibility of classical tasks in quantum domain imposes limitations on the type of entanglement and quantum operators. We propose a benchmark for the evaluation of quantum and classical versions of games, and derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a physical realization. We give examples of entangled states that can and cannot be used, and the characteristics of quantum operators used as strategies.

  5. A necessary and sufficient condition to play games in quantum mechanical settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Junichi Shimamura; Nobuyuki Imoto

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum game theory is a multidisciplinary field which combines quantum mechanics with game theory by introducing non-classical resources such as entanglement, quantum operations and quantum measurement. By transferring two-player-two strategy (2x2) dilemma containing classical games into quantum realm, dilemmas can be resolved in quantum pure strategies if entanglement is distributed between the players who use quantum operations. Moreover, players receive the highest sum of payoffs available in the game, which are otherwise impossible in classical pure strategies. Encouraged by the observation of rich dynamics of physical systems with many interacting parties and the power of entanglement in quantum versions of 2x2 games, it became generally accepted that quantum versions can be easily extended to N-player situations by simply allowing N-partite entangled states. In this article, however, we show that this is not generally true because the reproducibility of classical tasks in quantum domain imposes limitations on the type of entanglement and quantum operators. We propose a benchmark for the evaluation of quantum and classical versions of games, and derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a physical realization. We give examples of entangled states that can and cannot be used, and the characteristics of quantum operators used as strategies.

  6. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelmann, A.

    As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section ...

  7. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  8. MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Student Handbook Visit us on the Web at http://www.millersville.edu/~physics the Millersville University Physics Department and its programs. It complements, but does not replace, the catalog of Department Programs 8 Description of Individual Programs: 8 -- B.S. in Physics 8 -- B.A. in Physics 8 -- B

  9. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  10. Understanding the Dehumidification Performance of Air-Conditioning Equipment at Part-Load Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don B. Shirey III; Hugh I. Henderson Jr; Richard A. Raustad

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air conditioner cooling coils typically provide both sensible cooling and moisture removal. Data from a limited number of field studies (Khattar et al. 1985; Henderson and Rengarajan 1996; Henderson 1998) have demonstrated that the moisture removal capacity of a cooling coil degrades at part-load conditions--especially when the supply fan operates continuously while the cooling coil cycles on and off. Degradation occurs because moisture that condenses on the coil surfaces during the cooling cycle evaporates back into air stream when the coil is off. This degradation affects the ability of cooling equipment to maintain proper indoor humidity levels and may negatively impact indoor air quality. This report summarizes the results of a comprehensive project to better understand and quantify the moisture removal (dehumidification) performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. A review of the open literature was initially conducted to learn from previous research on this topic. Detailed performance measurements were then collected for eight cooling coils in a controlled laboratory setting to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation by the coils. Measurements of cooling coil dehumidification performance and space humidity levels were also collected at seven field test sites. Finally, an existing engineering model to predict dehumidification performance degradation for single-stage cooling equipment at part-load conditions (Henderson and Rengarajan 1996) was enhanced to include a broader range of fan control strategies and an improved theoretical basis for modeling off-cycle moisture evaporation from cooling coils. The improved model was validated with the laboratory measurements, and this report provides guidance for users regarding proper model inputs. The model is suitable for use in computerized calculation procedures such as hourly or sub-hourly building energy simulation programs (e.g., DOE's EnergyPlus building energy simulation program, http://www.energyplus.gov ).

  11. Physics and College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    and Professional Writing Physics 188: First-Year Seminar Physics 303: Modern Physics I Physics 320: Mechanics 202/206: Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Physics 303: Modern Physics I Physics 304: ModernPhysics and Astronomy College of Arts and Sciences Degree Options Bachelor of Science in Physics

  12. Postdoctoral Position in Experimental Neutrino Physics at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    Postdoctoral Position in Experimental Neutrino Physics at UC Davis The experimental Neutrinos physics is required. Double Chooz is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment that seeks to measure on the data analysis. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) is a next-generation oscillation experiment

  13. People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics book Ch 2-1 The Big Idea Energy is a measure of the amount of, or potential for, often by heat or sound waves. #12;People's Physics book Ch 2-2 Key Applications · In "roller coaster of the bonding energy into energy that is used to power the body. This energy goes on to turn into kinetic energy

  14. Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer1 and Ko van der Weele2 1 Physics of Fluids) A striking example of levitation is encountered in the "kugel fountain" where a granite sphere, sometimes with measurements on a fountain holding a granite sphere of one meter in diameter. We close by discussing several

  15. Physical Model of Current-Induced Scour at Ventura Harbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Physical Model of Current-Induced Scour at Ventura Harbor Steven A. Hughes1 and Bradd R at Ventura Harbor, California, USA. The physical model was calibrated by adjusting the total flow discharge to achieve equilibrium scour development that matched the scour hole measured at Ventura Harbor

  16. A possible definition of a {\\it Realistic} Physics Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Gisin

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A definition of a {\\it Realistic} Physics Theory is proposed based on the idea that, at all time, the set of physical properties possessed (at that time) by a system should unequivocally determine the probabilities of outcomes of all possible measurements.

  17. Modeling SRAM Start-Up Behavior for Physical Unclonable Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    /data, which are highly prone to physical attacks [1­3]; hence, the methods are no longer secure. Ideally), and reports some industrial measurements to validate the model. Simulation of the impact of different

  18. A Brief Survey of Physical Activity Monitoring Devices1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    on their mechanisms, measurements, product forms, and data portability. and 3) the role of personal devices both conventional standalone pedometer devices and personal digital devices integrated A Brief Survey of Physical Activity Monitoring Devices1 Technical Report MPCL-08

  19. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding...

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and as such hosts 200 - 300 Users each year. It is supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the Department of Energy. The Users come from U.S. universities and national...

  2. Physical Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy management objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5632.1C. Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  3. Physical process Mechanical mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Physical process Generation · Mechanical mechanisms F = m·a · Electric/Magnetic mechanisms F = B·i·l · Fluid dynamic/Hydraulic mechanisms q, p, ij · Thermal/Optical #12;2 Source unit

  4. PHYSICAL THERAPIST STUDENT EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    planning worksheets, Clinical Site Information Form (CSIF), program outcomes, and other sourcesPHYSICAL THERAPIST STUDENT EVALUATION: CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION June 10, 2003 and clinical educators' requests to provide a voluntary, consistent and uniform approach for students

  5. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997, San Jose, CBP Note-205, LBNL-39944, February 1997.71-259 wurtele@lbl.gov Joined LBNL in 1995 Ph. D. , Physics,collider collaboration) Chap. 8, LBNL- "Free Electron Laser

  6. QCD and Hadron Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley J. Brodsky; Abhay L. Deshpande; Haiyan Gao; Robert D. McKeown; Curtis A. Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Richard G. Milner; Jianwei Qiu; David G. Richards; Craig D. Roberts

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. It highlights progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and presents a vision for the future by identifying key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define our next decade. In defining the priority of outstanding physics opportunities for the future, both prospects for the short (roughly 5 years) and longer term (beyond 10 years) are identified together with the facilities, personnel and other resources needed to maximize the discovery potential in hadronic physics worldwide. In this connection, the potential of an electron ion collider is highlighted.

  7. Measurement of the absolute \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10{sup 20} protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10{sup 20} POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  9. Gravitation Physics at BGPL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Boynton; R. M. Bonicalzi; A. M. Kalet; A. M. Kleczewski; J. K. Lingwood; K. J. McKenney; M. W. Moore; J. H. Steffen; E. C. Berg; W. D. Cross; R. D. Newman; R. E. Gephart

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report progress on a program of gravitational physics experiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large-amplitude torsion oscillation. This program includes tests of the gravitational inverse square law and of the weak equivalence principle. Here we describe our ongoing search for inverse-square-law violation at a strength down to $10^{-5}$ of standard gravity. The low-vibration environment provided by the Battelle Gravitation Physics Laboratory (BGPL) is uniquely suited to this study.

  10. programme in MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    CODEX Doctoral programme in MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS Ljubljana, August 2008 #12;FMF UL, Phys.....................................................................................4 3. Fundamental objectives of the doctoral study programme mathematics and physics and general.................................................................................12 Subprogramme Physics............................................................................12

  11. Health Physics Technician | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment of Energy Health Physics RecordsHealth

  12. Introduction Simulation of Pathological conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Reference Survey of the Modeling Brain Energy Metabolism and Function -- Report of the work by Larisa. V et State University MATH 690P, Dec. 1. 06 Wen Zhou Modeling Brain Energy #12;Outline Introduction Modeling Simulation of Pathological conditions Conclusion and Discussion Reference Introduction Modeling Energy

  13. Conditionally Independent Generalized Competing Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is subjected to corrective maintenance (CM) and condition-based preventive maintenance (PM) actions. In order into a state in which it can perform its function again. Preventive maintenance (PM) is carried out when whether the maintenance is preventive or correc- tive. 2. Characterization of the PM-CM process Let Ht

  14. Conditions of Occupancy College Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Green and at Trinity Hall, Dartry, Dublin 6. There may be local differences in the Conditions of Occupancy between the main campus and Trinity Hall. Such differences will be described within to either the Warden of Trinity Hall in relation to rooms or residents at Trinity Hall or the Registrar

  15. Top Quark Physics at the CDF Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernd Stelzer; for the CDF Collaboration

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator is recently performing at record luminosities that enables a program systematically addressing the physics of top quarks. The CDF collaboration has analyzed up to 5/fb of proton anti-proton collisions from the Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The large datasets available allow to push top quark measurements to higher and higher precision and have lead to the recent observation of electroweak single top quark production at the Tevatron. This article reviews recent results on top quark physics from the CDF experiment.

  16. Realizing Physical Approximation of the Partial Transpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyang-Tag Lim; Yong-Su Kim; Young-Sik Ra; Joonwoo Bae; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The partial transpose by which a subsystem's quantum state is solely transposed is of unique importance in quantum information processing from both fundamental and practical point of view. In this work, we present a practical scheme to realize a physical approximation to the partial transpose using local measurements on individual quantum systems and classical communication. We then report its linear optical realization and show that the scheme works with no dependence on local basis of given quantum states. A proof-of-principle demonstration of entanglement detection using the physical approximation of the partial transpose is also reported.

  17. PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 2008 Prepared by _________________________________________________ T. Mullen Physics Division Chemical Hygiene Officer Reviewed by ___________________________________________________ J. Woodring Site Chemical Hygiene Officer Approved

  18. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM DatagovMeasurementsVisibilityMeasurements

  19. AGN Physics from QSO Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Croom; Brian Boyle; Tom Shanks; Phil Outram; Robert Smith; Lance Miller; Nicola Loaring; Suzanne Kenyon; Warrick Couch

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of QSO clustering measurements, particular with respect to their relevance in understanding AGN physics. Measurements based on the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) find a scale length for QSO clustering of s_0=5.76(+0.17-0.27) h-1 Mpc at a redshift ~1.5, very similar to low redshift galaxies. There is no evidence of evolution in the clustering of QSOs from z~0.5 to z~2.2. This lack of evolution and low clustering amplitude suggests a short life time for AGN activity of the order ~10^6-10^7 years. Large surveys such at the 2QZ and SDSS also allow the the study of QSO environments in 3D for the first time (at least at low redshift), early results from this work seem to show no difference between the environments of QSOs and normal galaxies. Future studies e.g. measuring clustering as a function of black hole mass, and deep QSO surveys should provide further insight into the formation and evolution of AGN.

  20. Two-Baryon Systems with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohreh Davoudi

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I derive the most general quantization condition for energy eigenvalues of two interacting baryons in a finite cubic volume when arbitrary twisted boundary conditions are imposed on their finite-volume wavefunctions. These quantization conditions are used, along with experimentally known scattering parameters of two-nucleon systems in the coupled 3S1-3D1 channels, to demonstrate the expected effect of a selection of twisted boundary conditions on the spectrum of the deuteron. It is shown that an order of magnitude reduction in the finite-volume corrections to the deuteron binding energy arise in moderate volumes with a proper choice of boundary conditions on the proton and the neutron, or by averaging the result of periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions. These observations mean that a sub-percent accuracy can be achieved in the determination of the deuteron binding energy at (spatial) volumes as small as ~(9[fm])^3 in upcoming lattice QCD calculations of this nucleus with physical light-quark masses. The results reviewed in this talk are presented in details in Ref. [1].

  1. EVALUATION OF THE PAVEMENT STRUCTURAL CONDITION AT NETWORK LEVEL USING FALLING WEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    EVALUATION OF THE PAVEMENT STRUCTURAL CONDITION AT NETWORK LEVEL USING FALLING WEIGHT DEFLECTOMETER agencies to improve the surface condition of pavements, but these measures have not successfully prevented the problem from reoccurring. As a result, the overall pavement condition keeps deteriorating because

  2. The determination of lithology from core physical properties measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Paula Ann

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (10 -6 SI) ? (10 -8 m 3 /kg) Iron-bearing minerals Biotite 1,500 to 2,900 5 to 52 to 95 to 98 Orthopyroxene, olivines, amphiboles 1,500 to 1,800 1 to 43 to 50 to 130 iron a 3,900,000 50,000 to 2,000,000 Iron sulfides Pyrite 35-5,000 11...

  3. atomic physics measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures have revealed a lot about the nature of three-dimensional BoseEinstein condensates. They play an even bigger part in two-dimensional cold atomic gases and drive a...

  4. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D{sub 0}?=?0.53(×2.1±1) cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1} that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  5. Constructivism, measurement, mathematics Concepts of measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Christian

    Constructivism, measurement, mathematics Concepts of measurement Measurement and statistics Conclusion Measurement as a constructive act - a statistician's view Christian Hennig March 14, 2013 Christian Hennig Measurement as a constructive act - a statistician's view #12;Constructivism, measurement

  6. Application of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter to nonreference condition dosimetry in the postal dose audit system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki, E-mail: h-mizuno@nirs.go.jp; Fukumura, Akifumi; Fukahori, Mai [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Sakata, Suoh; Yamashita, Wataru; Takase, Nobuhiro [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, Chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Toho University Omori Medical Center, 6-11-1 Omori-Nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-8541 (Japan); Katayose, Tetsurou [Chiba Cancer Center, 666-2 Nitona-Cho, Chuoh-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Abe-Sakama, Kyoko; Kanai, Tatsuaki [Gunma University, Heavy Ion Medical Research Center, 4-2, Aramaki-machi, Maebashi City, Gunma 371-8510 (Japan); Kusano, Yohsuke [Kanagawa Cancer Center, 1-1-2 Nakao, Asahi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 241-8515 (Japan); Shimbo, Munefumi [Saitama Medical Center, 1981, Kamoda, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8550 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to obtain a set of correction factors of the radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) output for field size changes and wedge insertions. Methods: Several linear accelerators were used for irradiation of the RGDs. The field sizes were changed from 5 × 5 cm to 25 × 25 cm for 4, 6, 10, and 15 MV x-ray beams. The wedge angles were 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. In addition to physical wedge irradiation, nonphysical (dynamic/virtual) wedge irradiations were performed. Results: The obtained data were fitted with a single line for each energy, and correction factors were determined. Compared with ionization chamber outputs, the RGD outputs gradually increased with increasing field size, because of the higher RGD response to scattered low-energy photons. The output increase was about 1% per 10 cm increase in field size, with a slight difference dependent on the beam energy. For both physical and nonphysical wedged beam irradiation, there were no systematic trends in the RGD outputs, such as monotonic increase or decrease depending on the wedge angle change if the authors consider the uncertainty, which is approximately 0.6% for each set of measured points. Therefore, no correction factor was needed for all inserted wedges. Based on this work, postal dose audits using RGDs for the nonreference condition were initiated in 2010. The postal dose audit results between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed. The mean difference between the measured and stated doses was within 0.5% for all fields with field sizes between 5 × 5 cm and 25 × 25 cm and with wedge angles from 15° to 60°. The standard deviations (SDs) of the difference distribution were within the estimated uncertainty (1SD) except for the 25 × 25 cm field size data, which were not reliable because of poor statistics (n = 16). Conclusions: A set of RGD output correction factors was determined for field size changes and wedge insertions. The results obtained from recent postal dose audits were analyzed, and the mean differences between the measured and stated doses were within 0.5% for every field size and wedge angle. The SDs of the distribution were within the estimated uncertainty, except for one condition that was not reliable because of poor statistics.

  7. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    223Th 7 1279-2 Catherine Deibel Measurement of the 26Si(&alpha,p)29P Reaction Rate in X-Ray Bursts 6 1281-2 Lee Riedinger Plunger measurement of lifetimes in a possible...

  8. PHYSICS 9005B: MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS JANUARY 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    PHYSICS 9005B: MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS JANUARY 2012 Instructor: S. R. Valluri, P&A 112, 661 background and interest in Mathematics are encouraged to take this course Course Website: http://publish.uwo.ca/~valluri/physics major topics relevant for physics and engineering will be covered. Complex Variables: Analytic

  9. Roadmap: Physical Education Physical Education Licensure Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Physical Education ­ Physical Education Licensure ­ Bachelor of Science [EH | Last Updated: 31-May-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study;Roadmap: Physical Education ­ Physical Education Licensure ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-PEP-PEL] College

  10. Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me? If you are interested in learning a Physical Earth Science degree. The skills you will gain are wide-ranging and will provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector. Are all Physical Earth Science degrees the same? Universities do not have

  11. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALPHA Collaboration; M. C. Fujiwara; G. B. Andresen; W. Bertsche; P. D. Bowe; C. C. Bray; E. Butler; C. L. Cesar; S. Chapman; M. Charlton; J. Fajans; R. Funakoshi; D. R. Gill; J. S. Hangst; W. N. Hardy; R. S. Hayano; M. E. Hayden; A. J. Humphries; R. Hydomako; M. J. Jenkins; L. V. Jorgensen; L. Kurchaninov; W. Lai; R. Lambo; N. Madsen; P. Nolan; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; A. Povilus; P. Pusa; F. Robicheaux; E. Sarid; S. Seif El Nasr; D. M. Silveira; J. W. Storey; R. I. Thompson; D. P. van der Werf; L. Wasilenko; J. S. Wurtele; Y. Yamazaki

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  12. Search for New Physics in Rare Top Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratishruti Saha

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Top physics provides a fertile ground for new-physics searches. At present, most top observables appear to be in good agreement with the respective Standard Model predictions. However, in the case of decay modes that are suppressed in the Standard Model, new-physics contributions of comparable magnitude may exist and yet go unnoticed because their impact on the total decay width is small. Hence it is interesting to probe rare top decays. This analysis focuses on the decay $t \\to b \\bar b c$. Useful observables are identified and prospects for measuring new-physics parameters are examined.

  13. Set theory and physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svozil, K. [Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inasmuch as physical theories are formalizable, set theory provides a framework for theoretical physics. Four speculations about the relevance of set theoretical modeling for physics are presented: the role of transcendental set theory (i) in chaos theory, (ii) for paradoxical decompositions of solid three-dimensional objects, (iii) in the theory of effective computability (Church-Turing thesis) related to the possible {open_quotes}solution of supertasks,{close_quotes} and (iv) for weak solutions. Several approaches to set theory and their advantages and disadvantages for physical applications are discussed: Cantorian {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} (i.e., nonaxiomatic) set theory, contructivism, and operationalism. In the author`s opinion, an attitude, of {open_quotes}suspended attention{close_quotes} (a term borrowed from psychoanalysis) seems most promising for progress. Physical and set theoretical entities must be operationalized wherever possible. At the same time, physicists should be open to {open_quotes}bizarre{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}mindboggling{close_quotes} new formalisms, which need not be operationalizable or testable at the time of their creation, but which may successfully lead to novel fields of phenomenology and technology.

  14. Recent results in electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulia Manca

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Run II physics program of CDF and D0 has just begun with the first 72 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data collected at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Electroweak measurements are among the first and most important benchmarks for the best understanding of the detectors and testing the Standard Model. We present measurements of the W and Z inclusive cross sections and decays asymmetries, recent results in di-boson physics and searches for new physics which make use of distinct electroweak signatures.

  15. NRL PLASMA FORMULARY Beam Physics Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman,John C.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Solar Physics Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Thermonuclear Fusion

  16. Neutrino Physics: A Selective Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott M. Oser

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos in the Standard Model of particle physics are massless, neutral fermions that seemingly do little more than conserve 4-momentum, angular momentum, lepton number, and lepton flavour in weak interactions. In the last decade conclusive evidence has demonstrated that the Standard Model's description of neutrinos does not match reality. We now know that neutrinos undergo flavour oscillations, violating lepton flavour conservation and implying that neutrinos have non-zero mass. A rich oscillation phenomenology then becomes possible, including matter-enhanced oscillation and possibly CP violation in the neutrino sector. Extending the Standard Model to include neutrino masses requires the addition of new fields and mass terms, and possibly new methods of mass generation. In this review article I will discuss the evidence that has established the existence of neutrino oscillation, and then highlight unresolved issues in neutrino physics, such as the nature of three-generational mixing (including CP-violating effects), the origins of neutrino mass, the possible existence of light sterile neutrinos, and the difficult question of measuring the absolute mass scale of neutrinos.

  17. The Future of High Energy Nuclear Physics in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schukraft

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In less than two years from now, the LHC at CERN will start operating with protons and later with heavy ions in the multi TeV energy range. With its unique physics potential and a strong, state-of-the complement of detectors, the LHC will provide the European, and in fact worldwide Nuclear Physics community, with a forefront facility to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions well into the next decade.

  18. The Measure of a Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palle E. T. Jorgensen

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    While finite non-commutative operator systems lie at the foundation of quantum measurement, they are also tools for understanding geometric iterations as used in the theory of iterated function systems (IFSs) and in wavelet analysis. Key is a certain splitting of the total Hilbert space and its recursive iterations to further iterated subdivisions. This paper explores some implications for associated probability measures (in the classical sense of measure theory), specifically their fractal components. We identify a fractal scale $s$ in a family of Borel probability measures $\\mu$ on the unit interval which arises independently in quantum information theory and in wavelet analysis. The scales $s$ we find satisfy $s\\in \\mathbb{R}_{+}$ and $s\

  19. Roberta E. Rikli, C. Jessie Jones. (1997). Assessing Physical Performance in Independent Older Adults: Issues and Guidelines. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 5 (3).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Adults: Issues and Guidelines. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 5 (3). With the projected growth measure physical performance on a continuum across the wide range of functioning in the independent parameters associated with common activities of daily living. Additional tools are needed for measuring

  20. Early Top Physics at CMS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus Manuel Vizan

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron in 1995. For the last decade the study of its properties has been a major theme in the worldwide experimental high energy physics program. The advent of the LHC opens up a new era in top quark physics; because of the large $t\\bar{t}$ cross-section and the high luminosity, the LHC can be thought of as a top factory. Here we present the prospects and plans for ttbar physics at CMS at an early stage of the experiment, covering from the initial establishment of the top signal, to the first measurements that become possible for an integrated luminosity of 100 $pb^{-1}$, considering a realistic detector performance.

  1. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  2. Corrosion in gas conditioning plants - An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, B.; Dupart, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1800's, fuel gases of various sorts (acetylene, blast furnace gas, flue water gas, carbureted water gas, coal gas, coke oven gas and producer gas) were transmitted at low pressures in pipelines and were conditioned for contaminate removal. The removal of such contaminates as H/sub 2/S was usually accomplished by solid absorbents such as iron oxide, a process that is still in use today. The discovery in the late 20's of a regenerative process employing alkanolamines was instrumental in rapid increase in the use of natural gas in large volumes. Also at this time, the development of wide diameter pipelines that could handle 500-700 psi gas pressure provided the means of handling these large volumes of gas. The protection of the pipeline from corrosion depended upon contaminate removal of water, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. In the process of contaminant removal, the process equipment suffered severe corrosion damage. Corrosion test methods and inhibitors were applied to those early processes and have advanced from weep holes and coupons to the present way of electronic and physical test methods. The trend is away from the primary amine at either low strength or inhibited at high concentration to less corrosive, ''tailor-made'' solvents that can be designed or formulated to perform a given task at acceptable corrosion rates and at much lower energy levels.

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Experimental Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    at Constant q OP-XP-617 1. Overview of planned experiment Goal: Measure RF power loss properties as a function of magnetic field constant q to elucidate: · RF power loss scaling with B under similar stability conditions of shots around 112699) [J. Hosea et al., 2005 RF Conference]. Thus the RF power loss is significantly

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  5. Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Rick; /Florida U.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of the XXXIV International Meeting on Fundamental Physics held in El Escorial, Spain on April 2-7, 2006 was ''From HERA and the TEVATRON to the LHC''. This is a summary of the four lectures I presented on ''Physics at the Tevatron''. Heavy quark production and the production of photons, bosons, and jets at the Tevatron are discussed. Also, a detailed study at the ''underlying event'' at CDF is presented together with a discussion of PYTHIA 6.2 tunes. A look back at the ''old days'' of Feynman-Field collider phenomenology is included.

  6. Physics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An error occurred. Try

  7. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become a User Recovery ActgovMeasurements Measurement

  8. Performance of U/P finite elements subjected to nearly incompressible linear axisymmetric orthotropic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Robert D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element analysis is a vastly expanding field which provides engineers a viable instrumentation to model and measure idealized constitutive stress strain relationships for various complex physical bodies. In the field ...

  9. Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical Physics in Cellular Biology: Some Illustrative Case Studies Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application observation, I will describe a few specific instances where approaches inspired by theoretical physics allow

  10. Faculty Positions Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Faculty Positions Department of Physics Texas Tech University The Department of Physics at Texas condensed matter materials physics. Successful candidates at the senior level will be expected to transfer an existing successful research program to Texas Tech and instruct physics courses at all levels offered

  11. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A Qualitative Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kleer, Johan

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A Qualitative Physics Confluences Johan De Kleer and John Seely Brown Xerox physics are (1) to be far simpler than the classical physics and yet retain all the important distinctions quantities and differential equations, (2) to produce causal accounts of physical mechanisms that are easy

  12. Department of Physics Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

    Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 `Botany' of correlated fermion physics #12;Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 Example: 3He;Department of Physics Columbia University Copyright A. J. Millis 2010 Normal liquid D. Greywall PRB 27 2747

  13. Physics Division annual report - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries are given of progress accomplished for the year in the following areas: (1) Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Research; (2) Operation and Development of Atlas; (3) Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics Research; (4) Theoretical Physics Research; and (5) Atomic and Molecular Physics Research.

  14. Mathemathical methods of theoretical physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Svozil

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Course material for mathematical methods of theoretical physics intended for an undergraduate audience.

  15. Mathemathical methods of theoretical physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svozil, Karl

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Course material for mathemathical methods of theoretical physics intended for an undergraduate audience.

  16. Market conditions affecting energy efficiency investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seabright, J. [Agency for International Development, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy, Environment, and Technology; Smith, S.G.; Vierbicher, H.L. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The global energy efficiency market is growing, due in part to energy sector and macroeconomic reforms and increased awareness of the environmental benefits of energy efficiency. Many countries have promoted open, competitive markets, thereby stimulating economic growth. They have reduced or removed subsidies on energy prices, and governments have initiated energy conservation programs that have spurred the wider adoption of energy efficiency technologies. The market outlook for energy efficiency is quite positive. The global market for end-use energy efficiency in the industrial, residential and commercial sectors is now estimated to total more than $34 billion per year. There is still enormous technical potential to implement energy conservation measures and to upgrade to the best available technologies for new investments. For many technologies, energy-efficient designs now represent less than 10--20% of new product sales. Thus, creating favorable market conditions should be a priority. There are a number of actions that can be taken to create favorable market conditions for investing in energy efficiency. Fostering a market-oriented energy sector will lead to energy prices that reflect the true cost of supply. Policy initiatives should address known market failures and should support energy efficiency initiatives. And market transformation for energy efficiency products and services can be facilitated by creating an institutional and legal structure that favors commercially-oriented entities.

  17. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  18. A lower bound of quantum conditional mutual information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin Zhang; Junde Wu

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a lower bound of quantum conditional mutual information is obtained by employing the Peierls-Bogoliubov inequality and Golden Thompson inequality. Comparison with the bounds obtained by other researchers indicates that our result is independent of any measurements. It may give some new insights over squashed entanglement and perturbations of Markov chain states.

  19. TOT Measurement Implemented in FPGA TDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huanhuan Fan; Ping Cao; Shubin Liu; Qi An

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Time measurement plays a crucial rule for the purpose of particle identification in high energy physical experiments. With the upgrading of physical goal and the developing of electronics, modern time measurement system meets the requirement of excellent resolution specification as well as high integrity. Due to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), FPGA time-to-digital converter (TDC) becomes one of mature and prominent time measurement methods in recent years. For correcting time-walk effect caused by leading timing, time-over-threshold (TOT) measurement should be added in the FPGA TDC. TOT can be obtained by measuring the interval time of signal leading and trailing edge. Unfortunately, a traditional TDC can recognize only one kind of signal edge, the leading or the trailing. Generally, to measure the interval, two TDC channels can be used at the same time, one for leading, the other for trailing. However, this method will increase the amount of used FPGA resource and reduce the TDC's integrity unavoidably. This paper presents one method of TOT measurement implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA. In this method, TOT measure can be achieved in only one TDC input channel. The consumed resources and time resolution can both be guaranteed. Test shows that this TDC can achieve resolution better than 15 ps for leading edge measurement and 37 ps for TOT measurement. Furthermore, the TDC measuring dead time is about 2 clock cycles, which makes it be good for applications of higher physical event rate

  20. Admissibility Conditions for Degenerate Cyclotomic BMW Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Frederick M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study admissibility conditions for the parameters of degenerate cyclotomic BMW algebras. We show that the u-admissibility condition of Ariki, Mathas and Rui is equivalent to a simple module theoretic condition.

  1. Physical properties of kraft black liquor: Summary report, Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, A.L.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1981, a research program has been in progress to determine the physical properties of kraft black liquors and to develop methods for reduction of data and correlation of properties with pumping conditions. The basic premise that has been used to direct the research program is that kraft black liquor behaves as a polymer solution, particularly at high solids, and that the behavior is dominated by the characteristics of the lignin present. This premise is proving to be correct, and the principles that follow from this premise are proving to be successful for data reduction and correlation. The research has been a complex program involving experimental pulping, chemical analysis, lignin separation and characterization, thermal analysis, rheological measurements, and considerable equipment and methods development. Due to the complexity of the program, the unforeseen need to expend a great deal of effort in development of experimental techniques for analysis, and the fact that our liquors proved to be unstable at high temperatures and solids, all of the original objectives could not be accomplished. However, our program has added substantially to the body of knowledge of physical properties of black liquor. Our results indicate that the goal of developing correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor is practical and can be realized through extension of the present work.

  2. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190?°C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition systems.

  3. A Performance Comparison of Condition Based Monitoring Damage Features Used in Rotating Machines under Variable Conditions /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Luke Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M. Papaelias, “Condition monitoring of wind turbines:Condition monitoring and fault detection of wind turbinesCondition monitoring and fault diagnostics of wind turbines,”

  4. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried Ducts Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried...

  5. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commitee Presentation Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Space Conditioning Standing Technical ommittee, as...

  6. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Design Options for Locating Ducts...

  7. Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant...

  8. Roadmap for selected key measurements of LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LHCb Collaboration; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Amoraal; J. Anderson; O. Aquines Gutierrez; L. Arrabito; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; Y. Bagaturia; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; MdC. Barandela Pazos; R. J. Barlow; S. Barsuk; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; A. Bizzeti; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; E. Bos; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; J. Bressieux; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; J. Buytaert; J. -P. Cachemiche; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; W. Cameron; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; A. Chlopik; P. Ciambrone; X. Cid Vidal; P. J. Clark; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; D. G. d'Enterria; W. Da Silva; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; H. De Vries; D. Decamp; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; M. Dima; S. Donleavy; A. C. dos Reis; A. Dovbnya; T. Du Pree; P. -Y. Duval; L. Dwyer; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; L. Eklund; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estève; S. Eydelman; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. L. Fungueirino Pazos; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; Yu. Gilitsky; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; G. Guerrer; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; Z. Guzik; T. Gys; F. Hachon; G. Haefeli; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; P. F. Harrison; J. He; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; V. Iakovenko; C. Iglesias Escudero; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; M. John; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; F. Kapusta; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; S. Khalil; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; J. Knopf; S. Koblitz; A. Konoplyannikov; P. Koppenburg; I. Korolko; A. Kozlinskiy; M. Krasowski; L. Kravchuk; P. Krokovny; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; I. Kudryashov; T. Kvaratskheliya; D. Lacarrere; A. Lai; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; R. Lefevre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; K. Lessnoff; L. Li; Y. Y. Li; J. Libby; M. Lieng; R. Lindner; S. Lindsey; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; A. Maier; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; F. Marin; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; D. Martinez Santos; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; V. Matveev; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; B. Mcharek; C. Mclean; R. McNulty; M. Merk; J. Merkel; M. Merkin; R. Messi; F. C. D. Metlica; J. Michalowski; S. Miglioranzi; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; J. V. Morris; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; R. Muresan; F. Murtas; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; L. Nicolas; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Noor; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; A. Ostankov; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papadelis; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson; G. N. Patrick; E. Pauna; C. Pauna; C. Pavel; A. Pazos Alvarez; A. Pellegrino; G. Penso; M. Pepe Altarelli; S. Perazzini; D. L. Perego; A. Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; E. Perez Trigo; P. Perret; G. Pessina; A. Petrella; A. Petrolini; B. Pietrzyk; D. Pinci; S. Playfer; M. Plo Casasus; G. Polok; A. Poluektov; E. Polycarpo; D. Popov; B. Popovici; S. Poss; C. Potterat; A. Powell; S. Pozzi; V. Pugatch; A. Puig Navarro; W. Qian; J. H. Rademacker; B. Rakotomiaramanana; I. Raniuk; G. Raven; S. Redford; W. Reece

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Six of the key physics measurements that will be made by the LHCb experiment, concerning CP asymmetries and rare B decays, are discussed in detail. The "road map" towards the precision measurements is presented, including the use of control channels and other techniques to understand the performance of the detector with the first data from the LHC.

  9. Physics and Life 043008001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang-Yuan

    . 2. #12; 1. Renewable Energy 2nd edition, Editor Godfrey Boyle Published : OXFORD 2004. 2. Renewable Boyle Published : OXFORD 2004 2. Renewable Energy : Its physics, engineering, environmental impacts DEVELOPMENT 1. 2. 3. 4. , , #12; ,[] 2-3, #12;&: 1. Renewable Energy 2nd edition · Editor: Godfrey

  10. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy] [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  11. Jet Physics at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenichi Hatakeyama; for the CDF Collaboration

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on jet physics at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider from the CDF Collaboration are presented. The main focus is put on results for the inclusive jet and dijet, $b\\bar b$ dijet, $W/Z+$jets and $W/Z+b$-jets production.

  12. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    ., Professor of Physical Education, MA, 1963, University of Michigan: Golf coach. (1963)* Back, Patrice: Ice skating. (1993) Vogely, Anita, Adjunct Lecturer, PhD, 1995, University of Texas: Foreign language, BS, 1998, State University of New York College at Cortland: Assistant basketball coach. (1993

  13. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  14. CARBON -14 PHYSICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    CARBON - 14 [14C] PHYSICAL DATA · Beta Energy: 156 keV (maximum) 49 keV (average) (100% abundance on wipes. #12;RADIATION MONITORING DOSIMETERS · Not needed (beta energy too low). · 14C Beta Dose Rate: 6) · Effective Half-Life: 40 days (unbound) · Specific Activity: 4460 mCi/gram · Maximum Beta Range in Air: 24

  15. The Unreasonable Success of Quantum Probability I: Quantum Measurements as Uniform Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a 'uniform tension-reduction' (UTR) model, which allows to represent the probabilities associated with an arbitrary measurement situation and use it to explain the emergence of quantum probabilities (the Born rule) as 'uniform' fluctuations on this measurement situation. The model exploits the geometry of simplexes to represent the states, in a way that the measurement probabilities can be derived as the 'Lebesgue measure' of suitably defined convex subregions of the simplexes. We consider a very simple and evocative physical realization of the abstract model, using a material point particle which is acted upon by elastic membranes, which by breaking and collapsing produce the different possible outcomes. This easy to visualize mechanical realization allows one to gain considerable insight into the possible hidden structure of an arbitrary measurement process. We also show that the UTR-model can be further generalized into a 'general tension-reduction' (GTR) model, describing conditions of lack of knowledge generated by 'non-uniform' fluctuations. In this ampler framework, particularly suitable to describe experiments in cognitive science, we define and motivate a notion of 'universal measurement', describing the most general possible condition of lack of knowledge in a measurement, emphasizing that the uniform fluctuations characterizing quantum measurements can also be understood as an average over all possible forms of non-uniform fluctuations which can be actualized in a measurement context. This means that the Born rule of quantum mechanics can be understood as a first order approximation of a more general non-uniform theory, thus explaining part of the great success of quantum probability in the description of different domains of reality. This is the first part of a two-part article.

  16. Designing a future Conditions Database based on LHC experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formica, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration; Gallas, Elizabeth; Govi, Giacomo; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS and CMS Conditions Database infrastructures have served each of the respective experiments well through LHC Run 1, providing efficient access to a wide variety of conditions information needed in online data taking and offline processing and analysis. During the long shutdown between Run 1 and Run 2, we have taken various measures to improve our systems for Run 2. In some cases, a drastic change was not possible because of the relatively short time scale to prepare for Run 2. In this process, and in the process of comparing to the systems used by other experiments, we realized that for Run 3, we should consider more fundamental changes and possibilities. We seek changes which would streamline conditions data management, improve monitoring tools, better integrate the use of metadata, incorporate analytics to better understand conditions usage, as well as investigate fundamental changes in the storage technology, which might be more efficient while minimizing maintenance of the data as well as simplif...

  17. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  18. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  19. Electroweak, top and bottom physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ukegawa, Fumihiko; /Tsukuba U.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron Run-II program has been in progress since 2001, and the CDF and D0 experiments have been operational with upgraded detectors. Coupled with recent improvements in the Tevatron accelerator performance, the experiments have started producing important physics results and measurements. They report these measurements as well as prospects in the near future.

  20. Physics program in Hall A at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here the physics program planned for Hall A at CEBAF. It encompass exclusive as well as inclusive electromagnetic measurements requiring both high precision and accuracy. The program includes measurements of the elementary form factors of the nucleon, systematic studies of the few nucleon systems (d, {sup 3,4}He), high momentum structure of nuclei, their structure at high Q{sup 2} to look for hadronization and quark effects, spin response of nuclei via ({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec p}) reactions and the study of nuclear pion fields.