Sample records for measurement variable surface

  1. Variable energy positron measurements at nitrogen ion bombarded steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, G.; Kolitsch, A. [Research Centre Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany); Schut, H.; Veen, A. van [TU Delft (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen ion bombardment of steel samples has been studied by utilizing the Delft variable energy positron beam facility. The energy of the beam was varied between 250 eV and 25 keV and a line-shape parameter S describing the annihilation radiation has been measured. By use of the VEPFIT fitting program, up to five different layers, each having different densities, could be identified and characterized. The results show that carbon layers deposited during nitrogen implantation can be observed. A relation between the measured depth profiles of nitrogen, carbon and oxygen by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and the results of positron annihilation is given and discussed. The wear and friction properties of the steel surfaces before and after nitrogen implantation are presented.

  2. Measurements of Sea Surface Height Variability in the Eastern South Atlantic from Pressure Sensor-Equipped Inverted Echo Sounders: Baroclinic and Barotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker-Yeboah, Sheekela

    Variability in sea surface height (SSH) can be decomposed into two contributions: one from changes in mass in the water column (barotropic) and the other from purely steric changes (baroclinic). Both contributions can be ...

  3. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  4. Compressional wave character in gassy, near-surface sediments in southern Louisiana determined from variable frequency cross-well, borehole logging, and surface seismic measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Fasnacht, T. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity and attenuation data were used to test theoretical equations describing the frequency dependence of compressional wave velocity and attenuation through gas-rich sediments in coastal Louisiana. The cross-well data were augmented with velocities derived from a nearby seismic refraction station using a low-frequency source. Energy at 1 and 3 kHz was successfully transmitted over distances from 3.69 to 30 m; the 5 and 7-kHz data were obtained only at distances up to 20 m. Velocity tomograms were constructed for one borehole pair and covered a depth interval of 10--50 m. Results from the tomographic modeling indicate that gas-induced low velocities are present to depths of greater than 40 m. Analysis of the velocity dispersion suggests that gas-bubble resonance must be greater than 7 kHz, which is above the range of frequencies used in the experiment. Washout of the boreholes at depths above 15 m resulted in a degassed zone containing velocities higher than those indicated in both nearby refraction and reflection surveys. Velocity and attenuation information were obtained for a low-velocity zone centered at a depth of approximately 18 m. Measured attenuations of 1.57, 2.95, and 3.24 dB/m for the 3-, 5-, and 7-kHz signals, respectively, were modeled along with the velocity data using a silt-clay sediment type. Density and porosity data for the model were obtained from the geophysical logs; the bulk and shear moduli were estimated from published relationships. Modeling results indicate that gas bubbles measuring 1 mm in diameter occupy at least 25% to 35% of the pore space.

  5. Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

  6. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  7. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  8. Method for measuring surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  9. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumberDoppler ARM DatagovMeasurementsSea

  10. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soilvegetationatmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    of the incoming radiation or energy budget noise variability at the surface. Conversely, soil heat flux is shown on the influence of landsurface energy budget errors on the soilABL system. Other numerical studiesHarmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled

  11. Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    from the ECHAM4.5 general circulation model indicate that it is possible to quantify groundwater variability; Groundwater-surface water interaction; Hydroclimatology; Forecasting. Introduction ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over

  12. Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures Brent T Temperatures of Window Specimens: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith1 , Howdy and cold sides, respectively. Surface temperature maps were compiled using an infrared thermographic system

  13. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J. R., E-mail: john.harris@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5?cm/?s, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50?mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup ?} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  14. String method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    York University, New York, New York 10012 Giovanni Ciccottid INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica in the free energy. Provided that the number of collective variables is large enough, the new techniqueString method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces Luca

  15. Submitted to Journal of Physical Oceanography Sea Surface Temperature Variability Along the Path of the Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaja, Arnaud

    level pressure and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that a significant fraction of SST variability) and remote forcing by ENSO. The physical mechanisms rely on the interplay between atmospheric variability the South Pa- cific, inducing surface heat fluxes (Fs) and Ekman heat advection (Fek) anomalies. A simple

  16. Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Air Temperature Variability: 18402007* JASON E. BOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Air Temperature Variability: 1840­2007* JASON E. BOX Byrd Polar, seasonal, and annual mean Greenland ice sheet near- surface air temperatures. Independent observations Greenland in autumn and southern Greenland in winter. Spring trends marked the 1920s warming onset, while

  17. Host Range and Variability of Calcium Binding by Surface Loops in the Capsids of Canine and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    Host Range and Variability of Calcium Binding by Surface Loops in the Capsids of Canine and Feline, consisting of residues 359 to 375 of the capsid protein. This loop binds a divalent calcium ion in FPV and in the presence or absence of Ca2 . The largest structural difference was found to occur in a ¯exible surface loop

  18. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    1 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA 4 National Snow and Ice Data Center, University coherent regional patterns of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) change over a 17-year period

  19. Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chongpu Zhai; Sébastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwénaëlle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

  20. Improved Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force Using Gold Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Harris; F. Chen; U. Mohideen

    2000-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an improved precision measurement of the Casimir force using metallic gold surfaces. The force is measured between a large gold coated sphere and flat plate using an Atomic Force Microscope. The use of gold surfaces removes some theoretical uncertainties in the interpretation of the measurement. The forces are also measured at smaller surface separations. The complete dielectric spectrum of the metal is used in the comparison of theory to the experiment. The average statistical precision remains at the same 1% of the forces measured at the closest separation. These results should lead to the development of stronger constraints on hypothetical forces.

  1. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  2. High variability of Greenland surface temperature over the past 4000 years estimated from trapped air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    High variability of Greenland surface temperature over the past 4000 years estimated from trapped 10 October 2011; accepted 11 October 2011; published 10 November 2011. [1] Greenland recently is impacting the Greenland ice sheet and in turn accelerating global sealevel rise. Yet, it remains imprecisely

  3. Control of surface gravity waves by variable fluid injection in a model of a copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osses, Axel

    Control of surface gravity waves by variable fluid injection in a model of a copper converter splashing appears in copper converters when air is injected into the molten matte in order to carry out to the opposite extreme to where the nozzle injection is placed. Key words: Copper converter, gravity waves

  4. ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

    Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

  5. What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

  6. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  7. Variability in Measured Space Temperatures in 60 Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.; Lay, K.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the observed variability in indoor space temperature in a set of 60 homes located in Florida, New York, Oregon, and Washington. Temperature data were collected at 15-minute intervals for an entire year, including living room, master bedroom, and outdoor air temperature (Arena, et. al). The data were examined to establish the average living room temperature for the set of homes for the heating and cooling seasons, the variability of living room temperature depending on climate, and the variability of indoor space temperature within the homes. The accuracy of software-based energy analysis depends on the accuracy of input values. Thermostat set point is one of the most influential inputs for building energy simulation. Several industry standards exist that recommend differing default thermostat settings for heating and cooling seasons. These standards were compared to the values calculated for this analysis. The data examined for this report show that there is a definite difference between the climates and that the data do not agree well with any particular standard.

  8. Global Surface Temperature Measurement for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Rishabh

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation describes the use of permanent-change thermal paints as a technique for global surface temperature measurements on short-duration hypersonic flight vehicles. The thermal paints… (more)

  9. A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

  10. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F. [Aix-Marseille Univ, IUSTI, UMR CNRS 7343, F-13453 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (? ? 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (? ? 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  11. Surface pressure measurements for CFD code validation in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. The bluntness ratio of the geometry is 10% and the slice begins at 70% of the length of the vehicle. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from {minus}10 to + 18{degrees}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. A new and innovative uncertainty analysis was devised to estimate the contributors to surface pressure measurement uncertainty. Quantitative estimates were computed for the uncertainty contributions due to the complete instrumentation system, nonuniformity of flow in the test section of the wind tunnel, and variations in the wind tunnel model. This extensive set of high-quality surface pressure measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for hypersonic flow conditions.

  12. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D{sub 0}?=?0.53(×2.1±1) cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1} that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  13. Application of surface energy measurements to evaluate moisture susceptibility of asphalt and aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollinger, Corey James

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    is assessed using surface energy measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Surface energy is defined as the energy needed to create a new unit surface area of material in vacuum condition. Surface energy measurements are used to compute the adhesive...

  14. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5070 (United States); Kulkarni, Anand [Siemens Energy, Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  15. EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kogias, Ioannis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent qua...

  16. EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannis Kogias; Gerardo Adesso

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent quantum key distribution.

  17. Measurements of elastic modulus using laser-induced surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, D.J.; Amimoto, S.T.; Gross, R.W.F. [Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenn, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the mechanical testing methods that are utilized for alloys and polymers, e.g., dogbone, rheovibron, etc., are not applicable to thin film structures. We wish to report noncontacting measurements of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity and the elastic modulus applicable to thin films of moderate thickness. An accompanying paper extends this technique to smaller film dimensions. A 15 ns pulsed YAG laser was used as the energy source to thermoelastically excite surface waves. The propagation of the waves was then observed by a second, independent He-Ne laser at a distance from the excitation spot. using the knife edge/beam deflection technique. A cylindrical lens was used to reduce the energy loading of the YAG laser on the sample to avoid damaging the surface of the specimen. The Rayleigh wave velocity is calculated from measurements of the arrival time of the surface wave as a function of distance from the ND:YAG laser spot. The shear modulus, G, can be determined from the measured speed of the surface waves, V, the specimen density, p, and Poisson`s ratio, v, according to the following relationship: V = R(v){sm_bullet}(G/p){sup {1/2}} where R(v), expressed as (0.862 + 1.14v)/(l + v), is the ratio of the Rayleigh wave velocity to the shear wave velocity and ranges from 0.86 to 0.95 Table below lists the measured surface wave velocities and the calculated shear modulus for our experimental results and the published values. Excellent agreement is observed. The depth of the SAW is approximately equal to the SAW wavelength which is approximately the laser spot size. Typically 30 {mu}m spot sizes can be readily achieved. In conclusion, SAW velocities and the modulus of elasticity of various materials have been measured. We have demonstrated that this non-contacting method can be used to characterize moderately thin films.

  18. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes...

  19. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  20. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  1. Correlation of seismotectonic variables and GPS strain measurements in western Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Correlation of seismotectonic variables and GPS strain measurements in western Turkey Ali Osman O Mediterranean and western Turkey area. This analysis was conducted in three tectonic subdivisions corresponding measurements in western Turkey, J. Geophys. Res., 109, B11306, doi:10.1029/2004JB003101. 1. Introduction [2

  2. Surface-resistance measurements using superconducting stripline resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafner, Daniel; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc, E-mail: scheffl@pi1.physik.uni-stuttgart.de [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)] [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to measure the absolute surface resistance of conductive samples at a set of GHz frequencies with superconducting lead stripline resonators at temperatures 1–6 K. The stripline structure can easily be applied for bulk samples and allows direct calculation of the surface resistance without the requirement of additional calibration measurements or sample reference points. We further describe a correction method to reduce experimental background on high-Q resonance modes by exploiting TEM-properties of the external cabling. We then show applications of this method to the reference materials gold, tantalum, and tin, which include the anomalous skin effect and conventional superconductivity. Furthermore, we extract the complex optical conductivity for an all-lead stripline resonator to find a coherence peak and the superconducting gap of lead.

  3. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  4. ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability Devy Widjaja1 During ECG recording, several methods can be applied to derive a respiratory signal from the ECG (EDR signal). In this paper 4 EDR methods, including ECG filtering, R and RS amplitude based techniques

  5. A Climatological measurement methods This appendix describes the methods of climatological variable measurement at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a comparison of sensors employed. The measurement methods section describes the sensors used-wave A sensor used to measure the energy flux density of short-wave radiation is referred to as a pyranometer can be ±3 to 5% because of the relatively constant proportions of solar radiation at different

  6. Surface Energy Balance Measurements Above an Exurban Residential Neighbourhood of Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogun, Ahmed A.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Vezhapparambu, Sajith; Mauder, Matthias; McFadden, Joseph P.; Gallo, Kevin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9421-3 ARTICLE Surface Energy Balance Measurements Above anmeasurements of urban energy balances generally have beenuxes · Urban surface energy balance 1 Introduction Rapid

  7. Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupuis, Leonard Raymond

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Z4 April 1975. (after Fucik and Turner, 1975). 590 440 1D 1Dy ~ m 9 soo 530 560 18~ 530 I 22 ? g --' I / '3 22 0 590 20 338 530 16 850 mb 4 4 090 8 m 2D ? ? ? 6 ( ', -k 5 150 8 I '30 ~ 8O '4 210 210 700 BIb Fig. 6. (Cont3nued...DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MEASURED AND LINEARLY INTERPOLATED SYNOPTIC VARIABLES OVER A 12-h PERIOD DURING AVE IV A Thesis by LEONARD RAYMOND DUPUIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ful. fillment...

  8. CLUMPING AND THE INTERPRETATION OF kpc-SCALE MAPS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: SMOOTH H I AND CLUMPY, VARIABLE H{sub 2} SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lee, Cheoljong [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pety, Jerome [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large ({approx}kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds ({approx}pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a ''clumping factor'' that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and H I emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H{sub 2}/H I measured at {approx}kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. H I emission appears very smooth, with a clumping factor of only {approx}1.3. Based on the scarce and heterogeneous high-resolution data available, CO emission is far more clumped with a widely variable clumping factor, median {approx}7 for our heterogeneous data. Our measurements do not provide evidence for a universal mass-weighted surface density of molecular gas, but also cannot conclusively rule out such a scenario. We suggest that a more sophisticated treatment of molecular ISM structure, one informed by high spatial resolution CO maps, is needed to link cloud-scale models to kpc-scale observations of galaxies.

  9. Centennial-Scale Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity Variability in the Florida Straits During the Early Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinlein, William

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    variability in the Florida Straits. Here, we combine Mg/Ca-paleothermometry and stable oxygen isotope measurements on the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) from Florida Straits sediment core KNR166-2 JPC 51 (24 degrees 24.70? N, 83...

  10. Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. However,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 of 4 Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous frequency (HF) ratio with little change in mean heart rate. Results suggest that nicotine affects both components may yield erroneous results. Keywords--Autonomic regulation, heart rate variability, Lomb

  11. Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

  12. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in colloidal ensembles levitated above macroscopic surfaces. TIRM and VM are well established optical microscopy techniques for measuring normal and lateral colloidal excursions near macroscopic planar surfaces. The interactions between particle-particle...

  13. Intraseasonal variability in sea surface height over the South Wei Zhuang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    : Zhuang, W., S.P. Xie, D. Wang, B. Taguchi, H. Aiki, and H. Sasaki (2010), Intraseasonal variability through baroclinic Rossby waves [Z. Liu et al., 2001; Gan et al., 2006]. In the NSCS, the circulation Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) [Xie et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2004; Wu and Chang, 2005; Fang et

  14. MEASURING X-RAY VARIABILITY IN FAINT/SPARSELY SAMPLED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allevato, V. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Paolillo, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Papadakis, I. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Pinto, C. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584-CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the statistical properties of the normalized excess variance of variability process characterized by a ''red-noise'' power spectral density (PSD), as in the case of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We perform Monte Carlo simulations of light curves, assuming both a continuous and a sparse sampling pattern and various signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). We show that the normalized excess variance is a biased estimate of the variance even in the case of continuously sampled light curves. The bias depends on the PSD slope and on the sampling pattern, but not on the S/N. We provide a simple formula to account for the bias, which yields unbiased estimates with an accuracy better than 15%. We show that the normalized excess variance estimates based on single light curves (especially for sparse sampling and S/N < 3) are highly uncertain (even if corrected for bias) and we propose instead the use of an ''ensemble estimate'', based on multiple light curves of the same object, or on the use of light curves of many objects. These estimates have symmetric distributions, known errors, and can also be corrected for biases. We use our results to estimate the ability to measure the intrinsic source variability in current data, and show that they could also be useful in the planning of the observing strategy of future surveys such as those provided by X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN populations and, more in general, in the estimation of the variability amplitude of sources that will result from future surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  15. A variable capacitor made from single crystal silicon fracture surface pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprunt, Alexander D. (Alexander Dalziel), 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complementary and nano-smooth single-crystal-silicon surfaces have been fabricated by deliberately fracturing a weakened portion of a larger structure whose flexural mechanism refines and concentrates an externally applied ...

  16. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4,Measurements

  17. A comparison of variability of undisturbed and surface mined soils in Freestone County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearden, Eddie Dean

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selected at random and a systematic radial transect design was used to collect observations at variable intervals ranging from 1 to 21 m to provide both short-range and long-range spatial analysis. Soils rep- resentative of given distuzbed... LITERATURE CITED APPENDIX 1. Soil Classification by Site APPENDIX 2. Field Soil Descriptions APPENDIX 3. Detailed Nicromorphological Descriptions APPENDIX 4. Laboratory Characterization Data VITA 82 86 123 133 184 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1...

  18. Systems and Methods for Integrated Emissivity and Temperature Measurement of a Surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  19. Diagnostic technique for measuring plasma parameters near surfaces in radio frequency discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Diagnostic technique for measuring plasma parameters near surfaces in radio frequency discharges September 1998 A plasma diagnostic technique for measuring the electron density, electron temperature the plasma parameters. The technique is demonstrated by implementing the diagnostic in a computer model

  20. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rye,Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM), Yost,Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  1. Laboratory Scale Seismic Analysis of a Spatially Variable Hydrological Surface in Unconfined, Unconsolidated Sand.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolkin, David E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The ability to measure the depth to the water table can provide information such as reservoir characteristics, soil conditions for agriculture, and actions to be… (more)

  2. Scales of temporal and spatial variability of midlatitude land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    ] Meteorologists have used land surface temperature (LST) in the energy balance equations for a long time high spatial resolution infrared satellite observation of LST is possible only during clearsky weather conditions. Micro- wave radiometers that can monitor LST in cloudy conditions are not yet able to provide

  3. Sensitivity of Global Tropical Climate to Land Surface Processes: Mean State and Interannual Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere­ocean interactions. 1. Introduction Future projections influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. The results further demonstrate

  4. A new measure of acceleration of heart rate: dependence on age and comparison with time domain conventional heart rate variability measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cammarota, Camillo

    A new measure of acceleration of heart rate: dependence on age and comparison with time domain conventional heart rate variability measures Giuseppe Germanò, M.D., Gianfranco Piccirillo, M.D., *Camillo We introduce a new index, Acceleration Ratio (AR), in order to investigate the dependence of Heart

  5. Simultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    to simultaneously retrieve the vertical profile of precipitation and the near-surface wind speed. ResultsSimultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements simultaneously estimates the over ocean near-surface wind speed and rain rate profile using data from a 10.7 GHz

  6. Ris-R-1074(EN) Surface Activity Distribution Measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inside the Destroyed Chernobyl Re- actor A.V. Chesnokov, V.I. Fedin, A.A. Gulyaev, V.N. Potapov, S designed for contamination survey inside the re- actor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been of the Detectors 15 3.3 Test Measurements Inside the Chernobyl Reactor Unit 4 17 4 Measurements Inside the Reactor

  7. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks Byungkun, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting ­ united propose several techniques for measuring work surface illuminance and ambient light using a sensor network

  8. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  9. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  10. Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance variability: 19912003 Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, 1090 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1002, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance variability: 1991­2003 J.E. BOX Byrd Polar Research Center. There is little evidence for a total ice-sheet surface mass-balance trend, although the meltwater runoff has a positive trend and, combined with iceberg discharge and basal melting estimates, suggests the ice sheet

  11. New imaging tool directly measures liquid surfaces | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.govNew imaging tool directly measures

  12. Assessing the Accuracy of Contact Angle Measurements for Sessile Drops on Liquid-Repellent Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Siddarth

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased ...

  13. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartwig, Zachary Seth

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ( ? 10?min) time scale with ? 1??m depth and ? ...

  14. On the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    the accuracies of surface wind fields in the National Centers for Envi- ronmental Prediction (NCEP) and EuropeanOn the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction ocean vector winds for marine weather prediction is investigated from two Northern Hemisphere case

  15. Bragg spectroscopy for measuring Casimir-Polder interactions with Bose-Einstein condensates above corrugated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo A. Moreno; Diego A. R. Dalvit; Esteban Calzetta

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to probe dispersive atom-surface interactions by measuring via two-photon Bragg spectroscopy the dynamic structure factor of a Bose-Einstein condensate above corrugated surfaces. This method takes advantage of the condensate coherence to reveal the spatial Fourier components of the lateral Casimir-Polder interaction energy.

  16. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Bohanon, T.M.; Mikrut, J.M.

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contact method and apparatus are described for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement of mechanical characteristics of fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use. 4 figures.

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Bernard M. (Oak Park, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Bohanon, Thomas M. (Evanston, IL); Mikrut, John M. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contact method and apparatus for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement mechanical characteristics' fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use.

  18. Classical simulation of measurement-based quantum computation on higher-genus surface-code states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Goff; Robert Raussendorf

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the efficiency of classically simulating measurement-based quantum computation on surface-code states. We devise a method for calculating the elements of the probability distribution for the classical output of the quantum computation. The operational cost of this method is polynomial in the size of the surface-code state, but in the worst case scales as $2^{2g}$ in the genus $g$ of the surface embedding the code. However, there are states in the code space for which the simulation becomes efficient. In general, the simulation cost is exponential in the entanglement contained in a certain effective state, capturing the encoded state, the encoding and the local post-measurement states. The same efficiencies hold, with additional assumptions on the temporal order of measurements and on the tessellations of the code surfaces, for the harder task of sampling from the distribution of the computational output.

  19. In Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nanosecond irradiation coupled with extinction measurement Total deposited fluence Fig. 2 Optical microscopyIn Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser Irradiation of Silver Ion Exchanged Silicate Glass Olivier Véron & Jean-Philippe Blondeau

  20. A noncontacting technique for measuring surface tension of liquids C. Cinbis and B. T. Khuri-Yakub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    A noncontacting technique for measuring surface tension of liquids C. Cinbis and B. T. Khuri is the surface tension which acts to minimize the surface area of the liquid. Therefore, capillary wavesin of capillary wavesin order to mea- sure in siiu the surface tension of liquids. Current tech- niques of surface

  1. Measure Guideline: Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provide a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  2. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czarske, Juergen; Moebius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  3. In situ surface pH measurement during electrolysis using a rotating pH electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deligianni, H.; Romankiw, L.T.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ technique has been developed for measuring the surface pH adjacent to a solid electrode/liquid interface during electrolysis. Measurements of the surface pH can be used to obtain insights regarding the electrodeposition of various transition metals and to obtain a better understanding of associated in situ surface chemistry effects. Many transition metals and alloys deposit with simultaneous hydrogen evolution and, as a result, are accompanied by a pH rise near the cathode, thereby affecting the reactivity of the nearby metal-ion species. Measurements of the surface pH of a solution containing simple salts during hydrogen evolution from a cathode were performed. The surface pH of a cathode during Ni and NiFe electrodeposition was also measured. The experiments demonstrated that, in the absence of buffers or metal ions, the surface pH rises many pH units above the bulk value. During Ni and NiFe electrodeposition, however, the surface pH of solutions consisting of simple salts and starting from a bulk pH level of 2 does not increase more than 3 pH units from the bulk value. In the case of Ni and NiFe electrodeposition, surface buffering occurs because of the hydrolysis of the metal-ion species present. Additionally, it is found that during the anomalous codeposition of NiFe, the surface pH is much lower than that required by the Dahms-Cross hypothesis.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring surface contour on parts with elevated temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horvath, Mark S. (Canton, MI); Nance, Roy A. (McMurray, PA); Cohen, George H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fodor, George (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method and apparatus for measuring the surface contour of a test piece, such as the bow of a radioactive fuel rod, which is completely immersed in water. The invention utilizes ultrasonic technology and is capable of measuring surface contours of test pieces which are at a higher temperature than the surrounding water. The presence of a test piece at a higher temperature adversely affects the distance measurements by causing thermal variations in the water near the surface of the test piece. The contour measurements depend upon a constant temperature of the water in the path of the ultrasonic wave to provide a constant acoustical velocity (the measurement is made by the time of flight measurement for an ultrasonic wave). Therefore, any variations of water temperature near the surface will introduce errors degrading the measurement. The present invention overcomes these problems by assuring that the supply of water through which the ultrasonic waves travel is at a predetermined and constant temperature.

  5. Measurement of black liquor surface tension: Technical report No. 3. [Black liquor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnagopalan, J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface tension and density of two kraft black liquors were measured at a series of temperatures, from a minimum value when gas bubbles can be blown into the liquor to a maximum value near the elevated boiling point of a particular sample. Available methods for the measurement of surface tension were evaluated critically and, as a result, the maximum bubble pressure method was selected. Varying the flow rate of the gas changes the frequency of bubble formation and thereby the age of the surface. The parameter has been utilized by many researchers to monitor the diffusion of low surface energy components (e.g., surfactants) to the liquid/air interface. The effect of bubble frequency when tested with a few pure liquids, indicated that the dynamics of bubble formation had to be further examined to separate out inertial and viscous effects from purely surface tension related pressure. The pressure versus flow rate data were extrapolated to zero flow rate and surface tension and density were calculated using these extrapolated values. As expected, surface tension decreased with increasing temperature for all the samples. Surface tension decreases with increasing solids content (when compared with the value for water) to a certain level (about 20%) and it starts to increase again. The decrease in surface tension in the dilute black liquor, is probably due to the decrease in the concentration of water, which has a high surface tension value. The occurrence of the minimum is probably due to the effect of inorganic components dominating over the effect of surfactants and other components. Reduction in the solubilities of the inorganics, promotion of micelles of the surfactants and reduction in the diffusion of surfactants to the surface, also could contribute to this phenomenon. 54 refs., 54 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. On-shell constrained $M_2$ variables with applications to mass measurements and topology disambiguation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won Sang Cho; James S. Gainer; Doojin Kim; Konstantin T. Matchev; Filip Moortgat; Luc Pape; Myeonghun Park

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a class of on-shell constrained mass variables that are 3+1 dimensional generalizations of the Cambridge $M_{T2}$ variable and that automatically incorporate various assumptions about the underlying event topology. The presence of additional on-shell constraints causes their kinematic distributions to exhibit sharper endpoints than the usual $M_{T2}$ distribution. We study the mathematical properties of these new variables, e.g., the uniqueness of the solution selected by the minimization over the invisible particle 4-momenta. We then use this solution to reconstruct the masses of various particles along the decay chain. We propose several tests for validating the assumed event topology in missing energy events from new physics. The tests are able to determine: 1) whether the decays in the event are two-body or three-body, 2) if the decay is two-body, whether the intermediate resonances in the two decay chains are the same, and 3) the exact sequence in which the visible particles are emitted from each decay chain.

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (MANUSCRIPT TBME-00741-2012R1) 1 Spatial Variability of the 12-Lead Surface ECG as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the 12-Lead Surface ECG as a Tool for Noninvasive Prediction of Catheter Ablation Outcome in Persistent electrocardiogram (ECG) have been analyzed in previous works to predict AF termination by CA, such as fibrillatory-invasive predictor of CA outcome is adopted by exploring ECG inter-lead spatial variability. An automatic procedure

  8. Effects of surface voids on burning rate measurements of pulverized coal at diffusion-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayless, D.J.; Schroeder, A.R.; Peters, J.E.; Buckius, R.O. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the effects of voids (pores on the particle surface that are deeper than their surface radius) on burning area at diffusion-limited combustion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and digital processing of images of quenched particles were used to quantify surface void area, perimeter, and reacting void wall area for voids with diameters larger than 1 {micro}m. After careful analysis, the most accurate determination of particle burning area at diffusion-limited conditions was achieved by measuring particle surface area using the technique of discrete revolution, subtracting surface void area, and adding reacting void wall area. In situ measurements of reacting coal particle temperatures and images were taken for three coals and spherocarb particles at conditions that limit the formation of CO{sub 2} from reacting carbon under various oxygen concentrations and heating rates. The results of these experiments indicate that correcting the measured surface area for void area and reacting void wall area produces calculated burning rates closely matching diffusion-limited burning rates for all conditions and all coals investigated. These results suggest that void area effects should be included for accurate determination of burning area at diffusion-limited conditions.

  9. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  10. Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

  11. Dimension Reduction with Gene Expression Data Using Targeted Variable Importance Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hui; van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and we refer to it as the TMLE-VIM procedure. 1. Obtain theResults: We propose a TMLE-VIM dimension reduction procedureimportance measurement (VIM) in the frame work of targeted

  12. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  13. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  14. Preliminary Surface Pressure Measurements of Transitional, Hypersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    96-4541 M P Re rms X (T Preliminary Surface Pressure Measurements of Transitional, Hypersonic Shock moves into the hypersonic realm. A critical aspect in designing an airbreathing hy- personic vehicle a number of recent investigations in un- derstanding hypersonic, laminar and turbulent, shock wave

  15. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for surface tension measurement at zero Bond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    is stationary, the net force acting on it must be zero. The net force is the sum of three forces: (iCompound pendant drop tensiometry for surface tension measurement at zero Bond number of the particle Fweight acting downwards. We now calculate each of these components separately, adopting

  16. Synergistic Effect of coal blends on thermoplasticity evaluated using a temperature-variable dynamic viscoelastic measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito; Kensuke Masaki; Atsushi Dobashi; Kiyoshi Fukada [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To maximize the conversion of low-quality coal into good coke, we investigated the thermoplasticity of various binary blends of caking coals with slightly or noncaking coals using a dynamic viscoelastic technique with a temperature-variable rheometer. Coal blend samples were prepared by mixing two coals (1:1 by weight), which were heated from room temperature to 600 C at a rate of 3-80{sup o}C/min. At the slow rate of 3{sup o}C/min, the blends had a tan {delta} that was generally lower than the calculated value, showing that a negative interaction caused a loss of thermoplasticity. In contrast, at the rapid heating rate of 80{sup o}C/min, the tan {delta} of some blends was higher than the calculated value, indicating a positive interaction that enhanced the thermoplasticity. With rapid heating, the thermoplasticity of each coal itself increased, and their thermoplastic temperature ranges widened with rapid heating. Therefore, rapid heating was effective at converting these coal blends into good cokes. Moreover, even with slow heating, when a combination of coals (Gregory:Enshu, 1:1) showing some thermoplasticity in nearly the same temperature range was blended, a desirable synergistic effect of the blend was obtained. This suggests that blending coal with an overlapping thermoplastic temperature range is important for the synergistic effect, regardless of the heating rate. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Kinematic measures and stroke rate variability in elite female 200-m swimmers in the four swimming techniques: Athens 2004 Olympic semi-finalists and French National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Kinematic measures and stroke rate variability in elite female 200-m swimmers in the four of this work was to study stroke rate variability in elite female swimmers (200-m events, all four techniques semi-finalists (group N, n=64). Since swimming speed (V) is the product of stroke rate (SR) and stroke

  18. Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorus contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilers (WYKO and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665..mu..m) 20x WYKO scans yielded values of better than 10 A rms after correction for instrument roll-off.

  19. Surface finish measurements of diamond-turned electroless-nickel-plated mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.S.; Syn, C.K.; Saito, T.T.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface roughness data are presented for a matrix of diamond-turned electroless-nickel samples having a combination of six phosphorous contents and four heat treatments. Roughness measurements were conducted with commercial optical and stylus profilometers (Wyko and Talystep). The results are discussed in terms of the material composition and heat treatment, plus other factors having an observed influence on the surface roughness. For the optimum material properties, full-length (665 ..mu..m) restored 20X Wyko scans yielded values of better than 10A rms.

  20. Dose measurements behind reduced shielding at the Texas A&M University variable energy cyclotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Douglas Carey

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the reduced shielding by measuring neutron and gamma ray dose rates. A listing of currently available beams that are included in the study is given in Table 1. The purpose of this study is to provide information that can be used to limit radiation... conducted into accelerator shielding. It is known that a shield which is adequate to attenuate the high energy neutron component of the incident radiation will be more than enough to contain the charged particle and gamma ray com- ponents (NCRP77...

  1. Measurement of acoustoelastic effect of Rayleigh surface waves using laser ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W.Y.; Peng, L.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Materials and Engineering Sciences Center; Holland, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acoustoelastic effect refers to the fact that elastic wave velocities vary with stress. Measurements of the change in stress induced velocity yield information which leads to the determination of stresses. Some work has been done to explore the possibility of using ultrasonic waves, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves as well as surface waves, for the nondestructive evaluation of stresses. This paper focuses on Rayleigh surface waves, which have the advantage of detecting both surface stresses and stress gradients. Piezoelectric or electromagnetic acoustic transducers have been used for the application of Rayleigh waves in the acoustoelastic measurement of stress. The size of these transducers and their fixtures limit the distance between transducers. Sharp edge wedges are usually bound to the pick-up piezoelectric transducers, known as the Rayleigh or surface wave device (SWD), to provide a better spatial resolution when the stress field is not uniform. The smallest distance reported is 11 mm. On the other hand, acoustic microscopes (AM) can measure localized stress for a very small area, from 30 {micro}m to 2 mm. Both SWD and AM method may lack the agility required for general applications. Laser ultrasonics (LU) is a method for optical generation and detection of ultrasound. The generation and detection areas can be focused to very small spot sizes, less than 1 mm, which allow velocity measurements to be made over a path length of a few millimeters. The LU technique is non-contact and can be applied remotely; it has many potential applications. The authors used the LU technique to measure the acoustoelastic behavior of an aluminum alloy, A16061-T6.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of several state variables in shocked carbon by imaging x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E. J., E-mail: eliseo@umich.edu; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Trantham, M. R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Falk, K.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the novel experimental technique of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering to measure the spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state, relative material density, and the shock speed in a high-energy density system. A blast wave driven in a low-density foam is probed with 90? scattering of 7.8?keV helium-like nickel x-rays, which are spectrally dispersed and resolved in one spatial dimension by a doubly curved crystal. The inferred properties of the shock are shown to be self-consistent with 1D analytical estimates. These high-resolution measurements enable a direct comparison of the observed temperature with the results from hydrodynamic simulations. We find good agreement with the simulations for the temperature at the shock front but discrepancies in the modeling of the spatial temperature profile and shock speed. These results indicate the challenges in modeling the shock dynamics of structured materials like foams, commonly used in many high-energy density and laboratory astrophysics experiments.

  3. Method And Apparatus For Two Dimensional Surface Property Analysis Based On Boundary Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining properties of a conductive film is disclosed. A plurality of probe locations selected around a periphery of the conductive film define a plurality of measurement lines between each probe location and all other probe locations. Electrical resistance may be measured along each of the measurement lines. A lumped parameter model may be developed based on the measured values of electrical resistance. The lumped parameter model may be used to estimate resistivity at one or more selected locations encompassed by the plurality of probe locations. The resistivity may be extrapolated to other physical properties if the conductive film includes a correlation between resistivity and the other physical properties. A profile of the conductive film may be developed by determining resistivity at a plurality of locations. The conductive film may be applied to a structure such that resistivity may be estimated and profiled for the structure's surface.

  4. Ion-trap measurements of electric-field noise near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brownnutt; M. Kumph; P. Rabl; R. Blatt

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric-field noise near surfaces is a common problem in diverse areas of physics, and a limiting factor for many precision measurements. There are multiple mechanisms by which such noise is generated, many of which are poorly understood. Laser-cooled, trapped ions provide one of the most sensitive systems to probe electric-field noise at MHz frequencies and over a distance range 30 - 3000 $\\mu$m from the surface. Over recent years numerous experiments have reported spectral densities of electric-field noise inferred from ion heating-rate measurements and several different theoretical explanations for the observed noise characteristics have been proposed. This paper provides an extensive summary and critical review of electric-field noise measurements in ion traps, and compares these experimental findings with known and conjectured mechanisms for the origin of this noise. This reveals that the presence of multiple noise sources, as well as the different scalings added by geometrical considerations, complicate the interpretation of these results. It is thus the purpose of this review to assess which conclusions can be reasonably drawn from the existing data, and which important questions are still open. In so doing it provides a framework for future investigations of surface-noise processes.

  5. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  6. The influence of surface properties on the plasma dynamics in radio-frequency driven oxygen plasmas: Measurements and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)] [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma parameters and dynamics in capacitively coupled oxygen plasmas are investigated for different surface conditions. Metastable species concentration, electronegativity, spatial distribution of particle densities as well as the ionization dynamics are significantly influenced by the surface loss probability of metastable singlet delta oxygen (SDO). Simulated surface conditions are compared to experiments in the plasma-surface interface region using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is demonstrated how in-situ measurements of excitation features can be used to determine SDO surface loss probabilities for different surface materials.

  7. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chason, Eric H. (Sandia Park, NM); Floro, Jerrold A. (Edgewood, NM); Seager, Carleton H. (Albuquerque, NM); Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90.degree. about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90.degree. relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen.

  8. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chason, E.H.; Floro, J.A.; Seager, C.H.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through a means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90[degree] about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90[degree] relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen. 5 figs.

  9. Seasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of SeaWiFS measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    of a possible 184 modes, which explain 67% of the total temporal variability associated with the global meanSeasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of Sea and other sources of phytoplankton variability on global scales, which is an important component

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object using a polarizing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  11. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object using a polarizing interfeometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  13. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  14. Results of experimental tests and calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, W.T.; Bussell, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface neutron moisture probe has been tested both to demonstrate that is is able to operate in the expected in-tank temperature and gamma-ray fields and to provide detector responses to known moisture concentration materials. The probe will properly function in a simultaneous high temperature (80 degrees C) and high gamma radiation field (210 rad/hr)environment. Comparisons between computer model predicted and experimentally measured detector responses to changes in moisture provide a basis for the probe calibration to in-tank moisture concentrations.

  15. Measurement of the surface wavelength distribution of narrow-band radiation by a colorimetric method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested for determining the wavelength of narrow-band light from a digital photograph of a radiating surface. The digital camera used should be appropriately calibrated. The accuracy of the wavelength measurement is better than 1 nm. The method was tested on the yellow doublet of mercury spectrum and on the adjacent continuum of the incandescent lamp radiation spectrum. By means of the method suggested the homogeneity of holographic sensor swelling was studied in stationary and transient cases. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong, E-mail: apannale@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao, E-mail: apannale@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials - FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Devices Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Xu, Ting-Ting [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials - FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Devices Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  17. Studies on the Use of Liquid Surface Passivation for Lifetime Measurements on Good-Quality Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devayajanam, S.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Sopori, B. L.; Ravindra, N. M.; Caskey, D.; Chang, J.; Covington, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluated several liquid passivants, viz. solutions of iodine ethanol (IE), quinhydrone methanol (QHM), and potassium cyanide (KCN), for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Lifetime was measured by the WCT-100 (Sinton Instruments) and WT-2000 (Semilab). Our results show that both IE and QHM passivation are reliable mechanisms. We also find that the KCN solution is moderately passivating on oxidized surfaces, but is only minimally effective on bare Si surfaces. This paper presents details of our studies. In particular, the effect of illumination on IE-passivated surfaces and possible reasons for variations in lifetime measurement are discussed.

  18. A solution of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics by using a variable hidden in Newtonian mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Hyung Myung

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of a correct description of the physical phenomena of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is solved by using a variable hidden in Newtonian mehcanics.

  19. Detecting arbitrary quantum errors via stabilizer measurements on a sublattice of the surface code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Córcoles; Easwar Magesan; Srikanth J. Srinivasan; Andrew W. Cross; M. Steffen; Jay M. Gambetta; Jerry M. Chow

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To build a fault-tolerant quantum computer, it is necessary to implement a quantum error correcting code. Such codes rely on the ability to extract information about the quantum error syndrome while not destroying the quantum information encoded in the system. Stabilizer codes are attractive solutions to this problem, as they are analogous to classical linear codes, have simple and easily computed encoding networks, and allow efficient syndrome extraction. In these codes, syndrome extraction is performed via multi-qubit stabilizer measurements, which are bit and phase parity checks up to local operations. Previously, stabilizer codes have been realized in nuclei, trapped-ions, and superconducting qubits. However these implementations lack the ability to perform fault-tolerant syndrome extraction which continues to be a challenge for all physical quantum computing systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate a key step towards this problem by using a two-by-two lattice of superconducting qubits to perform syndrome extraction and arbitrary error detection via simultaneous quantum non-demolition stabilizer measurements. This lattice represents a primitive tile for the surface code, which is a promising stabilizer code for scalable quantum computing. Furthermore, we successfully show the preservation of an entangled state in the presence of an arbitrary applied error through high-fidelity syndrome measurement. Our results bolster the promise of employing lattices of superconducting qubits for larger-scale fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  20. Surface Impedance Measurements of Single Crystal MgB2 Films for Radiofrequency Superconductivity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binping Xiao, Xin Zhao, Joshua Spradlin, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, Teng Tan, Xi Xiaoxing

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report microstructure analyses and superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) measurements of large scale epitaxial MgB{sub 2} films. MgB{sub 2} films on 5 cm dia. sapphire disks were fabricated by a Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) technique. The electron-beam backscattering diffraction (EBSD) results suggest that the film is a single crystal complying with a MgB{sub 2}(0001) {parallel} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) epitaxial relationship. The SRF properties of different film thicknesses (200 nm and 350 nm) were evaluated under different temperatures and applied fields at 7.4 GHz. A surface resistance of 9 {+-} 2 {mu}{Omega} has been observed at 2.2 K.

  1. Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). 1. Introduction Water vapor is the key atmosphericTen Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection ZHENGZHAO LUO, DIETER KLEY,* AND RICHARD H. JOHNSON

  2. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive ?(s)=7??TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse ...

  3. GAMS program used to estimate capacity with the hyperbolic graph efficiency measure, with variable returns to scale and undesirable outputs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . "Estimating Capacity and Efficiency in Fisheries with Undesirable Outputs." VIMS Marine resource Report N(obs) weights gamma(obs,var) ; POSITIVE Variable weight, gamma; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint

  4. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  5. Use of the portable infrared thermometer as a means of measuring limb surface temperature in the horse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, S.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation was made of the portable infrared thermometer to measure limb surface temperature in 3 horses--first standing in a stall and then placed in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia. To determine the effect of pigment, black and white targets were examined with the instrument under various clinical conditions. In each horse, thermal gradient measurements were consistent along the extremities. Mean limb surface temperatures were less than rectal temperature and greater than ambient temperature. Limb surface temperatures measured in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia were uniformly higher than those obtained in the standing position in the stall. The average SD of absolute temperature measurements made under general anesthesia was +/- 0.1 C, whereas the average SD of those made in standing horses was +/- 0.2 C. For practical use, the latter deviation of +/- 0.2 C was considered more appropriate as the limit of significance for clinical measurements made with the instrument. When used indoors in the absence of direct sunlight, the influence of pigment on measurements made with the instrument was not significant. Optimal conditions for the clinical use of the portable infrared thermometer are defined and factors which affect limb surface temperature are discussed.

  6. Feasibility of measuring surface electron spin dynamics by inelastic scattering of metastable helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    helium atoms M. El-Batanouny, G. Murthy, and C. R. Willis Department of Physics, Boston University atoms (He*) from surfaces of magnetic insulators to study the dynamical properties of surface electron a metastable He atom and the surface electron spins are determined by a configuration interaction calculation

  7. Performance of a HPGe System for Surface and Container Measurements - 13582

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twomey, Timothy R. [ORTEC - AMETEK, 801 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [ORTEC - AMETEK, 801 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Keyser, Ronald M. [Software and Information Services, 562 Bacon Springs Ln, Clinton, TN 37716 (United States)] [Software and Information Services, 562 Bacon Springs Ln, Clinton, TN 37716 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of a nuclear facility or post-accident cleanup is an immense engineering effort requiring an array of specialist tools and techniques. The decommissioning and cleanup activities generate large quantities of low activity waste. For economic disposal, it is desirable to certify the waste as suitable for free release. Every container must be assayed to a sufficient degree of accuracy and sensitivity so that it may be certified to be or not to be suitable for 'free release'. In a previous work, the performance of a highly-automated system for free release of large numbers of containers was presented in which the spectroscopy hardware comprised four ORTEC Interchangeable Detector Module (IDM) mechanically cooled HPGe spectrometers in conjunction with ORTEC ISOPlus waste assay software. It was shown that the system was capable of assaying large containers to free release levels in reasonable measurement times. Not all operations have enough waste to justify an automated system or rapid assay results may be required, perhaps in a remote location. To meet this need, a new mobile system has been developed for the assay of smaller objects (drums, boxes, and surfaces) In-Situ. The system incorporates the latest generation IDM-200 and ISOPlus software and a new variant of the ISOCart hardware. This paper will describe the system and performance. (authors)

  8. Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Heavy oil; Asphaltenes; Naphthenic acids; Wettability; Oil­waterContact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water RonaldoG.dosSantos a , Rahoma S. Mohamed a,F , Antonio C. Bannwart b , Watson Loh c

  9. /II sifu reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements of low temperature surface cleaning for Si molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    /II sifu reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements of low temperature surface cleaning for Si molecular beam epitaxy Shouleh Nikzad, Selmer S. Wong, Channing C. Ahn, Aimee L. Smith molecular beam epitaxy system, using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy, in conjunction

  10. Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

  11. NEC Hazardous classification and compliance regarding the surface moisture monitor measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussell, J.H., WHC

    1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, and National Fire Protection Association requirements for use of Surface Moisture Monitor Systems in classified locations are discussed. The design and configuration of the surface moisture monitor are analyzed with respect to how they comply with requirements of the National Electrical Code requirements, articles 500-504.

  12. Measuring the role of surface chemistry in silicon microphotonics Matthew Borselli,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Oskar

    can be de- fined as s s/ts, where s is the fractional electric field energy overlap with a surface, California 91125 Received 13 December 2005; accepted 7 March 2006; published online 31 March 2006 Utilizing surface optical loss of s 10-7 , we show that the optical loss within Si microphotonic components can

  13. Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over specific intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data Histogram A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over energies. Before you start you should know that: o This set of instructions only assumes a very minimal

  14. ASTM standards for measuring solar reflectance and infrared emittance of construction materials and comparing their steady-state surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Levinson, R.; Berdahl, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous experiments on individual buildings in California and Florida show that painting roofs white reduces air conditioning load up to 50%, depending on the thermal resistance or amount of insulation under the roof. The savings, of course, are strong functions of the thermal integrity of a building and climate. In earlier work, the authors have estimated the national energy savings potential from reflective roofs and paved surfaces. Achieving this potential, however, is conditional on receiving the necessary Federal, states, and electric utilities support to develop materials with high solar reflectance and design effective implementation programs. An important step in initiating an effective program in this area is to work with the american Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the industry to create test procedures, rating, and labeling for building and paving materials. A subcommittee of ASTM E06, E06.42, on Cool Construction Materials, was formed as the vehicle to develop standard practices for measuring, rating, and labeling cool construction materials. The subcommittee has also undertaken the development of a standard practice for calculating a solar reflectance index (SRI) of horizontal and low-sloped surfaces. SRI is a measure of the relative steady-state temperature of a surface with respect to a standard white surface (SRI = 100) and a standard black surface (SRI = 0) under standard solar and ambient conditions. This paper discusses the technical issues relating to development of these two ASTM standards.

  15. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  16. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive ?(s)=7??TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse thrust, thrust minor, and transverse sphericity, each defined using the final-state charged particles’ momentum components perpendicular to the beam direction. Events with at least six charged particles are selected by a minimum-bias trigger. In addition to the differential distributions, the evolution of each event shape variable as a function of the leading charged-particle transverse momentum, charged-particle multiplicity, and summed transverse momentum is presented. Predictions from several Monte Carlo models show significant deviations from data.

  17. Characterizing Surface Temperature and Clarity of Kuwait's Seawaters Using Remotely Sensed Measurements and GIS Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsahli, Mohammad M. M.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The aim of this project was to study the spatial and temporal distributions of ...

  18. Temporal measurements of surfactant squeeze-out from a surface using magnetically levitated liquid bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Philip L.

    A cylindrical liquid bridge, laden with surfactant and constrained at the two ends by circular rods area Langmuir trough with a plate that monitors the surface tension [6]. This techni- que is useful

  19. Integrated Measurement of the Mass and Surface Charge of Discrete Microparticles Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manalis, Scott

    averages over multiple particles. Hence, accuracy in estimating the particle's charge, which is dependent measurement and that of the size measure- ment, because they have inherently different optimum orifice lengths

  20. The development and application of a questionnaire designed to measure pre-existing, process, and outcome variables in the productivity measurement and enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decuir, Arlette Desha

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement: 1. Takes guesswork out of observation about productivity 2. Assists in the efficient conduct of operations. 3. Facilitates communication between members of the organization. 4. Aids in evaluating progress toward improving productivity. 5...

  1. Simultaneous measurement of the surface temperature and the release of atomic sodium from a burning black liquor droplet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, Woei L.; Nathan, Graham J. [Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, SA 5006 (Australia); School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide (Australia); Ashman, Peter J.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T. [Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, SA 5006 (Australia); School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide (Australia); Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi, Biskopsgatan 8 FI-20500 Aabo (Finland)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of the concentration of released atomic sodium, swelling, surface and internal temperature of a burning black liquor droplet under a fuel lean and rich condition has been demonstrated. Two-dimensional two-colour optical pyrometry was employed to determine the distribution of surface temperature and swelling of a burning black liquor droplet while planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to assess the temporal release of atomic sodium. The key findings of these studies are: (i) the concentration of atomic sodium released during the drying and devolatilisation stages was found to be correlated with the external surface area; and (ii) the insignificant presence of atomic sodium during the char consumption stage shows that sodium release is suppressed by the lower temperature and by the high CO{sub 2} content in and around the particle. (author)

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of plankton stocks from acoustic backscatter intensity and direct measurements in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Rebecca Lee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF FIGIJRES I'IGURE Page 1 Map of the DeSoto Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexii:o including locations of twelve moored ADCPs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ?. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 Cruise... series of SeaWiFS chlorophyll data at four ADCP mooring locations west of 87. 5' W . 59 23 Time series ot SeaWiFS chlorophyll data at four ADCP mooring locations east of 87. 5' W . . . 60 24 13ox and whisker plot showing the tv o-year average surface...

  3. Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite observations of CO2 from TES and surface flask measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Brenninkmeijer, CAM [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Schuck, TJ [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Worthy, DE [Environment Canada

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We infer CO2 surface fluxes using satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and measurements of CO2 from surface flasks in a time-independent inversion analysis based on the GEOS-Chem model. Using TES CO2 observations over oceans, spanning 40 S 40 N, we find that the horizontal and vertical coverage of the TES and flask data are complementary. This complementarity is demonstrated by combining the datasets in a joint inversion, which provides better constraints than from either dataset alone, when a posteriori CO2 distributions are evaluated against independent ship and aircraft CO2 data. In particular, the joint inversion offers improved constraints in the tropics where surface measurements are sparse, such as the tropical forests of South America. Aggregating the annual surface-to-atmosphere fluxes from the joint inversion for the year 2006 yields 1.13 0.21 PgC for the global ocean, 2.77 0.20 PgC for the global land biosphere and 3.90 0.29 PgC for the total global natural flux (defined as the sum of all biospheric, oceanic, and biomass burning contributions but excluding CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion). These global ocean and global land fluxes are shown to be near the median of the broad range of values from other inversion results for 2006. To achieve these results, a bias in TES CO2 in the Southern Hemisphere was assessed and corrected using aircraft flask data, and we demonstrate that our results have low sensitivity to variations in the bias correction approach. Overall, this analysis suggests that future carbon data assimilation systems can benefit by integrating in situ and satellite observations of CO2 and that the vertical information provided by satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 combined with measurements of surface CO2, provides an important additional constraint for flux inversions.

  4. Moving-Boundary Heat Exchanger Models with Variable Outlet Phase, ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldredge, B.D; Rasmussen, B.P.; Alleyne, A.

    , MEASUREMENT, AND CON- ROL. Manuscript received June 8, 2006; final manuscript received May 22, 2008; ublished online September 24, 2008. Assoc. Editor: Huei Peng. ournal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control NOVEMBER 2008, Vol. 130 / 061003-1Brian D.... Eldredge University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 158 MEB, MC-244, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 e-mail: brian.eldredge@gmail.com Bryan P. Rasmussen Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3123 e-mail: brasmussen...

  5. Surface Energy Balance Measurements Above an Exurban Residential Neighbourhood of Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogun, Ahmed A.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Vezhapparambu, Sajith; Mauder, Matthias; McFadden, Joseph P.; Gallo, Kevin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and energy ?ows within cities and their surrounding areas.energy balance measurements over a new exurban residential area near Kansas City,

  6. Laser Measurement of SAM Bulk and Surface Wave Amplitudes for Material Microstructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken L. Telschow; Chiaki Miyasaka; David L. Cottle

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) at ultra high frequencies has proven to be a useful tool for investigating materials on the scale of individual grains. This technique is normally performed in a reflection mode from one side of a sample surface. Information about the generation and transmission of bulk acoustic waves into the material is inferred from the reflection signal amplitude. We present an adaptation to the SAM method whereby the acoustic bulk waves are directly visualized through laser acoustic detection. Ultrasonic waves were emitted from a nominal 200 MHz point focus acoustic lens into a thin silicon plate (thickness 75ìm) coupled with distilled water. A scanned laser beam detected the bulk and surface acoustic waves at the opposite surface of the thin silicon plate. Distinct amplitude patterns exhibiting the expected symmetry for Silicon were observed that alter in predictable ways as the acoustic focal point was moved throughout the plate. Predictions of the acoustic wave fields generated by the acoustic lens within and at the surface of the Silicon are being investigated through the angular spectrum of plane waves approach. Results shall be presented for plates with (100) and (111) orientations followed by discussion of applications of the technique for material microstructure analysis.

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring surface density of explosive and inert dust in stratified layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Perlee, Henry E. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the surface density of coal dust on top of rock dust or rock dust on top of coal dust is disclosed which comprises directing a light source at either a coal or rock dust layer overlaying a substratum of the other, detecting the amount of light reflected from the deposit, generating a signal from the reflected light which is converted into a normalized output (V), and calculating the surface density from the normalized output. The surface density S.sub.c of coal dust on top of rock dust is calculated according to the equation: S.sub.c =1/-a.sub.c ln(V) wherein a.sub.c is a constant for the coal dust particles, and the surface density S.sub.r of rock dust on top of coal dust is determined by the equation: ##EQU1## wherein a.sub.r is a constant based on the properties of the rock dust particles. An apparatus is also disclosed for carrying out the method of the present invention.

  8. Interpolation of surface radiative temperature measured from polar orbiting satellites to a diurnal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    . Instruments on polar orbiting satellites, such as advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) or Moderate. This approach is based on the surface energy balance with the soil heat flux being treated by a conventional in temperate and tropical regions, observed empirical relationships between solar radiative energy and skin

  9. Dynamic surface displacement measurement in 1-3 and 1-1-3 piezocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    stimulus. The deformation of each constituent depends on the relative compliance of the ceramic and matrix results in a composite with 1-1-3 connectivity. In the current investigation, dynamic surface hydrostatic performance over a homogeneous piezo- ceramic. In a 1-3 piezocomposite, the piezoceramic rod

  10. Validation of satellite observed thermal emission with in-situ measurements over an urban surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderle, Stefan

    for analysis of the urban surface heat island (USHI) during the BUBBLE Experiment. Primarily, this Remote Gergely Rigo a,, Eberhard Parlow a , David Oesch b a Institute of Meteorology, Climatology and Remote Sensing, University of Basel, Switzerland b Remote Sensing Research Group, University of Berne

  11. High Variability of the Metal Content of Tree Growth Rings as Measured by Synchrotron Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin,R.; Naftel, S.; Macfie, S.; Jones, K.; Feng, H.; Trembley, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation analysis was used to investigate the metal content of tree rings collected from paper birch, Betula papyrifera Marsh, on transects downwind from two metal smelters (nickel and copper). Individual trees reflected changes in ring metal content with time, which may be presumed to represent changes in local metal bioavailability. However, between-tree variations were large and no statistically significant differences in metal content as a function of time were found within or between sites. Although concentrations of both total and exchangeable copper and nickel in the soil increased with proximity to the respective smelter, this pattern was reflected only in the nickel content of rings near the nickel smelter; copper content did not vary with distance from either smelter. The sites did differ with respect to lead, manganese and zinc content of the rings, which may be related to pH. In conclusion, the variability between trees at each site suggests that dendroanalysis is a poor method for evaluating metal exposure at a large (site) scale. Tree ring metal content may be used to evaluate the metal uptake by individual trees but metal mobility in the stem makes it difficult to establish a reliable chronology.

  12. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

  13. Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganow, H.C.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

  14. Relation between surface adsorption states and emf in a solid electrolyte concentration cell during carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum studied by local current measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kudo, T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of measuring adsorption during surface catalysis has been emphasized often. This is true for the oxidation of carbon monoxide on a platinum surface. Surface adsorption states during the reaction under steady states can be learned from electromotive force (emf) measurement with appropriate assumptions. Two mechanisms for emf generation have been proposed, one is that only oxygen activity generates emf, the other is that both oxygen and CO adsorption generates emf.

  15. Micro- and Nanoscale Measurement Methods for Phase Change Heat Transfer on Planar and Structured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buongiorno, Jacopo

    In this opinion piece, we discuss recent advances in experimental methods for characterizing phase change heat transfer. We begin with a survey of techniques for high-resolution measurements of temperature and heat flux ...

  16. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase...

  17. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  18. Comparison of laser-induced surface damage density measurements with small and large beams: toward representativeness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamaignere, Laurent; Dupuy, Gabriel; Donval, Thierry; Grua, Pierre; Bercegol, Herve

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed laser damage density measurements obtained with diverse facilities are difficult to compare, due to the interplay of numerous parameters, such as beam area and pulse geometry, which, in operational large beam conditions, are very different from laboratory measurements. This discrepancy could have a significant impact; if so, one could not even pretend that laser damage density control is a real measurement process. In this paper, this concern is addressed. Tests with large beams of centimeter size on a high-power laser facility have beam performed according to a parametric study and are compared to small beam laboratory tests. It is shown that laser damage densities obtained with large and small beams are equal, within calculated error bars.

  19. Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, W. L

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to measure volatilized NH3 in the labora- tory. A) Vacuum pump, B) Boric acid trap to collect volatilized NH ~ C) NH3 volatilization chamber, D) Trkp to re- move NH3 from incoming air . . . . . . . . . . . 21 A schematic of the apparatus used to make... direct measurements of NH losses in the field. A) Vacuum pum), B) Boric acid trap, C) NH volatilization chamber, consisting of metal cylinder and plexi- glass top The cumulative NH losses over time for four rates of' a)plication of urea...

  20. Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

  1. Application of optical remote sensing to the measurment of wave surface kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedl, Stephen James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation. Adjustments are then made to the measured velocity time series to represent any drift currents that might be present in the flume that theory can not predict. Comparison of the adjusted time series are then made...

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  4. Hort-Range Wetting at Liquid Gallium-Bismuth Alloy Surfaces: X-ray Measurements and Square-Gradient Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, P.; Shpyrko, O; Pershan, P; Ocko, B; DiMasi, E; Deutsch, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal alloy gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of the wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along several paths in the bulk phase diagram. The wetting of the Ga-rich bulk's surface by a Bi-rich wetting film, the thickness of which is limited by gravity to only 50 Angstroms, creates a Ga-rich/Bi-rich liquid/liquid interface close enough to the free surface to allow its detailed study by x rays. The structure of the interface is determined with Angstromsngstrem resolution, which allows the application of a mean-field square gradient model extended by the inclusion of capillary waves as the dominant thermal fluctuations. The sole free parameter of the gradient model, the influence parameter K, that characterizes the influence of concentration gradients on the interfacial excess energy, is determined from our measurements. This, in turn, allows a calculation of the liquid/liquid interfacial tension, and a separation of the intrinsic and capillary wave contributions to the interfacial structure. In spite of expected deviations from MF behavior, based on the upper critical dimensionality (Du = 3 ) of the bulk, we find that the capillary wave excitations only marginally affect the short-range complete wetting behavior. A critical wetting transition that is sensitive to thermal fluctuations appears to be absent in this binary liquid-metal alloy.

  5. Mass changes in NSTX Surface Layers with Li Conditioning as Measured by Quartz Microbalances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.H. Skinner, H.W. Kugel, A. L. Roquemore, PS. Krstic and A. Beste

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retention, lithium deposition, and the stability of thick deposited layers were measured by three quartz crystal microbalances (QMB) deployed in plasma shadowed areas at the upper and lower divertor and outboard midplane in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Deposition of 185 {micro}/g/cm{sup 2} over 3 months in 2007 was measured by a QMB at the lower divertor while a QMB on the upper divertor, that was shadowed from the evaporator, received an order of magnitude less deposition. During helium glow discharge conditioning both neutral gas collisions and the ionization and subsequent drift of Li{sup +} interrupted the lithium deposition on the lower divertor. We present calculations of the relevant mean free paths. Occasionally strong variations in the QMB frequency were observed of thick lithium films suggesting relaxation of mechanical stress and/or flaking or peeling of the deposited layers.

  6. Multiscale Variability of the River Runoff System in China and Its Long-Term Link to Precipitation and Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    and Sea Surface Temperature YONGKANG XUE,*, SHUFEN SUN,# K.-M. LAU,@ JINJUN JI,*, ISABELLE POCCARD,* RENHE with precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) at the continental scale. Monthly mean data from 72 runoff­north dipole anomaly patterns for the first two runoff EOF's spatial distributions have been identified

  7. TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patra, P. K.

    A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

  8. Mahler Measures of Hypergeometric Families of Calabi-Yau Varieties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samart, Detchat

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    geometry and number theory to understand this phenomenon. In this dissertation, we study Mahler measures of certain families of Laurent polynomials of two, three, and four variables, whose zero loci define elliptic curves, K3 surfaces, and Calabi...

  9. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Winds: 10 meters • Temperature and Relative Humidity: 2 meters • Barometric Pressure: 1 meter. Depending upon the geographical location, different models and types of sensors may be used to measure the core variables due to the conditions experienced at those locations. Most sites have additional sensors that measure other variables that are unique to that site or are well suited for the climate of the location but not at others.

  10. Direct Measurement of the Surface Tension of a Soft Elastic Hydrogel: Exploration of Elasto-Capillary Instability in Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aditi Chakrabarti; Manoj K. Chaudhury

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An adhesively stressed thin film of a soft hydrogel confined between two rigid flat substrates auto-roughens with its dominant wavelength exhibiting pronounced dependence on the film thickness (H). A linear stability analysis confirmed that this long wavelength instability (~7H) is due to an elasto-capillary effect, the implementation of which required direct measurements of the surface tension and the elasticity of the gel. The surface tension of the gel was estimated from the fundamental spherical harmonic of a hemispherical cap of the gel that was excited by an external noise. The shear modulus of the gel was determined from its resonant shear mode in a confined geometry. During the course of this study, it was found that a high density steel ball submerges itself inside the gel by balancing its excess weight with the accumulated strain induced elastic force that allows another estimation of its elastic modulus. The large ratio (1.8 mm) of the surface tension to its elasticity ascertains the role of elasto-capillarity in the adhesion induced pattern formation with such gels. Experimental results are in accord with a linear stability analysis that predicts that the rescaled wavelength is linear with H, which modifies the conventional stress to pull-off a rigid flat object from a very soft film by a multiplicative factor. The analysis also suggests some new results related to the role of the finite dilation of a material in interfacial pattern formation that may have non-trivial consequences in the adhesive delamination of very thin and/or soft elastic films via self-generated cracks.

  11. Measurement of the specific surface area of snow using infrared reflectance in an integrating sphere at 1310 and 1550 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Zender, C. S; Picard, G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection of solar radiation by the Antarctic snow surface at ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared

  12. ARM - Measurement - Surface albedo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discoveryalbedo ARM Data

  13. ARM - Measurement - Surface condition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discoveryalbedo ARM

  14. Sequence of surface meteorological variables with the passage of winter cold fronts in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huckaby, Daniel Dale

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and dramatically alter weather conditions. Since these surface boundaries often mark distinct weather changes, locating their positions and forecasting their movement is critical to accurate forecasting. By analyzing the timing of changes in meteorological... than synoptic-scale processes, depend upon accurate synoptic analysis. As Bosart (1989) so appropriately stated, "the evolution of mesoscale features is critically dependent upon the configuration of the synoptic-scale flow. " Therefore, forecasting...

  15. Contribution of seasonal sub-Antarctic surface water variability to millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2over the last deglaciation and Marine Isotope Stage 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . bulloides (dark red) and N. pachyderma (s.) (dark blue) based on the eferences to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version ronology between 68 and 27 ka BP strongly depend on the tie- int density and amount to about 1600 ± 500... and the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean: a) surface ocean currents eterson and Stramma, 1991; Stramma and England, 1999) and the position of major fronts (from south to north: Polar Front (dark grey line), sub-Antarctic Front (grey e), sub-Tropical Front...

  16. A theory for calculating the surface-adsorbate bond dissociation energy from collision-induced desorption threshold measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, Robert J.

    to determine surface-adsorbate bond energies.3 Here we present a new model for determin- ing the bondA theory for calculating the surface-adsorbate bond dissociation energy from collision is presented for determining the bond dissociation energy, Do, of a surface-adsorbate complex from collision

  17. Constructive Contrasts Between Modeled and Measured Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    Constructive Contrasts Between Modeled and Measured Climate Responses Over a Regional Scale of simulated net primary production (NPP) to climate variables and the response observed in field measurements of NPP. Residual contrasts com- pared deviations of NPP from the empirical surface to identify groupings

  18. Healthy transportation - healthy communities: developing objective measures of built-environment using GIS and testing significance of pedestrian variables on walking to transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maghelal, Praveen Kumar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -Transportation-Air Quality (LUTRAQ) study for Portland, Oregon (1000 Friends of Oregon, 1997) looked at the impact of specific built- environment variables on travel. The built-environment variables such as ease of street crossings, sidewalk continuity, local street... twenty-one pedestrian indices (Allan, 2001; Bandara et al., 1994; Bradshaw, 1993; Dixon 1996; USDOT; Landis et al., 2001; City of Ft. Collins, 2002; Khisty, 1994; Moudon, 2001; Moudon et al., 2002; City of Portland, 1998; Wellar; Gallin, 2001; Portland...

  19. Precision of Surface Measurements for Below-Knee Residua Paul K. Commean, BEE, Kirk E. Smith, AAS, James M. Cheverud, PhD, Michael W. Vannier, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverud, James M.

    ) residua and their BK plaster positive casts using calipers, electromag- netic digitizer, optical surface digitizer; residuum was scanned using three- dimensional(3D) OSS; a negative plaster cast of subject's resid measurement session. Plaster positive casts were constructed and subsequently mea- sured using the same

  20. Experimental Measurement of the Interface Heat Conductance Between Nonconforming Beryllium and Type 316 Stainless Steel Surfaces Subjected to Nonuniform Thermal Deformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert Dean; Abdou, Mohamed A. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion blanket designs that employ beryllium as a neutron multiplier, the interface conductance h plays a key role in evaluating the blanket's thermal profile. Therefore, an extensive experimental program was conducted to measure the magnitude of h between nonconforming beryllium and Type 316 stainless steel surfaces subjected to nonuniform thermal deformations. The magnitude of h was measured as a function of relevant environmental, surface, and geometric parameters, including surface roughness, contact pressure, gas pressure, gas type, and magnitude and direction of heat flow. The results indicate the following: (a) Decreasing the interfacial surface roughness from 6.28 to 0.28 {mu}m, in 760 Torr of helium, increased the magnitude of h by up to 100%; however, increasing the surface roughness reduced the dependence of h on the magnitude of the contact pressure. (b) The interface conductance was significantly higher for measurements made in helium gas as opposed to air. Additionally, the sensitivity of h to the gas pressure was significantly greater for runs conducted in helium and/or with smoother surfaces. This sensitivity was reduced in air and/or with roughened surfaces, and it was essentially nonexistent for the 6.25-{mu}m specimen for air pressures exceeding 76 Torr. (c) For runs conducted in vacuum, the interface conductance was more sensitive to heat flux than when runs were conducted in 760 Torr of helium. (d) The interface conductance was found to be dependent on the direction of heat flux. When the specimens were arranged so that heat flowed from the steel to the beryllium disk, the magnitude of h was generally greater than in the opposite direction.

  1. Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, S. M.

    [1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

  2. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00 -22-01-2049Hall

  3. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00

  4. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00core velocity

  5. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00core velocityfast

  6. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00core

  7. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00core1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ

  8. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00core1Picosecondradial

  9. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012

  10. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012magnetic field induced by

  11. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012magnetic field induced

  12. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012magnetic field

  13. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  14. Cataclysmic Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Connon Smith

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cataclysmic variables are binary stars in which a relatively normal star is transferring mass to its compact companion. This interaction gives rise to a rich range of behaviour, of which the most noticeable are the outbursts that give the class its name. Novae belong to the class, as do the less well known dwarf novae and magnetic systems. Novae draw their energy from nuclear reactions, while dwarf novae rely on gravity to power their smaller eruptions. All the different classes of cataclysmic variable can be accommodated within a single framework and this article will describe the framework, review the properties of the main types of system and discuss models of the outbursts and of the long-term evolution.

  15. Xe chemical shift measurements on a single crystal surface H.J. Jaansch *, P. Gerhard, M. Koch, D. Stahl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as to understand the numerous phenomena occurring in catalytic reactions, corrosion, or lubrication phenomena. Many;diffusion phenomena and electric field gradients at surfaces. These experiments use highly polarized lithium

  16. Chapter 18: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 Â… December 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 Injection Begins8: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation

  17. TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY WITH f MODES AS A METHOD FOR MEASUREMENT OF NEAR-SURFACE FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gizon, Laurent

    600­1200. In this range the f -mode kinetic energy is concentrated within 2 Mm of the solar photosphere. There are several advantages to using the f mode as a tracer of flows near the solar surface. DUVALL JR.1 and L. GIZON2 1Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  18. Imaging System to Measure Kinetics of Material Cluster Ejection During Exit-Surface Damage Initiation and Growth in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, R N; Negres, R A; Demos, S G

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced damage on the surface of optical components typically is manifested by the formation of microscopic craters that can ultimately degrade the optics performance characteristics. It is believed that the damage process is the result of the material exposure to high temperatures and pressures within a volume on the order of several cubic microns located just below the surface. The response of the material following initial localized energy deposition by the laser pulse, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work we introduce a time-resolved microscope system designed to enable a detailed investigation of the sequence of dynamic events involved during surface damage. To best capture individual aspects of the damage timeline, this system is employed in multiple imaging configurations (such as multi-view image acquisition at a single time point and multi-image acquisition at different time points of the same event) and offers sensitivity to phenomena at very early delay times. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated with preliminary results from the study of exit-surface damage in fused silica. The time-resolved images provide information on the material response immediately following laser energy deposition, the processes later involved during crater formation or growth, the material ejecta kinetics, and overall material motion and transformation. Such results offer insight into the mechanisms governing damage initiation and growth in the optical components of ICF class laser systems.

  19. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  20. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Martin C

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

  1. On the practice of dichotomization of quantitative variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCallum, R. C.; Zhang, S.; Preacher, K. J.; Rucker, D. D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors examine the practice of dichotomization of quantitative measures, wherein relationships among variables are examined after 1 or more variables have been converted to dichotomous variables by splitting the sample ...

  2. MEASUREMENTS OF PAST 14C LEVELS AND 13C/12C RATIOS IN THE SURFACE WATERS OF THE WORLD'S SUBPOLAR OCEANS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T A

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this project we have developed methods that allow the reconstruction of past {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean by measuring the {sup 14}C contents of archived salmon scales. The overall goal of this research was to reduce of the uncertainty in the uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} by the oceans and thereby improve the quantification of the global carbon cycle and to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs), with their three dimensional global spatial coverage and temporal modeling capabilities, provide the best route to accurately calculating the total uptake of CO{sub 2} by the oceans and, hence, to achieving the desired reduction in uncertainty. {sup 14}C has played, and continues to play, a central role in the validation of the OGCMs calculations, particularly with respect to those model components which govern the uptake of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and the transport of this carbon within the oceans. Under this project, we have developed time-series records of the {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of three areas of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean. As the previously available data on the time-history of oceanic surface water {sup 14}C levels are very limited, these time-series records provide significant new {sup 14}C data to constrain and validate the OGCMs.

  3. A promising concept for using near-surface measuring angles in angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy considering elastic scattering effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswald, S.; Oswald, F. [IFW Dresden, Postfach 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing number of applications of very thin films requires both reliable thin-layer and interface characterization. A powerful method for characterization in the nanometer thickness range is the angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is a nondestructive depth-profiling method, which can provide elemental content as well as chemical information. Two of the drawbacks of ARXPS are, that it requires dedicated mathematical modeling and that, at least up until now, its use has been restricted away from near-surface angles. In this paper we present a method for the mathematical description of a few, hitherto unaccounted, measurement effects in order to improve the simulations of ARXPS data for complex surface structures. As an immediate application, we propose a simple algorithm to consider the effects of elastic scattering in the standard ARXPS data interpretation, which in principle would allow the use of the whole angular range for the analysis; thus leading to a significant increase in the usable information content from the measurements. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with model calculations for a few thin film examples.

  4. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vos, Wiebe M. de [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's close, BS8 1TS Bristol (United Kingdom); School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M. [School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's close, BS8 1TS Bristol (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, Robert M. [ISIS Neutron Source, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex{sup Registered-Sign }). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D{sub 2}O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  5. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  6. ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discovery

  7. ARM - Measurement - Surface energy balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discoveryalbedo ARMenergy

  8. ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discoveryalbedo

  9. Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean Alessandra Giannini the interannual variability of Caribbean­Central American rainfall are examined. The atmospheric circulation over) and sea surface temper­ ature (SST) variability associated with Caribbean rainfall, as selected

  10. Singularity of projections of 2-dimensional measures invariant under the geodesic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risto Hovila; Esa Järvenpää; Maarit Järvenpää; François Ledrappier

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that on any compact Riemann surface with variable negative curvature there exists a measure which is invariant and ergodic under the geodesic flow and whose projection to the base manifold is 2-dimensional and singular with respect to the 2-dimensional Lebesgue measure.

  11. Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

    One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power...

  12. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  13. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  14. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  15. The Sun is an active, variable,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    The Sun is an active, variable, magnetic star with oscillations on its surface and deep within its the physical processes of the Sun-Earth connection. Visit Us on the Web: Solar Terrestrial Probes Program: http://stp.gsfc.nasa.gov For More Information, See: Sun-Earth Connection: http://sec.gsfc.nasa.gov Living With a Star: http

  16. Direct measurement of the Hall effect in a free-electron-like surface state Toru Hirahara, Iwao Matsuda,* Canhua Liu, Rei Hobara, Shinya Yoshimoto, and Shuji Hasegawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    a number of reports on the Hall effect and magnetoresistance at metal or metal silicide ultrathin films- or alkali-metal atoms on the surface, the electron pocket becomes larger because electrons are doped

  17. Lorentzian Metrics from Characteristic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonetta Frittelli; Carlos Kozameh; Ted Newman

    1995-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The following issue is raised and discussed; when do families of foliations by hypersurfaces on a given four dimensional manifold become the null surfaces of some unknown, but to be determined, metric $g_{ab}(x)$? It follows from these results that one can use these surfaces as fundamental variables for GR.

  18. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, Arvid C. (Lake in the Hills, IL); Thigpen, Larry T. (Angier, NC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  19. 6, 1205712120, 2006 Surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 12057­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Surface tensions of multi­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O. Topping et al. Title Page

  20. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  1. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per-ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions and differing harvest, collection and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  2. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  3. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  4. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect ...

  5. Variable Frequency Pump Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karassik, I. J.; Petraccaro, L. L.; McGuire, J. T.

    -frequency electric motor drive. What is happenin9 with variable frequency driven pun,ps is a classical illustration that evolution in technical products takes place not only because of changes in the processes served by these products, or because of innovations...-pole 3550 rpm squirrel caqe induction motor became available in the early 1930s that high pressure pumps operating at that speed could be buil t. And now, in the 1980s, the development of the solid-state, variable frequency electric motor drive...

  6. Estimation of scalar moments from explosion-generated surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.L.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh waves from underground nuclear explosions are used to estimate scaler moments for 40 Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions and 18 explosions at the Soviet East Kazakh test site. The Rayleigh wave spectrum is written as a product of functions that depend on the elastic structure of the travel path, the elastic structure of the source region and the Q structure of the path. Results are used to examine the worldwide variability of each factor and the resulting variability of surface wave amplitudes. The path elastic structure and Q structure are found by inversion of Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities and spectral amplitudes. The Green's function derived from this structure is used to estimate the moments of explosions observed along the same path. This procedure produces more consistent amplitude estimates than conventional magnitude measurements. Network scatter in log moment is typically 0.1. In contrast with time-domain amplitudes, the elastic structure of the travel path causes little variability in spectral amplitudes. When the mantle Q is constrained to a value of approximately 100 at depths greater than 120 km, the inversion for Q and moment produces moments that remain constant with distance. Based on the best models available, surface waves from NTS explosions should be larger than surface waves from East Kazakh explosions with the same moment. Estimated scaler moments for the largest East Kazakh explosions since 1976 are smaller than the estimated moments for the largest NTS explosions for the same time period.

  7. Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Fairén-jiménez; Francisco Carrasco-marín; David Djurado; Françoise Bley; Françoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 °C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

  8. Correcting the MODIS snow albedo bias in Greenland based on in situ GC-Net measurements: Implications for the surface energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Correcting the MODIS snow albedo bias in Greenland based on in situ GC-Net measurements). We have documented a systematic negative bias for SZA>55-60° in Greenland. This study uses in situ data from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) to characterize and empirically correct the MODIS snow

  9. Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating surface emissions. Until recently, dedicated research-grade instruments have been required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG columns · Quantifying local to regional GHG enhancements for emissions inventory verificationAbstract Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating with another Cessna 210 over Central California quantified enhancements in CO2 and CH4 from urban

  10. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Deepak S [UNLV; Trabia, Mohamed [UNLV; O'Toole, Brendan [UNLV; Hixson, Robert S [NSTec

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  11. Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

  12. 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    . It is difficult to design effective stream and channel restoration measures, or evaluate project performance expansion of efforts in and expenditures for stream restoration. Increasingly, resto- ration efforts focus39 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration D. R. MONTGOMERY1 AND S. M. BOLTON2

  13. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Drew F., E-mail: Drew.Parsons@anu.edu.au; Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  14. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  15. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  16. Variable Crop Share Leases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )OC lAL45.7 173 1. 1224 Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel,Director colleg e Station, Texas / f , ' '~ :';,; ,,: ''': ~ " k , -~. _Variable _Crop Share _Leases ... Marvin... Sartin and Ray Sammons* Renting or leasing farmland is part of many modern farming operations and increases average farm size in U. S. agriculture. Economies of size are vitally import ant to farm operations as they strive to cope with the continuous...

  17. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  18. Surface Fluxes and Tropical Intraseasonal Variability: a Reassessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA 2 Department whose essential features -- its existence, energetics, spatial and temporal scales -- remain so be fundamental similarities in their energetics. General circulation models (GCMs) simulate tropical

  19. Regional Climate Variability in the Western U.S.: Observed vs. Anticipated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature Trends #12;More remarks on climate variability&trends Climate = GHG + `Natural Variability'+ Surface Changes + Noise GHG: Greenhouse-gas-related `Global Change' Natural Variability: Decadal (PDO Cycle · ENSO Footprint(s) · Recent Climate Trends · Outlook to Mid-21st Century Range Mgmt. Symposium

  20. A new variable in flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. H. Zhang; L. Huo; W. N. Zhang

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a simple spectrum distribution which was derived from a hydrodynamical equation\\cite{Csorgo} to fit the data of the STAR group. It is found that it can fit the $v_2$ of STAR group very well. We have found that $v_2$ is sensitive to both the effective temperature of particles and the expanding velocity. We have suggested a new variable ${\\bf z}$ to be used in the flow analysis. This new variable will measure the correlation of particles momentum components. We have also shown that one of the $x$ or $y$ direction in the reaction plane is the direction which has the largest variance.

  1. Dual surface interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  2. Interfacial temperature measurements, high-speed visualization and finite-element simulations of droplet impact and evaporation on a solid surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to investigate the coupling of fluid dynamics, heat transfer and mass transfer during the impact and evaporation of droplets on a heated solid substrate. A laser-based thermoreflectance method is used to measure the temperature at the solid-liquid interface, with a time and space resolution of 100 {\\mu}s and 20 {\\mu}m, respectively. Isopropanol droplets with micro- and nanoliter volumes are considered. A finite-element model is used to simulate the transient fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the droplet deposition process, considering the dynamics of wetting as well as Laplace and Marangoni stresses on the liquid-gas boundary. For cases involving evaporation, the diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. High-speed visualizations are performed to provide matching parameters for the wetting model used in the simulations. Numerical and experimental results are compar...

  3. PHP: Constructs and Variables Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Zanden, Brad

    PHP: Constructs and Variables Introduction This document describes: 1. the syntax and types of variables, 2. PHP control structures (i.e., conditionals and loops), 3. mixed-mode processing, 4. how to use one script from within another, 5. how to define and use functions, 6. global variables in PHP, 7

  4. Technical Sessions Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8, 2013Battelle:Technical

  5. A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using long-term datasets from the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The Nauru and Darwin sites show significant variability in sky cover, downwelling radiative fluxes, and surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) due to El Niño and the Australian monsoon, respectively, while the Manus site shows little intra-seasonal or interannual variability. Cloud radar measurement of cloud base and top heights are used to define cloud types so that the effect of cloud type on the surface CRE can be examined. Clouds with low bases contribute 71-75% of the surface shortwave (SW) CRE and 66-74% of the surface longwave (LW) CRE at the three TWP sites, while clouds with mid-level bases contribute 8-9% of the SW CRE and 12-14% of the LW CRE, and clouds with high bases contribute 16-19% of the SW CRE and 15-21% of the LW CRE.

  6. Measuring Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4,Measurements ofMeasurement

  7. Multiwave imaging in an enclosure with variable wave speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Acosta; Carlos Montalto

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the mathematical model of thermo- and photo-acoustic tomography for the recovery of the initial condition of a wave field from knowledge of its boundary values. Unlike the free-space setting, we consider the wave problem in a region enclosed by a surface where an impedance boundary condition is imposed. This condition models the presence of physical boundaries such as interfaces or acoustic mirrors which reflect some of the wave energy back into the enclosed domain. By recognizing that the inverse problem is equivalent to a statement of boundary observability, we use control operators to prove the unique and stable recovery of the initial wave profile from knowledge of boundary measurements. Since our proof is constructive, we explicitly derive a solvable equation for the unknown initial condition. This equation can be solved numerically using the conjugate gradient method. We also propose an alternative approach based on the stabilization of waves. This leads to an exponentially and uniformly convergent Neumann series reconstruction when the impedance coefficient is not identically zero. In both cases, if well-known geometrical conditions are satisfied, our approaches are naturally suited for variable wave speed and for measurements on a subset of the boundary.

  8. Surface Currents and Winds at the Delaware Bay Mouth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscarella, P A; Barton, N P; Lipphardt, B L; Veron, D E; Wong, K C; Kirwan, A D

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an eight-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two high-frequency radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.

  9. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  10. Crystal diffraction lens with variable focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for altering the focal length of a focusing element of one of a plurality of pre-determined focal lengths by changing heat transfer within selected portions of the element by controlled quantities is disclosed. Control over heat transfer is accomplished by manipulating one or more of a number of variables, including: the amount of heat or cold applied to surfaces; type of fluids pumped through channels for heating and cooling; temperatures, directions of flow and rates of flow of fluids; and placement of channels. 19 figures.

  11. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

  12. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, Martin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.

  13. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, Martin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office ofby the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of

  14. New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov RonStaff Research PhysicistsofNM,

  15. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Surface Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearch Staff Materials and Chemical Science

  16. Interannual variability of photosynthesis across Africa and its attribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    on understanding surface sources and sinks of CO2 and the biosphere's ability to offset anthropogenic carbon is thought to be a large source of interannual variability in the global carbon cycle, only vaguely.1029/2008JG000718. 1. Introduction [2] The rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide, its relation to global warming

  17. Selection automatique de variables pertinentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    S´election automatique de variables pertinentes Vers la d´ecouverte de nouvelles modalit´es sensori-motrices corr´elations entre ses variables sensori-motrices afin d'apprendre `a r´esoudre sa t^ache d

  18. Biosurfactant Production by Bacteria in the Phyllosphere: Relieving the Tension of Life on a Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burch, Adrien Yuan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed mass spectra and surface tension measurements, A.B.by liquids: dependence on surface tension, wettability, andby liquids: dependence on surface tension, wettability, and

  19. Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Caryn

    Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance. We examined how substrate and complex hydraulic variables limit the distribution of freshwater mussels. We sampled mussels and measured substrate and hydraulic variables (at low and high flows) at 6

  20. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  1. Application of a highly variable gauge stabilizer at Wytch Farm to extend the ERD envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odell, A.C. II; Payne, M.L.; Cocking, D.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wytch Farm operations have demonstrated that downhole adjustable, highly variable gauge stabilizers (HVGSs) can cost-effectively extend the reach of extended-reach-drilling (ERD) wells. This paper will describe the operation and benefits of using an HVGS at the Wytch Farm ERD project to control hole inclination while minimizing time consuming oriented drilling. The first Wytch Farm well drilled with an HVGS had a Reach/TVD ratio of 4.22 at a true vertical depth (TVD) of 1603 m. The total depth was 7522 m with a reach of 6732 m, which set a new world record for reach at the subject reservoir depth. The second well drilled with an HVGS had a Reach/TVD ratio of 4.28 at a TVD of 1592 m. The HVGS was used in conjunction with an instrumented steerable motor with near-bit inclination sensor. The HVGS is controlled from the surface through a series of mud pump flow sequences, and communicates the blades` commanded and measured positions to the surface with mud pulse telemetry. Wytch Farm operations required that the HVGS telemetry be modified to Cow compatibility with previously contracted measurement-while-drilling/logging-while-drilling (MWD/LWD) systems. This paper will describe the new telemetry scheme and will document the success of the HVGS in receiving commands and in actuating to desired positions at measured depths in excess of 7300 m and departures beyond 6100 m.

  2. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric OpticalExperimentgovField CampaignsMidlatitudegovMeasurementsSurface

  3. Effect of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Satellite Near-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    in regulating the energy and water balance at the soil surface and it is therefore a crucial variable for many. SMOS will carry an L-band (1.4GHz) microwave radiometer and will provide near-surface soil moisture highly heterogeneous land surface conditions. The principal objectives of this research are to (i) test

  4. Influence of the Combustion Energy Release on Surface Accelerations of an HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Jeffery A [ORNL; Eaton, Scott J [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large cyclic variability along with increased combustion noise present in low temperature combustion (LTC) modes of internal combustion engines has driven the need for fast response, robust sensors for diagnostics and feedback control. Accelerometers have been shown as a possible technology for diagnostics and feedback control of advanced LTC operation in internal combustion engines. To make better use of this technology, an improved understanding is necessary of the effect of energy release from the combustion process on engine surface vibrations. This study explores the surface acceleration response for a single-cylinder engine operating with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. Preliminary investigation of the engine surface accelerations is conducted using a finite element analysis of the engine cylinder jacket along with consideration of cylindrical modes of the engine cylinder. Measured in-cylinder pressure is utilized as a load input to the FE model to provide an initial comparison of the computed and measured surface accelerations. Additionally, the cylindrical cavity resonant modes of the engine geometry are computed and the in-cylinder pressure frequency content is examined to verify this resonant behavior. Experimental correlations between heat release and surface acceleration metrics are then used to identify specific acceleration frequency bands in which characteristics of the combustion heat release process is detected with minimal structural resonant influence. Investigation of a metric capable of indicting combustion phasing is presented. Impact of variations in the combustion energy release process on the surface accelerations is discussed.

  5. The Effect of surface morphology on the friction of Electrogalvanized sheet steel in forming processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skarpelos, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect in the drawbead simulator test were evaluated for a set of commercially coated steels and a set of laboratory coated steels with underlying surfaces produced by laser textured, shot blast, and electro-discharge textured rolls. In general, surfaces with higher roughness (R{sub a} parameter) measured lower friction in the DBS tests. The requisite roughness amplitude necessary for low friction was moderated somewhat by having a more closely spaced roughness as described by the median wavelength, {lambda}m, of the power spectrum. This effect is due to interaction with the lubricant by the micro-roughness imparted by the galvanizing process. The lubricant tends to be retained better by the surfaces with the micro-roughness, thereby increasing the amount of elasto- and plasto-hydrodynamic support of the load. Other variables, such as large variations in thickness of the sheet can mask the effect of the surface by changing the actual distance of sliding contact during the DBS test. For tests where the amount of sliding is similar, the effect of roughness is significant. The friction measured for EG steels in the DBS test is dominated by deformation of the surface with plowing by the asperities of the tooling adding to that caused by the deformation. The size of the plow marks in the deformed surfaces corresponds to the roughness of the tooling and no significant evidence of wear particles was observed.

  6. Quantum information with modular variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ketterer; S. P. Walborn; A. Keller; T. Coudreau; P. Milman

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel strategy, based on the use of modular variables, to encode and deterministically process quantum information using states described by continuous variables. Our formalism leads to a general recipe to adapt existing quantum information protocols, originally formulated for finite dimensional quantum systems, to infinite dimensional systems described by continuous variables. This is achieved by using non unitary and non-gaussian operators, obtained from the superposition of gaussian gates, together with adaptative manipulations in qubit systems defined in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We describe in details the realization of single and two qubit gates and briefly discuss their implementation in a quantum optical set-up.

  7. The effects of surface instabilities on laminar film condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstmann, Joseph

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer rates for laminar film condensation of Freon-1l3 were measured on the underside of horizontal surfaces, inclined surfaces, and vertical surfaces. Several distinct regimes of flow were observed. On the underside ...

  8. Update this !!! What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    with higher humidity and precipitation. #12;4 #12;5 For two identical beams of sunlight (solar energy of the Earth's axis causes the solar beam at B to become more concentrated, thereby providing more energy than regions of Australia. #12;999 The constant supply of radiative energy from the sun would continue to heat

  9. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Eric A. (Rio Rancho, NM); Wasserman, Daniel (Lowell, MA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  10. Measuring Cost Variability in Provision of Transit Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Brian D.; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive Transit Performance Indicators. UCTC WorkingModal Transit Performance Indicators. Ph.D. dissertation.

  11. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell...

  12. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  13. VARIABILITY OF NEARSURFACE ZOOPLANKTON OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN BY TOWED-PUMP SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VARIABILITY OF NEAR·SURFACE ZOOPLANKTON OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN BY TOWED-PUMP SAMPLING Cl of 1962. Samples were collected with a towed pump at a depth of 5 m. Allproximately 162 samples, each repl pump surveys re- llorted here were undertaken to obtain informa- tion on variability and trends

  14. Coupled variability and air-sea interaction in the South Atlantic Andreas Sterl, Wilco Hazeleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    and Tanimoto (1998) describe a pan-Atlantic SST pattern reaching from South Africa to Greenland. Most studiesCoupled variability and air-sea interaction in the South Atlantic Ocean Andreas Sterl, Wilco mechanisms involved in forcing and damping of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) variability in the South Atlantic

  15. Transport and variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current south of Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transport and variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current south of Africa Sebastiaan Swart,1) of the ACC south of Africa. Surface dynamic height is derived from XBT data by establishing an empirical and variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current south of Africa, J. Geophys. Res., 113, C09014, doi:10

  16. Variable metric conjugate gradient methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, T.; Manteuffel, T.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Motivation. In this paper we present a framework that includes many well known iterative methods for the solution of nonsymmetric linear systems of equations, Ax = b. Section 2 begins with a brief review of the conjugate gradient method. Next, we describe a broader class of methods, known as projection methods, to which the conjugate gradient (CG) method and most conjugate gradient-like methods belong. The concept of a method having either a fixed or a variable metric is introduced. Methods that have a metric are referred to as either fixed or variable metric methods. Some relationships between projection methods and fixed (variable) metric methods are discussed. The main emphasis of the remainder of this paper is on variable metric methods. In Section 3 we show how the biconjugate gradient (BCG), and the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) methods fit into this framework as variable metric methods. By modifying the underlying Lanczos biorthogonalization process used in the implementation of BCG and QMR, we obtain other variable metric methods. These, we refer to as generalizations of BCG and QMR.

  17. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  18. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  19. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  20. Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

  1. The impact of uncertainty and risk measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Soojin; Jo, Soojin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.3 A Measure Based on GARCH Process . . . . . 3.4 Measuresand flexibly. Then, I introduce GARCH-based measure, SRISK,directly in the two-variable GARCH-in- Mean VAR using US and

  2. The effects of surface conditions on boiling characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, J. J.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified model relating surface variables to the nucleate pool boiling characteristics was developed. A simple vapor trapping mechanism was postulated and a geometrical model constructed for idealized conical cavities ...

  3. An updated climatology of surface dimethlysulfide concentrations and emission fluxes in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationship between ocean DMS and solar radiation, Geophys.solar radiation dose over the global surface ocean, Science,ocean surface DMS reveal macroscale patterns of variability such as a global proportionality between DMS concentration and average daily solar radiation

  4. Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

  5. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Wittle, J. Kenneth (Chester Springs, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  6. Towards the Light Front Variables for High Energy Production Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. S. Amaglobeli; S. M. Esakia; V. R. Garsevanishvili; G. O. Kuratashvili; N. K. Kutsidi; R. A. Kvatadze; Yu V. Tevzadze; T. P. Topuria

    1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale invariant presentation of inclusive spectra in terms of light front variables is proposed. The variables introduced go over to the well-known scaling variables x_F = 2p_z/sqrt(s) and x_T=2p_T/sqrt{s} in the high p_z and high p_T limits respectively. So Some surface is found in the phase space of produced pi-mesons in the inclusive reaction anti p p -> pi+- X at 22.4 GeV/c, which separates two groups of particles with significantly different characteristics. In one of these regions a naive statistical model seems to be in a good agreement with data, whereas it fails in the second region. Key words: Light front, inclusive, hadron-hadron, electron-positron, relativistic heavy ions, deep inelastic.

  7. Towards the Light Front Variables for High Energy Production Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaglobeli, N S; Garsevanishvili, V R; Kuratashvili, G O; Kutsidi, N K; Kvatadze, R A; Tevzadze, Yu V; Topuria, T P; Tevzadze, Yu V.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale invariant presentation of inclusive spectra in terms of light front variables is proposed. The variables introduced go over to the well-known scaling variables x_F = 2p_z/sqrt(s) and x_T=2p_T/sqrt{s} in the high p_z and high p_T limits respectively. So Some surface is found in the phase space of produced pi-mesons in the inclusive reaction anti p p -> pi+- X at 22.4 GeV/c, which separates two groups of particles with significantly different characteristics. In one of these regions a naive statistical model seems to be in a good agreement with data, whereas it fails in the second region. Key words: Light front, inclusive, hadron-hadron, electron-positron, relativistic heavy ions, deep inelastic.

  8. Decadal Variability in the Formation of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water: Oceanic versus Atmospheric Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    cooling. In contrast, the decadal signal is found to be closely related to variability in the dynamic cooling. Sheltered from surface processes in subsequent seasons or years, depending on the atmospheric- trainment and/or lateral induction, modulating local or remote wintertime sea surface temperatures (SSTs

  9. Onset of surface superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giamarchi, T.; Beal-Monod, M.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud 91405 Orsay, (France)); Valls, O.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, (France) Center for the Science and Application of Superconductivity, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the onset of superconductivity in the surface region of a metal. Surface effects are particularly important in systems with a short bulk coherence length {xi}{sub 0}. We show that, to the accuracy of the calculation, the surface transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}} equals the bulk transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} if the electron-electron interaction is of the standard BCS form, i.e., a single attractive square well, extending up to some critical energy {omega}{sub 0} much smaller than the Fermi energy {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}. If one takes into account, in addition, the repulsive part of the interaction extending beyond {omega}{sub 0} up to energies of order {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, then one may have {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} in certain cases, although, due to restrictions imposed on the parameter values by various physical conditions, the relative increase of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is very small, typically 10{sup {minus}3}, at least in the weak coupling limit. However, we also find a considerable gap enhancement, of order 20%, near the surface which could be of interest for critical-current measurements. Therefore we suggest an experimental reexamination of systems with short {xi}{sub 0}, i.e., superconducting degenerate semiconductors and the new high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} oxides in confined geometries where the surface-to-volume ratio is non-negligible.

  10. Operating Reserves and Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

  11. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AS DETERMINISM WITH JUMP STOCHASTIC PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollt, Erik

    HEART RATE VARIABILITY AS DETERMINISM WITH JUMP STOCHASTIC PARAMETERS JIONGXUAN ZHENG, JOE SKUFCA, AND ERIK BOLLT§ Abstract. We use measured heart rate information (RR intervals) to develop a one with persistence which causes the heart rate and rhythm system to wander about a bifurcation point. We propose

  12. Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

  13. Method and Appartus for Calibrating a Linear Variable Differential Transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokrywka, Robert J.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) having an armature positioned in au LVDT armature orifice, and the armature able to move along an axis of movement. The calibration apparatus includes a heating mechanism with an internal chamber, a temperature measuring mechanism for measuring the temperature of the LVDT, a fixture mechanism with an internal chamber for at least partially accepting the LVDT and for securing the LVDT within the heating mechanism internal chamber, a moving mechanism for moving the armature, a position measurement mechanism for measuring the position of the armature, and an output voltage measurement mechanism. A method for calibrating an LVDT, including the steps of powering the LVDT; heating the LVDT to a desired temperature; measuring the position of the armature with respect to the armature orifice; and measuring the output voltage of the LVDT.

  14. Method and apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pokrywka, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration apparatus for calibrating a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) having an armature positioned in au LVDT armature orifice, and the armature able to move along an axis of movement. The calibration apparatus includes a heating mechanism with an internal chamber, a temperature measuring mechanism for measuring the temperature of the LVDT, a fixture mechanism with an internal chamber for at least partially accepting the LVDT and for securing the LVDT within the heating mechanism internal chamber, a moving mechanism for moving the armature, a position measurement mechanism for measuring the position of the armature, and an output voltage measurement mechanism. A method for calibrating an LVDT, including the steps of: powering the LVDT; heating the LVDT to a desired temperature; measuring the position of the armature with respect to the armature orifice; and measuring the output voltage of the LVDT.

  15. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansur, Louis K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhattacharya, R [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL] [ORNL; Clemons, Art [ORNL] [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans, H B [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL] [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, E H [Consultant, Milpitas, CA] [Consultant, Milpitas, CA; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL] [ORNL; Rivard, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  16. Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Briceno

    2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

  17. Review of Probability Random Variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Mark

    at close 4) Height of wheel going over a rocky road #12;3 Random Variable Non-examples 1) `Heads' or `Tails' on coin 2) Red or Black ball from urn But we can make these into RV's Basic Idea ­ don't know · Temperature · Wheel height #12;5 Given Continuous RV X... What is the probability that X = x0 ? Oddity : P

  18. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Székely, V; Kollar, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  19. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Szekely; S. Torok; E. Kollar

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  20. Effective Theories of Coupled Classical and Quantum Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Halliwell

    1998-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the issue of coupling variables which are essentially classical to variables that are quantum. Two approaches are discussed. In the first (based on collaborative work with L.Di\\'osi), continuous quantum measurement theory is used to construct a phenomenological description of the interaction of a quasiclassical variable $X$ with a quantum variable $x$, where the quasiclassical nature of $X$ is assumed to have come about as a result of decoherence. The state of the quantum subsystem evolves according to the stochastic non-linear Schr\\"odinger equation of a continuously measured system, and the classical system couples to a stochastic c-number $\\x (t)$ representing the imprecisely measured value of $x$. The theory gives intuitively sensible results even when the quantum system starts out in a superposition of well-separated localized states. The second approach involves a derivation of an effective theory from the underlying quantum theory of the combined quasiclassical--quantum system, and uses the decoherent histories approach to quantum theory.

  1. Nanostructured surfaces for microfluidics and sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picraux, Samuel Thomas (Arizona State University); Piech, Marcin (United Technologies Corp.); Schneider, John F.; Vail, Sean (Arizona State University); Hayes, Mark A. (Arizona State University); Garcia, Anthony A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Gust, D (Arizona State University); Yang, Dongqing (Arizona State University)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work demonstrates the use of light to move liquids on a photoresponsive monolayer, providing a new method for delivering analyses in lab-on-chip environments for microfluidic systems. The light-driven motion of liquids was achieved on photoresponsive azobenzene modified surfaces. The surface energy components of azobenzene modified surfaces were calculated by Van Oss theory. The motion of the liquid was achieved by generation of a surface tension gradient by isomerization of azobenzene monolayers using UV and Visible light, thereby establishing a surface energy heterogeneity on the edge of the droplet. Contact angle measurements of various solvents were used to demonstrate the requirement for fluid motion.

  2. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  3. Variable flexure-based fluid filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B.; Colston Jr., Billy W.; Marshall, Graham; Wolcott, Duane

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for filtering particles from a fluid comprises a fluid inlet, a fluid outlet, a variable size passage between the fluid inlet and the fluid outlet, and means for adjusting the size of the variable size passage for filtering the particles from the fluid. An inlet fluid flow stream is introduced to a fixture with a variable size passage. The size of the variable size passage is set so that the fluid passes through the variable size passage but the particles do not pass through the variable size passage.

  4. Saturn's icy satellites and rings investigated by Cassini - VIMS. III. Radial compositional variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filacchione, G; Ciarniello, M; Clark, R N; Cuzzi, J N; Nicholson, P D; Cruikshank, D P; Hedman, M M; Buratti, B J; Lunine, J I; Soderblom, L A; Tosi, F; Cerroni, P; Brown, R H; McCord, T B; Jaumann, R; Stephan, K; Baines, K H; Flamini, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years Cassini-VIMS, the Visible and Infared Mapping Spectrometer, returned to us a comprehensive view of the Saturn's icy satellites and rings. After having analyzed the satellites' spectral properties (Filacchione et al. (2007a)) and their distribution across the satellites' hemispheres (Filacchione et al. (2010)), we proceed in this paper to investigate the radial variability of icy satellites (principal and minor) and main rings average spectral properties. This analysis is done by using 2,264 disk-integrated observations of the satellites and a 12x700 pixels-wide rings radial mosaic acquired with a spatial resolution of about 125 km/pixel. The comparative analysis of these data allows us to retrieve the amount of both water ice and red contaminant materials distributed across Saturn's system and the typical surface regolith grain sizes. These measurements highlight very striking differences in the population here analyzed, which vary from the almost uncontaminated and water ice-rich surfac...

  5. Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    [1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

  6. Natural Climate Variability Michael Ghil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    periodic (often called quasi-periodic) variations in Earth's orbit around the Sun affect the intensity-gas concentrations in the atmosphere, such as that of carbon dioxide (CO2), will increase surface temperatures through the greenhouse effect (see Projection of Future Changes in Climate, Volume 1). This temperature

  7. Principal Components Instrumental Variable Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelried, Diego; Smith, Richard J.

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of the main results are displayed in two appendices. 2 Econometric Framework Consider the simultaneous equations model y = X? + u and X = Z?+ V , (1) 1 An advantage of such general structure is that the ‘large-sample’ condition used in previous studies Kn/ p n... ? 0, where Kn is the number of instruments and n is the sample size, is not required in our asymptotic approximations. 4 where y is the n × 1 vector containing n observations of the dependent variable; X is the n × G matrix with observations...

  8. Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-InducedCloudPoissonVampire Power1 -Variable

  9. Variable Mass Theories of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Leclerc

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Several attempts to construct theories of gravity with variable mass are considered. The theoretical impacts of allowing the rest mass to vary with respect to time or an appropriate curve parameter are examined in the framework of Newtonian and Einsteinian gravity theories. In further steps, scalar-tensor theories are examined with respect to their relation to the variation of the mass and in an ultimate step, an additional coordinate is introduced and its possible relation to the mass is examined, yielding a five dimensional space-time-matter theory.

  10. Interannual variability in tropospheric nitrous oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, R. L.

    Observations of tropospheric N2O mixing ratio show significant variability on interannual timescales (0.2?ppb, 1 standard deviation). We found that interannual variability in N2O is weakly correlated with that in CFC-12 ...

  11. Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall Technical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technical Workshop Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop October 15, 2014 9:00AM CDT to October 17, 2014 3:00PM CDT The Utility Variable Generation...

  12. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  13. NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology Energy Technology (RET) projects. These climatological profiles are used for designing systems that have for implementing RETs, there are inherent problems in using them for resource assessment. Ground measurement

  14. Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we evaluate individual options that have the potential to stem the decline in the marginal value of variable generation (VG) with increasing penetration levels. We focus only on the effectiveness of mitigation measures for wind and PV.

  15. The Use of Variable Speed Drives to Retrofit Hydraulic Injection Molding Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambs, L.; Frerker, M. M.

    Research Institute, Palo Alto, California. 8.) Remley, Carl H. (1993) "Measured performance of variable speed drives on injection molding hydraulic pumps." Energy Management Consulting and Equipment, Inc., North Attleboro, Massachusetts'. 9.) Rosato...

  16. Multidimensional Characterization of Fibrillatory Wave Amplitude on Surface ECG to Describe Catheter Ablation Impact on Persistent Atrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Multidimensional Characterization of Fibrillatory Wave Amplitude on Surface ECG to Describe of principal component analysis (PCA), surface electrocardiogram (ECG) spatial diversity is exploited influences f- wave amplitude during the procedure as quantified by ECG inter-lead spatial variability

  17. surface science | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface science surface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Nonlinear Photoemission Electron Micrographs of Plasmonic Nanoholes in Gold Thin Films. Abstract:...

  18. Ferrofluid surface and volume flows in uniform rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elborai, Shihab M. (Shihab Mahmoud), 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrofluid surface and volume effects in uniform dc and rotating magnetic fields are studied. Theory and corroborating measurements are presented for meniscus shapes and resulting surface driven flows, spin-up flows, and ...

  19. Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

  20. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  1. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  2. Processing of Neutron Diffraction Data for Strain Measurement in Geological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL] [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL] [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Conventional rock mechanics testing techniques typically involve the loading of samples and measurement of displacements or strains on the outer boundary of the specimen surface. Neutron diffraction based strain measurement techniques represent a unique and powerful tool for measuring the strain within geological materials under load. The structural variability and non-uniform crystallinity of geological materials, however, create many complexities in the intensity patterns that must be analyzed to quantify strains within the material. The attenuating and scattering properties of the pressure cell housing the sample further add difficulties to the data analysis. This paper describes the methods and processes used to process neutron scattering data for strain measurement in geological materials. It is intended to provide a primer for those in the rock mechanics community that are interested in utilizing this technique along with additional discussion of neutron diffraction experimental factors that may affect data quality.

  3. Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoringand Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential for CO2 monitoring in thenear-surface environment as an approach to exploration for hiddengeothermal systems. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration from a modelhidden geothermal system show that CO2 concentrations can reach highlevels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low CO2 fluxes.Therefore, subsurface measurements offer an advantage over above-groundmeasurements which are affected by winds that rapidly disperse CO2. Tomeet the challenge of detecting geothermal CO2 emissions within thenatural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach thatintegrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statisticalanalysis and modeling.

  4. Periodic photometric variability of the brown dwarf Kelu-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Clarke; C. G. Tinney; K. R. Covey

    2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have detected a strong periodicity of 1.80+/-0.05 hours in photometric observations of the brown dwarf Kelu-1. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the variation is ~1.1% (11.9+/-0.8 mmag) in a 41nm wide filter centred on 857nm and including the dust/temperature sensitive TiO & CrH bands. We have identified two plausible causes of variability: surface features rotating into- and out-of-view and so modulating the light curve at the rotation period; or, elliposidal variability caused by an orbiting companion. In the first scenario, we combine the observed vsin(i) of Kelu-1 and standard model radius to determine that the axis of rotation is inclined at 65+/-12 degrees to the line of sight.

  5. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  6. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommars, Mark F. (Sparland, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  7. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  8. Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

  9. Evidence for Two Distinct Morphological Classes of Gamma-Ray Bursts from their Short Timescale Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Q. Lamb; C. Graziani; I. A. Smith

    1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the 241 bursts for which peak counts $\\C$ exist in the publicly available Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) catalog. Introducing peak counts in 1024 ms as a measure of burst brightness $\\B$ and the ratio of peak counts in 64 and 1024 ms as a measure of short timescale variability $\\V$, we find a statistically significant correlation between the brightness and the short timescale variability of \\g-ray bursts. The bursts which are smoother on short timescales are both faint and bright, while the bursts which are variable on short timescales are faint only, suggesting the existence of two distinct morphological classes of bursts.

  10. Full bore drill stem testing apparatus with surface pressure readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidry, S. L.; DeCuir Sr., P. J.

    1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a full-bore drill stem testing system includes a lower housing member having a ball valve for opening and closing a flow passage extending axially therethrough and an upper housing member having an open axial bore in communication with said flow passage. Downwardly facing recesses are formed in the wall of the upper housing member laterally offset from the open bore, and each recess receives an electrical contact that is connected with transducer means for sensing variables such as pressure and temperature of well fluids below the ball valve. Guide slots having orienting surfaces at their lower ends lead upwardly to each recess. A running tool that is lowered into the upper housing member on electrical wireline has normally retracted arms which carry electrical contacts on their upper ends. The running tool is actuated upon engagement with a stop shoulder in the upper housing member to cause extension of the arms, whereupon the running tool is shifted upwardly to cause the upper ends of the arms and the contacts thereon to be oriented and guided by the slots into engagement with the contacts in the recesses. The electrical connections thus made enable surface readout of the downhole measurements as the drill stem test proceeds.

  11. Atomic filtering for hybrid continuous-variable/discrete-variable quantum optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joanna A. Zieli?ska; Federica A. Beduini; Vito Giovanni Lucivero; Morgan W. Mitchell

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate atomic filtering of frequency-degenerate photon pairs from a sub-threshold optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The filter, a modified Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), achieves 70% peak transmission simultaneous with 57 dB out-of-band rejection and a 445 MHz transmission bandwidth. When applied to the OPO output, only the degenerate mode, containing one-mode squeezed vacuum, falls in the filter pass-band; all other modes are strongly suppressed. The high transmission preserves non-classical continuous-variable features, e.g. squeezing or non-gaussianity, while the high spectral purity allows reliable discrete-variable detection and heralding. Correlation and atomic absorption measurements indicate a spectral purity of 96% for the individual photons, and 98% for the photon pairs. These capabilities will enable generation of atom-resonant hybrid states, e.g. "Schr\\"odinger kittens" obtained by photon subtraction from squeezed vacuum, making these exotic states available for quantum networking and atomic quantum metrology applications.

  12. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuels Practical Full Time HCCI Operation Will Require Specific HCCI Fuel Low Octane gasoline Experimental Variables Experimental Variables Engine Variables Intake Manifold...

  13. Seasonal Variability in Anthropogenic Halocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    ozone depleting potential and as hazards to human health, they are also of concern due to their positive banned by the Montreal Protocol with a minimal number of exceptions for critical purposes in a few-12). For example, studies measuring halocarbons in off-gas from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills report

  14. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Tappert, Claus [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Hoffman, Douglas I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Campbell, Ryan K., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu, E-mail: claus.tappert@uv.cl, E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humobldt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA 95521 (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

  15. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg).

  16. Rational nanostructuring of surfaces for extraordinary icephobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    to the same extremely low, robust nucleation temperature of $Ã?24 C for over three orders of magnitude change lubricant impregnated surfaces23,24 which exhibit remarkable droplet roll-off properties have been studied of repeated measurements. Our measurements were performed under the condition of saturated humidity

  17. Effects of sulfate aerosol on the central Pennsylvania surface shortwave radiation budget. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimond, P.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface radiation measurements are taken simultaneously with measurements of meteorological variables including temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and visibility to evaluate the impact of sulfate haze on the surface radiation budget. A relationship is sought between flux losses due only to aerosol and relative humidity, visibility or both, with the goal of facilitating parameterization of sulfate hazes by climate modelers. At the same time, a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is compared with a more costly sun photometer to determine the feasibility of substituting the former for the latter in future research. It is found that depletion of surface radiation due to aerosol is typically ten to twenty percent of initial insolation, and that the losses can be correlated with zenith angle, relative humidity and optical depth. In the case of flux loss as a function of optical depth, the two are related in a nearly linear fashion. It is also discovered that the RSR has a predictable error owing to a wider field of view than the sun photometer, and can be used as a replacement for the former by correcting for the error.

  18. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith Edward (Kobe, JP); Moser, William Elliott (Peoria, IL); Roozenboom, Stephan Donald (Washington, IL); Knox, Kevin Jay (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  19. Evaluation of surface sampling method performance for Bacillus Spores on clean and dirty outdoor surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Einfeld, Wayne; Boucher, Raymond M.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Tezak, Matthew Stephen

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of Bacillus atrophaeous spores from grime-treated and clean surfaces was measured in a controlled chamber study to assess sampling method performance. Outdoor surfaces investigated by wipe and vacuum sampling methods included stainless steel, glass, marble and concrete. Bacillus atrophaeous spores were used as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores in this study designed to assess whether grime-coated surfaces significantly affected surface sampling method performance when compared to clean surfaces. A series of chamber tests were carried out in which known amounts of spores were allowed to gravitationally settle onto both clean and dirty surfaces. Reference coupons were co-located with test coupons in all chamber experiments to provide a quantitative measure of initial surface concentrations of spores on all surfaces, thereby allowing sampling recovery calculations. Results from these tests, carried out under both low and high humidity conditions, show that spore recovery from grime-coated surfaces is the same as or better than spore recovery from clean surfaces. Statistically significant differences between method performance for grime-coated and clean surfaces were observed in only about half of the chamber tests conducted.

  20. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  1. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  2. Multivector Functions of a Real Variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Moya; V. V. Fernández; W. A. Rodrigues Jr

    2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an introduction to the theory of multivector functions of a real variable. The notions of limit, continuity and derivative for these objects are given. The theory of multivector functions of a real variable, even being similar to the usual theory of vector functions of a real variable, has some subtle issues which make its presentation worhtwhile.We refer in particular to the derivative rules involving exterior and Clifford products, and also to the rule for derivation of a composition of an ordinary scalar function with a multivector function of a real variable.

  3. Hybrid Bayesian Networks with Linear Deterministic Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Barry R.; Shenoy, Prakash P.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference (UAI-05), 2005, AUAI Press, Arlington, VA. 136 Y X Z Figure 2: A Bayesian Network Representation of the Mixed Distribution for X. this example, Y is a discrete variable with state space ? Y = {1,2,3}, Z is a real-valued variable, and X is a... conditionally deterministic variable whose condi- tional distribution is described as follows: X |{y,z} = y if y =1,2 and X |{y,z} = z if y =3. Potentials of the type described above are used in this paper to represent distributions of variables in hy- brid...

  4. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

  5. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

  6. surface chemistry | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface chemistry surface chemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study....

  7. Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stored in poorly designed facilities or where it has been leached from U mill tailings [USDOE, 1996Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions alluvial aquifer beneath a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was simulated using a surface

  8. Journal of Environmental Management 86 (2008) 1426 Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jenny (Qian)

    Journal of Environmental Management 86 (2008) 14­26 Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology and environmental modeling for citrus pest management Qian Dua , Ni-Bin Changb causing pollution in surface water in Texas (Texas Environmental Profiles, 2005). As the Safe Drinking

  9. Integrated Analysis for the Design of Reusable TPS based on Variable Transpiration Cooling for Hypersonic Cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    with the high dynamic pressure flight trajectories, generates surface temperatures for which the strength1 Integrated Analysis for the Design of Reusable TPS based on Variable Transpiration Cooling of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles presents formidable challenges. Reusable thermal protection systems (TPS

  10. Simulating solar power plant variability : a review of current methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, Matthew; Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Stein, Joshua S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to be able to accurately simulate the variability of solar PV power plants for grid integration studies. We aim to inform integration studies of the ease of implementation and application-specific accuracy of current PV power plant output simulation methods. This report reviews methods for producing simulated high-resolution (sub-hour or even sub-minute) PV power plant output profiles for variability studies and describes their implementation. Two steps are involved in the simulations: estimation of average irradiance over the footprint of a PV plant and conversion of average irradiance to plant power output. Six models are described for simulating plant-average irradiance based on inputs of ground-measured irradiance, satellite-derived irradiance, or proxy plant measurements. The steps for converting plant-average irradiance to plant power output are detailed to understand the contributions to plant variability. A forthcoming report will quantify the accuracy of each method using application-specific validation metrics.

  11. SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

  12. A Lesson Learned on Determination of Radionuclides on Metal Surface Fixed Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEZNARICH, H.K.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Measurement of fixed surface contamination required to determine classification as low-level or as transuranic waste.

  13. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

  14. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  15. Practical evaluation of action-angle variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A practical method is described for establishing action-angle variables for a Hamiltonian system. That is, a given nearly integrable Hamiltonian is divided into an exactly integrable system plus a perturbation in action-angle form. The transformation of variables, which is carried out using a few short trajectory integrations, permits a rapid determination of trajectory properties throughout a phase space volume.

  16. Quantum Computing and Hidden Variables Scott Aaronson #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    Quantum Computing and Hidden Variables Scott Aaronson # Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton of a hidden variable, then we could e#ciently solve problems that are believed to be intractable even powerful than the quantum computing model. PACS numbers: 03.65.Ta, 03.65.Ud, 03.67.Lx, 02.70.­c I

  17. Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm for continuous variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun K. Pati; Samuel L. Braunstein

    2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an idealized quantum continuous variable analog of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm which can be implemented on a perfect continuous variable quantum computer. Using the Fourier transformation and XOR gate appropriate for continuous spectra we show that under ideal operation to infinite precision that there is an infinite reduction in number of query calls in this scheme.

  18. The Galex Ultraviolet Variability (GUVV) Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry Y. Welsh; Jonathan M. Wheatley; Kenneth Heafield; Mark Seibert; Stanley E. Browne; Samir Salim; R. Michael Rich; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; D. Christopher Martin; Bruno Milliard; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Ted K. Wyder

    2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Version 1.0 of the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet variability catalog (GUVV) that contains information on 84 time-variable and transient sources gained with simultaneous near and far ultraviolet photometric observations. These time-variable sources were serendipitously revealed in the various 1.2 degree star fields currently being surveyed by the GALEX satellite in two ultraviolet bands (NUV 1750-2750A, FUV 1350-1750A) with limiting AB magnitudes of 23-25. The largest-amplitude variable objects presently detected by GALEX are M-dwarf flare stars, which can brighten by 5-10 mag in both the NUV and FUV bands during short duration (< 500s) outbursts. Other types of large-amplitude ultraviolet variable objects include ab-type RR Lyrae stars, which can vary periodically by 2-5mag in the GALEX FUV band. This first GUVV catalog lists galactic positions and possible source identifications in order to provide the astronomical community with a list of time-variable objects that can now be repeatedly observed at other wavelengths. We expect the total number of time-variable source detections to increase as the GALEX mission progresses, such that later version numbers of the GUVV catalog will contain substantially more variable sources.

  19. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212" F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  20. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212° F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  1. SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

  2. Surface characterization based on optical phase shifting interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mello, Michael (Pasadena, CA), Rosakis; Ares J. (Altadena, CA)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus, techniques and systems for implementing an optical interferometer to measure surfaces, including mapping of instantaneous curvature or in-plane and out-of-plane displacement field gradients of a sample surface based on obtaining and processing four optical interferograms from a common optical reflected beam from the sample surface that are relatively separated in phase by .pi./2.

  3. Quantification of surface tension and internal pressure generated by single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jülicher, Frank

    Quantification of surface tension and internal pressure generated by single mitotic cells Elisabeth of a liquid cell interior, the surface tension is related to the local curvature and the hydrostatic pressure measured confined cell shapes to shapes obeying Laplace's law with uniform surface tension and find

  4. Surface-integral formalism of deuteron stripping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Mukhamedzhanov; D. Y. Pang; C. A. Bertulani; A. S. Kadyrov

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an alternative theory of deuteron stripping to resonance states based on the surface integral formalism of Kadyrov et al. [Ann. Phys. 324, 1516 (2009)] and continuum-discretized coupled channels (CDCC). First we demonstrate how the surface integral formalism works in the three-body model and then we consider a more realistic problem in which a composite structure of target nuclei is taken via optical potentials. We explore different choices of channel wave functions and transition operators and show that a conventional CDCC volume matrix element can be written in terms of a surface-integral matrix element, which is peripheral, and an auxiliary matrix element, which determines the contribution of the nuclear interior over the variable $r_{nA}$. This auxiliary matrix element appears due to the inconsistency in treating of the $n-A$ potential: this potential should be real in the final state to support bound states or resonance scattering and complex in the initial state to describe $n-A$ scattering. Our main result is formulation of the theory of the stripping to resonance states using the prior form of the surface integral formalism and CDCC method. It is demonstrated that the conventional CDCC volume matrix element coincides with the surface matrix element, which converges for the stripping to the resonance state. Also the surface representation (over the variable $r_{nA}$ of the stripping matrix element enhances the peripheral part of the amplitude although the internal contribution doesn't disappear and increases with increase of the deuteron energy. We present calculations corroborating our findings for both stripping to the bound state and the resonance.

  5. A comparison of light and velocity variations in Semiregular variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lebzelter; L. L. Kiss; K. H. Hinkle

    2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NIR velocity variations are compared with simultaneous visual light curves for a sample of late-type semiregular variables (SRV). Precise radial velocity measurements are also presented for the SRV V450 Aql. Our aim is to investigate the nature of the irregular light changes found in these variables. Light and velocity variations are correlated in all stars of our sample. Based on these results we discuss several possibilities to explain the observed behavior. We find that pulsation is responsible for large amplitude variations. In a recent paper Lebzelter (1999) invoked large convective cells to understand observed velocity variations. This possibility is discussed with respect to the observed correlation between light and velocity changes. In the light of these results we investigate the origin of the semiregular variations.

  6. Continuous variable quantum teleportation with non-Gaussian resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dell'Anno; S. De Siena; L. Albano Farias; F. Illuminati

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate continuous variable quantum teleportation using non-Gaussian states of the radiation field as entangled resources. We compare the performance of different classes of degaussified resources, including two-mode photon-added and two-mode photon-subtracted squeezed states. We then introduce a class of two-mode squeezed Bell-like states with one-parameter dependence for optimization. These states interpolate between and include as subcases different classes of degaussified resources. We show that optimized squeezed Bell-like resources yield a remarkable improvement in the fidelity of teleportation both for coherent and nonclassical input states. The investigation reveals that the optimal non-Gaussian resources for continuous variable teleportation are those that most closely realize the simultaneous maximization of the content of entanglement, the degree of affinity with the two-mode squeezed vacuum and the, suitably measured, amount of non-Gaussianity.

  7. A variable-field permanent-magnet dipole for accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Barlow, D.B.; Meyer, R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept for a variable-field permanent-magnet dipole has been developed and fabricated at Los Alamos. The application requires an extremely uniform dipole field in the magnet aperture and precision variability over a large operating range. An iron-core permanent- magnet design using a shunt that was specially shaped to vary the field in a precise and reproducible fashion with shunt position. The key to this design is in the shape of the shunt. The field as a function of shunt position is very linear from 90% of the maximum field to 20% of the minimum field. The shaped shunt also results in a small maximum magnetic force attracting the shunt to the yoke allowing a simple mechanical design. Calculated and measured results agree well for the magnet.

  8. A variable-field permanent-magnet dipole for accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Barlow, D.B.; Meyer, R.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new concept for a variable-field permanent-magnet dipole has been developed and fabricated at Los Alamos. The application requires an extremely uniform dipole field in the magnet aperture and precision variability over a large operating range. An iron-core permanent- magnet design using a shunt that was specially shaped to vary the field in a precise and reproducible fashion with shunt position. The key to this design is in the shape of the shunt. The field as a function of shunt position is very linear from 90% of the maximum field to 20% of the minimum field. The shaped shunt also results in a small maximum magnetic force attracting the shunt to the yoke allowing a simple mechanical design. Calculated and measured results agree well for the magnet.

  9. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  10. GR via Characteristic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonetta Frittelli; Carlos Kozameh; Ted Newman

    1995-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We reformulate the Einstein equations as equations for families of surfaces on a four-manifold. These surfaces eventually become characteristic surfaces for an Einstein metric (with or without sources). In particular they are formulated in terms of two functions on R4xS2, i.e. the sphere bundle over space-time, - one of the functions playing the role of a conformal factor for a family of associated conformal metrics, the other function describing an S2's worth of surfaces at each space-time point. It is from these families of surfaces themselves that the conformal metric - conformal to an Einstein metric - is constructed; the conformal factor turns them into Einstein metrics. The surfaces are null surfaces with respect to this metric.

  11. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

  12. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  13. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  14. Study of the Effects of Single and Double Droplets Impingement on Surface Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Min

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the independent variable and the observed heat transfer mechanism. The study of coherent droplet impingement on an open surface is experimentally characterized using high speed imaging and infrared thermography. Single stream droplet impingent cooling...

  15. Surface-wave calibration studies for improved monitoring of a CTBT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, H.J.; Jones, L.E.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic calibration of the International Monitoring System (IMS) and other key monitoring stations is critical for effective verification of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Detection, location, and identification all depend upon calibration of source and path effects to ensure maximum efficiency of the IMS to monitor at small magnitudes. This project gathers information about the effects of source and propagation on surface waves for key monitoring areas in central Asia with initial focus on western China. Source calibration focuses on surface-wave determinations of focal depth and seismic moment, M{sub o}, for key earthquakes, which serve as calibration sources in location studies and for developing regional magnitude scales. The authors present a calibration procedure for Lg attenuation, which exploits an empirical relationship between M{sub o} and 1-Hz Lg amplitude for stable and tectonic continental regions. The procedure uses this relationship and estimates of M{sub o} to predict Lg amplitudes at a reference distance of 10 km from each calibrated source. Path-specific estimates of Q{sub o} in the power-law formula of Q (Q = Q{sub o}f{sup {zeta}}) are made using measurements of 1-Hz Lg amplitudes observed at the station and amplitudes predicted for the reference distance. Nuttli`s formula for m{sub b}(Lg) is thus calibrated for the source region of interest, and for paths to key monitoring stations. Path calibration focuses on measurement of surface-wave group velocity dispersion curves in the period range of 5 to 50 s. Concentrating on the Lop Nor source region initially, they employ broadband data recorded at CDSN stations, regional event (M > 4.0), and source-receiver path lengths from 200 to 2000 km. Their approach emphasizes path-specific calibration of key stations and source regions and will result in a family of regionally appropriate phase-match filters, designed to extract fundamental mode surface-wave arrivals for each region of interest. They characterize and quantify regional variability in surface wave dispersion measurements by creating slowness residual maps for a given period and set of paths, and by performing variogram analysis by wave type (Love and Rayleigh Waves), wave period, and station. Results from the slowness residual maps yield point measurements which form the raw input for kriged correction surfaces appropriate to specific source regions. The variogram analysis yields correlation lengths used for smoothing in the kriging process.

  16. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S. [UK Research Centre in NDE, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  17. Anisotropic surface tension of buckled fluid membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Noguchi

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid sheets and fluid membranes exhibit buckling under lateral compression. Here, it is revealed that fluid membranes have anisotropic buckling surface tension contrary to solid sheets. Surprisingly, the surface tension perpendicular to the buckling direction shows stronger dependence than that parallel to it. Our theoretical predictions are supported by numerical simulations of a meshless membrane model. This anisotropic tension can be used to measure the membrane bending rigidity. It is also found phase synchronization occurs between multilayered buckled membranes.

  18. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Binping [JLAB, William and Mary College; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB, William and Mary College

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  19. Surface charge in dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opaits, D. F.; Shneider, M. N.; Miles, Richard B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Likhanskii, A. V. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Macheret, S. O. [Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Palmdale, California 93599 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurements of the dielectric surface potential and its dynamics in asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators show that the charge builds up at the dielectric surface and extends far downstream of the plasma. The surface charge persists for a long time (tens of minutes) after the driving voltage has been turned off. For a sinusoidal voltage waveform, the dielectric surface charges positively. With the voltage waveform consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on a dc bias, the sign of the dielectric surface charge is the same as the sign (polarity) of the bias voltage. The surface charging significantly affects DBD plasma actuator performance.

  20. Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  1. A comparison of two variables in relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Paul Edwin

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF TWO VARIABLES IN RELAXATION A Thesis by PAUL EDWIN TURNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject...: Psychology A COMPARiSON OF TWO VARIABLES IN RELAXATION A Thesis by PAUL EDWIN TURNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ Head of Dep tment Member ?2 J L, ~Xi~ Member M-. ~~2 y May 1974 ABSTRACT A Comparison of Two Variable...

  2. Probing thermal waves on the free surface of various media: Surface Fluctuation Specular Reflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrid Tay; Caroline Thibierge; Danièle Fournier; Christian Frétigny; François Lequeux; Cécile Monteux; Jean-Paul Roger; Laurence Talini

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal motion gives rise to fluctuations in free surfaces; the propagation of the thermally excited waves on such surfaces depends on the mechanical properties of the medium. Their measurement can therefore provide information on those properties. We have developed an optical tool to probe the thermally excited waves on free surfaces: Surface Fluctuation Specular Reflection (SFSR) spectroscopy. It consists in measuring the fluctuations in the position of a laser beam, which is specularly reflected onto the free surface of a medium, and is therefore sensitive to the roughness of that surface. We show how the measured signal is related to the medium properties. We also present measurements performed on Newtonian liquids as well as on a viscoelastic solid; we show that, in all cases, there is a very good agreement between experimental and computed spectra. SFSR thus applies to a broad range of materials. It moreover offers a very good temporal resolution and should provide a useful tool for dynamical measurements on complex fluids.

  3. Intra-canopy variability of fruit growth rate in peach trees grafted on rootstocks with different vigour-control capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeJong, Theodore

    Intra-canopy variability of fruit growth rate in peach trees grafted on rootstocks with different research was to study intra-canopy variability in fruit growth under conditions of low fruit-to- fruit vertically into five layers.The diameter of 12 fruit per canopy layer was measured early in the growing

  4. Pg: 1 February 11, 2009 Surface Water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    -mesoscale and kinetic energy containing scales -- What is the small- scale (10-100 km) variability of ocean surface/C requirements: ·Payload power, mass: ~1.1KW, ~300Kg ·Stringent Pointing knowledge requirements ·High Data Rate · Use conventional Jason- class altimeter for nadir coverage and radiometer for wet-tropospheric delay

  5. Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barghassa, Peyam

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rice residue and related factors on NH3 volatilization from an acid Beaumont clay (pH 5.4) and an alkaline Lake Charles clay (pH 7.4). The treatments in the greenhouse and lab consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface...

  6. EMSL - surface chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface-chemistry en FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  7. Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

  8. Inserting Group Variables into Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jackiw

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid, like a quark-gluon plasma, may possess degrees of freedom indexed by a group variable, which retains its identity even in the fluid/continuum description. Conventional Eulerian fluid mechanics is extended to encompass this possibility.

  9. Energy Savings of Variable Speed Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishel, F. D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the energy savings available by utilizing variable speed motors on pump and fan applications. Conventional control of flow or pressure in process plants is normally accomplished by throttling the various streams with control...

  10. Variable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang-Olson, Jeffrey; Wachs, Martin; Taylor, Brian D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J Bradshaw, "SLate ’F~es’ Gasoline Tax So ~t Wdl Rise," TheVarlable-Rate State Gasoline Taxers Jeffrey Ang-Olson MartinVariable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes Jeffrey Ang-Olson

  11. UselessVariable Elimination Olin Shivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Olin

    flow analysis on the CPS inter­ mediate form. (I use a CPS representation essentially identical­passing style (CPS) intermediate representations, continuation variables are frequently passed around loops

  12. Hybrid permanent magnet and variable reluctance generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidya, J.; Belanger, D.J.

    1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a hybrid electrical generator. It comprises: a permanent magnet generator having a permanent magnet rotor mounted on a shaft, the permanent magnet generator providing an output voltage over an operating range which falls in response to an increasing electrical load; a variable reluctance generator having a rotor mounted on the shaft with excitation of a stator of the variable reluctance generator being provided from the permanent magnet generator, the variable reluctance generator providing an output voltage which varies in response to an increasing electrical load over an operating range; and a voltage regulator, responsive to combined output voltages of the generators, for controlling the output voltage provided by the variable reluctance generator.

  13. Phenomenology of the CAH+ measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem; Alexander Vilenkin

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CAH+ measure regulates the infinite spacetime volume of the multiverse by constructing a surface of constant comoving apparent horizon (CAH) and then removing the future lightcones of all points on that surface (the latter prescription is referred to by the "+" in the name of the measure). This measure was motivated by the conjectured duality between the bulk of the multiverse and its future infinity and by the causality condition, requiring that the cutoff surfaces of the measure should be spacelike or null. Here we investigate the phenomenology of the CAH+ measure and find that it does not suffer from any known pathologies. The distribution for the cosmological constant Lambda derived from this measure is in a good agreement with the observed value, and the distribution for the number of inflationary e-foldings satisfies the observational constraint. The CAH+ measure does not exhibit any "runaway" behaviors at zero or negative values of Lambda, which have been recently shown to afflict a number of other measures.

  14. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes.

  15. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  16. The Energy-Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golkhou, V Zach; Littlejohns, Owen M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 GRBs observed by the Fermi/GBM instrument prior to July 11, 2012. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands -- or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift -- we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor 2--3 longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 ms and 10 ms, respectively. Fewer than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors $\\gtrsim 400$ and imply typical emission radii $R \\approx 1 {\\times} 10^{14}$ cm for long-duration GRBs and $R \\approx 3 {\\times} 10^{13}$ cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether GRB minimum timescales evolve w...

  17. Variability in the North Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current : upstream causes and downstream effects as observed at Line W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peña-Molino, Beatriz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variability in the DWBC, its connection to the forcing in the northern North Atlantic and interaction with the Gulf Stream were explored from a combination of remote sensing and in-situ measurements in the western North ...

  18. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  19. Cataclysmic Variable Primary Effective Temperatures: Constraints on Binary Angular Momentum Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean M. Townsley; Boris T. Gaensicke

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the most decisive currently available measurements of the surface effective temperatures, Teff, of white dwarf (WD) primaries in cataclysmic variables (CVs) during accretion quiescence, and use these as a diagnostic for their time averaged accretion rate, . Using time-dependent calculations of the WD envelope, we investigate the sensitivity of the quiescent Teff to long term variations in the accretion rate. We find that the quiescent Teff provides one of the best available tests of predictions for the angular momentum loss and resultant mass transfer rates which govern the evolution of CVs. While gravitational radiation is sufficient to explain the of strongly magnetic CVs at all Porb, faster angular momentum loss is required by the temperatures of dwarf nova primaries (non-magnetic systems). This provides evidence that a normal stellar magnetic field structure near the secondary is essential for the enhanced braking mechanism to work, supporting the well-known stellar wind braking hypothesis. The contrast in is most prominent for orbital periods Porb > 3 hours, above the period gap, but a modest enhancement is also present at shorter Porb. The averaging time which reflects is as much as 10^5 years for low- systems and as little as 10^3 years for high- systems. We discuss the security of conclusions drawn about the CV population in light of these time scales and our necessarily incomplete sample of systems. Measurements for non-magnetic systems above the period gap fall below predictions from traditional stellar wind braking prescriptions, but above more recent predictions with somewhat weaker angular momentum loss. We also discuss the apparently high Teff's found in the VY Scl stars. (abridged)

  20. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  1. Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Broom, Belt, Carpet) Shot Peened Exposed Aggregate Porous (Pervious) Concrete Milled HMA and SurfaceImproving Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics Pooled Fund TPF-5(139) National Concrete do with this knowledge? #12;Better Design and Construction Practices for Texturing Concrete Pavement

  2. The EUV and X-ray Emission of Nonmagnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1997-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results are presented and discussed regarding the EUV and X-ray emission of nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables. Emphasis is given to high accretion rate systems (novalike variables and dwarf novae in outburst), and to a number of apparent discrepancies between observations and the theory of the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf. Discussed are EUV and X-ray light curves, dwarf nova oscillations, and spectra, with new and previously unpublished results on SS Cyg and OY Car.

  3. Response Surfaces for Optimal Weight of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cracked Composite Panels; Melih Papila; Raphael T. Haftka

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two levels of fidelity are used for minimum weight design of a composite bladestiffened panel subject to crack propagation constraints. The low fidelity approach makes use of an equivalent strain constraint calculated by a closed form solution for the stress intensity factor. The high fidelity approach uses the stress intensity factor directly as the constraint and computes it from the stress distribution around the crack. A number of panels were optimized by both approaches for different values of applied load, crack length, and blade height, and response surface approximations for optimal weight as function of these configuration variables were constructed. Computational cost, noise and accuracy for the results are compared.

  4. Guide to transverse projections and mass-constraining variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, A. J. [Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Khoo, T. J.; Lester, C. G. [Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Konar, P. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, Gujarat - 380 009 (India); Kong, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA 66045 (United States); Matchev, K. T.; Park, M. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (m{sub T}, m{sub eff}, m{sub T2}, missing p-vector{sub T}, h{sub T}, {radical}(s-circumflex){sub min}, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the strengths and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript 'T' (as in 'pe{sub T}') in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of transverse notation distinguishing 'T' from 'v' or or from 'o', and 'early projection' from 'late projection', will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naieve use of the so-called 'transverse methods' of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the 'transverse mass' they are employing.

  5. Phenotypic and genetic relationships between certain body measurements and milk production of first lactation Holsteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Joseph Calbert

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    2 The relative improvement expected to be gained by selection based 3olely on body measurement variables APPENDIX TABLES 3 Analysis cf variance to measure importance of in- breeding 4 Analysis of variance to measure importance of variation due... production and six body measurements 9 The within-year, within-sire correlations between nine variables measured on dam and daughter Page 21 LI 43 44 45 46 47 4 8 49 Phenotypic and Genetic Relationships Between Certain Body Measurements and Milk...

  6. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  7. Variable Temperature UHV STM/AFM | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of oxide materials, determining their properties is widely pursued both... Surface Chemistry of 2-Propanol on TiO2(110): Low and High Temperature Dehydration, Isotope...

  8. Electron cyclotron emission spectrometry on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimanov, I.; Porte, L.; Alberti, S.; Blanchard, P.; Fasoli, A.; Goodman, T.P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements are an important component of the diagnostic suite on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) [F. Hoffman et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 36, B277 (1994)]. A recently installed, 24-channel dual-conversion heterodyne radiometer covering the radio frequency range 65-100 GHz and viewing from the low-field side (LFS) of the tokamak greatly enhances the system and, in combination with an existing radiometer viewing from the high-field side (HFS), allows simultaneous measurements of emission from the HFS and LFS. In addition, the new radiometer has multiple lines of sight that can receive the emission perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field as well as with a finite k{sub parallel} (wave vector parallel to magnetic field). Such flexibility allows the LFS radiometer to make standard measurements of thermal emission and nonstandard measurements of nonthermal, anisotropic emission. The toroidal line of sight allows access to overdense plasma via mode converted emission. The enhanced ECE diagnostic is described and examples of measurements made in various configurations are presented.

  9. Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean Alessandra Giannini variability of Caribbean-Central Americanrainfall are examined. The atmosphericcirculation over this region- ature (SST) variability associated with Caribbean rainfall, as selected by canonical correlation

  10. Software Enabled Virtually Variable Displacement Pumps -Theoretical and Experimental Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Software Enabled Virtually Variable Displacement Pumps - Theoretical and Experimental Studies the functional equivalent of a variable displacement pump. This approach combines a fixed displacement pump valve control, without many of the shortcomings of commercially available variable displacement pumps

  11. The use of 'race' as a variable in biomedical research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efstathiou, Sophia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be used as a variable in biomedical research but mainly toRace’ as a Variable in Biomedical Research A dissertationRace’ as a Variable in Biomedical Research…………. Manifest,

  12. de Sitter Extremal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study extremal surfaces in de Sitter space in the Poincare slicing in the upper patch, anchored on spatial subregions at the future boundary ${\\cal I}^+$, restricted to constant boundary Euclidean time slices (focussing on strip subregions). We find real extremal surfaces of minimal area as the boundaries of past lightcone wedges of the subregions in question: these are null surfaces with vanishing area. We find also complex extremal surfaces as complex extrema of the area functional, and the area is not always real-valued. In $dS_4$ the area is real and has some structural resemblance with entanglement entropy in a dual $CFT_3$. There are parallels with analytic continuation from the Ryu-Takayanagi expressions for holographic entanglement entropy in $AdS$. We also discuss extremal surfaces in the $dS$ black brane and the de Sitter "bluewall" studied previously. The $dS_4$ black brane complex surfaces exhibit a real finite cutoff-independent extensive piece. In the bluewall geometry, there are real surface...

  13. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch RelatedcontentcharacteristicsMeasurements RelatedMeasurements

  14. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  15. Interannual variability of surface energy exchange depends on stand age in a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 ] Half-hourly data of net radiation and sensible andhour time series data of net radiation, sensible heat flux,data in March of 2002. b K # : incoming shortwave radiation (

  16. Free and forced tropical variability: role of the wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the equator over the Atlantic during El-Nino events. Comparative studies between Last GlacialMaximum (LGM) equivalent imposed northern hemispheric sea-ice experiments withthe WES-off model and the standard model indicate a dominant role for the WESfeedback...

  17. Pacific Ocean Pleistocene and Holocene surface temperature variability and implications for climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyez, Kelsey

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sacramento-San Joaquin delta: Water Resources Bulletin,, no.coastal and estuarine waters: Radiocarbon, v. 38, no. 3, p.salinity systematics in estuarine waters and carbonates: San

  18. Amplification of surface temperature trends and variability in the tropical atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CM2.1 GISS-AOM GISS-EH GISS-ER INM-CM3.0 IPSL-CM4 MIROC3.2(GISS-AOM, two; GISS-EH, ?ve; GISS-ER, ?ve); the Center forCM2.1 GISS-AOM GISS-EH GISS-ER INM-CM3.0 IPSL-CM4 MIROC3.2(

  19. Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Mesurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn|Oil

  20. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

  1. VIIRS narrowband to broadband land surface albedo conversion: formula and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    albedo, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Moderate Resolution Imaging broadband albedo (0.4­4.0 mm) of land surfaces from Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS algorithm. 1. Introduction Albedo is a critical variable for accurate climate and surface energy balance

  2. Continuous surface ocean measurements of dissolved oxygen isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafelski, Lauren Elmegreen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 6.2: Fossil fuel emissions perof Carbon Dioxide from Fossil Fuels, editors W. P. Elliott,Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels: A procedure for

  3. Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many building owners and facility managers are deeply interested in both operation and maintenance costs related to a building's life cycle. Optimizing energy consumption and obtaining long equipment activity requires sophisticated management...

  4. Some measures of aircraft performance on the airport surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swedish, William J.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the month of January, a survey was conducted at Boston and Atlanta Airports to obtain input data for an interactive computer simulation of runway and taxiway traffic being developed by Lincoln Laboratory. Data was ...

  5. Implementing Rational Surface Locations Measured From Thomson Scattering Into

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |EndecahemeEMSLImagingOregon Department of

  6. Advances in measuring water's surface potential referenced | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP Aircraft EnginesofTime Tag Approach

  7. Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing variable lift, timing and duration to enable high efficiency engine combustion control Compact,...

  8. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human...

  9. Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications - Executive Summary Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications - Executive Summary This document...

  10. Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Adaptation to Climate Variability and...

  11. Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite to Supercritical CO2. Microstructural Response of Variably Hydrated Ca-Rich Montmorillonite to Supercritical...

  12. Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013 Peer Review Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for...

  13. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature...

  14. Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate Requirements Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate Requirements This tip sheet discusses...

  15. Two-Stage Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) System to Increase...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Two-Stage Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) System to Increase Efficiency in Gasoline Powertrains Two-Stage Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) System to Increase Efficiency in...

  16. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  18. A surface ionization source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  19. Structured surfaces for hemocompatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrauth, Anthony J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of micro- and nano-technologies has brought to light intriguing examples of scale-driven performance in a diverse array of fields. The quest to create highly hydrophobic surfaces is one such field. The application ...

  20. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  1. Entropy and surfaceness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casper, James Kyle

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The layer of the Earth's atmosphere which contains clouds and weather systems is a thin thermoregulatory surface. It maintains an exact energy budget between the Earth and the Sun. Recent work in theoretical physics is ...

  2. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  3. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Lew, D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the U.S., a number of utilities are adopting higher penetrations of renewables, driven in part by state policies. While power systems have been designed to handle the variable nature of loads, the additional supply-side variability and uncertainty can pose new challenges for utilities and system operators. However, a variety of operational and technical solutions exist to help integrate higher penetrations of wind and solar generation. This paper explores renewable energy integration challenges and mitigation strategies that have been implemented in the U.S. and internationally, including forecasting, demand response, flexible generation, larger balancing areas or balancing area cooperation, and operational practices such as fast scheduling and dispatch.

  4. Variable pressure power cycle and control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

  5. INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY IN GLOBAL SOIL RESPIRATION (1980-1994) Interannual Variability in Global Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY IN GLOBAL SOIL RESPIRATION (1980-1994) NDP-081 Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994) Contributed by: James W. Raich 1, Tennessee 37831-6335. The ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under

  6. Measuring Neutrino Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4,Measurements of NOMeasuring

  7. An Attack Surface Metric Pratyusa K. Manadhata and Jeannette M. Wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Jeannette M.

    An Attack Surface Metric Pratyusa K. Manadhata and Jeannette M. Wing Carnegie Mellon University's security? We propose to use the measure of a system's attack surface as an indication of the system, prior work has shown that a system's attack surface measurement serves as a reliable proxy for security

  8. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncementsgovMeasurements Measurement Categories Select below

  9. A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A mean field approach for computing solid-liquid surface tension for nanoscale interfaces Chi are largely determined by the solid-liquid surface tension. This is especially true for nanoscale systems with high surface area to volume ratios. While experimental techniques can only measure surface tension

  10. Heart Rate Variability Malvin Carl Teich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Heart Rate Variability Malvin Carl Teich Boston University and Columbia University http, Grasmere, UK, 2005 #12;CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE INABILITY OF HEART TO INCREASE CARDIAC OUTPUT IN PROPORTION of breath Swelling in legs General fatigue and weakness Clinical diagnostics: Ascultate heart Carotid pulse

  11. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  12. Chapter 18: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romberger, J.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adjustable-speed drive (ASD) includes all devices that vary the speed of a rotating load, including those that vary the motor speed and linkage devices that allow constant motor speed while varying the load speed. The Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol presented here addresses evaluation issues for variable-frequency drives (VFDs) installed on commercial and industrial motor-driven centrifugal fans and pumps for which torque varies with speed. Constant torque load applications, such as those for positive displacement pumps, are not covered by this protocol. Other ASD devices, such as magnetic drive, eddy current drives, variable belt sheave drives, or direct current motor variable voltage drives, are also not addressed. The VFD is by far the most common type of ASD hardware. With VFD speed control on a centrifugal fan or pump motor, energy use follows the affinity laws, which state that the motor electricity demand is a cubic relationship to speed under ideal conditions. Therefore, if the motor runs at 75% speed, the motor demand will ideally be reduced to 42% of full load power; however, with other losses it is about 49% of full load power.

  13. Markovian feedback to control continuous variable entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Mancini

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model to realize quantum feedback control of continuous variable entanglement. It consists of two interacting bosonic modes subject to amplitude damping and achieving entangled Gaussian steady state. The possibility to greatly improve the degree of entanglement by means of Markovian (direct) feedback is then shown.

  14. Variable Light-Cone Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. T. Drummond

    1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to reformulate Variable Speed of Light Theories (VSLT) in a covariant fashion as Variable Light-Cone Theories (VLCT) by introducing two vierbein bundles each associated with a distinct metric. The basic gravitational action relates to one bundle while matter propagates relative to the other in a conventional way. The variability of the speed of light is represented by the variability of the matter light-cone relative to the gravitational light-cone. The two bundles are related locally by an element M, of SL(4,R). The dynamics of the field M is that of a SL(4,R)-sigma model gauged with respect to local (orthochronous) Lorentz transformations on each of the bundles. Only the ``massless'' version of the model with a single new coupling, F, that has the same dimensions as Newton's constant $G_N$, is considered in this paper. When F vanishes the theory reduces to standard General Relativity. We verify that the modified Bianchi identities of the model are consistent with the standard conservation law for the matter energy-momentum tensor in its own background metric. The implications of the model for some simple applications are examined, the Newtonian limit, the flat FRW universe and the spherically symmetric static solution.

  15. An Exploratory Study of Variability in Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    An Exploratory Study of Variability in Safety Culture among Clinician types and Patient Care of the current study was to (a) examine how different types of care providers viewed the safety culture of their unit, and (b) examine the relationship between hospital safety culture and patient satisfaction

  16. Original article Variability of digestibility criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Variability of digestibility criteria in maize elite hybrids submitted of various in vitro digestibility criteria used to estimate genotypic variation in silage maize elite hybrids and in vitro digestibility of whole-plant and cell-walls were pre- dicted by near infra-red reflectance

  17. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  18. Gowdy phenomenology in scale-invariant variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Andersson; Henk van Elst; Claes Uggla

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of Gowdy vacuum spacetimes is considered in terms of Hubble-normalized scale-invariant variables, using the timelike area temporal gauge. The resulting state space formulation provides for a simple mechanism for the formation of ``false'' and ``true spikes'' in the approach to the singularity, and a geometrical formulation for the local attractor.

  19. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Gabe V. (Las Cruces, NM); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  20. Surface heterogeneity impacts on boundary layer dynamics via energy balance partitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Mechem, David B.; Anderson, M. C.

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    energy balance partitioning N. A. Brunsell1, D. B. Mechem1, and M. C. Anderson2 1Dept. of Geography, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA 2Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory, USDA. Beltsville, MD, USA Received: 22 June 2010 – Published in Atmos... responsible for altering surface heat and moisture fluxes. Twelve coupled land surface – large eddy simulation scenarios with four different length scales of surface variability under three different horizontal wind speeds are used in the analysis. The base...

  1. Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon’s surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact ...

  2. Correlated spectral variability in brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. L. Bailer-Jones

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of brown dwarf atmospheres suggest they exhibit complex physical behaviour. Observations have shown that they are indeed dynamic, displaying small photometric variations over timescales of hours. Here I report results of infrared (0.95-1.64 micron) spectrophotometric monitoring of four field L and T dwarfs spanning timescales of 0.1-5.5 hrs, the goal being to learn more about the physical nature of this variability. Spectra are analysed differentially with respect to a simultaneously observed reference source in order to remove Earth-atmospheric variations. The variability amplitude detected is typically 2-10%, depending on the source and wavelength. I analyse the data for correlated variations between spectral indices. This approach is more robust than single band or chisq analyses, because it does not assume an amplitude for the (often uncertain) noise level (although the significance test still assumes a shape for the noise power spectrum). Three of the four targets show significant evidence for correlated variability. Some of this can be associated with specific features including Fe, FeH, VO and KI, and there is good evidence for intrinsic variability in water and possibly also methan. Yet some of this variability covers a broader spectral range which would be consistent with dust opacity variations. The underlying common cause is plausibly localized temperature or composition fluctuations caused by convection. Looking at the high signal-to-noise ratio stacked spectra we see many previously identified spectral features of L and T dwarfs, such as KI, NaI, FeH, water and methane. In particular we may have detected methane absorption at 1.3-1.4 micron in the L5 dwarf SDSS 0539-0059.

  3. Symbolic Variable Elimination for Discrete and Continuous Graphical Models Scott Sanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanner, Scott

    Symbolic Variable Elimination for Discrete and Continuous Graphical Models Scott Sanner NICTA & ANU, e.g., estimating the position and pose of entities from measurements in robotics, or radar track Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. n xx1 ...x2 d 10 d 0 100 P(d) = P(x |d) = d x i i Figure 1

  4. The fertilizing value of livestock waste is hardly determined considering its initial variability, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The fertilizing value of livestock waste is hardly determined considering its initial variability measurements of liquid waste outflows and Near Infrared spectrometry technique have been implemented it is exchanged, manure is mainly in this form. The quantity of solid waste can be estimated with the classical

  5. Efficient Energy Management and Data Recovery in Sensor Networks using Latent Variables Based Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Efficient Energy Management and Data Recovery in Sensor Networks using Latent Variables Based factor in a successful sensor network deployment is finding a good balance between maximizing the number of measurements taken (to maintain a good sampling rate) and minimizing the overall energy consumption (to extend

  6. T Tauri variability in the context of the beat-frequency model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. W. Smith; G. F. Lewis; I. A. Bonnell

    1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the implications of a beat frequency modulated model of T Tauri accretion. In particular we show that measurements of the variability of accretion generated lines can be used in conjunction with existing photometry to obtain a measurement of the underlying photospheric and disc flux. This provides an independent way of checking spectral energy distribution modelling. In addition, we show how spectroscopy of T Tauri stars can reveal the inclination angle between the magnetic axis and the plane of the disc.

  7. Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

  8. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  9. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  10. Surface states controlled broadband enhancement of two-photon absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhiqiang; Lu, Changgui; Xu, Shuhong; Jiang, Yuan; Yun, Binfeng; Wang, Chunlei; Cui, Yiping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Advanced Photonics Center, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)] [Advanced Photonics Center, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the controllable broadband enhancement of two-photon absorption in a wide spectral range from 710?nm to 960?nm by controlling the surface states of aqueous Co{sup 2+} doped CdTe quantum dots, which is consistent with the measurement results of surface potential and fluorescence decay. The enhancement can be tuned in the range between 1 and 1.7 by changing the dopant concentrations that determine the surface states.

  11. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  12. A Surface Energy Transfer Nanoruler for Measuring Binding Site Distances on Live Cell Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    background significantly reduces the signal-to-background ratio of the plasmonic sensor and greatly hinders SET nanoruler for live cells with long distance, easy construction, fast detection, and low background (LSPR) sensors meet these requirements.8-10 Liu et al.8 constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler

  13. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, A.

    We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH[subscript 4]) fluxes for the period June 2009–December 2010 using proxy dry-air ...

  14. Concentration of ozone in surface air over greater Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widen, Donald Allen

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface ozone concentrations were measured in the Greater Boston area from November, 1964 to December, 1965. Ozone was monitored continuosly using a Mast microcoulombmetric sensor. A chromium trioxide filter was fitted to ...

  15. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  16. Surface spectroscopic characterization of oxide thin films and bimetallic model catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Tao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . The interaction of metal clusters (Ag) with defects was examined by work function measurements. On various Pd related bimetallic alloy surfaces, CO chemisorption behavior was addressed by IRAS and TPD. Observed changes in the surface chemical properties during...

  17. Measurement of \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Bazarko, A O; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Cao, J; Coney, L; Conrad, J M; Cox, D C; Curioni, A; Djurcic, Z; Finley, D A; Fleming, B T; Ford, R; Garcia, F G; Garvey, G T; Gonzales, J; Grange, J; Green, C; Green, J A; Hart, T L; Hawker, E; Imlay, R; Johnson, R A; Karagiorgi, G; Kasper, P; Katori, T; Kobilarcik, T; Kourbanis, I; Koutsoliotas, S; Laird, E M; Linden, S K; Link, J M; Liu, Y; Louis, W C; Mahn, K B M; Marsh, W; Mauger, C; McGary, V T; McGregor, G; Metcalf, W; Meyers, P D; Mills, F; Mills, G B; Monroe, J; Moore, C D; Mousseau, J; Nelson, R H; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J A; Osmanov, B; Ouedraogo, S; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Perevalov, D; Polly, C C; Prebys, E; Raaf, J L; Ray, H; Roe, B P; Russell, A D; Sandberg, V; Schirato, R; Schmitz, D; Shaevitz, M H; Shoemaker, F C; Smith, D; Soderberg, M; Sorel, M; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; Stancu, I; Stefanski, R J; Sung, M; Tanaka, H A; Tayloe, R; Tzanov, M; Van de Water, R G; Wascko, M O; White, D H; Wilking, M J; Yang, H J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single \\pi^0 production on CH_2 induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC \\pi^0 events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of \\pi^0 momentum and \\pi^0 angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.40_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =808 MeV and (1.48+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.14_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =664 MeV for \

  18. A cutting surface algorithm for semi-infinite convex programming ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 16, 2013 ... this distribution optimization method and the cutting surface algorithm yields a ... We present a novel cutting surface algorithm for general ...... in their formulation are defined through bounds on the measure, bounds on the distance from a .... in Algorithm 2, in the remainder of this section we provide a short ...

  19. Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

  20. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch RelatedcontentcharacteristicsMeasurements Related Links MC3E

  1. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch RelatedcontentcharacteristicsMeasurements Related Links

  2. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch RelatedcontentcharacteristicsMeasurements Related

  3. An empirical analysis of the spatial variability of atmospheric CO2: Implications for inverse analyses and space-borne sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    analyses and space-borne sensors J. C. Lin,1 C. Gerbig,1 B. C. Daube,1 S. C. Wofsy,1 A. E. Andrews,2 S. A observations and spatial averages simulated by models or observed from space-borne sensors surface fluxes or to validate space-borne sensors. We empirically derive the spatial variability

  4. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  5. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain)] [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)] [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  6. A Plan to Meet the Nation's Needs for Surface Current Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are insufficient to provide the level of detail required by scientists and forecast- ers to measure surface current current measurements than are pres- ently available. High frequency radar (known as "HF radar" or simply measurements and to provide increased spa- tial and temporal resolution. Requirements for ocean surface

  7. The VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea survey: A first glance on stellar variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekany, I; Minniti, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) is an ESO public near-infrared variability survey of the Galactic bulge and an adjacent area of the southern mid-plane. It will produce a deep atlas in the ZYJHKs filters, and a Ks-band time-series database of ~10^9 point sources, among which >~10^6 are expected to be variable. One of VVV's immediate scientific goals is to provide accurate light curves of primary distance indicators, such as RR Lyrae stars, and utilize these data to produce a 3-D map of the surveyed area and, ultimately, trace the structure of the inner Galaxy. We give, based on the first ~1.5 years of the 5-yr-long survey, an early assessment on the basic properties and the overall quality of the VVV photometric time-series, and use these data to put an estimate of the fraction of variable stellar sources.

  8. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Racker; Pablo Sisterna; Hector Vucetich

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light ($c$), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of $c$ is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  9. Correlated spectral variability in brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailer-Jones, C A L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of brown dwarf atmospheres suggest they exhibit complex physical behaviour. Observations have shown that they are indeed dynamic, displaying small photometric variations over timescales of hours. Here I report results of infrared (0.95-1.64 micron) spectrophotometric monitoring of four field L and T dwarfs spanning timescales of 0.1-5.5 hrs, the goal being to learn more about the physical nature of this variability. Spectra are analysed differentially with respect to a simultaneously observed reference source in order to remove Earth-atmospheric variations. The variability amplitude detected is typically 2-10%, depending on the source and wavelength. I analyse the data for correlated variations between spectral indices. This approach is more robust than single band or chisq analyses, because it does not assume an amplitude for the (often uncertain) noise level (although the significance test still assumes a shape for the noise power spectrum). Three of the four targets show significant evidence for cor...

  10. X-ray variability in M87

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Harris; J. A. Biretta; W. Junor

    1996-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the evidence for X-ray variability from the core and from knot A in the M87 jet based on data from two observations with the Einstein Observatory High Resolution Imager (HRI) and three observations with the ROSAT HRI. The core intensity showed a 16% increase in 17 months ('79-'80); a 12% increase in the 3 years '92 to '95; and a 17% drop in the last half of 1995. The intensity of knot A appears to have decreased by 16% between 92Jun and 95Dec. Although the core variability is consistent with general expectations for AGN nuclei, the changes in knot A provide constraints on the x-ray emission process and geometry. Thus we predict that the x-ray morphology of knot A will differ significantly from the radio and optical structure.

  11. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racker, Juan [CONICET, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Avenida Bustillo 9500 (8400), San Carlos De Bariloche (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Sisterna, Pablo [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Vucetich, Hector [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light (c), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of c is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  12. Variable aperture collimator for high energy radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed providing a variable aperture energy beam collimator. A plurality of beam opaque blocks are in sliding interface edge contact to form a variable aperture. The blocks may be offset at the apex angle to provide a non-equilateral aperture. A plurality of collimator block assemblies may be employed for providing a channel defining a collimated beam. Adjacent assemblies are inverted front-to-back with respect to one another for preventing noncollimated energy from emerging from the apparatus. An adjustment mechanism comprises a cable attached to at least one block and a hand wheel mechanism for operating the cable. The blocks are supported by guide rods engaging slide brackets on the blocks. The guide rods are pivotally connected at each end to intermediate actuators supported on rotatable shafts to change the shape of the aperture. A divergent collimated beam may be obtained by adjusting the apertures of adjacent stages to be unequal.

  13. Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

  14. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childs, E.L.

    1984-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

  15. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childs, Everett L. (Boulder, CO)

    1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

  16. Teleportation using continuous variable quantum cloning machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyabrata Adhikari

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that an unknown quantum state in phase space can be teleported via three-mode entanglement generated by continuous variable quantum cloning machine (transformation). Further, proceeding with our teleportation protocol we are able to improve the fidelity of teleportation obtained by Loock et.al. [Phys.Rev.Lett. 84, 3482(2000)]. Also we study here the entanglement between the two output copies from cloning machine.

  17. HVAC's Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Comfort by Design Steve Jones Commercial Sales Manager for Mitsubishi Southwest Business Unit HVAC?s Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Technology HVAC Industry Overview HVAC Market Dollar Volume $18 Billion Source:;NABH Research....2M Systems Ductless is a small percent of the U.S. HVAC market but current building and energy usage trends indicate a large growth opportunity Determining the Proper Application Worldwide Usage-Opportunity Window Unitary Chillers...

  18. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  19. Multivector Functions of a Multivector Variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Moya; V. V. Fernández; W. A. Rodrigues Jr

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we develop with considerable details a theory of multivector functions of a $p$-vector variable. The concepts of limit, continuity and differentiability are rigorously studied. Several important types of derivatives for these multivector functions are introduced, as e.g., the $A$% -directional derivative (where $A$ is a $p$-vector) and the generalized concepts of curl, divergence and gradient. The derivation rules for different types of products of multivector functions and for compositon of multivector functions are proved.

  20. Hidden Variables and Quantum Statistics Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. F. Kamalov

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the nature of quantum statistics can be clarified by assuming the existence of a background of random gravitational fields and waves, distributed isotropically in the space. This background is responsible for correlating phases of oscillations of identical microobjects. If such a background of random gravitational fields and waves is considered as hidden variables then taking it into account leads to the Bell-type inequalities that are fairly consistent with the experimental data.