National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for measurement program climate

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... DOESC-ARM-11-008 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility ...

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... DOESC-ARM-10-029 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility ...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... DOESC-ARM-11-002 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility ...

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... DOESC-ARM-11-019 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility ...

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-12-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-11-022 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-12-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  9. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  10. Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Measurements - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 – June 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. The eight computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the AMF; and the DMF at PNNL. However, users are warned that the data provided at the time of collection have not been fully screened for quality and therefore are not considered to be official ACRF data. Hence, these accounts are considered to be part of the facility activities associated with field campaign activities, and users are tracked. In addition, users who visit sites can connect their computer or instrument to an ACRF site data system network, which requires an on-site device account. Remote (off-site) users can also have remote access to any ACRF instrument or computer system at any ACRF site, which requires an off-site device account. These accounts are also managed and tracked.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that 22% (a slight decrease from last quarter) of the Archive users are ARM Science funded principal investigators and 35% (the same as last quarter) of all other facility users are either ARM Science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data then are sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by 1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and 2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Another reason for the apparent reduction in Archive users is that data from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), a major field campaign conducted on the North Slope of Alaska, are not yet available to users. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-03-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 through December 31, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. For all fixed sites, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2007. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the current deployment in Niamey, Niger, Africa. PYE represents the AMF statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP Central Facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF in Niger. This report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days-broken down by institution type, gender, race, citizenship, visitor role, visit purpose, and facility-for actual visitors and for active user research computer accounts. During this reporting period, the ACRF Archive did not collect data on user characteristics in this way. Work is under way to collect and report these data. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. For the first quarter of FY 2007, the overall number of users is up from the last reporting period. The historical data show that there is an apparent relationship between the total number of users and the 'size' of field campaigns, called Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs): larger IOPs draw more of the site facility resources, which are reflected by the number of site visits and site visit days, research accounts, and device accounts. These types of users typically collect and analyze data in near-real time for a site-specific IOP that is in progress. However, the Archive accounts represent persistent (year-to-year) ACRF data users that often mine from the entire collection of ACRF data, which mostly includes routine data from the fixed and mobile sites, as well as cumulative IOP data sets. Archive data users continue to show a steady growth, which is independent of the size of IOPs. For this quarter, the number of Archive data user accounts was 961, the highest since record-keeping began. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Although the AMF is not officially collecting data this quarter, personnel are regularly involved with teardown, packing, hipping, unpacking, setup, and maintenance activities, so they are included in the safety statistics. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2006. There were no recordable or lost workdays or incidents for the first quarter of FY 2007.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ...

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    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study ... for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research ...

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, that began on May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities by the end of 2011. The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in support of the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The first field deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility will be used to validate ARM-developed algorithms that convert the remote sensing measurements to cloud properties for liquid and mixed phase clouds. Although AMF2 is being set up this quarter, the official start date of the field campaign is not until November 1, 2010. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of scientific user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  3. A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. McFarlane, Y. Shi, C.N. Long

    2009-04-15

    In 2009, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the second quarter metrics are reported in Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales. For ARM, the metrics will produce and make available new continuous time series of radiative fluxes based on one year of observations from Barrow, Alaska, during the International Polar Year and report on comparisons of observations with baseline simulations of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the ACRF fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at PNNL for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The DOE requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-10-15

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-07-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  8. Cambodia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Cambodia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Name Cambodia-Pilot Program for Climate...

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... DOESC-ARM-16-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-069 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  11. Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overview Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve global climate models by increasing understanding of clouds and radiative feedbacks. Through the ARM Facility, DOE funded the development of highly instrumented research sites at strategic locations around the world: the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA).

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2010-01-15

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-04-11

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ...

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    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) Biological and ... BER Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ...

  16. Netherlands Climate Assistance Program | Open Energy Information

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    search Name: Netherlands Climate Assistance Program Address: ETC International P.O.Box 64, 3830 AB Place: Leusden, Netherlands Phone Number: 31 (0) 33 432 6000 Website:...

  17. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

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    user facility in 2003, ARM Climate Research Facility sites provide the national and international research community with climate data from three permanent...

  18. South Africa-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open...

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    Energy and Climate Change Research Program Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa Energy and Climate Change Research Program AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of...

  19. OLADE-Central America Climate Change Vulnerability Program |...

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    Central America Climate Change Vulnerability Program Jump to: navigation, search Name OLADE-Central America Climate Change Vulnerability Program AgencyCompany Organization Latin...

  20. Mexico-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open Energy...

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    Energy and Climate Change Research Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico Energy and Climate Change Research Program AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of...

  1. EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy...

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    ECUNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDPEC Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The European Union...

  2. Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program ...

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    EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The...

  3. China-Energy and Climate Change Research Program | Open Energy...

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    and Climate Change Research Program Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Energy and Climate Change Research Program AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development...

  4. File:(PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY (english...

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    (PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY (english).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:(PECC) Special Program on Climate Change SUMMARY...

  5. Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

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    Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization:...

  6. Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change...

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    National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  7. Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  8. Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  9. Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  10. Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  11. Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  12. Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  13. Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tonga-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  14. Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank,...

  15. Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  16. Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  17. Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  18. Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  19. Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  20. Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  1. Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy...

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    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany Organization World Bank Sector...

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER ...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  4. Overview of the Climate Change Science Program \\(by Richard Moss...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Science Team Meeting The U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan 2003 ARM Science Team Meeting The U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan Susan K....

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. ... Fiscal Year 2004 Budget Summary and User Statistics Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ...

  6. DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  7. Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work ...

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING WARNING Today is April 1 But that ...

  9. UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDPEC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Retrieved from...

  10. U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  11. How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning | Department of Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides an overview of seven energy efficiency program types that offer large savings opportunities, including building energy codes, city-led efficiency programs, combined heat and power, energy savings performance contracting, industrial energy efficiency, low income energy efficiency, and ratepayer-funded energy

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  13. A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

    2009-09-08

    There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

  14. Survey of Whole House Programs in Midwestern Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGeough, U.; Baker, W.; Peters, J.; Beitel, A.

    2012-11-01

    In this project, existing single-family whole home energy efficiency programs in cold weather climates, focused on the Midwest, were analyzed in detail to understand program design, including requirements, processes, incentives and outcomes, focusing on savings and participation. The report presents information about specific programs, aggregated program trends and observations, and recommendations for future cold weather climate whole home program design and implementation. This study makes several recommendations to whole home program designers and implementers on improving the cost effectiveness and reach of whole home programs.

  15. Survey of Whole House Programs in Midwestern Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGeough, U.; Baker, W.; Peters, J.; Beitel, A.

    2012-11-01

    Existing single family whole home energy efficiency programs in cold weather climates, focused on the Midwest, were analyzed in detail to understand program design, including requirements, processes, incentives and outcomes, focusing on savings and participation. The report presents information about specific programs, aggregated program trends and observations, and recommendations for future cold weather climate whole home program design and implementation. This study makes several recommendations to whole home program designers and implementers on improving the cost-effectiveness and reach of whole home programs.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T

    2004-10-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  17. Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2015 2014 2013 2016 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S.

  18. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) AgencyCompany...

  19. Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks, a webinar from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings program.

  20. Duplex Rules June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duplex Rules June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility North Slope of AlaskaAdjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRFNSAAAO) Duplex Rules Who can stay in the ...

  1. Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201) Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201) Better ...

  2. Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, RA; Kehoe, KE; Sonntag, KL; Bahrmann, CP; Richardson, SJ; Christensen, SW; McCord, RA; Doty, DJ; Wagener, Richard; Eagan, RC; Lijegren, JC; Orr, BW; Sisterson, DL; Halter, TD; Keck, NN; Long, CN; Macduff, MC; Mather, JH; Perez, RC; Voyles, JW; Ivey, MD; Moore, ST; Nitschke, DL; Perkins, BD; Turner, DD

    2008-03-01

    This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, April 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2000-05-05

    This issue of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM Program) monthly newsletter is about the ARM Program goal to improve scientific understanding of the interactions of sunlight (solar radiation) with the atmosphere, then incorporate this understanding into computer models of climate change. To model climate accurately all around the globe, a variety of data must be collected from many locations on Earth. For its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, ARM chose locations in the US Southern Great Plains, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean to represent different climate types around the world. In this newsletter they consider the North Slope of Alaska site, with locations at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska.

  4. NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Measure and Evaluate Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    toward a Carbon-Neutral Campus Measure and Evaluate Progress toward a Carbon-Neutral Campus Successful implementation of a climate action plan at your campus involves flexibility and long-term support from your organization's leadership and stakeholders. Above all, it involves measuring and reporting progress toward a specific target. The American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education

  5. Developing public awareness for climate change: Support from international research programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, F.J.; Clements, W.E.

    1998-12-31

    Developing regional and local public awareness and interest in global climate change has been mandated as an important step for increasing the ability for setting policy and managing the response to climate change. Research programs frequently have resources that could help reach regional or national goals for increasing the capacity for responding to climate change. To obtain these resources and target recipients appropriately, research investigators need clear statements of national and regional strategies or priorities as a guide. One such program, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has a requirement to develop local or regional education enrichment programs at their observational sites in the central US, the tropical western Pacific (TWP), and on the north slope of alaska. ARM's scientific goals will result in a flow of technical data and as well as technical expertise that can assist with regional needs to increase the technical resources needed to address climate change issues. Details of the ARM education program in the Pacific will be presented.

  6. DOE/SC-ARM-13-013 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-13-013 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  7. DOE/SC-ARM-14-025 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-14-025 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  8. DOE/SC-ARM-15-037 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-037 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  9. DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  10. DOE/SC-ARM-14-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-14-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  11. DOE/SC-ARM-15-018 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-018 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  12. DOE/SC-ARM-14-019 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-14-019 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  13. DOE/SC-ARM-15-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  14. DOE/SC-ARM-14-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-14-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  15. DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  16. DOE/SC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  17. DOE/SC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  18. DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  19. President Obama Announces Program Tie-Ins to Combat Climate Change, Brings

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Opportunities for Tribes | Department of Energy Program Tie-Ins to Combat Climate Change, Brings New Opportunities for Tribes President Obama Announces Program Tie-Ins to Combat Climate Change, Brings New Opportunities for Tribes February 12, 2016 - 9:40am Addthis The White House is helping communities tackle climate change challenges by linking two new programs: Climate Action Champions and Resilience AmeriCorps. These two initiatives help communities apply creative solutions to address

  20. DOE, USDA, and NSF Launch Joint Climate Change Prediction Research Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy DOE, USDA, and NSF Launch Joint Climate Change Prediction Research Program DOE, USDA, and NSF Launch Joint Climate Change Prediction Research Program March 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced the launch of a joint research program to produce high-resolution models for predicting climate change and its resulting impacts. Called Decadal and Regional Climate

  1. Session Papers Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program- Unmanned...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Session Papers Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program- Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle: The Follow-On Phase J. Vitko, Jr. ARM-UAV Technical Director Sandia National Laboratories ...

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D.L.

    2000-02-16

    The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

  3. ClimateSmart Loan Program: Proposal to Boulder County Board of Commissioners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boulder County's proposal to its Board of Commissioners contains information about the background of the ClimateSmart Loan Program, outlines key elements of the program, and requests direction from the board on specific program design features.

  4. Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. U.S. Global Climate Change program | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Climate Change program Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes...

  6. Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued October 18, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis Report Details Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of its third in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs). Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, numbered 4.5 and titled

  7. UAVs in climate research: The ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    In the last year, a Department of Energy/Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program project known as ``ARM-UAV`` has made important progress in developing and demonstrating the utility of unmanned aerospace vehicles as platforms for scientific measurements. Recent accomplishments include a series of flights using an atmospheric research payload carried by a General Atomics Gnat UAV at Edwards AFB, California, and over ground instruments located in north-central Oklahoma. The reminder of this discussion will provide background on the program and describe the recent flights.

  8. Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse...

  9. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  10. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  11. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  12. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARMs Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  14. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  15. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. Cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air in older homes in warm-humid climates. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long-off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  16. LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and relative to climate observations remain significant and poorly understood. The nature and causes of these disagreements must be accounted for in a systematic fashion in...

  17. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Current descriptions of the RGCM and other Climate and Earth System Modeling projects, ... Metrics to evaluate components of the Earth system, such as the carbon cycle, ocean ...

  18. Bangladesh-USAID Climate Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ourwork Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References Bangladesh1 "USAID's climate change activities in Bangladesh seek to improve energy sector performance through...

  19. Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued Second Major U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report Issued July 10, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis Report Evaluates the Emissions, Energy, and Economic Implications of Stabilizing Greenhouse Gas Concentrations WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the second in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment (S&A) reports. Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this

  20. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-28

    The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

  1. Climate Change Projections of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Sain, Steve; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; McGinnis, Seth; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Jones, Richard; Nunes, A M B.; Tucker, S.; Herzmann, D.; McDaniel, Larry; Sloan, Lisa

    2013-10-01

    We investigate major results of the NARCCAP multiple regional climate model (RCM) experiments driven by multiple global climate models (GCMs) regarding climate change for seasonal temperature and precipitation over North America. We focus on two major questions: How do the RCM simulated climate changes differ from those of the parent GCMs and thus affect our perception of climate change over North America, and how important are the relative contributions of RCMs and GCMs to the uncertainty (variance explained) for different seasons and variables? The RCMs tend to produce stronger climate changes for precipitation: larger increases in the northern part of the domain in winter and greater decreases across a swath of the central part in summer, compared to the four GCMs driving the regional models as well as to the full set of CMIP3 GCM results. We pose some possible process-level mechanisms for the difference in intensity of change, particularly for summer. Detailed process-level studies will be necessary to establish mechanisms and credibility of these results. The GCMs explain more variance for winter temperature and the RCMs for summer temperature. The same is true for precipitation patterns. Thus, we recommend that future RCM-GCM experiments over this region include a balanced number of GCMs and RCMs.

  2. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  4. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  5. Mexico City Climate Action Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of greenhouse gas emissions, reduce the vulnerability of the city to the effects of global warming, and heighten our adaptation. To this end, the Program considers related...

  6. How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Variation Potential Program Components * Strategic Energy Management (SEM) * ISO50001 * Superior Energy Performance (SEP) Potential Electricity Savings 85 - 130 million MWh in 2030 ...

  7. Memorandum, Fire Safety Program Performance Measures- October 10, 1998

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with a list of recommended fire safety program performance measures.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  9. NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Campus-Wide Measures Have Greater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Campus-Wide Measures Have Greater Potential Pursuing climate neutrality on research campuses fits into the bigger picture of addressing the impacts of climate change and fossil-fuel depletion. International scientific bodies addressing climate change are calling for reductions of carbon emissions of 80% by 2050. Because of their size and complexity, research campuses are well positioned to take advantage of campus-wide efficient energy systems. For example, many campuses have

  10. DOE Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan, which details measures to accelerate the development and reduce the cost of new and advanced technologies that avoid, reduce, or capture and store greenhouse gas emissions. ...

  11. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Home/Climate - subter_intern Permalink Gallery Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research (SubTER) Internship Opportunities Climate, News Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research (SubTER) Internship Opportunities Sandia National Laboratories will offer a Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research (SubTER) oriented summer internship mid-May through early August 2016 and focus on subjects including geophysical data processing, tomographic imaging, automatic picking, and

  12. Second NBL measurement evaluation program meeting: A summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaletto, M.I.; Clapper, M.; Tolbert, M.E.M.

    1997-12-31

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), the US government`s nuclear materials measurements and reference materials laboratory, administers interlaboratory measurement evaluation programs to evaluate the quality and adequacy of safeguards measurements. The NBL Measurement Evaluation Program covers several types of safeguards analytical measurements. The Safeguards Measurement Evaluation (SME) program distributes test materials destructive measurements of uranium for both elemental concentration and isotopic abundances, and of plutonium for isotopic abundances. The Calorimetry Exchange (CalEx) Program tests the quality of nondestructive measurements of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma spectroscopy and plutonium concentration by calorimetry. In May 1997, more than 30 representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE), its contractor laboratories, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees met at NBL in Argonne, Illinois, for the annual meeting of the Measurement Evaluation Program. The summary which follows details key points that were discussed or presented at the meeting.

  13. The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

    2011-01-05

    Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates???¢????????s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI???¢????????s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M???????©t???????©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

  14. Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks, a presentation on August 21, 2013 by Dale Hoffmeyer, U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201), November 12, 2015.

  16. Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Climate Home/Tag:Climate - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis, Capabilities,

  17. Overview of the United States Department of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, G.M. ); Tichler, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a major atmospheric research effort, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM). The program is a key component of DOE's research strategy to address global climate change and is a direct continuation of DOE's decade-long effort to improve the ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to provide reliable simulations of regional, and long-term climate change in response to increasing greenhouse gases. The effort is multi-disciplinary and multi-agency, involving universities, private research organizations and more than a dozen government laboratories. The objective of the ARM Research is to provide an experimental testbed for the study of important atmospheric effects, particularly cloud and radiative processes, and to test parameterizations of these processes for use in atmospheric models. This effort will support the continued and rapid improvement of GCM predictive capability. 2 refs.

  18. Department of Energy Announces $7 Million in Funding for Climate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Through these field studies, scientists in DOE's Atmospheric RadiationMeasurement (ARM) ... ARM Climate Research Facility, view the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program website. ...

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. The New Brunswick Laboratory Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacic, C.G.; Trahey, N.M.; Zook, A.C.

    1987-07-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has been tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) to assess and evaluate the adequacy of measurement technology as applied to materials accounting in DOE nuclear facilities. The Safeguards Measurement Evaluation (SME) Program was developed as a means to monitor and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of accounting measurements by site, material balance area (MBA), or unit process. Phase I of the SME Program, initiated during 1985, involved evaluation of the primary accountability measurement methods at six DOE Defense Programs facilities: Savannah River Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Y-12 Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, Rockwell Hanford Operations, and NBL. Samples of uranyl nitrate solution, dried plutonium nitrates, and plutonium oxides were shipped to the participants for assay and isotopic abundance measurements. Resulting data are presented and evaluated as indicators of current state-of-the-practice accountability measurement methodology, deficiencies in materials accounting practices, and areas for possible assistance in upgrading measurement capabilities. Continuing expansion of the SME Program to include materials which are representative of specific accountability measurement points within the DOE complex is discussed.

  1. Results of a Technical Review of the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's R&D Portfolio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn A

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) is a multi-agency planning and coordinating entity, led by the U.S. Department of Energy that aims to accelerate the development and facilitate the adoption of technologies to address climate change. In late 2005, CCTP asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Energetics Incorporated to organize and coordinate a review of the CCTP R&D portfolio using structured workshops. Each workshop focused on one of CCTP's six strategic goals: 1.Reduce emissions from energy end-use and infrastructure 2.Reduce emissions from energy supply 3.Capture and sequester carbon dioxide 4.Reduce emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHG) 5.Improve capabilities to measure and monitor GHG emissions 6.Bolster basic science contributions to technology development To promote meaningful dialogue while ensuring broad coverage, a group of broadly experienced professionals with expertise in fields relevant to each CCTP goal were asked to participate in the portfolio reviews and associated workshops. A total of 75 experts participated in the workshops; 60 of these participants represented non-Federal organizations. This report summarizes the findings of the workshops and the results of the Delphi assessment of the CCTP R&D portfolio.

  2. Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program nuclear materials measurement data: Phase 1: Final report, 1985 through 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacic, C.G.

    1988-08-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory has been tasked by the US Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security to assess and evaluate the adequacy of measurement technology as applied to materials accounting in US Department of Energy nuclear facilities. The Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program was developed as a means to monitor and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of accounting measurements by site, material balance area, or unit process. Phase 1 of the Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program, initiated during 1985, involved evaluation of the primary accountability measurement methods at six US Department of Energy Defense Programs facilities. Resulting data are presented and evaluated as indicators of current state-of-the-practice accountability measurement methodology, deficiencies in materials accounting practices, and areas for possible assistance in upgrading measurement capabilities. 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

    1998-02-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

  4. World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  7. Aviation Best Safety First RSL's Aerial Measuring Systems program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aviation Best Safety First RSL's Aerial Measuring Systems program earns top honors. NNSS contractors pour their hearts into this year's holiday contributions. EM Safety Fairs encourage employees to look out for each other. See page 6. See page 5. Cold War Patriots Honored During National Day of Remembrance One hundred and fifty men and women who worked at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) streamed into the National Atomic Testing Museum (NATM) in Las Vegas on Oct. 31. Many of them, aided

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  10. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  11. Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

    2009-07-14

    Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

  12. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooraghi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  13. Our Changing Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Our Changing Climate Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of...

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. International-Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) Training Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotre T.; Malchor, Russell L.; Maurer, Richard J.; Adams, Henry L.

    2015-10-01

    Since the Fukushima reactor accident in 2011, there has been an increased interest worldwide in developing national capabilities to rapidly map and assess ground contamination resulting from nuclear reactor accidents. The capability to rapidly measure the size of the contaminated area, determine the activity level, and identify the radionuclides can aid emergency managers and decision makers in providing timely protective action recommendations to the public and first responders. The development of an aerial detection capability requires interagency coordination to assemble the radiation experts, detection system operators, and aviation aircrews to conduct the aerial measurements, analyze and interpret the data, and provide technical assessments. The Office of International Emergency Management and Cooperation (IEMC) at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsors an International - Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) training program for partner nations to develop and enhance their response to radiological emergencies. An initial series of courses can be conducted in the host country to assist in developing an aerial detection capability. As the capability develops and expands, additional experience can be gained through advanced courses with the opportunity to conduct aerial missions over a broad range of radiation environments.

  18. Lidar-measured winds from space: A key component for weather and climate prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.E.; Emmitt, G.D.; Robertson, F.

    1995-06-01

    The deployment of a space-based Doppler lidar would provide information that is fundamental to advancing the understanding and prediction of weather and climate. This paper reviews the concepts of wind measurement by Doppler lidar, highlights the results of some observing system simulation experiments with lidar winds, and discusses the important advances in earth system science anticipated with lidar winds. Observing system simulation experiments, conducted using two different general circulation models, have shown (1) that there is a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy over the Southern Hemisphere and tropical oceans resulting from the assimilation of simulated satellite wind data, and (2) that wind data are significantly more effective than temperature or moisture data in controlling analysis error. Because accurate wind observations are currently almost entirely unavailable for the vast majority of tropical cyclones worldwide, lidar winds have the potential to substantially improve tropical cyclone forecasts. Similarly, to improve water vapor flux divergence calculations, a direct measure of the ageostrophic wind is needed since the present level of uncertainty cannot be reduced with better temperature and moisture soundings alone. 99 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Global Climate Change Response Program: Potential regional impacts of global warming on precipitation in the western United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leverson, V.

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to build upon a previous Global Climate Change Response Program investigation in which an initial `first guess` climate change scenario was derived for the Western United States. Using the scenario`s hypothesized northward shift in the mean wintertime storm track, historical upper-air patterns in the atmosphere were searched to identify winter months (December, January, or February) that would serve as appropriate global warming analogues (GWA). Contour charts were generated of four geopotential height parameters. Specific pattern configurations of the four parameters were identified that reflected the altered storm track pattern, and guidelines for selecting suitable analogues based on the configurations were developed. Monthly mean precipitation values for the GWA months at three climatological divisions in Western Montana, northern Utah, and east central Arizona were compared with median values for the 1946-89 period to determine if any significant differences existed.

  20. Climate Investment Funds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Fund (SCF), Forest Investment Program (FIP) Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP)...

  1. Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learned presentation More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation How Can the Network Meet Your Needs? Optional Residential Program Benchmarking

  2. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Software Development: Applications, Infrastructure, and Middleware/Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-30

    The status of and future plans for the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) hinge on software that PCMDI is either currently distributing or plans to distribute to the climate community in the near future. These software products include standard conventions, national and international federated infrastructures, and community analysis and visualization tools. This report also mentions other secondary software not necessarily led by or developed at PCMDI to provide a complete picture of the overarching applications, infrastructures, and middleware/networks. Much of the software described anticipates the use of future technologies envisioned over the span of next year to 10 years. These technologies, together with the software, will be the catalyst required to address extreme-scale data warehousing, scalability issues, and service-level requirements for a diverse set of well-known projects essential for predicting climate change. These tools, unlike the previous static analysis tools of the past, will support the co-existence of many users in a productive, shared virtual environment. This advanced technological world driven by extreme-scale computing and the data it generates will increase scientists productivity, exploit national and international relationships, and push research to new levels of understanding.

  3. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan (Program...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric RadiationMeasurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy ...

  4. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation Measures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program announced the expansion of the Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE program to include two new energy conservation measures.

  5. InfoDev and DFID Climate Technology Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    harness economic opportunities in developing countries through technology entrepreneurship and small and medium enterprise(SME) development. The program includes the...

  6. DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Benchmarking & Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook provides cost-effective, standardized analytic methods for determining gross and net energy reduction, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation, job creation and economic growth impacts.

  7. Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy

  8. WPN 12-9: Weatherization Assistance Program Incidental Repair Measure Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide guidance on incidental repair measures (IRM) allowable under the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  9. Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Announces Tribal Climate

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Resilience Program | Department of Energy Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Announces Tribal Climate Resilience Program Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Announces Tribal Climate Resilience Program July 16, 2014 - 3:38pm Addthis Access Recordings from the Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country Webinar Series On July 16, at the fourth and final meeting of the White House State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, the

  10. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  11. A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2009-11-01

    Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

  12. Toward Robust Climate Baselining: Objective Assessment of Climate Change Using Widely Distributed Miniaturized Sensors for Accurate World-Wide Geophysical Measurements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Teller, E.; Leith, C.; Canavan, G.; Marion, J.; Wood, L.

    2001-11-13

    A gap-free, world-wide, ocean-, atmosphere-, and land surface-spanning geophysical data-set of three decades time-duration containing the full set of geophysical parameters characterizing global weather is the scientific perquisite for defining the climate; the generally-accepted definition in the meteorological community is that climate is the 30-year running-average of weather. Until such a tridecadal climate baseline exists, climate change discussions inevitably will have a semi-speculative, vs. a purely scientific, character, as the baseline against which changes are referenced will at least somewhat uncertain.

  13. Geothermal Program Review XII: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the President's Climate Change Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    Geothermal Program Review XII, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of US Department of Energy, was held April 25--28, 1994, in San Francisco, California. This annual conference is designed to promote effective technology transfer by bringing together DOE-sponsored researchers; utility representatives; geothermal energy developers; suppliers of geothermal goods and services; representatives from federal, state, and local agencies; and others with an interest in geothermal energy. In-depth reviews of the latest technological advancements and research results are presented during the conference with emphasis on those topics considered to have the greatest potential to impact the near-term commercial development of geothermal energy.

  14. Long-Term Climate Change Assessment Task for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program: Status through FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L.; Chatters, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized (Adams and Wing 1986) to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The goals of the Barrier Development Program are to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 years; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-year design life. The performance and stability of natural barrier analogs that have existed for several millennia and the reconstruction of climate changes during the past 10,000 to 125,000 years also will provide insight into bounding conditions of possible future changes and increase confidence in the barriers design. In the following discussion the term {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} references periods of time up to 1000`s of years, distinguishing it from {open_quotes}short-term{close_quotes} weather patterns covering a decade or less. Specific activities focus on planning and conducting a series of studies and tests required to confirm key aspects of the barrier design. The effort is a collaborative one between scientists and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to design barriers to limit movement of radionuclides and other contaminants to the accessible environment for at least 1,000 years. These activities have been divided into 14 groups of tasks that aid in the complete development of protective barrier and warning marker system.

  15. 2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Collins Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-06-01

    The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

  16. Program Contacts | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Program Program Manager Telephone Email Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Sally McFarlane, Ph.D. ...

  17. U.S. Global Change Research Program Recommended Citation: Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, Thomas R. Karl, Jerry M. Melillo, and Thomas C. Peterson,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A State of Knowledge Report from the U.S. Global Change Research Program Recommended Citation: Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, Thomas R. Karl, Jerry M. Melillo, and Thomas C. Peterson, (eds.). Cambridge University Press, 2009. The bars at the bottom of the front cover show the global annual average temperature from 1900-2008, see page 17. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi Cambridge University Press 32

  18. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility Field Campaign (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Program Document: Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research Facility Field Campaign Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research Facility Field Campaign Matching observed diurnal cycles is a fundamental yet extremely complex test for models. High temporal resolution measurements of surface turbulent heat fluxes and boundary layer

  19. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Attends World Water Week in Stockholm Climate, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Water Security Sandia Team Attends World Water Week in Stockholm Stephanie Kuzio, Vince Tidwell, and Tom Lowry (all from Sandia's Earth Systems Analysis Dept.), represented Sandia's Water and Environment Program (part of the Sandia's Climate & Environment Program Area) at World Water Week in Stockholm August 31-September 5th. The theme for this

  20. Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M; Johnson, K; Mather, J; Randall, D

    2008-03-01

    In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties.

  1. DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change

  2. Measuring energy-saving retrofits: Experiences from the Texas LoanSTAR program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberl, J.S.; Reddy, T.A.; Claridge, D.E.; Turner, W.D.; O`Neal, D.L.; Heffington, W.M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

    1996-02-01

    In 1988 the Governor`s Energy Management Center of Texas received approval from the US Department of Energy to establish a $98.6 million state-wide retrofit demonstration revolving loan program to fund energy-conserving retrofits in state, public school, and local government buildings. As part of this program, a first-of-its-kind, statewide Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) was established to verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements, improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program, and initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings located in Texas. This report discusses the LoanSTAR MAP with an emphasis on the process of acquiring and analyzing data to measure savings from energy conservation retrofits when budgets are a constraint. This report includes a discussion of the program structure, basic measurement techniques, data archiving and handling, data reporting and analysis, and includes selected examples from LoanSTAR agencies. A summary of the program results for the first two years of monitoring is also included.

  3. Strategic Climate Fund (SCF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    There are three funds under the SCF framework: the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), the Forest Investment Program (FIP) and the Program for Scaling Up Renewable...

  4. Assessment of Weatherization Assistance Program Needs for Improved Residential Measure Selection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettings, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the current measure selection techniques and needs of agencies within the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study precedes initiation of a project to revise and upgrade the current means of selecting energy conservation measures for low-income single- and multi-family housing and includes recommendations for the revision. Issues relevant to the formation of the revised audit procedures are discussed. Currently available audits are reviewed. No single- to multi-family audit program was found capable of fulfilling the currents needs of the WAP. Recommendations include the separate development of single- and multi-family audits. Addition of specific features to the single-family audit is recommended, including (1) measure ranking unique to each eligible house, (2) heating and cooling equipment measures, (3) cooling envelope measures, (4) means of determining the amount of infiltration work to be performed, (5) potential for customizing and simplifying to meet local needs, and (6) implementation on either a personal computer or as an alternate manual technique. A single-family audit development plan is proposed which includes examination of several existing programs as potential starting points. Recommendations related to the development of a WAP multi-family audit include examination of several existing private programs for possible use by state WAP agencies expressing the greatest need and further study of the DOE supported programs ASEAM and CIRA as possible starting points for a DOE procedure. Early identification of approved multi-family measures and their applicability to various building stock, equipment types, and fuels is also recommended.

  5. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  6. OSMOSE program : statistical review of oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor R1-UO2 configuration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoven, G.; Klann, R.; Zhong, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-28

    The OSMOSE program is a collaboration on reactor physics experiments between the United States Department of Energy and the France Commissariat Energie Atomique. At the working level, it is a collaborative effort between the Argonne National Laboratory and the CEA Cadarache Research Center. The objective of this program is to measure very accurate integral reaction rates in representative spectra for the actinides important to future nuclear system designs, and to provide the experimental data for improving the basic nuclear data files. The main outcome of the OSMOSE measurement program will be an experimental database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark to verify and validate reactor analysis codes. The OSMOSE program (Oscillation in Minerve of isotopes in Eupraxic Spectra) aims at improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through oscillation measurements in the MINERVE facility on samples containing the following separated actinides: {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, and {sup 245}Cm. The first part of this report provides an overview of the experimental protocol and the typical processing of a series of experimental results which is currently performed at CEA-Cadarache. In the second part of the report, improvements to this technique are presented, as well as the program that was created to process oscillation measurement results from the MINERVE facility in the future.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ARM is known for its comprehensive set of world-class, and in some cases, unique, instruments available for use by the global scientific community. In addition to the ARM instruments, the ARM Climate Research Facility identifies and acquires a wide variety of data including model, satellite, and surface data, from "external instruments," to augment the data being generated within the program. External instruments belong to organizations that are outside of the ARM Program. Field campaign instruments are another source of data used to augment routine observations. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by instrument categories into twelve "collections:" Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models, Ocean Observations, Radiometric, Satellite Observations, Surface Meteorology, Surface/Subsurface Properties, and Other. Clicking on one of the instrument categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Atmospheric Profiling" is broken down into ARM instruments (with 11 subsets), External Instruments (with 6 subsets), and Field Campaign Instruments (with 42 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading.

  8. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program`s mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RI), feasibility studies (FS), decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed a Numerical Scoring System (NSS) and actually scoring the generators of Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) at six ER sites: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), and Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (Portsmouth). This report summarizes the findings of this initial numerical scoring evaluation and shows where improvements in the overall ER Pollution prevention program may be required. This report identifies a number of recommendations that, if implemented, would help to improve site-performance measures. The continued development of the NSS will support generators in maximizing their Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization efforts. Further refinements of the NSS, as applicable suggest comments and/or recommendations for improvement.

  9. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    Provides an overview of evaluation, measurement, and verification approaches used to estimate the load impacts and effectiveness of energy efficiency programs.

  10. Sandia Energy - Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" This Fall event was a follow-up to a Climate and Environment Program Area meeting with the California governor's office in July. There, the...

  11. Climate Change Adaptation/Resilience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE facilities are located in all eight climate regions identified in the 2014 National Climate Assessment (as established by the U.S. Global Change Research Program), and are vulnerable to identified climate change impacts in those regions. To assist with establishing and maintaining an effective climate adaptation process, DOE is working to integrate climate adaptation concerns into all applicable DOE orders, policies, and planning documents.

  12. Audit of the Quality Assurance Program for the Control and Use of Measuring and Test Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QA001 Revision 0 Effective October 15, 2001 AUDIT OF THE QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR THE CONTROL AND USE OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Jude M. Clark Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-QA001 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Audit Objectives

  13. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program's mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RI), feasibility studies (FS), decontamination and decommissioning (D D), and surveillance and maintenance (S M) site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed a Numerical Scoring System (NSS) and actually scoring the generators of Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) at six ER sites: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), and Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (Portsmouth). This report summarizes the findings of this initial numerical scoring evaluation and shows where improvements in the overall ER Pollution prevention program may be required. This report identifies a number of recommendations that, if implemented, would help to improve site-performance measures. The continued development of the NSS will support generators in maximizing their Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization efforts. Further refinements of the NSS, as applicable suggest comments and/or recommendations for improvement.

  14. Measured Cooling Season Results Relating the Impact of Mechanical Ventilation on Energy, Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Eric; Amos, Bryan; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Widder, Sarah H.; Fonorow, Ken

    2014-08-22

    Conference Paper for ACEEE Summer Study in Buildings discussing results to date of a project evaluating the impact of ventialtion on energy use, comfort, durability, and cost in the hot humid climate.

  15. Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R

    2012-06-26

    The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

  16. International impacts of global climate change: Testimony to House Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.; Cushman, R.M.; Marland, G.; Rayner, S.

    1989-02-21

    International impacts of global climate change are those for which the important consequences arise because of national sovereignty. Such impacts could be of two types: (1) migrations across national borders of people, of resources (such as agricultural productivity, or surface water, or natural ecosystems), of effluents, or of patterns of commerce; and (2) changes to the way nations use and manage their resources, particularly fossil fuels and forests, as a consequence of international concern over the global climate. Actions by a few resource-dominant nations may affect the fate of all. These two types of international impacts raise complex equity issues because one nation may perceive itself as gaining at the expense of its neighbors, or it may perceive itself as a victim of the actions of others. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Climate Change Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment Office presentation icon 66_clim_ornl_sale_v2mjs.ppt More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Hydropower Technologies Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) Assessment of the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower

  18. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Generator training manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle.

  19. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Management training manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle.

  20. Tools for Teaching Climate Change Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maestas, A.M.; Jones, L.A.

    2005-03-18

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) develops public outreach materials and educational resources for schools. Studies prove that science education in rural and indigenous communities improves when educators integrate regional knowledge of climate and environmental issues into school curriculum and public outreach materials. In order to promote understanding of ACRF climate change studies, ACRF Education and Outreach has developed interactive kiosks about climate change for host communities close to the research sites. A kiosk for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) community was installed at the Iupiat Heritage Center in 2003, and a kiosk for the Tropical Western Pacific locales will be installed in 2005. The kiosks feature interviews with local community elders, regional agency officials, and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program scientists, which highlight both research and local observations of some aspects of environmental and climatic change in the Arctic and Pacific. The kiosks offer viewers a unique opportunity to learn about the environmental concerns and knowledge of respected community elders, and to also understand state-of-the-art climate research. An archive of interviews from the communities will also be distributed with supplemental lessons and activities to encourage teachers and students to compare and contrast climate change studies and oral history observations from two distinct locations. The U.S. Department of Energy's ACRF supports education and outreach efforts for communities and schools located near its sites. ACRF Education and Outreach has developed interactive kiosks at the request of the communities to provide an opportunity for the public to learn about climate change from both scientific and indigenous perspectives. Kiosks include interviews with ARM scientists and provide users with basic information about climate change studies as well as interviews with elders and community leaders discussing the impacts of climate change on land, sea, and other aspects of village life.

  1. Climate Models: Rob Jacob | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science & technology Environmental modeling tools Programs Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling, simulation, & visualization Rob Jacob, Computational Climate...

  2. Climate Education Update_Aug06 MOD.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE STUDIES FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility supports education and outreach efforts for communities and schools located near its sites. The mission of the Education and Outreach Program is to promote basic science education and community awareness of climate change research by focusing on three goals: student enrichment, teacher support, and community outreach. ACRF Education and Outreach Director: Larry

  3. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More » Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable. Read More » Process Limits The hard and soft process limits are listed. Read More » Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:27

  4. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This page provides examples of compilation and running scripts when mixing CC++ with Fortran codes. Read More Programming Tuning Options Tips for tuning performance on the...

  5. President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    announced a robust package of resources, funding, and other programs to assist with combatting climate change and building climate resilience in remote Alaskan communities. ...

  6. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messenger, Mike; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Golemboski, Bill; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2010-04-14

    Public and private funding for end-use energy efficiency actions is expected to increase significantly in the United States over the next decade. For example, Barbose et al (2009) estimate that spending on ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in the U.S. could increase from $3.1 billion in 2008 to $7.5 and 12.4 billion by 2020 under their medium and high scenarios. This increase in spending could yield annual electric energy savings ranging from 0.58% - 0.93% of total U.S. retail sales in 2020, up from 0.34% of retail sales in 2008. Interest in and support for energy efficiency has broadened among national and state policymakers. Prominent examples include {approx}$18 billion in new funding for energy efficiency programs (e.g., State Energy Program, Weatherization, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants) in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Increased funding for energy efficiency should result in more benefits as well as more scrutiny of these results. As energy efficiency becomes a more prominent component of the U.S. national energy strategy and policies, assessing the effectiveness and energy saving impacts of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for policymakers and private and public funders of efficiency actions. Thus, it is critical that evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is carried out effectively and efficiently, which implies that: (1) Effective program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methodologies and tools are available to key stakeholders (e.g., regulatory agencies, program administrators, consumers, and evaluation consultants); and (2) Capacity (people and infrastructure resources) is available to conduct EM&V activities and report results in ways that support program improvement and provide data that reliably compares achieved results against goals and similar programs in other jurisdictions (benchmarking). The National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (2007) presented commonly used definitions for EM&V in the context of energy efficiency programs: (1) Evaluation (E) - The performance of studies and activities aimed at determining the effects and effectiveness of EE programs; (2) Measurement and Verification (M&V) - Data collection, monitoring, and analysis associated with the calculation of gross energy and demand savings from individual measures, sites or projects. M&V can be a subset of program evaluation; and (3) Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) - This term is frequently seen in evaluation literature. EM&V is a catchall acronym for determining both the effectiveness of program designs and estimates of load impacts at the portfolio, program and project level. This report is a scoping study that assesses current practices and methods in the evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, with a focus on methods and practices currently used for determining whether projected (ex-ante) energy and demand savings have been achieved (ex-post). M&V practices for privately-funded energy efficiency projects (e.g., ESCO projects) or programs where the primary focus is greenhouse gas reductions were not part of the scope of this study. We identify and discuss key purposes and uses of current evaluations of end-use energy efficiency programs, methods used to evaluate these programs, processes used to determine those methods; and key issues that need to be addressed now and in the future, based on discussions with regulatory agencies, policymakers, program administrators, and evaluation practitioners in 14 states and national experts in the evaluation field. We also explore how EM&V may evolve in a future in which efficiency funding increases significantly, innovative mechanisms for rewarding program performance are adopted, the role of efficiency in greenhouse gas mitigation is more closely linked, and programs are increasingly funded from multiple sources often with multiple program administrators and in

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-04-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime.

  8. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using MPI and OpenMP on NERSC systems, the same does not always exist for other supported parallel programming models such as UPC or Chapel. At the same time, we know that these...

  9. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the...

  10. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling Codes There are three compiler suites available on Carver: Portland Group (PGI), Intel, and GCC. The PGI compilers are the default, to provide compatibility with other NERSC platforms. Read More » Using MKL Intel's Math Kernel Library (MKL) is a library of highly optimized, extensively threaded math routines optimized for Intel processors. Core math functions include BLAS, LAPACK, ScaLAPACK, Sparse Solvers, Fast Fourier Transforms, Vector Math, and more. It is

  11. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with boundaries defined by the occupant's activity patterns and the field variation from the sources affecting the area. Such a stratification allows the researcher to determine which microenvironment are of most interest, and to methodically focus the areas, in order to gather the most relevant set of data.

  12. Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

    2009-10-14

    The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The NIPP framework incorporates consequence, threat, and vulnerability components and addresses all hazards. The analysis of the vulnerability data needs to be reproducible, support risk analysis, and go beyond protection. It also needs to address important security/vulnerability topics, such as physical security, cyber security, systems analysis, and dependencies and interdependencies. This report provides an overview of the approach being developed to estimate vulnerability and provide vulnerability comparisons for sectors and subsectors. the information will be used to assist DHS in analyzing existing protective measures and vulnerability at facilities, to identify potential ways to reduce vulnerabilities, and to assist in preparing sector risk estimates. The owner/operator receives an analysis of the data collected for a specific asset, showing a comparison between the facility's protection posture/vulnerability index and those of DHS sector/subsector sites visited. This comparison gives the owner/operator an indication of the asset's security strengths and weaknesses that may be contributing factors to its vulnerability and protection posture. The information provided to the owner/operator shows how the asset compares to other similar assets within the asset's sector or subsector. A 'dashboard' display is used to illustrate the results in a convenient format. The dashboard allows the owner/operator to analyze the implementation of additional protective measures and to illustrate how such actions would impact the asset's Protective Measures Index (PMI) or Vulnerability Index (VI).

  13. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Study shows clean diesel programs slashed black carbon, a powerful short-term contributor to global warming June 13, 2013 Jon Weiner 510-486-4014 jrweiner@lbl.gov CA-BC-graphic.jpg Sacramento - Reductions in emissions of black carbon since the late 1980s, mostly from diesel engines as a result of air quality programs, have resulted in a measurable reduction of concentrations of

  14. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  15. Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Third Quarter 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JH Mather; DA Randall; CJ Flynn

    2008-06-30

    In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. This report describes the aerosol optical depth (AOD) product.

  16. NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Implementing the Climate Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Implementing the Climate Action Plan When implementing climate action plans on research campuses, two important and related questions must be answered. How do we pay for climate actions? And, who will manage and oversee implementation of the plan? The answer to each question will be specific to your campus. Narrow climate action plans focus on incremental savings through low-cost and voluntary measures. This approach begs the question about what should be done after the short-term,

  17. climate change | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate change Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

  18. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate Cocoa, Florida PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Flexible Residential Test Facility Location: Cocoa, FL Partners: Florida Energy Systems Consortium www.floridaenergy.ufl.edu/ Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, www.ba-pirc.org Building Components: Infiltration and ventilation Application: Single-family Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable Climate

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World's premier ground-based observations facility advancing climate change research Feature Tracking Clouds Down Under Tracking Clouds Down Under While penguins and seals are the main inhabitants of Macquarie Island, a remote grassy outcrop which lies about half-way between New Zealand and Antarctica, they will soon be joined by a suite of instruments from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. These instruments will measure

  20. Measures used to tackle environmental problems related to global warming and climate change resulting from the use of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental issues continue to play a major role in strategic planning associated with the use of coal for power generation. Problems, such as Acid Rain resulting from SO{sub 2} emissions produced from the sulfur content of coal during coal combustion, have recently cornered the attention of policy makers and planners. More recently the carbon content of coal, which provides for most of the coals heating value, has been identified as the major contributor to the production of CO{sub 2} and other emissions associated with Global Warming and Climate Change. Total world carbon emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels were approximately 6 billion metric tons in 1990, of which 44% were from the consumption of oil, 39% from coal, and 17% from natural gas. Assuming no change in current regulations, carbon emissions are anticipated to grow by 1.5% per year, and are predicted to reach more than 8 billion tons by the year 2010. Most of this increase in carbon emissions is expected to come from developing countries in the Asian Pacific Region such as China where coal use dominates the power production industry and accounts for 71% of its total CO{sub 2} emissions. Asian Pacific coal demand is expected to double over the next 15 years accounting for a 46% increase in total primary energy demand, and China currently produces approximately 11% of the world`s global greenhouse gas emissions which is expected to grow to 15% by the year 2010.

  1. Grand Junction/New Brunswick Laboratory interlaboratory measurement program. Part I. Evaluation. Part II. Methods manual. [National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trahey, N.M.; Voeks, A.M.; Soriano, M.D.

    1982-09-01

    This interlaboratory measurement program was conducted to provide a reference data base for comparison of measurements performed using various measurement methods under the National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE) Program. The design of the program also included an evaluation of the accuracies of the measurement methods used by the participating laboratories in measuring New Brunswick Laboratory Reference Materials (RMs) 101-A through 110-A, the low level uranium and thorium samples distributed in the program. Finally, consensus values for these RMs, based on participants measurement data, were calculated.

  2. Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, J.

    2004-12-31

    Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

  4. ETA-HQA01 - Audit of the Quality Assurance Program for the Control and Use of Measuring and Test Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQA01 Revision 1 Effective November 1, 2004 AUDIT OF THE QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR THE CONTROL AND USE OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Roberta Brayer Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-HQA01 Revision 1 2 2004 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Audit Objectives

  5. ETA-NQA001 - Audit of the Quality Assurance Program for the Control and Use of Measuring and Test Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NQA001 Revision 0 Effective October 15, 2001 AUDIT OF THE QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR THE CONTROL AND USE OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Jude M. Clark Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-NQA001 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Audit

  6. 3 Ways Solar Energy Programs Are Helping Achieve President Obama...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Programs Are Helping Achieve President Obama's Climate Goals 3 Ways Solar Energy Programs Are Helping Achieve President Obama's Climate Goals September 8, 2015 - ...

  7. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  8. Arctic Climate Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark D.; Robinson, David G.; Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.; Peterson, Kara J.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Desilets, Darin Maurice; Reinert, Rhonda Karen

    2015-03-01

    This study began with a challenge from program area managers at Sandia National Laboratories to technical staff in the energy, climate, and infrastructure security areas: apply a systems-level perspective to existing science and technology program areas in order to determine technology gaps, identify new technical capabilities at Sandia that could be applied to these areas, and identify opportunities for innovation. The Arctic was selected as one of these areas for systems level analyses, and this report documents the results. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the arctic atmosphere since Sandia has been active in atmospheric research in the Arctic since 1997. This study begins with a discussion of the challenges and benefits of analyzing the Arctic as a system. It goes on to discuss current and future needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for more comprehensive data products related to the Arctic; assess the current state of atmospheric measurement resources available for the Arctic; and explain how the capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories can be used to address the identified technological, data, and modeling needs of the defense, scientific, energy, and intelligence communities for Arctic support.

  9. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Walneuski

    2004-09-16

    ChevronTexaco has successfully operated a 200 kW PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant at the corporate data center in San Ramon, California for the past two years and seven months following installation in December 2001. This site was chosen based on the ability to utilize the combined heat (hot water) and power generation capability of this modular fuel cell power plant in an office park setting . In addition, this project also represents one of the first commercial applications of a stationary fuel cell for a mission critical data center to assess power reliability benefits. This fuel cell power plant system has demonstrated outstanding reliability and performance relative to other comparably sized cogeneration systems.

  10. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in ''real-world'' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in ''real-world'' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the ''real world''. The use of solanesol was compromised--as it had been in the chamber experiments.

  11. Center for Climate Strategies Catalog of Policy Options | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization: The Center for Climate Strategies Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Website:...

  12. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia, DOE Energy Storage Program, GeneSiC Semiconductor, U.S. Army ARDEC: Ultra-High-Voltage Silicon Carbide Thyristors Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage Systems, Global Climate & Energy, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, SMART Grid, Systems Engineering, Transmission Grid Integration Sandia, DOE Energy Storage Program, GeneSiC Semiconductor, U.S. Army ARDEC:

  13. Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Change: Energy and Community Impacts Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts Presentation by Jonathan Pershing (DOE) at the 2015 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program in Washington, DC. PDF icon Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts More Documents & Publications 2012 Program Review Meeting Quality Control Inspector: Different Programs, Different Responsibilities Project Reports for The Sealion Corporation -

  14. Russian surety research projects in the Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Measures Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Over forty safety and security related research and development projects have been initiated between Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian nuclear weapons laboratories VNIIEF and VNIITF. About half of these projects have been completed. All relate to either safety or security methodology development, processes, accident environment analysis and testing, accident databases, assessments or product design of devices. All projects have a potential benefit to various safety or security programs and some may directly have commercial applications. In general, these projects could benefit risk assessments associated with systems that could result in accidents or incidents having high public consequences. These systems typically have already been engineered to have very low assessed probabilities of occurrence of such accidents or incidents. This paper gives an overview of the Sandia surety program with a focus on the potential for future collaboration between Sandia, three Russian Institutes; VNIIEF, VNIITF and VNIIA, and other industry and government organizations. The intent is to serve as an introduction to a roundtable session on Russian Safety Collaboration at the 14th International System Safety Conference. The current Sandia collaboration program scope and rationale is presented along with the evolved program focus. An overview of the projects is given and a few specific projects are briefly highlighted with tangible results to date.

  15. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  16. Evidence of progress. Measurement of impacts of Australia's S and L program from 1990-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowenthal-Savy; McNeil, Michael; Harrington, Lloyd

    2013-10-15

    Australia first put categorical energy efficiency labels on residential appliances in the mid-1980s, and the first Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for refrigerators was implemented in 1999. Updated in 2005, these MEPS were aligned with US 2001 levels. Considered together, these actions set Australia apart as having one of the most aggressive appliance efficiency programs in the world. For these reasons, together with good data on product sales over time, Australia represents a potentially fruitful case study for understanding the dynamics energy efficiency standards and labeling (EES and L) programs impacts on appliance markets. This analysis attempts to distinguish between the impacts of labeling alone as opposed to MEPS, and to probe the time-dependency of such impacts. Fortunately, in the Australian case, detailed market sales data and a comprehensive registration system provides a solid basis for the empirical evaluation of these questions. This paper analyzes Australian refrigerator efficiency data covering the years 1993-2009. Sales data was purchased from a commercial market research organization (in this case, the GfK Group) and includes sales and average price in each year for each appliance model this can be used to understand broader trends by product class and star rating category, even where data is aggregated. Statistical regression analysis is used to model market introduction and adoption of high efficiency refrigerators according to logistic adoption model formalism, and parameterizes the way in which the Australian programs accelerated adoption of high-efficiency products and phased out others. Through this analysis, the paper presents a detailed, robust and quantitative picture of the impacts of EES and L in the Australian case, but also demonstrates a methodology of the evaluation of program impacts that could form the basis of an international evaluation framework for similar programs in other countries.

  17. Evidence of Progress - Measurement of Impacts of Australia's S&L Program from 1990-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowenthal-Savy, Danielle; McNeil, Michael; Harrington, Lloyd

    2013-09-11

    Australia first put categorical energy efficiency labels on residential appliances in the mid-1980s, and the first Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for refrigerators was implemented in 1999. Updated in 2005, these MEPS were aligned with US 2001 levels. Considered together, these actions set Australia apart as having one of the most aggressive appliance efficiency programs in the world. For these reasons, together with good data on product sales over time, Australia represents a potentially fruitful case study for understanding the dynamics energy efficiency standards and labeling (EES&L) programs impacts on appliance markets. This analysis attempts to distinguish between the impacts of labeling alone as opposed to MEPS, and to probe the time-dependency of such impacts. Fortunately, in the Australian case, detailed market sales data and a comprehensive registration system provides a solid basis for the empirical evaluation of these questions. This paper analyzes Australian refrigerator efficiency data covering the years 1993-2009. Sales data was purchased from a commercial market research organization (in this case, the GfK Group) and includes sales and average price in each year for each appliance model; this can be used to understand broader trends by product class and star rating category, even where data is aggregated. Statistical regression analysis is used to model market introduction and adoption of high efficiency refrigerators according to logistic adoption model formalism, and parameterizes the way in which the Australian programs accelerated adoption of high-efficiency products and phased out others. Through this analysis, the paper presents a detailed, robust and quantitative picture of the impacts of EES&L in the Australian case, but also demonstrates a methodology of the evaluation of program impacts that could form the basis of an international evaluation framework for similar programs in other countries.

  18. Wake Imaging Measurement System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wake Imaging Measurement System - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  19. Phasor Measurement Units

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phasor Measurement Units - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. ETA-HIQA01 - Audit of the Quality Assurance Program for the Control and Use of Measuring and Test Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HIQA01 Revision 0 Effective May 1, 2004 AUDIT OF THE QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR THE CONTROL AND USE OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Roberta Brayer Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-HIQA01 Revision 0 2 2004 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Audit Objectives 3

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitko, J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

  2. Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate

  3. Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling

  4. Final Technical Report for Chief Scientist for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2011-10-21

    The major responsibilities of the PI were identified as 1) the formulation of campaign plans, 2) the representation of AVP in various scientific communities inside and outside of ARM and the associated working groups, 3) the coordination and selection of the relative importance of the three different focus areas (routine observations, IOPs, instrument development program), 4) the examination and quality control of the data collected by AVP, and 5) providing field support for flight series. This report documents the accomplishments in each of these focus areas for the 3 years of funding for the grant that were provided.

  5. EMF Rapid Program Engineering Projects, Project 1, Development of Recommendations for Guidelines for Field Source Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The goal of this project is to develop a protocol for measuring the electric and magnetic fields around sources. Data from these measurements may help direct future biological effects research by better defining the complexity of magnetic and electric fields to which humanity is exposed, as well asprovide the basis for rigorous field exposure analysis and risk assessment once the relationship between field exposure and biological response. is better understood. The data base also should have sufficient spatial and temporal characteristics to guide electric and magnetic field management. The goal of Task A is to construct a set of characteristics that would be ideal to have for guiding and interpreting biological studies and for focusing any future effort at field management. This ideal set will then be quantified and reduced according to the availability (or possible development of) instrumentation to measure the desired characteristics. Factors that also will be used to define pragmatic data sets will be the cost of collecting the data, the cost of developing an adequate data base, and the needed precision in measuring specific characteristics. A field, electric or magnetic, will always be ,some function of time and space. The first step in this section of the protocol development will be to determine what span of time and what portion of space are required to quantify the electric and magnetic fields around sources such as appliances and electrical apparatus. Constraints on time will be set by examining measurement limitations and biological data requirements.

  6. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Programs Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy July 10, 2015 Christopher C. Deschene, Director, Office of Indian Energy Global Energy Infrastructure 2 Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs: A Global Context * Energy Sector of the Global Economy is measured in the Trillions of dollars. * Global competition within energy and science has impacted job growth and national security priorities. * Climate Change 3 US Energy Revolution * US Oil & Gas production leading the world *

  7. Sandia Energy - Climate Measurement & Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the black carbon lifecycle and for methane detection and attribution in the Arctic environment. Sandia's extensive expertise in accounting for uncertainties in...

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Voyles

    2005-12-31

    Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

  9. Assessment of the measurement control program for solution assay instruments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, A.S.

    1985-05-01

    This report documents and reviews the measurement control program (MCP) over a 27-month period for four solution assay instruments (SAIs) Facility. SAI measurement data collected during the period January 1982 through March 1984 were analyzed. The sources of these data included computer listings of measurements emanating from operator entries on computer terminals, logbook entries of measurements transcribed by operators, and computer listings of measurements recorded internally in the instruments. Data were also obtained from control charts that are available as part of the MCP. As a result of our analyses we observed agreement between propagated and historical variances and concluded instruments were functioning properly from a precision aspect. We noticed small, persistent biases indicating slight instrument inaccuracies. We suggest that statistical tests for bias be incorporated in the MCP on a monthly basis and if the instrument bias is significantly greater than zero, the instrument should undergo maintenance. We propose the weekly precision test be replaced by a daily test to provide more timely detection of possible problems. We observed that one instrument showed a trend of increasing bias during the past six months and recommend a randomness test be incorporated to detect trends in a more timely fashion. We detected operator transcription errors during data transmissions and advise direct instrument transmission to the MCP to eliminate these errors. A transmission error rate based on those errors that affected decisions in the MCP was estimated as 1%. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. ARM - Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Climate refers to the long-term changes in atmospheric conditions including temperature, rainfall, wind, humidity, pressure and cloudiness. One would need to take into account the fact that superimposed on the arithmetical average of

  11. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  12. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  13. Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  14. Climate & Earth Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Earth Systems - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  16. An innovative approach to multimedia waste reduction measuring performance for environmental cleanup programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges we now face in environmental clean up is measuring the progress of minimizing multimedia transfer releases and achieving waste reduction. Briefly, multimedia transfer refers to the air, land, and water where pollution is not just controlled, concentrated, and moved from one media to another. An example of multimedia transfer would be heavy metals in waste water sludges moved from water to land disposal. Over two billion dollars has been budgeted for environmental restoration site cleanups by the Department of Energy for fiscal year 1994. Unless we reduce the huge waste volumes projected to be generated in the near future, then we will devote more and more resources to manage and dispose of these wastes.

  17. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  18. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Development of an EMF Measurements Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-04-01

    The EMF measurement data sets in existence today were compiled with varying goals and techniques. Consequently, they have different information content as well as varying logical and physical structure. Future studies will continue to pursue varying goals and utilize techniques that cannot be known in advance. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database developed under the Department of Energy EMF RAPID Program are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to preserve study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data Products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products in the possession of the EMF Measurements Database are available for download from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other parties who may have their own access procedures. In addition, data set contributors or users can provide reports that describe results of the study and analysis of the data with text and figures. Guidelines have been developed for preparation of reports. Access to the EMF Measurements Database is provided via an Internet site (http://www.emf-data. erg). The site provides descriptive information in a home page, . . access to data products with a file transfer protocol (ftp) address, and links to other EMF-related sites.

  20. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T.

    2013-07-01

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  1. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ​

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  3. Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  4. Program Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Leadership - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  5. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy

  6. Chile-NAMA program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NAMA program Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-NAMA program AgencyCompany Organization Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development...

  7. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux "invited... a... W. X. Ding, D. L. Brower, and T. Y. Yates Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA ͑Presented 13 May 2008; received 12 May 2008; accepted 16 May 2008; published online 31 October 2008͒ Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial

  8. State and Local Climate and Energy Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State and Local Climate and Energy Newsletters State and Local Climate and Energy Newsletters The State Partner Network Newsletter is targeted to any state staff involved in advancing clean energy opportunities, developing climate change mitigation policies and programs, looking to understand and describe the benefits of climate actions, and/or seeking up-to-date information on what other states are doing. Subscribers receive a weekly summary of state climate and energy policy news. The State

  9. Climate Action Champions: San Francisco, CA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    San Francisco, CA Climate Action Champions: San Francisco, CA To meet the challenge of climate change, San Francisco is working with residents, businesses, community organizations, and state and federal agencies to create innovative programs and policies. To meet the challenge of climate change, San Francisco is working with residents, businesses, community organizations, and state and federal agencies to create innovative programs and policies. Climate Action Progress and Plans San Francisco

  10. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R.; Dixon, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  11. The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Thomas; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milton

    2009-01-10

    The call for ever-increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate and weather models demands a continual increase in computing power. The IBM Cell processor's order-of-magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive to fulfill this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics, 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. As a trial, we selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (half the total computational time), (2) has an extremely high computational intensity: the ratio of computational load to main memory transfers, and (3) exhibits embarrassingly parallel column computations. In this paper, we converted the baseline code (single-precision Fortran) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20. For performance, we manually SIMDize four independent columns and include several unrolling optimizations. Our results show that when compared with the baseline implementation running on one core of Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, the Cell is approximately 8.8x, 11.6x, and 12.8x faster, respectively. Our preliminary analysis shows that the Cell can also accelerate the dynamics component (~;;25percent total computational time). We believe these dramatic performance improvements make the Cell processor very competitive as an accelerator.

  12. Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Lecture - Climate Prisms Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change for All WHEN: Feb 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350...

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 1999 ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 ...

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 1999 ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with ...

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1999 ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 ...

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 1999 ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with ...

  17. Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model - First Quarter 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JH Mather; D Randall

    2007-12-30

    In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. The first quarter milestone is initial formulation of the algorithm to produce and make available, new continuous time series of retrieved cloud , aerosol and dust properties, based on results from the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niger, Africa. The first quarter milestone has been achieved.

  18. Climate Change Press Release | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Change Press Release Climate Change Press Release Community Leaders Institutes (CLIs) to be conducted to promote awareness of climate change impacts. PDF icon CLI Climate Change Press Release More Documents & Publications A Review of the Department of Energy's Implementation of Executive Order 12898 and Recommendations for a Second Five-Year Strategic Plan Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2015 Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan - First Annual Progress Report

  19. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-01-29

    The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

  20. Climate wise case study compendium: Report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This case study compendium is one of several Climate Wise tools available to help interested companies identify cost-effective options. Climate Wise, a private-public partnership program, is a key Federal initiative to return greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2000.

  1. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interpretation of micro benchmark and application energy use on the Cray XC30 Brian Austin, and Nicholas J. Wright ⇤ August 29, 2014 Abstract Understanding patterns of application energy use is key to reaching future HPC e ciency goals. We have measured the sensitivity of en- ergy use to CPU frequency for several microbenchmarks and applications on a Cray XC30. First order fits to the performance and power data are su cient to describe the energy used by these applications. Exam- ination of

  2. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core velocity fluctuations and the dynamo in a reversed-field pinch * D. J. Den Hartog, †,a) J. T. Chapman, b) D. Craig, G. Fiksel, P. W. Fontana, S. C. Prager, and J. S. Sarff Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 16 November 1998; accepted 20 January 1999͒ Plasma flow velocity fluctuations have been directly measured in the high-temperature magnetically confined plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus ͑MST͒

  3. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ cross section by Ryan P. Fitzgerald A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2005 Approved: A. E. Champagne, Advisor J. C. Blackmon, Reader C. Iliadis, Reader ABSTRACT Ryan P. Fitzgerald: Measurement of the 1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ cross section (Under the Direction of A. E. Champagne) The fusion

  4. A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

  5. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools book detailing DOE's EnergySmart Schools Program for Arctic Climates.

  6. Inside stories on climate compatible development | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: cdkn.org201207cdkns-inside-stories-on-climate-c...

  7. Information Toolkit for post-2012 climate policies | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization: Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Partner: Brinkman Climate Change Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policiesdeployment programs, Pathways...

  8. Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map References: CTI - About1 Climate Technology Initiative is an organization based in Japan. Contents 1 Overview 2 Resources 2.1 CTI Tools 2.2 CTI Programs 3 References...

  9. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America (BA) program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing.

  10. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing mechanical ventilation.

  11. Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program

  12. Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program

  13. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview...

  14. MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate)...

  15. Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) of Residential Behavior-Based Energy Efficiency Programs: Issues and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-16

    Offers technically valid methods for state and local policymakers to estimate the energy savings from residential behavior-based energy efficiency programs.

  16. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The annual Climate Leadership Conference convenes a global audience of climate, energy, and sustainability professionals to address climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Now in its fifth year, the 2016 event will host the first U.S. climate conference post-Paris to further accelerate climate solutions and a low-carbon economy.

  17. ARM Data Help Improve Precipitation in Global Climate Models...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Image courtesy of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ... of Graciosa Island where Atmospheric Radiation Measurement observations were collected ...

  18. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  19. One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Important Role | Department of Energy One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role June 25, 2014 - 4:46pm Addthis One Year into President’s Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) Since the President released the Climate Action Plan one year ago, eight

  20. DOE Science Showcase - Featured Climate Change Research from DOE Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Featured Climate Change Research from DOE Databases Search Results from DOE Databases View research documents, citations, accomplishments, patents, and projects related to climate change, one of the primary scientific challenges addressed through the Incite Program. Climate Change Information Bridge Energy Citations Database DOE R&D Accomplishments Database DOE Data Explorer Climate Modeling Information Bridge

  1. President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assist Remote Alaskan Communities | Department of Energy New Investments to Combat Climate Change and Assist Remote Alaskan Communities President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change and Assist Remote Alaskan Communities September 3, 2015 - 3:57pm Addthis On Sept. 2 in Kotzebue, Alaska, the President announced a robust package of resources, funding, and other programs to assist with combatting climate change and building climate resilience in remote Alaskan communities.

  2. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during years with abnormally wet winters While we cannot observe future climate, Williams said, we can consider projections of future climate trends produced by a collection of...

  3. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  5. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural ...

  6. Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The lead authors include David Bader (coordinating lead author) and Curt Covey, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; William J. Gutowski Jr., Iowa State University; Isaac Held, ...

  7. RCS auditor trainee manual: renewable resource measures (revised). United States Department of Energy Technical Assistance Program for the Residential Conservation Service Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This manual describes the use of renewable measures and the procedures used to audit for them. Included are active solar space and water heating systems, passive solar space and water heating systems, and wind energy systems. Sample audit forms are completed for a house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A summary of installation standards for active solar systems is included. (WHK)

  8. An Evaluation of the Nonlinearity Correction Applied to Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Data Collected by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, DD; Revercomb, HE; Knuteson, RO; Dedecker, RG; Feltz, WF

    2004-09-01

    Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) detectors provide excellent sensitivity to infrared radiation and are used in passive infrared remote sensors such as the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). However, MCT detectors have a nonlinear response and thus this nonlinearity must be characterized and corrected to provide accurate infrared radiance observations. This paper discusses the significance of the nonlinearity correction applied to AERI data and its impacts on the parameters retrieved from the AERI spectra. It also evaluates the accuracy of the scheme used to determine the nonlinearity of the MCT detectors used in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Programs AERIs.

  9. Climate selection and development of climate indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, W.M.; Moreno, S.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01

    A climate analysis procedure for selecting climate locations which would represent the variation in climate conditions throughout the United States is documented. Separate energy analysis projects for three building categories were to use the results of the climate location project. The categories are: commercial buildings (including multifamily residences), single family residences, and mobile homes. The overall objectives, approach, and method used for all three categories are presented, then the specific application of the general method to each building category is discussed. Climate selection results, conclusions, recommendations, and limits for each building category are presented within the description of the application of the method for that category. (LEW)

  10. DOE Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology Program: NBS Measurement Technology Project: Annual report, March 2, 1981-March 2, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    A Uniform Hot Gas Stream Facility has been constructed as part of the NBS high temperature sensor program. The facility provides a unique capability of testing the fiber optic devices to 4300/sup 0/F in a uniform, two inch diameter hot gas stream. This facility will be used to evaluate the new fiber optic devices and thin film devices. A related sputtering facility has also come on-line at NBS. An rf and dc sputtering system is operational and the facility used to sputter a wide array of thin films on the tips of the fibers and thin film sensors. In conclusion, the optical fiber sensor program directed towards automotive applications has been developed to the initial stage of proof of concept, displaying unusual accuracy and endurance. At this point, the effort will focus on the thin film sensors since the thin film devices appear to be of more direct interest to the ECUT automotive engine program.

  11. EPA Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the Climate Registry, is hosting the Climate Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 23-25, 2015.

  12. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted and organized by the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the Climate Registry, the three-day conference will showcase how new business opportunities, current policies, technologies, climate solutions and energy transformation will drive our low-carbon future.

  13. Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM Measurements This five-year award supports the project "Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM Measurements (FASTER)". The goal of this project is to produce accurate, consistent and comprehensive

  14. Environmental Programs: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-05-01

    Major NREL environmental programs and initiatives include: integrated energy and environmental strategies; implementation of air pollution programs and climate change programs; Green Power Network; environmental and economic impacts and benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy (EERE) technologies; technology transfer between developed and developing countries; greenhouse gas emission reduction projects; climate change action plans with developing countries and development of life cycle assessments.

  15. climate | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    climate | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home

  16. Systems Long Term Exposure Program: Analysis of the First Year...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the current analysis. TABLE I SYSTEM LOCATIONS AND CLIMATES Location Climate Florida Solar Energy Center ... conditions for comparison to measured energy production. ...

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  18. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  19. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 μm, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore » projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m⁻² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m⁻², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  20. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.82.0 W m? difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2K, 10 W m?, and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  1. The DOE Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement Program's LES ARM Symbio4c Simula4on and Observa4on (LASSO) Workflow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement Program's LES ARM Symbio4c Simula4on and Observa4on (LASSO) Workflow Ini4aliza4on, Forcing and Mul4scale Data Assimila4on Zhijin Li JPL and UCLA Coauthors: Xiaoping Cheng (UCLA), William I. Gustafson Jr. and Heng Xiao (PNNL), Andrew Vogelmann, Satoshi Endo and Tami Toto (BNL) AGU Fall Mee*ng 2015, San Francisco, CA, December 14, 2015 The Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement (ARM) Facility for Integra4ng Modeling with Observa4ons Dense observa4ons are coupled with

  2. DOE-LPO-MiniReport_CLIMATE-Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation drives the U.S. economy and is a key to combating the global challenge of climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy's Loan Programs O ce (LPO) is helping meet this challenge by providing the critical financing needed to deploy some of the world's largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects. The low-carbon energy and auto manufacturing projects in LPO's portfolio currently play a significant role in addressing climate change in

  3. DOE Appoints Stephen Eule As Director of the Climate Change Technology

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program | Department of Energy Appoints Stephen Eule As Director of the Climate Change Technology Program DOE Appoints Stephen Eule As Director of the Climate Change Technology Program March 31, 2006 - 9:51am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the appointment of Stephen D. Eule as the Director of the Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) in the Office of Policy and International Affairs. "With his depth of experience in science,

  4. Environmental effects on composite airframes: A study conducted for the ARM UAV Program (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noguchi, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    Composite materials are affected by environments differently than conventional airframe structural materials are. This study identifies the environmental conditions which the composite-airframe ARM UAV may encounter, and discusses the potential degradation processes composite materials may undergo when subjected to those environments. This information is intended to be useful in a follow-on program to develop equipment and procedures to prevent, detect, or otherwise mitigate significant degradation with the ultimate goal of preventing catastrophic aircraft failure.

  5. IEA Policies and Measures Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Climate Change Topics: Policiesdeployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset...

  6. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  7. Guides and Case Studies for All Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    All Climates Guides and Case Studies for All Climates The Map of the United States shows climate zones in different colors. The Marine zone contains the Pacific coast from the Canadi The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program has developed a series of technology-specific case studies and best practices guides that may be applicable to all climate zones. Technology Case Studies Guides for All Climates Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Image of a low-load HVAC

  8. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.2: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the climate zone designations used by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program, and is intended to help builders to identify the appropriate climate designation for the counties in which they are building.

  9. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  10. The ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, W.E.; Barnes, F.J.; Ackerman, T.P.; Mather, J.H.

    1998-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 as part of the US Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiative and cloud processes in computer models used to predict climate change. The overall goal of the ARM program is to develop and test parameterizations of important atmospheric processes, particularly cloud and radiative processes, for use in atmospheric models. This goal is being achieved through a combination of field measurements and modeling studies. Three primary locales were chosen for extensive field measurement facilities. These are the Southern Great Plains of the United States, the Tropical Western Pacific, and the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. This paper describes the ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific locale.

  11. Climatic Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climatic Solar Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climatic Solar Name: Climatic Solar Address: 650 2nd Lane Place: Vero Beach, Florida Zip: 32962 Sector: Solar Product: solar energy...

  12. Eos Climate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eos Climate Place: South San Francisco, California Zip: 94080 Product: California-based firm focused on developing climate change mitigation strategies. References: Eos Climate1...

  13. Radiometric measurements on the fabrication of non-destructive assay standards for WIPP-Performance Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, A.S.; Marshall, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The Inorganic Elemental Analysis Group of LANL has prepared several different sets of working reference materials (WRMs). These WRMs are prepared by blending quantities of nuclear materials (plutonium, americium, and enriched uranium) with diatomaceous earth. The blends are encapsulated in stainless steel cylinders. These WRMs are being measured as blind controls in neutron and gamma based non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments. Radiometric measurements on the blending homogeneity and verification on a set of sixty three plutonium based WRMs are discussed in this paper.

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2014-11-21

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility.

  15. Biofuels: A Solution for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, S.

    1999-10-04

    Our lives are linked to weather and climate, and to energy use. Since the late 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in research and technology related to global climate change. DOE's Office Fuels Development (OFD) manages the National Biofuels Program and is the lead technical advisor on the development of biofuels technologies in the United States. Together with industry and other stakeholders, the program seeks to establish a major biofuels industry. Its goals are to develop and commercialize technologies for producing sustainable, domestic, environmentally beneficial, and economically viable fuels from dedicated biomass feedstocks.

  16. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  17. Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium brings together Native speakers who are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coals terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change.

  18. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Participated in the 2013 Domenici Public Policy Conference Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Climate, Earth Sciences Research Center, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Global Climate & Energy, News, News & Events, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Water Security Sandia Participated in the 2013 Domenici Public Policy Conference Marianne Walck, Director of Sandia's Geoscience, Climate, and Consequence Effects Center, spoke on "Hydraulic Fracturing: The Role of

  19. ARM - Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SitesClimate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change to help provide students and educators with clear, accurate

  20. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  1. Measuring Up: How to Track and Evaluate Local Sustainability Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join this EPA Local Climate and Energy webinar to learn how to measure and evaluate the results of local climate, energy, and sustainability projects.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program

  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program

  4. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  5. Sustainable Electric Utility (SEU)- SREC Purchase Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SREC purchase program is a joint incentive of Delaware Division of Energy and Climate (DNREC) and the state’s Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU). The program offers a standard onetime payment of $450...

  6. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  7. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a key component of the U.S. Department of ...

  8. Embedding climate change risk assessment within a governance context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Climate change adaptation is increasingly being framed in the context of climate risk management. This has contributed to the proliferation of climate change vulnerability and/or risk assessments as means of supporting institutional decision-making regarding adaptation policies and measures. To date, however, little consideration has been given to how such assessment projects and programs interact with governance systems to facilitate or hinder the implementation of adaptive responses. An examination of recent case studies involving Australian local governments reveals two key linkages between risk assessment and the governance of adaptation. First, governance systems influence how risk assessment processes are conducted, by whom they are conducted, and whom they are meant to inform. Australia s governance system emphasizes evidence-based decision-making that reinforces a knowledge deficit model of decision support. Assessments are often carried out by external experts on behalf of local government, with limited participation by relevant stakeholders and/or civil society. Second, governance systems influence the extent to which the outputs from risk assessment activities are translated into adaptive responses and outcomes. Technical information regarding risk is often stranded by institutional barriers to adaptation including poor uptake of information, competition on the policy agenda, and lack of sufficient entitlements. Yet, risk assessments can assist in bringing such barriers to the surface, where they can be debated and resolved. In fact, well-designed risk assessments can contribute to multi-loop learning by institutions, and that reflexive problem orientation may be one of the more valuable benefits of assessment.

  9. International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments: Conference summary and statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments was held in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, from May 22--25, 1995. Sponsored by the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring, the US Country Studies Program, and the directorate General for International Cooperation of the Netherlands Government, it was the first international conference focusing exclusively on adaptation to climate change. More than 100 people from 29 countries on five continents participated. The conference primarily addressed measures to anticipate the potential effects of climate change to minimize negative effects and take advantage of any positive effects. The focus was on what governments, institutions, and individuals can do to prepare for climate change. The conference dealt with two major topics: What adaptation options are most effective and efficient in anticipating climate change and what methods should be used to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of adaptation options. Brief summaries are given from the following sessions on agriculture; Water resources; coastal resources; ecosystems and forests; fisheries; human settlements; water and agriculture; and the panel session on international adaptation in national communications and other development plans and needs for technical assistance.

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, R E

    1980-01-01

    The Office of the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environmental Technology has established the OTEC Program Management Office to be responsible for the ANL-assigned tasks of the OTEC Program under DOE's Chicago Operations and Regional Office (DOE/CORO). The ANL OTEC Program Management Plan is essentially a management-by-objective plan. The principal objective of the program is to provide lead technical support to CORO in its capacity as manager of the DOE power-system program. The Argonne OTEC Program is divided into three components: the first deals with development of heat exchangers and other components of OTEC power systems, the second with development of biofouling counter-measures and corrosion-resistant materials for these components in seawater service, and the third with environmental and climatic impacts of OTEC power-system operation. The essential points of the Management Plan are summarized, and the OTEC Program is described. The organization of the OTEC Program at ANL is described including the functions, responsibilities, and authorities of the organizational groupings. The system and policies necessary for the support and control functions within the organization are discussed. These functions cross organizational lines, in that they are common to all of the organization groups. Also included are requirements for internal and external reports.

  11. Global Climate and Energy Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Energy Project Global Climate and Energy Project 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program PDF icon deer_2003_edwards.pdf More Documents & Publications ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation Audit Report: IG-0678

  12. Measuring the accomplishments of public participation programs: Overview of a methodological study performed for DOE`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, M.; Carnes, S.A.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.

    1997-06-01

    Recently, staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a study for the Office of Intergovernmental and Public Accountability within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), examining how to measure the success of public participation programs. While the study began with a thorough literature review, the primary emphasis of this research effort was on getting key stakeholders to help identify attributes of successful public participation in EM activities and to suggest how those attributes might be measured. Interviews were conducted at nine DOE sites that provided substantial variety in terms of geographic location, types of environmental management activities undertaken, the current life-cycle stage of those EM efforts, and the public participation mechanisms utilized. Approximately 12 to 15 oral interviews were conducted at each site, and each respondent also was asked to complete a written survey. Those interviewed included: non-regulatory state and local government officials; project managers and public participation staff for DOE and its management and operations contractors; non-government groups concerned with environmental protection, public safety, and health issues; federal and state environmental regulators; business organizations; civic groups; and other interested parties. While this study examined only those public participation programs sponsored by DOE, the resulting findings also have applicability to the public involvement efforts sponsored by many other public and private sector organizations.

  13. Supercharger for Heat Pumps in Cold Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supercharger for Heat Pumps in Cold Climates Supercharger for Heat Pumps in Cold Climates Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech15_walter_040313.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrics: The New Green Automotive Technology Next Generation Rooftop Unit - 2013 Peer Review Vehicular Thermoelectrics: The New Green Technology

  14. Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    The Climate Stewardship Act of 2004 would establish a system of tradable allowances to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The bill includes requirements for mandatory emissions reporting by covered entities and for voluntary reporting of emissions reduction activities by noncovered entities; a national greenhouse gas database and registry of reductions; and a research program on climate change and related activities.

  15. Building Actionable Climate Action Plans | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Actionable Climate Action Plans Building Actionable Climate Action Plans Transcript PDF icon Presentation More Documents & Publications Partnering with Utilities Part 2: Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings Procuring and Implementing Solar Projects on Public Buildings: How to Avoid Common Pitfalls

  16. DOE Announces Webinars on the SunShot Catalyst Prize Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the SunShot Catalyst Prize Program, Regional Impacts of Climate Change, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the SunShot Catalyst Prize Program, Regional Impacts of Climate Change, ...

  17. BC TIPS - Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans Building Technologies Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Builders Challenge recognizes quality homes that also save you money. U.S. homebuilders...

  18. http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/climate/

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Climatological and Gamma Radiation Summary Select a station from the list Alamo Nevada Go Page 1 of 1 Community Environmental Monitoring Program | CEMP - DOE 5/15/2011 http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/climate/

  19. Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support (C-ROADS) Simulator...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support (C-ROADS) Simulator1 Related Tools Gold Standard Program Model CRiSTAL VS Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) ......

  20. DOE Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology Program: NBS Measurement Technology Project: Quarterly progress report No. 3, July 1-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    There are two objectives of this task. The initial and primary objective is the development of a technique for fast time response gas temperature measurements in high temperature combustion systems. The accurate determination of time-resolved gas temperatures is particularly important. A closed system optical fiber probe has been chosen to measure wide bandwidth gas temperatures more than one thousand degrees higher than the present state of the art methods. The device consists of a single or several layers of temperature sensitive material applied to the tip of a high temperature optical fiber. Microprocessors analyze the complex optical signals generated by the sensors. The program will address the solid state and optical physics of signal generation and sensor construction together with the fluid mechanics and heat transfer elements which describe the response of the sensor to the conditions in continuous combustion systems. The second objective is to supply critical generic background on high temperature thin film devices for use in non-continuous combustion environments. The thin film devices are for application in internal combustion engines on moving parts, such as valves and pistons, where knowledge of surface temperatures and strains will help in the design of efficient engines. They will also find application in gas turbines. The program will supply information on methods of signal generation and construction in practical thin film devices. Solid state and surface physics studies of the films will be undertaken to develop new methods of high temperature strain, temperature, displacement and erosion/corrosion measurement; heat transfer and structural analyses of the films will be used to develop and understand the preferred methods of constructing durable thin film devices. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area.

  2. ARM - Different Climates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListDifferent Climates Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Different Climates The earth's climate varies from place to place. Locations near the Equator tend to be constantly hot and wet, such as the Pacific islands and the Amazon Basins. Some places near the North and South

  3. Climate Change Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural resources across America, and tribal communities are often the hardest hit by severe weather events such as droughts, floods and wildfires" - Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell "Impacts of climate change are increasingly evident for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and, in some cases, threaten the

  4. Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Fourth Quarter 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JH Mather; DA Randall; CJ Flynn

    2008-09-30

    In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. The first quarter milestone was the initial formulation of the algorithm for retrieval of these properties. The second quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved cloud properties and a year-long CCPP control simulation. The third quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved aerosol optical depth and a three-year CCPP control simulation. This final fourth quarter milestone includes the time-series of aerosol and dust properties and a decade-long CCPP control simulation.

  5. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  6. Climate & Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear...

  7. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 3/4, GRIB including SZIP compression, EXTRA, SERVICE and IEG are supported as IO-formats. Apart from that cdo can be used to analyse any kind gridded data not related to climate science. CDO has very small memory requirements and can process files larger than the physical memory. How to Use CDO module load cdo cdo [Options] Operators ... Further

  8. Climate Prisms Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment (NGEE-Arctic); and has amassed photos, videos, and data charting Arctic climate change. Mark Petersen Mark Petersen, Scientist Mark Petersen works at the...

  9. Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reality | Department of Energy Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global Reality Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global Reality July 2, 2015 - 11:31am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. The U.S. Department of Energy was invited to be a panelist for a made-for-television educational program in Columbia, South Carolina, titled Climate Change: A Global Reality. DOE also co-sponsored the program. John

  10. Atmosphere to Electrons program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Electrons program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. SCADA Program Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Overview - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  12. Integrating Program Component Executables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate

  13. Defense Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Management Programs - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. Tribal Energy Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribal Energy Program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. Climate Change Adaptation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change Adaptation Climate Change Adaptation DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related...

  16. NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL Climate Activities (Redirected from Climate Activities at NREL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL AgencyCompany...

  17. European Climate Foundation (ECF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    European Climate Foundation (ECF) (Redirected from European Climate Foundation) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: European Climate Foundation (ECF) Name: European Climate...

  18. Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change for All

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special Lecture - Climate Prisms Special Lecture - Climate Prisms: Understanding Climate Change for All WHEN: Feb 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Climate Lecture Event Description Climate Prisms is the museum's latest addition to their environment exhibit. The lecture intends to reinvent the way the public processes climate change data. Through a deep,

  19. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  20. Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium brings together Native speakers who are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coals terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change. All events are free and open to Evergreen students and the public.

  1. The ARM Climate Research Facility: A Review of Structure and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James H.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

    2013-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program (www.arm.gov) is a Department of Energy, Office of Science, climate research user facility that provides atmospheric observations from diverse climatic regimes around the world. Use of ARM data is free and available to anyone through the ARM data archive. ARM is approaching 20 years of operations. In recent years, the facility has grown to add two mobile facilities and an aerial facility to its network of fixed-location sites. Over the past year, ARM has enhanced its observational capabilities with a broad array of new instruments at its fixed and mobile sites and the aerial facility. Instruments include scanning millimeter- and centimeter-wavelength radars; water vapor, cloud/aerosol extinction, and Doppler lidars; a suite of aerosol instruments for measuring optical, physical, and chemical properties; instruments including eddy correlation systems to expand measurements of the surface and boundary layer; and aircraft probes for measuring cloud and aerosol properties. Taking full advantage of these instruments will involve the development of complex data products. This work is underway but will benefit from engagement with the broader scientific community. In this article we will describe the current status of the ARM program with an emphasis on developments over the past eight years since ARM was designated a DOE scientific user facility. We will also describe the new measurement capabilities and provide thoughts for how these new measurements can be used to serve the climate research community with an invitation to the community to engage in the development and use of these data products.

  2. NERSC Climate PIs Telecon!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Applications at NERSC Climate Projects --- 2 --- 75 Climate Projects at NERSC (AY2015) * Awards a re p ublished a t: - h%ps://www.nersc.gov/users/accounts/awarded---projects/2015--- alloca<on---awards/ * Or y ou c an s earch i n N IM * 29 p rojects u se C ESM o r C ESM c omponents. 2 47 u sers * 16 p rojects u se W RF. 3 6 u sers. --- 3 --- Climate Projects at NERSC (AY2015)-1 Repo Project T itle PI OrganizaMon Codes mp9 Climate C hange S imula<ons w ith C ESM: M oderate a nd H igh

  3. REGIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT WEBINAR SERIES U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REGIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT WEBINAR SERIES U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program THE QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW WITH KATE MARKS U.S. Department of Energy QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW (QER) QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW ENERGY TRANSMISSION, STORAGE, AND DISTRIBUTION INFRASTRUCTURE Minorities in Energy Climate Change Series August 2015 Changing U.S. Energy Landscape * Climate change impacts * Vulnerabilities more evident: aging infrastructure, physical and cyber threats

  4. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science and Implementation Plan (Program Document) | SciTech Connect ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Science and Implementation Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Science and Implementation Plan Atmospheric temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than predicted by climate models. The impact of this warming on permafrost degradation is not well understood,

  5. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  6. ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ARM Climate Research Facility Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (www.arm.gov) is a multi-platform ...

  7. Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers Work in Brazil's Amazon Basin should improve climate prediction. May 30, 2014 Curiosity zaps Mars for vital signs: ChemCam, designed by Lab team, looks for elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, all of which are crucial for life. Heath-Powers: Los Alamos scientist Heath Powers, foreground, and on-site technician Vagner Castro work on field equipment for measuring carbon

  8. Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon

  9. OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, scientific presentations and more. Climate Prisms: Arctic is...

  10. Climate Advisers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and climate-related forest conservation. Climate Advisers is known for its vision, policy expertise, political acumen, and access to senior policymakers in the United States...

  11. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation Climate Change Climate Change March 17, 2016 How to Store Carbon Find out how National Labs scientists are developing new tools to ensure carbon storage is ...

  12. Climate Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Climate Energy Place: Witham, England, United Kingdom Zip: CM8 3UN Sector: Efficiency Product: Essex, UK, based provider of advice...

  13. Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

  14. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.260.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet velocity profiles is also presented.

  16. Utility Grant Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Government Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building Yes Riverside Public Utilities - Energy Efficiency Technology Grant Program (California) Utility Grant Program California...

  17. Grant Programs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    programs to encourage the use and development of renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency measures. Most programs offer support for a broad range of technologies, while...

  18. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change. Final report, July 15, 1989--July 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-01-29

    The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

  19. Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm Measurements Under the support of this grant, we investigated the fast process of interaction of clouds, shallow convection, and boundary layer turbulence and their parameterizations. Main accomplishments involve two things. One is the understanding of

  20. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

  1. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  2. Climate Prisms: The Acrtic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, sci-vis, interviews with scientists with an inside look at...

  3. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  4. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  5. Design Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency measures that are not eligible under this program may be eligible for other Focus on Energy Business Programs. Eligible buildings include free-standing buildings, adaptive reuse, subst...

  6. Program Evaluation: Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation and performance measurement professionals use terms that are common to the field of program evaluation. Knowledge of how these terms are used by evaluators will help program managers...

  7. Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Global Climate & Energy Home/Tag:Global Climate & Energy - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  9. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  10. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  11. Climate Action Champion: Technical

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings Climate Action Champion: Technical Assistance to the City of Seattle Planning for Seattle's new Building Energy Code Overview The City of Seattle, identified as a Climate Action Champion (CAC) by the Department of Energy (DOE), is revising its 2012 Energy Code, already one of the most progressive in the country. Seattle has made a pledge to be carbon neutral by 2050. Seattle received technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in

  12. Climate Action Champions: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact, FL | Department of Energy Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, FL Climate Action Champions: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, FL The Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact was executed by Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe, and Palm Beach Counties in January 2010 to coordinate mitigation and adaptation efforts across county lines. The Compact represents a new form of regional climate governance designed to allow local governments to set the agenda

  13. MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CENTER OF THE DOE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATIC CHANGE RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.

    2014-02-28

    The goal of NICCR (National Institute for Climatic Change Research) was to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The NICCR Midwestern Regional Center (MRC) supported work in the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The MRC of NICCR was able to support nearly $8 million in climatic change research, including $6,671,303 for twenty projects solicited and selected by the MRC over five requests for proposals (RFPs) and $1,051,666 for the final year of ten projects from the discontinued DOE NIGEC (National Institute for Global Environmental Change) program. The projects selected and funded by the MRC resulted in 135 peer-reviewed publications and supported the training of 25 PhD students and 23 Masters students. Another 36 publications were generated by the final year of continuing NIGEC projects supported by the MRC. The projects funded by the MRC used a variety of approaches to answer questions relevant to the DOE’s climate change research program. These included experiments that manipulated temperature, moisture and other global change factors; studies that sought to understand how the distribution of species and ecosystems might change under future climates; studies that used measurements and modeling to examine current ecosystem fluxes of energy and mass and those that would exist under future conditions; and studies that synthesized existing data sets to improve our understanding of the effects of climatic change on terrestrial ecosystems. In all of these efforts, the MRC specifically sought to identify and quantify responses of terrestrial ecosystems that were not well understood or not well modeled by current efforts. The MRC also sought to better understand and model important feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, and regional and global climate systems. The broad variety of projects the MRC has supported gave us a unique opportunity to greatly improve our ability to predict the future health, composition and function of important agricultural and natural terrestrial ecosystems within the Midwestern Region.

  14. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  15. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  16. Active Climate Stabilization: Practical Physics-Based Approaches to Prevention of Climate Change

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Teller, E.; Hyde, T.; Wood, L.

    2002-04-18

    We offer a case for active technical management of the radiative forcing of the temperatures of the Earth's fluid envelopes, rather than administrative management of atmospheric greenhouse gas inputs, in order to stabilize both the global- and time-averaged climate and its mesoscale features. We suggest that active management of radiative forcing entails negligible--indeed, likely strongly negative--economic costs and environmental impacts, and thus best complies with the pertinent mandate of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. We propose that such approaches be swiftly evaluated in sub-scale in the course of an intensive international program.

  17. Program Evaluation: Program Logic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Logic modeling is a thought process program evaluators have found to be useful for at least forty years and has become increasingly popular with program managers during the last decade. A logic model presents a plausible and sensible model of how the program will work under certain environmental conditions to solve identified problems. The logic model can be the basis for a convincing story of the program's expected performance – telling stakeholders and others the problem the program focuses on and how it is uniquely qualified to address it. The elements of the logic model are resources, activities, outputs, short, intermediate and longer-term outcomes. Some add the customers reached, as well as the relevant external contextual influences, present before a program begins or appearing as the program is implemented.

  18. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  19. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  20. Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2004-08-15

    This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

  1. Building America Best Practices Series: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-10-01

    This document describes the eight climate region designations used by the US Department of Energy Building America Program. In addition to describing the climate zones, the document includes a complete list of every county in the United States and their climate region designations. The county lists are grouped by state. The doucment is intended to assist builders to easily identify what climate region they are building in and therefore which climate-specific Building America best practices guide would be most appropriate for them.

  2. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 7.1: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Cole, Pamala C.; Hefty, Marye G.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-08-30

    This report for DOE's Building America program helps builders identify which Building America climate region they are building in. The guide includes maps comparing the Building America regions with climate designations used in the International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings and lists all U.S. counties by climate zone. A very brief history of the development of the Building America climate map and descriptions of each climate zone are provided. This report is available on the Building America website www.buildingamerica.gov.

  3. Blue Lake Rancheria-Forging a Path toward Climate Resiliency | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Rancheria-Forging a Path toward Climate Resiliency Blue Lake Rancheria-Forging a Path toward Climate Resiliency January 22, 2015 - 4:14pm Addthis Blue Lake Rancheria—Forging a Path toward Climate Resiliency Sarai Geary Sarai Geary Program Manager, 48 Contiguous States The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe is one of 16 communities selected as Climate Action Champions by the Obama Administration in December for exceptional work in response to climate change. To date, the Tribe has

  4. Climate Zones | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of

  5. Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures LANL researcher Nate McDowell will discuss climate change and its effects on forest systems. March 31, 2014 Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "The data

  6. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar...

  7. NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL Climate Activities Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL AgencyCompany Organization National Renewable Energy...

  8. Climate Adaptation for Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Adaptation for Transportation (Redirected from 03 Climate Adaptation for Transportation) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 03 Climate Adaptation...

  9. European Climate Foundation (ECF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    European Climate Foundation (ECF) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: European Climate Foundation (ECF) Name: European Climate Foundation (ECF) Address: Tournooiveld 4 2511 CX Place:...

  10. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  11. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Authority, CA | Department of Energy Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of Sonoma adopted a bold goal of a 25 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by 2015. Then in 2009, the Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA) was created as a clearinghouse for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, becoming the

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Measuring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measuring Solar Irradiance from Space: The SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment Harder, Jerry LASP University of Colorado Fontenla, Juan LASP University of Colorado Kopp, Greg...

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM ...

  14. U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The portable observatory, or Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility, is part of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARM Climate Research Facility, a collection of ...

  15. Climate Policies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Policies Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClimatePolicies&ol...

  16. Climate Care | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Care Jump to: navigation, search Name: Climate Care Place: Oxford, England, United Kingdom Zip: OX4 1RQ Sector: Carbon Product: Oxford-based carbon offsetting firm- making...

  17. Climate Consulting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia and China, gives assistance to companies and governments in climate change strategy plan. References: Climate Consulting1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  18. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 SahelMap...

  19. ARM - Predictions of Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TeachersTopic ListPredictions of Climate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Predictions of Climate Change There are no accurate predictions of what will happen to earth's climate with an increase in greenhouse gases. The climate system is very complex, so that scientists

  20. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  1. Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to...

  2. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of

  3. Climate Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Climate Vulnerabilities Climate Vulnerabilities The Energy Sector's Vulnerabilities to Climatic Conditions x Impacts Due to... Increasing Temperatures Decreasing Water Availability Increasing Storms, Flooding, and Sea Level Rise See All Impacts Map locations are approximate. Find out more about this data here. Click and drag the map to read about each location

  4. Department of Energy Announces $7 Million in Funding for Climate...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Through these field studies, scientists in DOE's Atmospheric RadiationMeasurement (ARM) ... Research Facility, view the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program website External ...

  5. Climate Funds Update | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Political Foundation Sector Climate Topics Finance Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learnedbest practices Website http:www.climatefundsupdate. References Climate...

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate-change Climate change en Using powerful computers, physicists uncover mechanism that stabilizes plasma within tokamaks...

  7. SEAB Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SEAB Climate Action Plan SEAB Climate Action Plan A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy. PDF icon Climate Action Plan (pdf) More Documents & Publications U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Climate Change and the U.S. Energy Sector: Regional Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

  8. Climate Financing Options | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidemanual, Training materials Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.orgcfo Language: English References: Climate Finance Options1 New climate finance tool for...

  9. How Ratepayer-Funded Efficiency Can Support State Climate and Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Planning | Department of Energy Ratepayer-Funded Efficiency Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning How Ratepayer-Funded Efficiency Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides states and their stakeholders with a short synopsis for what it would look like to include ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in their climate and energy plans, including current activity at the national and state levels, best practices, energy savings examples, cost-effectiveness, EM&V

  10. SWiFT Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Chitra Sivaraman October 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman February 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman November 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman January 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  15. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman October 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman January 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman October 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  18. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman January 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  20. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman January 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  2. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman April 2014 DOE/SC-ARM-14-014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman July 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  4. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman January 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

  5. Interior Department Announces $11.8 Million to Support Tribal Climate Change Adaptation and Planning Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to prepare communities for the impacts of climate change, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has awarded $11.8 million in Tribal Climate Resilience Program funding awards.

  6. Weatherization Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residences participating in the Home Energy Rebate or New Home Rebate Program may not also participate in the Weatherization Program.

  7. Program Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary

  8. Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

  9. DOE/SC-ARM-14-033 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT - 2014 On the cover: BAECC Site Panorama The Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign is a collaboration with Finnish scientists to measure biogenic aerosols emitted from forests in order to determine their effects on clouds, precipitation, and climate. BAECC placed the second ARM Mobile Facility in a Scots pine forest in southern Finland from February through September 2014 to obtain surface-based measurements of

  10. Assessment of cold-climate environmental research priorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    States, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has consistently recognized that cold regions pose unique environmental problems. This report sets forth the conceptual framework and research plans for several high priority research areas. It provides the fundamental basis for implementation of the EPA Cold-Climate Environmental Research Program. This three- to five-year program encompasses both short- and long-term research of high relevance to the EPA and to the cold regions that it serves.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Climate Systems for EV Extended Range

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Halla Visteon at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced climate systems for EV...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Climate Systems for EV Extended Range (ACSforEVER)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Halla Visteon at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced climate systems for EV...

  13. Program Evaluation: Program Life Cycle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In general, different types of evaluation are carried out over different parts of a program's life cycle (e.g., Creating a program, Program is underway, or Closing out or end of program)....

  14. Livermore research finds that climate models overestimate rainfall

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    increases | National Nuclear Security Administration research finds that climate models overestimate rainfall increases | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory receives Presidential Award as a climate

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    champion | National Nuclear Security Administration receives Presidential Award as a climate champion | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  16. NNSA's National Laboratories Engage in Climate Modeling, Data Gathering |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration National Laboratories Engage in Climate Modeling, Data Gathering | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact

  17. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    change | National Nuclear Security Administration partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios

  18. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the topographic, physical, and biotic features of Sonoma County that enhance resilience. ... see the Sonoma Country Regional Climate Protection Authority website and the RCPA Mission, ...

  19. U.S. Mayor's Climate Protection Agreement: Climate Action Handbook...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Action Handbook offers examples of actions that local governments can take to reduce global warming emissions and implement the commitments for climate protection called out...

  20. Department of Energy Releases Vision & Framework for the U.S. Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Change Technology Program | Department of Energy WASHINGTON, DC -- In a speech before the Climate Policy Center in Washington, D.C., David Conover, Director of the Department of Energy's Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP), today announced the release of the department's Vision and Framework for Strategy and Planning report on behalf of Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman. The report provides strategic direction and guidance to the 10 Federal agencies developing new and advanced global