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Sample records for meadow jumping mouse

  1. White Meadow Lake, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Meadows Place, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop, IncSouth Dakota: EnergyMeadows Place,

  3. Meadow Creek | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII JumpWestaco Jump

  4. TRUCKEE MEADOWS FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT, NEVADA 17 December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    TRUCKEE MEADOWS FLOOD CONTROL PROJECT, NEVADA 17 December 2013 ABSTRACT: The Truckee Meadows Flood economically infeasible. In 1996, local communities requested that flooding problems in Truckee Meadows-sensitive, and technically feasible flood risk management and related recreation for the Cities of Reno and Sparks, Nevada

  5. Meadow Ridge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII JumpWestacoIVRidge

  6. Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics Utilizing an LID approach that featured porous asphalt and supporting designs. This case study shows how a combination of porous asphalt and standard pavement design natural underlying soils are mainly clay in composition, which is very prohibitive towards infiltration

  7. Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII JumpWestacoIV Jump

  9. Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: EnergyLebanonTexas: Energy Resources JumpInformation

  10. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further found that this water can be timed to return to the river during the desired time of the year (summer to early fall). This is because the river stage, which remains relatively high until this time, drops during the irrigation season-thereby releasing the stored groundwater and increasing river flows. A significant side benefit is that these enhanced groundwater return flows will be clean and cold, particularly as compared to the Umatilla River. We also believe that this same type of application of water could be done and the resulting stream flows could be realized in other watersheds throughout the Pacific Northwest. This means that it is critical to compare the results from this baseline report to the full implementation of the project in the next phase. As previously stated, this report only discusses the results of data gathered during the baseline phase of this project. We have attempted to make the data that has been gathered accessible with the enclosed databases and spreadsheets. We provide computer links in this report to the databases so that interested parties can fully evaluate the data that has been gathered. However, we cannot emphasize too strongly that the real value of this project is to implement the phases to come, compare the results of these future phases to this baseline and develop the science and strategies to successfully implement this concept to other rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The results from our verified and calibrated groundwater model matches the observed groundwater data and trends collected during the baseline phase. The modeling results indicate that the return flows may increase to their historic values with the addition of 1 acre-ft/acre of recharge water to the groundwater system (about 9,600 acre-feet total). What this means is that through continued recharge project, you can double to quadruple the annual baseflow of the Umatilla River during the low summer and fall flow periods as compared to the present base-flow. The cool and high quality recharge water is a significant beneficial impact to the river system.

  11. Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Meadow Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII JumpWestacoIV

  14. Hydraulic jumps on an incline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Luc Thiffeault; Andrew Belmonte

    2010-09-01

    When a fluid jet strikes an inclined solid surface at normal incidence, gravity creates a flow pattern with a thick outer rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory or experiments describing simple aspects of this phenomenon, such as the maximum rise height of the fluid above the impact point, and its dependence on jet velocity and inclination angle. We address this with experiments, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its scaling, though without describing the shape of the parabolic envelope.

  15. Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W.M.

    Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by Jeffrey M. Aristoff, Jeffrey D. Leblanc, Annette E. Hosoi, and John W. M. Bush, Massachusetts Institute of Technology We examine the form of the viscous hydraulic of height 2­10 mm. Elegaard et al.1 first demonstrated that the axial symme- try of the viscous hydraulic

  16. A comparison of flooded forest and floating meadow fish assemblages in an upper Amazon floodplain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    A comparison of flooded forest and floating meadow fish assemblages in an upper Amazon floodplain S of gillnets of different mesh-sizes were used to evaluate the degree to which contiguous and connected flooded forest and floating meadow habitats are characterized by distinct fish faunas during the flooding season

  17. New Meadows, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. HERO Ski Trip to Mt. Hood Meadows February

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdateScienceForTrip to Mt. Hood Meadows

  19. Park Profiler/Jump Analyzer Practical method for determining terrain park jump performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terrain Park jump safety as a rider/resort partnership II. USTPC criteria: Quantifying best practices in terrain park jump design III. "Park Profiler" - practical tool to measure TP jump IV. "Jump Analyzer of flying ... but, as Icarus leaned the hard way, there are risks. #12;Terrain Park Jump Safety Terrain park

  20. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  1. RIDGE JUMP PROCESS IN ICELAND Sebastian GARCIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 RIDGE JUMP PROCESS IN ICELAND Sebastian GARCIA Freie Universität Berlin ­ Department of Geologie, sgarcia@zedat.fu-berlin.de Abstract Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact

  2. Abies lasiocarpa establishment of subalpine meadows in Glacier National Park, Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and forest establishment. Both forest and meadow categories showed significant inverse trends in Pacific Decadal Oscillation and establishment. These data indicate warmer fall temperatures and alteration in snowpack lengthen the growing season and provide...

  3. Rolling Meadows, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast Jump to:Ridgway,RochesterMissouri: Energy

  4. Meadow Lake II (3Q10) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII JumpWestaco JumpII

  5. Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

    2013-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

  6. JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mocioalca, Oana

    JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS "non-systematic" risk, inclusive of transaction costs. We compute the total transac- tion costs and the turnover for different options, transaction costs, and revision intervals

  7. Hidden Meadows, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:Hidden Hills, California:

  8. Princeton Meadows, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliam County, Virginia:

  9. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  10. The hydraulic jump as a white whole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volovik, G E

    2005-01-01

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the `white-hole'. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  11. A Model For Polygonal Hydraulic Jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Erik A; Bohr, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard et al., based on the known flow structure for the type II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including non-hydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush et al. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated, but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a pol...

  12. Homestead Meadows North, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: EnergyHollyHoma Hills,Homeland,Facility |

  13. Homestead Meadows South, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: EnergyHollyHoma Hills,Homeland,Facility |South,

  14. Meadow Acres, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop, IncSouth Dakota: Energy Resources

  15. Meadow Woods, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop, IncSouth Dakota: Energy ResourcesWoods,

  16. Montane meadow change during drought varies with background hydrologic regime and plant functional group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.; Wickham, Hadley; Kindscher, Kelly; Caruthers, Jennet C.; Germino, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    pour l’Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite imagery. Both regions have similar plant communities, but patch sizes of meadows are much smaller in the Gallatin region. We measured changes in the percent cover of bare ground and plants by species...

  17. Hydraulic/Shock-Jumps in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Boley; R. H. Durisen

    2006-03-10

    In this paper, we describe the nonlinear outcome of spiral shocks in protoplanetary disks. Spiral shocks, for most protoplanetary disk conditions, create a loss of vertical force balance in the post-shock region and result in rapid expansion of the gas perpendicular to the disk midplane. This expansion has characteristics similar to hydraulic jumps, which occur in incompressible fluids. We present a theory to describe the behavior of these hybrids between shocks and hydraulic jumps (shock bores) and then compare the theory to three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We discuss the fully three-dimensional shock structures that shock bores produce and discuss possible consequences for disk mixing, turbulence, and evolution of solids.

  18. Does the side jump effect exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushkov, O P; Mori, M; Maekawa, S

    2012-01-01

    The side-jump effect is a manifestation of the spin orbit interaction in electron scattering from an atom/ion/impurity. The effect has a broad interest because of its conceptual importance for generic spin-orbital physics, in particular the effect is widely discussed in spintronics. We reexamine the effect accounting for the exact nonperturbative electron wave function inside the atomic core. We find that value of the effect is much smaller than estimates accepted in literature. The reduction factor is 1/Z^2, where Z is the nucleus charge of the atom/impurity. This implies that the side-jump effect is practically irrelevant for spintronics, the skew scattering and/or the intrinsic mechanism always dominate the anomalous Hall and spin Hall effects.

  19. Jump-Diffusion Risk-Sensitive Asset Management II: Jump-Diffusion Factor Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article we extend earlier work on the jump-diffusion risk-sensitive asset management problem [SIAM J. Fin. Math. (2011) 22-54] by allowing jumps in both the factor process and the asset prices, as well as stochastic volatility and investment constraints. In this case, the HJB equation is a partial integro-differential equation (PIDE). By combining viscosity solutions with a change of notation, a policy improvement argument and classical results on parabolic PDEs we prove that the HJB PIDE admits a unique smooth solution. A verification theorem concludes the resolution of this problem.

  20. Electrowetting study of jumping droplets on hydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tio, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that jumping-droplet-enhanced condensation has higher heat transfer than state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces by -30-40%. Jumping-droplet condensation occurs due to the conversion of ...

  1. Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number Ratul Dasgupta I will present some results on undular hydraulic jumps occurring in a two bores (in rivers), where the interface remains horizontal, the moderate Reynolds hydraulic jump shows a linear increase in height due to viscosity

  2. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey Aguilar; Alex Lesov; Kurt Wiesenfeld; Daniel I. Goldman

    2012-08-30

    We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency $f_0$. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above $f_0$ is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below $f_0$ is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics.

  3. Mineral resources of the Sacatar Meadows Wilderness study Area, Tulare and Inyo counties, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diggles, M.F.; Frisken, J.G.; Griscom, A.; Kuizon, L.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the US Bureau of Land Management, approximately 11,447 acres of the Sacatar Meadows Wilderness Study Area were evaluated for mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). No mineral resources were identified. There are five areas of low mineral resource potential (tungsten and molybdenum) in and near the study area. The host rocks for these minerals are Mesozoic-age granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith and calcareous metamorphic roof-pendant rocks. The area has no geothermal energy, energy mineral, or oil and gas resource potential.

  4. Optimal Control of Standing Jump Movements Michael W. Koch, Sigrid Leyendecker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leyendecker, Sigrid

    Optimal Control of Standing Jump Movements Michael W. Koch, Sigrid Leyendecker Chair of Applied standing jumping movements, in particular, standing high jumps and standing long jumps are considered. The exemplary investigated jumps are restricted to standing jump movements. Historically, the standing high jump

  5. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chu, Houjuan; Wang, Shiping; Yue, Haowei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-07-07

    The grassland and shrubland are two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow, a region very sensitive to the impact of global warming and anthropogenic perturbation. Herein, we report a study showing that a majority of differences in soil microbial community functional structures, measured by a functional gene array named GeoChip 4.0, in two adjacent shrubland and grassland areas, were explainable by environmental properties, suggesting that the harsh environments in the alpine grassland rendered niche adaptation important. Furthermore, genes involved in labile carbon degradation were more abundant in the shrubland than those of the grassland but genes involved in recalcitrantmore »carbon degradation were less abundant, which was conducive to long-term carbon storage and sequestration in the shrubland despite low soil organic carbon content. In addition, genes of anerobic nitrogen cycling processes such as denitrification and dissimilatory nitrogen reduction were more abundant, shifting soil nitrogen cycling toward ammonium biosynthesis and consequently leading to higher soil ammonium contents. We also noted higher abundances of stress genes responsive to nitrogen limitation and oxygen limitation, which might be attributed to low total nitrogen and higher water contents in the shrubland. Together, these results provide mechanistic knowledge about microbial linkages to soil carbon and nitrogen storage and potential consequences of vegetation shifts in the Tibetan alpine meadow.« less

  6. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Houjuan; Wang, Shiping; Yue, Haowei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-07-07

    The grassland and shrubland are two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow, a region very sensitive to the impact of global warming and anthropogenic perturbation. Herein, we report a study showing that a majority of differences in soil microbial community functional structures, measured by a functional gene array named GeoChip 4.0, in two adjacent shrubland and grassland areas, were explainable by environmental properties, suggesting that the harsh environments in the alpine grassland rendered niche adaptation important. Furthermore, genes involved in labile carbon degradation were more abundant in the shrubland than those of the grassland but genes involved in recalcitrant carbon degradation were less abundant, which was conducive to long-term carbon storage and sequestration in the shrubland despite low soil organic carbon content. In addition, genes of anerobic nitrogen cycling processes such as denitrification and dissimilatory nitrogen reduction were more abundant, shifting soil nitrogen cycling toward ammonium biosynthesis and consequently leading to higher soil ammonium contents. We also noted higher abundances of stress genes responsive to nitrogen limitation and oxygen limitation, which might be attributed to low total nitrogen and higher water contents in the shrubland. Together, these results provide mechanistic knowledge about microbial linkages to soil carbon and nitrogen storage and potential consequences of vegetation shifts in the Tibetan alpine meadow.

  7. ISSN 1745-9648 Gasoline Prices Jump Up on Mondays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    ISSN 1745-9648 Gasoline Prices Jump Up on Mondays: an Outcome of Aggressive Competition? by Øystein Research Council is gratefully acknowledged. #12;Gasoline prices jump up on Mondays: An outcome, 2008 Abstract This paper examines Norwegian gasoline pump prices using daily station

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi equations with jumps: asymptotic stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Mahmood; Saima Parveen

    2009-09-05

    The asymptotic stability of a global solution satisfying Hamilton-Jacobi equations with jumps will be analyzed in dependence on the strong dissipativity of the jump control function and using orbits of the differentiable flows to describe the corresponding characteristic system.

  9. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  10. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Walker

    2014-03-05

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  11. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of hatchery three-year-olds collected indicated that the current stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year-olds. However, supplemental creel data indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee 30-45 days after release. Supplemental creel data should continue to be collected to accurately evaluate hatchery contributions to the creel.

  13. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured ...

  14. Spontaneous azimuthal breakout and instability at the circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Arnab K; Basu, Abhik; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a shallow, two-dimensional flow of a liquid in which the radial and the azimuthal dynamics are coupled to each other. The steady and radial background flow of this system creates an axially symmetric circular hydraulic jump. On this background we apply time-dependent perturbations of the matter flow rate and the azimuthal flow velocity, with the latter strongly localized at the hydraulic jump. The perturbed variables depend spatially on both the radial and azimuthal coordinates. Linearization of the perturbations gives a coupled system of wave equations. The characteristic equations extracted from these wave equations show that under a marginally stable condition a spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry occurs at the position of the hydraulic jump. Departure from the marginal stability shows further that a linear instability develops in the azimuthal direction, resulting in an azimuthal transport of liquid at the hydraulic jump. The time for the growth of azimuthal instability is scaled by viscosi...

  15. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

    2006-10-03

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

  16. Chemical Potential Jump during Evaporation of a Quantum Bose Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Bedrikova; A. V. Latyshev

    2013-01-07

    The dependence of the chemical potential jump coefficient on the evaporation coefficient is analyzed for the case in which the evaporating component is a Bose gas. The concentration of the evaporating component is assumed to be much lower than the concentration of the carrier gas. The expression for the chemical potential jump is derived from the analytic solution of the problem for the case in which the collision frequency of molecules of the evaporating component is constant.

  17. Non-Markovian Quantum Jump with Generalized Lindblad Master Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. L. Huang; H. Y. Sun; X. X. Yi

    2008-10-14

    The Monte Carlo wave function method or the quantum trajectory/jump approach is a powerful tool to study dissipative dynamics governed by the Markovian master equation, in particular for high-dimensional systems and when it is difficult to simulate directly. In this paper, we extend this method to the non-Markovian case described by the generalized Lindblad master equation. Two examples to illustrate the method are presented and discussed. The results show that the method can correctly reproduce the dissipative dynamics for the system. The difference between this method and the traditional Markovian jump approach and the computational efficiency of this method are also discussed.

  18. SHORT COMMUNICATION Dynamical analysis of winter terrain park jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this work is to show how a dynamical analysis can assess impact injury risks and inform safer terrain park frequently pose a hazard to patrons and may represent a significant liability risk to winter resorts. By performing a simple dynamic analysis of terrain park jumps, the relative risk to impact injuries for any

  19. Peak-Jumping Frequent Itemset Mining Nele Dexters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Gucht, Dirk

    Peak-Jumping Frequent Itemset Mining Algorithms Nele Dexters1 , Paul W. Purdom2 , and Dirk Van Gucht2 1 Departement Wiskunde-Informatica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium, nele.dexters@ua.ac.be, 2. We analyze algorithms that, under the right circumstances, permit efficient mining for frequent

  20. Vegetation dynamics of a native haymeadow, a grazed meadow, and an oldfield within the San Antonio Prairie of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Terry Paul

    1987-01-01

    rcl es represent position of the community within the ordination. 8 ~Sti a leucotricha (a) and Diodia tricocca (b) foliar cover across 6 sample dates for the non-defoliated and defoliated samples within the oldfield, grazed meadow and haymeadow... of the Fort Worth Prairie. The prairie was classified as a grazing disclimax, with S~ti a leucotricha and Bothriochloa saccharoides the major dominants. 5 sion in a g I d occ rr d h S~chizach ri s~i 1 re sed and ecological retrogression was indicated...

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

  2. Heat release by controlled continuous-time Markov jump processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Muratore-Ginanneschi; Carlos Mejía-Monasterio; Luca Peliti

    2012-12-17

    We derive the equations governing the protocols minimizing the heat released by a continuous-time Markov jump process on a one-dimensional countable state space during a transition between assigned initial and final probability distributions in a finite time horizon. In particular, we identify the hypotheses on the transition rates under which the optimal control strategy and the probability distribution of the Markov jump problem obey a system of differential equations of Hamilton-Bellman-Jacobi-type. As the state-space mesh tends to zero, these equations converge to those satisfied by the diffusion process minimizing the heat released in the Langevin formulation of the same problem. We also show that in full analogy with the continuum case, heat minimization is equivalent to entropy production minimization. Thus, our results may be interpreted as a refined version of the second law of thermodynamics.

  3. Insider Models with Finite Utility in Markets with Jumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohatsu-Higa, Arturo; Yamazato, Makoto

    2011-10-15

    In this article we consider, under a Levy process model for the stock price, the utility optimization problem for an insider agent whose additional information is the final price of the stock blurred with an additional independent noise which vanishes as the final time approaches. Our main interest is establishing conditions under which the utility of the insider is finite. Mathematically, the problem entails the study of a 'progressive' enlargement of filtration with respect to random measures. We study the jump structure of the process which leads to the conclusion that in most cases the utility of the insider is finite and his optimal portfolio is bounded. This can be explained financially by the high risks involved in models with jumps.

  4. Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

  5. Fast MCMC sampling for Markov jump processes and extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bach, Francis

    Fast MCMC sampling for Markov jump processes and extensions Vinayak Rao and Yee Whye Teh Rao-backward, Baum-Welch. V Rao and Y W Teh (Mar 2013) Fast MCMC for MJPs 2 / 41 #12;Continuous-Time Hidden Markov state i V Rao and Y W Teh (Mar 2013) Fast MCMC for MJPs 3 / 41 #12;Predator-Prey (Lotka-Volterra) Model

  6. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miljkovic, N; Enright, R; Nam, Y; Lopez, K; Dou, N; Sack, J; Wang, E

    2012-01-01

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces can not only allow for easy droplet removal at micrometric length scales during condensation but also promise to enhance heat transfer performance. However, the rationale for the design of an ideal nanostructured surface as well as heat transfer experiments demonstrating the advantage of this jumping behavior are lacking. Here, we show that silanized copper oxide surfaces created via a simple fabrication method can achieve highly efficient jumping-droplet condensation heat transfer. We experimentally demonstrated a 25% higher overall heat flux and 30% higher condensation heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art hydrophobic condensing surfaces at low supersaturations (<1.12). This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement but also promises a low cost and scalable approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification. Furthermore, the results offer insights and an avenue to achieve high flux superhydrophobic condensation.

  7. Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Martin, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergy Information Martin, Et Al., 2004)

  8. Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York: EnergyUnlimitedEnergy Information Jump

  9. Native Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and Pollinators of Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Native Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and Pollinators of Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadow A walk with Dr.footwear. No dogs please.footwear. No dogs please. For more information please call: Kathy Van Zuuk, PlantFor more

  10. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  11. Computing the Rates of Measurement-Induced Quantum Jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Bauer; Denis Bernard; Antoine Tilloy

    2015-06-08

    Small quantum systems can now be continuously monitored experimentally which allows for the reconstruction of quantum trajectories. A peculiar feature of these trajectories is the emergence of jumps between the eigenstates of the observable which is measured. Using the Stochastic Master Equation (SME) formalism for continuous quantum measurements, we show that the density matrix of a system indeed shows a jumpy behavior when it is subjected to a tight measurement (even if the noise in the SME is Gaussian). We are able to compute the jump rates analytically for any system evolution, i.e. any Lindbladian, and we illustrate how our general recipe can be applied to two simple examples. We then discuss the mathematical, foundational and practical applications of our results. The analysis we present is based on a study of the strong noise limit of a class of stochastic differential equations (the SME) and as such the method may be applicable to other physical situations in which a strong noise limit plays a role.

  12. Making Things Clearer: Exaggeration, Jumping the Gun, and The Venus Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Making Things Clearer: Exaggeration, Jumping the Gun, and The Venus Syndrome 15 April 2013 James. Jumping the Gun It has been said that I reach conclusions before the evidence warrants them. Two examples

  13. Precautionary Measures for Credit Risk Management in Jump Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egami, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Sustaining efficiency and stability by properly controlling the equity to asset ratio is one of the most important and difficult challenges in bank management. Due to unexpected and abrupt decline of asset values, a bank must closely monitor its net worth as well as market conditions, and one of its important concerns is when to raise more capital so as not to violate capital adequacy requirements. In this paper, we model the tradeoff between avoiding costs of delay and premature capital raising, and solve the corresponding optimal stopping problem. In order to model defaults in a bank's loan/credit business portfolios, we represent its net worth by Levy processes, and solve explicitly for the double exponential jump diffusion process and for a general spectrally negative Levy process.

  14. Markov Jump Processes Approximating a Non-Symmetric Generalized Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limic, Nedzad

    2011-08-15

    Consider a non-symmetric generalized diffusion X( Dot-Operator ) in Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} determined by the differential operator A(x) = -{Sigma}{sub ij} {partial_derivative}{sub i}a{sub ij}(x){partial_derivative}{sub j} + {Sigma}{sub i} b{sub i}(x){partial_derivative}{sub i}. In this paper the diffusion process is approximated by Markov jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ), in homogeneous and isotropic grids G{sub n} Subset-Of Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}, which converge in distribution in the Skorokhod space D([0,{infinity}), Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}) to the diffusion X( Dot-Operator ). The generators of X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ) are constructed explicitly. Due to the homogeneity and isotropy of grids, the proposed method for d{>=}3 can be applied to processes for which the diffusion tensor {l_brace}a{sub ij}(x){r_brace}{sub 11}{sup dd} fulfills an additional condition. The proposed construction offers a simple method for simulation of sample paths of non-symmetric generalized diffusion. Simulations are carried out in terms of jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ). For piece-wise constant functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} and piece-wise continuous functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup 2} the construction and principal algorithm are described enabling an easy implementation into a computer code.

  15. NUMERICAL STUDY OF A TURBULENT HYDRAULIC JUMP Qun Zhao 1 Shubhra K. Misra1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    . Hydraulic jumps are commonly used as energy dissipators and they have been studied intensively by hydraulicNUMERICAL STUDY OF A TURBULENT HYDRAULIC JUMP Qun Zhao 1 Shubhra K. Misra1 Ib A. Svendsen 1 (Member of a turbulent hydraulic jump. The numerical model is based on RIPPLE (Kothe et al., 1994) with two turbulence

  16. Jump Flooding in GPU with Applications to Voronoi Diagram and Distance Transform Guodong Rong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Tiow Seng

    Jump Flooding in GPU with Applications to Voronoi Diagram and Distance Transform Guodong Rong Tiow of the jump flooding algorithm is shown in the other six pictures, with the rightmost being the computed Voronoi diagram. Abstract This paper studies jump flooding as an algorithmic paradigm in the general

  17. Edit: Study -APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    Edit: Study - APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project Guidance Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project IdentificationStarDev/ResourceAdministration/Project/ProjectEditor?Project=com... 1 #12;Edit: Study - APP- Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 02. Study

  18. Quantum Jump from Singularity to Outside of Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dündar, Furkan Semih

    2015-01-01

    Considering the role of black hole singularity in quantum evolution, a resolution to the firewall paradox is presented. It is emphasized that if an observer has the singularity as a part of his spacetime, then the semi-classical evolution would be non-unitary as viewed by him. Specifically, a free-falling observer inside the black hole would have a Hilbert space with non-unitary evolution; a quantum jump for particles encountering the singularity to outside of the horizon as part of late radiations in black hole evaporation. Accordingly, we elaborate the first postulate of black hole complementarity: freely falling observers who pass through the event horizon would have non-unitarity evolutions. The non-unitary evolution is such that it does not have physically measurable effects for them. Besides, no information would be lost in singularity. Taking the modified picture into account, the firewall paradox {can be} resolved, respecting No Drama. A by-product of our modification is that roughly half of the mass ...

  19. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  20. Register now at career.ucla.edu/JumpStart The JumpStart Series is a fee-based program open to currently registered UCLA students.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    . Blogs Winter 2015 Internship Search Wednesday, January 7, 4-7pm Engineering / Technology / Consulting-7pm Graduate Student JumpStart Engineering and Technology Thursday, Oct 16, 4-7pm #12;

  1. Modelling the "Pop" in Winter Terrain Park Jumps J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at ski resorts have found that jumping generally poses a signif- icantly greater risk of spine and head found that jumping generally (whether in a terrain park or not) poses a significantly greater risk of the feature." The authors have since identified experimental errors in this work and an erratum has been

  2. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

  3. Information Shocks, Liquidity Shocks, Jumps, and Price Discovery: Evidence from the U.S. Treasury Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, George J.

    In this paper, we identify jumps in U.S. Treasury-bond (T-bond) prices and investigate what causes such unexpected large price changes. In particular, we examine the relative importance of macroeconomic news announcements ...

  4. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13436 Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13436 Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum non-demolition parity measurements L. Sun1 {, A. Petrenko1 , Z. Leghtas1 , B. Vlastakis1 , G. Kirchmair1 {, K. M. Sliwa1 , A. Narla1

  5. Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open the obstacle, two main flow structures are observed: i a hydraulic jump in the near-surface region and ii turbulent regime , the detachment length of the hydraulic jump exceeds the one of the horseshoe vortex

  6. Revisiting the emission from relativistic blast waves in a density-jump medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Dai, Z. G. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    Re-brightening bumps are frequently observed in gamma-ray burst afterglows. Many scenarios have been proposed to interpret the origin of these bumps, of which a blast wave encountering a density-jump in the circumburst environment has been questioned by recent works. We develop a set of differential equations to calculate the relativistic outflow encountering the density-jump by extending the work of Huang et al. This approach is a semi-analytic method and is very convenient. Our results show that late high-amplitude bumps cannot be produced under common conditions, rather only a short plateau may emerge even when the encounter occurs at an early time (<10{sup 4} s). In general, our results disfavor the density-jump origin for those observed bumps, which is consistent with the conclusion drawn from full hydrodynamics studies. The bumps thus should be caused by other scenarios.

  7. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial

  8. Dynamics of a drop trapped inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchesne, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Pirat, Christophe; Limat, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    A drop of moderate size deposited inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid remains trapped at the shock front and does not coalesce. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  9. Orbits and reversals of a drop rolling inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexis Duchesne; Clément Savaro; Luc Lebon; Christophe Pirat; Laurent Limat

    2013-02-14

    We explore the complex dynamics of a non-coalescing drop of moderate size inside a circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid formed on a horizontal disk. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  10. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Dorosenko, M.; Sutton, G. P.

    2015-03-05

    muscular control. In the second manipulation, flexibility of the abdomen was reduced by super-gluing the segments together and this resulted in the mantises rotating at an angular velocity of 0.6 ± 0.2 degrees ms -1 (mean of means of 17 jumps by two 5... lens. The images had a resolution of 1024 x 1024 pixels and were fed directly to a computer for later analysis. Jumps were made from a platform made of high density white foam (Plastazote, Watkins and Doncaster, Cranbrook, Kent, UK) 85 mm deep and 150...

  11. Dazl regulates mouse embryonic germ cell development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    In the mouse, germ cells can undergo differentiation to become either oocytes or spermatozoa in response to sex of their gonadal environment. The nature of the germ cell-intrinsic aspects of this signaling have not been ...

  12. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  13. Internal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    that tidal energy is both converted into internal waves, which radiate away from the topography, and used of tidal mixing for global climate models, the physical processes governing the transfer of energy fromInternal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge Sonya Legg

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Sulfate Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics and Mechanisms of Sulfate Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation Peng Chu Zhang* and Donald L. Sparks ABSTRACT Sulfate adsorption/desorption on goethite (Fe indicated that adsorption decreased with increased pH of the goethite suspension. The triple-layer model fit

  15. Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data Jianqing Fan and Yazhen Wang Version of May 2007 Abstract The wide availability of high-frequency data for many financial-diffusion processes observed with market microstructure noise are frequently used to model high-frequency financial

  16. Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae: Salticidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, Damian Octavio

    Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae of multicomponent seismic courtship signals in addition to and produced in concert with its multiple visual ornaments and movement displays. Here, we demonstrate the importance of these seismic signals

  17. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  18. Temperature jump in degenerate quantum gases in the presence of a Bose - Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

    2010-01-04

    We construct a kinetic equation modeling the behavior of degenerate quantum Bose gases whose collision rate depends on the momentum of elementary excitations. We consider the case where the phonon component is the decisive factor in the elementary excitations. We analytically solve the half-space boundary value problem of the temperature jump at the boundary of the degenerate Bose gas in the presence of a Bose -- Einstein condensate.

  19. A Lagrangian model of Copepod dynamics: clustering by escape jumps in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardeshiri, Hamidreza; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Toschi, Federico; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are small crustaceans that have the ability to swim by quick powerful jumps. Such an aptness is used to escape from high shear regions, which may be caused either by flow per- turbations, produced by a large predator (i.e. fish larvae), or by the inherent highly turbulent dynamics of the ocean. Through a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigate the impact of jumping behaviour on the small-scale patchiness of copepods in a turbulent environment. Recorded velocity tracks of copepods displaying escape response jumps in still water are here used to define and tune a Lagrangian Copepod (LC) model. The model is further employed to simulate the behaviour of thousands of copepods in a fully developed hydrodynamic turbulent flow obtained by direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. First, we show that the LC velocity statistics is in qualitative agreement with available experimental observations of copepods in tur- bulence. Second, we quantify the clustering of LC...

  20. Testing for jumps in the context of high frequency data Universite P. et M. Curie (Paris-6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing for jumps in the context of high frequency data Jean Jacod Universit´e P. et M. Curie of these discrete observations, in the case of high frequency observations. That is, n is small, and we are in fact Universit´e P. et M. Curie (Paris-6) Testing for Jumps in the Context of High Frequency Data MONDAY, April 2

  1. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  2. Jump Chaotic Behaviour of Ultra Low Loss Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Warrick G. Farr; Serge Galliou; Michael E. Tobar

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity ($Q>3\\times10^9$), which only occurs below 20 milli-Kelvin in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lays beyond the standard Duffing model.

  3. Jump chaotic behaviour of ultra low loss bulk acoustic wave cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, Serge [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l'Épitaphe 25000 Besançon (France)

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity (Q>3>10{sup 9}), which only occurs below 20 mK in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lies beyond the standard Duffing model.

  4. The evolution of asteroids in the jumping-Jupiter migration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roig, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the evolution of a primordial belt of asteroids, represented by a large number of massless test particles, under the gravitational effect of migrating Jovian planets in the framework of the jumping-Jupiter model. We perform several simulations considering test particles distributed in the Main Belt, as well as in the Hilda and Trojan groups. The simulations start with Jupiter and Saturn locked in the mutual 3:2 mean motion resonance plus 3 Neptune-mass planets in a compact orbital configuration. Mutual planetary interactions during migration led one of the Neptunes to be ejected in less than 10 Myr of evolution, causing Jupiter to jump by about 0.3 au in semi-major axis. This introduces a large scale instability in the studied populations of small bodies. After the migration phase, the simulations are extended over 4 Gyr, and we compare the final orbital structure of the simulated test particles to the current Main Belt of asteroids with absolute magnitude $H<9.7$. The results ...

  5. Smooth Light Curves from a Bumpy Ride: Relativistic Blast Wave Encounters a Density Jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud; /Caltech; Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curves show significant variability, which often includes episodes of rebrightening. Such temporal variability had been attributed in several cases to large fluctuations in the external density, or density ''bumps''. Here we carefully examine the effect of a sharp increase in the external density on the afterglow light curve by considering, for the first time, a full treatment of both the hydrodynamic evolution and the radiation in this scenario. To this end we develop a semi-analytic model for the light curve and carry out several elaborate numerical simulations using a one dimensional hydrodynamic code together with a synchrotron radiation code. Two spherically symmetric cases are explored in detail--a density jump in a uniform external medium, and a wind termination shock. The effect of density clumps is also constrained. Contrary to previous works, we find that even a very sharp (modeled as a step function) and large (by a factor of a >> 1) increase in the external density does not produce sharp features in the light curve, and cannot account for significant temporal variability in GRB afterglows. For a wind termination shock, the light curve smoothly transitions between the asymptotic power laws over about one decade in time, and there is no rebrightening in the optical or X-rays that could serve as a clear observational signature. For a sharp jump in a uniform density profile we find that the maximal deviation {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} of the temporal decay index {alpha} from its asymptotic value (at early and late times), is bounded (e.g, {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} < 0.4 for {alpha} = 10); {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} slowly increases with {alpha}, converging to {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} {approx} 1 at very large {alpha} values. Therefore, no optical rebrightening is expected in this case as well. In the X-rays, while the asymptotic flux is unaffected by the density jump, the fluctuations in {alpha} are found to be comparable to those in the optical. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the origin of the observed fluctuations in several GRB afterglows.

  6. "You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": The Value of Networking and Community Building in California Community Colleges' Reading Apprenticeship Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Deborah Lea

    2014-01-01

    You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": TheYou Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": Thejump  into  the  icy  pool  of  metacognition. ”  This  

  7. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-?-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated ?-sheet of ?90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two ?-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  8. Anomalous specific heat jump in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen Sedrakian; Herbert Müther; Artur Polls

    2006-09-20

    The thermodynamic functions of a Fermi gas with spin population imbalance are studied in the temperature-asymmetry plane in the BCS limit. The low temperature domain is characterized by anomalous enhancement of the entropy and the specific heat above their values in the unpaired state, decrease of the gap and eventual unpairing phase transition as the temperature is lowered. The unpairing phase transition induces a second jump in the specific heat, which can be measured in calorimetric experiments. While the superfluid is unstable against a supercurrent carrying state, it may sustain a metastable state if cooled adiabatically down from the stable high-temperature domain. In the latter domain the temperature dependence of the gap and related functions is analogous to the predictions of the BCS theory.

  9. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-08-11

    We study asymptotics of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity of the free energy including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  10. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-05-27

    We study asymptotic behaviors of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by the Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  11. "Granular jets and hydraulic jumps on an inclined plane", C. G. Johnson, J. M. N. T. Gray ( ), J. Fluid Mech., (Submitted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    · "Granular jets and hydraulic jumps on an inclined plane", C. G. Johnson, J. M. N. T. Gray ( ), J material impinging on an inclined plane pro- duces a diverse range of ows, from steady hydraulic jumps-moving radial ow, surrounded by either a teardrop-shaped, or a `blunted' hydraulic jump. A depth

  12. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MOUs MOU Between Nine Federal Agencies Regarding Coordination in Federal Agency Review of Electric Transmission Facilities on Federal Land. Sets procedures for federal agency...

  13. Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-05-14

    This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether governmental or private.

  14. Towards the integration of mouse databases - definition and implementation of solutions to two use-cases in mouse functional genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenberger, Michael; Alberts, Rudi; Smedley, Damian; Swertz, Morris A; Schofield, Paul; Consortium, Casimir; Schughart, Klaus

    2010-01-22

    number of allelic variants in many genes, combina- tions thereof, and many knock-out mouse lines with deletions in single genes are available [1]. Research on mouse model systems has generated valuable discoveries for our understanding of the biological... genomics studies (see the Mouse Resource Browser MRB [7]). Ad-hoc integration of these databases is very difficult. Many databases require a separate login procedure and need to be accessed using different methods (e.g. via a website, downloadable files...

  15. Quantum-jumps and photon-statistic in fluorescent systems coupled to classically fluctuating reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian A. Budini

    2010-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a quantum-jump approach for describing the photon-emission process of single fluorophore systems coupled to complex classically fluctuating reservoirs. The formalism relies on an open quantum system approach where the dynamic of the system and the reservoir fluctuations are described through a density matrix whose evolution is defined by a Lindblad rate equation. For each realization of the photon measurement processes it is possible to define a conditional system state (stochastic density matrix) whose evolution depends on both the photon detection events and the fluctuations between the configurational states of the reservoir. In contrast to standard fluorescent systems the photon-to-photon emission process is not a renewal one, being defined by a (stochastic) waiting time distribution that in each recording event parametrically depends on the conditional state. The formalism allows calculating experimental observables such as the full hierarchy of joint probabilities associated to the time intervals between consecutive photon recording events. These results provide a powerful basis for characterizing different situations arising in single-molecule spectroscopy, such as spectral fluctuations, lifetime fluctuations, and light assisted processes.

  16. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardison, Ross C.

    and knockin techniques17­22 . For these and other reasons, the Human Genome Project (HGP) recognized from its ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from

  17. HumanMouse Gene Identification by Comparative Evidence Integration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovic, Vladimir

    The identification of genes in the human genome remains a challenge, as the actual predictions appear to disagree of genes in the human genome by using a reference, such as mouse genome. However, this comparative genome. In particular, it is not clear whether the mouse is at the correct evolutionary distance from

  18. Magnetic flux jumps in textured Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 A. Nabialek,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    and it was found to be well accounted for by the available theoretical models. The magnetic-field sweep rate and magnetic-field range where flux jumps occur suggesting a relationship between the two. The heat exchange with decreasing magnetic-field sweep rate. De- magnetizing effects are also shown to have a significant influence

  19. Deformation zone `jumps' in a young convergent setting; the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt, New Guinea Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Deformation zone `jumps' in a young convergent setting; the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt, New The Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt in West Papua (Indonesia) has all the characteristics of a young orogen buttress. The construction of these two wedges is younger than 11 Myr. The structures of the Lengguru belt

  20. Abrupt changes in the rate of Andean Plateau uplift from reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion of river profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Abrupt changes in the rate of Andean Plateau uplift from reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo form 19 February 2015 Accepted 21 February 2015 Available online 1 March 2015 Keywords: Andean uplift of surface uplift of the central Andean Plateau provides important boundary conditions for regional

  1. Effect of shockwave-induced density jump on laser plasma interactions in low-pressure ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    and Aerospace Engineering and the Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman significantly reduce laser energy absorbed in the solid plasma. The ionization of the density jump was confirmed , extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) source 3 , and inertial fusion energy (IFE) 4 . During

  2. A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity Derivatives for Jump-Diffusion Processes Based on Continuous Time Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity Derivatives for Jump-Diffusion Processes Based.tompaidis@mccombs.utexas.edu Corresponding author. Tel. 512-4715252, Fax 512-4710587. #12;A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity method for pricing derivatives on electricity prices. The method is based on approximating the generator

  3. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Liane B [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable source of mouse models for human genetic disorders.

  4. Hydraulic jumps on an incline J E A N L U C T H I F F E A U L T1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hydraulic jumps on an incline J E A N ­ L U C T H I F F E A U L T1,2 AND A N D R E W B E L M O N rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its

  5. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  6. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  7. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  8. Detection of single photons by toad and mouse rods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reingruber, J; Pahlberg, J; Woodruff, ML; Sampath, AP; Fain, GL; Holcman, D

    2013-01-01

    variability of the single photon responses of mammalian rodtime (sec) Fig. 4. Single-photon response for WT mouse0.40. (B) Twenty single-photon response simulations (black)

  9. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  10. Airflow-terrain interactions through a mountain gap, with an example of eolian activity beneath an atmospheric hydraulic jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.; Dawson, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    The integration of atmospheric soundings from a fully instrumented aircraft with detailed sedimentary and geomorphic analyses of eolian features in the Ferris dune field of south-central Wyoming lends insight into the manner in which topography interacts with airflow to modify eolian activity. Topographically modified airflow results in zones of airflow deceleration, acceleration, and enhanced atmospheric turbulence, all of which influence the surface morphology and sedimentology. Extreme lateral confluence of prevailing airflow produces accelerated, unidirectional winds. These winds correlate with unusually continuous and elongate parabolic dunes that extend into a mountain gap (Windy Gap). Persistently heightened winds produced at the entrance to Windy Gap have resulted in a concentration of active sand dunes that lack slipfaces. Common development of a strongly amplified atmospheric wave analogous to a hydraulic jump in the gap contributes to the formation of a variety of eolian features that mantle the surface of Windy Gap and the Ferris dune field tail. Heightened, unidirectional winds in this zone promote grain-size segregation, the formation of elongated and aligned sand drifts, climbing and falling dunes, elongate scour streaks, and parabolic dunes that have low-angle (< 20/sup 0/) cross-stratification. Deflation of bedrock and loose sediment has been enhanced in the zone of maximum turbulence beneath the hydraulic jump.

  11. Laser-induced temperature jump/time-resolved infrared study of the fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Williams, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Callender, H.; Gilmanshin, R. [CUNY, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Laser-induced temperature jump followed by time-resolved infrared probe of reaction dynamics are used to study the temporal evolution of polypeptide structure during protein folding and unfolding. Reactions are initiated in times of 50 ps or longer by T-jumps of 10`s of degrees, obtained by laser excitation of water overtone absorbances. Observation of the Amide I transient absorbances reveal melting lifetimes of helices unconstrained by tertiary structure to be ca. 160 ns in a model 21-peptide and ca. 30 ns in {open_quotes}molten globule{close_quotes} apomyoglobin. No other processes are observed in these systems over the timescale 50 ps to 2 ms. Equilibrium data suggest the corresponding helix formation lifetimes to be ca. 16 and 1 ns, respectively. In {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} apomyoglobin two helix melting lifetimes are observed and we infer that a third occurs on a timescale inaccessible to our experiment (> 1 ms). The shorter observed lifetime, as in the molten globule, is ca. 30 ns. The longer lifetime is ca. 70 {mu}s. We suggest that the slower process is helix melting that is rate-limited by the unfolding of tertiary structure. Equilibrium data suggest a lifetime of ca. 1 {mu}s for the development of these tertiary folds.

  12. Probing the mechanism of rubredoxin thermal unfolding in the absence of salt bridges by temperature jump experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriques, Barbara J. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Saraiva, Ligia M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Gomes, Claudio M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)]. E-mail: gomes@itqb.unl.pt

    2005-08-05

    Rubredoxins are the simplest type of iron-sulphur proteins and in recent years they have been used as model systems in protein folding and stability studies, especially the proteins from thermophilic sources. Here, we report our studies on the rubredoxin from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii (T {sub opt} = 85 deg C), which was investigated in respect to its thermal unfolding kinetics by temperature jump experiments. Different spectroscopic probes were used to monitor distinct structural protein features during the thermal transition: the integrity of the iron-sulphur centre was monitored by visible absorption spectroscopy, whereas tertiary structure was followed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and exposure of protein hydrophobic patches was sensed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate fluorescence. The studies were performed at acidic pH conditions in which any stabilising contributions from salt bridges are annulled due to protonation of protein side chain groups. In these conditions, M. jannaschii rubredoxin assumes a native-like, albeit more flexible and open conformation, as indicated by a red shift in the tryptophan emission maximum and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate binding. Temperature jumps were monitored by the three distinct techniques and showed that the protein undergoes thermal denaturation via a simple two step mechanism, as loss of tertiary structure, hydrophobic collapse, and disintegration of the iron-sulphur centre are concomitant processes. The proposed mechanism is framed with the multiphasic one proposed for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, showing that a common thermal unfolding mechanism is not observed between these two closely related thermophilic rubredoxins.

  13. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 9931001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 993­1001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs­flow relationships in mouse lungs and does so via structural remodeling. They also provide important baseline data

  14. MouStress: Detecting Stress from Mouse Motion David Sun1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canny, John

    -hand dynamics that captures mus- cle stiffness during mouse movement. We show that the within-subject mouse interfaces, mouse interaction ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 User Interfaces (H.1.2, I.3.6): Theory and methods, Input devices and strategies INTRODUCTION Stress has a profound impact on the emotional

  15. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Brendan J.

    Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until

  16. Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused://www.jove.com/details.php?id=2690 DOI: 10.3791/2690 Keywords: Medicine, Issue 50, ex-vivo, mouse, lung, pulmonary vascular impedance of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow. J. Vis. Exp. (50), e2690

  17. Taming Wild Behavior: The Input Observer for Obtaining Text Entry and Mouse Pointing Measures from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Taming Wild Behavior: The Input Observer for Obtaining Text Entry and Mouse Pointing Measures from that can run quietly in the background of users' computers and measure their text entry and mouse pointing to segment text entry and mouse pointing input streams into "trials." We are the first to measure errors

  18. Please cite this article in press as: Ashley-Ross, M.A., et al., Jumping sans legs: does elastic energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes? Zoology (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.zool.2013.10.005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibb, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes? Zoology (2013), http sans legs: does elastic energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes Flexion of the vertebral column is a fundamental aspect of locomotor movements in the vast majority

  19. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19

    , providing a convenient animal model that can be investigated without the restrictions necessary to work with the SARS-coronavirus. A reverse genetic cDNA assembly system was developed for the betacoronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHVA59), in 2002...

  20. Acquisition and Mining of the Whole Mouse Brain Microstructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Jae-Rock

    2010-10-12

    data acquisition and analysis framework to overcome these challenges with a focus on data from the C57BL/6 mouse brain. Since there has been no such complete microstructure data from any mammalian species, the sheer amount of data can overwhelm...

  1. Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptordeficient mouse EPRO cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptor­deficient mouse EPRO cells Monika Zwergera of the inner nuclear membrane. Re- cent studies have demonstrated that genetic deficiency of LBR during changes to the expression of nuclear envelope proteins and heterochromatin structure that result from

  2. Investigating the maintenance of the mouse definitive adrenal cortex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-11-29

    Cherry-11B-EGFP ES cells. In conclusion, the location and fate of the adrenocortical progenitor cells were demonstrated by the BrdU pulse-chase studies in different mouse models. An AS-mCherry-11B-EGFP BAC construct was generated, and used to study...

  3. Decoherent time-dependent transport beyond the Landauer-Büttiker formulation: a quantum-drift alternative to quantum jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas J. Fernández-Alcázar; Horacio M. Pastawski

    2015-02-27

    We present a model for decoherence in time-dependent transport. It boils down into a form of wave function that undergoes a smooth stochastic drift of the phase in a local basis, the Quantum Drift (QD) model. This drift is nothing else but a local energy fluctuation. Unlike Quantum Jumps (QJ) models, no jumps are present in the density as the evolution is unitary. As a first application, we address the transport through a resonant state $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ that undergoes decoherence. We show the equivalence with the decoherent steady state transport in presence of a B\\"{u}ttiker's voltage probe. In order to test the dynamics, we consider two many-spin systems whith a local energy fluctuation. A two-spin system is reduced to a two level system (TLS) that oscillates among $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ $\\equiv $ $ \\left\\vert \\uparrow \\downarrow \\right\\rangle $ and $\\left\\vert 1\\right\\rangle \\equiv $ $\\left\\vert \\downarrow \\uparrow \\right\\rangle $. We show that QD model recovers not only the exponential damping of the oscillations in the low perturbation regime, but also the non-trivial bifurcation of the damping rates at a critical point, i.e. the quantum dynamical phase transition. We also address the spin-wave like dynamics of local polarization in a spin chain. The QD average solution has about half the dispersion respect to the mean dynamics than QJ. By evaluating the Loschmidt Echo (LE), we find that the pure states $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ and $\\left\\vert 1\\right \\rangle $ are quite robust against the local decoherence. In contrast, the LE, and hence coherence, decays faster when the system is in a superposition state. Because its simple implementation, the method is well suited to assess decoherent transport problems as well as to include decoherence in both one-body and many-body dynamics.

  4. Xuping Xu and Panos J. Antsaklis, "An Approach to General Switched Linear Quadratic Optimal Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory

  5. Quantum jump mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Samarin

    2015-05-10

    The change with time of the system consisting of the quantum object and the macroscopic measuring instrument is described on the base of the uniform dynamic law, which is suitable both evolution and reduction processes description. It is the integral wave equation with kernel in the form of a path integral. It is shown, that wave function collapse is the specific transformation which is fundamentally differ from Shr\\"odinger's evolution. Specifically, a formal cause of the collapse is a local time derivative (infinite large) of the potential energy. Such transformation can not be described using mathematical apparatus of conventional quantum mechanics.

  6. Multi-jump magnetic switching in ion-beam sputtered amorphous Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raju, M.; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, D. K.

    2013-08-07

    Unconventional multi-jump magnetization reversal and significant in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) in the ion-beam sputtered amorphous Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20}(5–75 nm) thin films grown on Si/amorphous SiO{sub 2} are reported. While such multi-jump behavior is observed in CoFeB(10 nm) film when the magnetic field is applied at 10°–20° away from the easy-axis, the same is observed in CoFeB(12.5 nm) film when the magnetic field is 45°–55° away from easy-axis. Unlike the previous reports of multi-jump switching in epitaxial films, their observance in the present case of amorphous CoFeB is remarkable. This multi-jump switching is found to disappear when the films are crystallized by annealing at 420 °C. The deposition geometry and the energy of the sputtered species appear to intrinsically induce a kind of bond orientation anisotropy in the films, which leads to the UMA in the as-grown amorphous CoFeB films. Exploitation of such multi-jump switching in amorphous CoFeB thin films could be of technological significance because of their applications in spintronic devices.

  7. Strong pressure-energy correlations in liquids as a configuration space property: Simulations of temperature down jumps and crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Schroder; Ulf R. Pedersen; Nicoletta Gnan; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2009-03-03

    Computer simulations recently revealed that several liquids exhibit strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble [U. R. Pedersen {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 100}, 015701 (2008)]. In order to investigate whether these correlations are present also far from equilibrium constant-volume aging following a temperature down jump from equilibrium was simulated for two strongly correlating liquids, an asymmetric dumbbell model and Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP, as well as for SPC water that is not strongly correlating. For the two strongly correlating liquids virial and potential energy follow each other closely during the aging towards equilibrium. For SPC water, on the other hand, virial and potential energy vary with little correlation as the system ages towards equilibrium. Further proof that strong pressure-energy correlations express a configuration space property comes from monitoring pressure and energy during the crystallization (reported here for the first time) of supercooled Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP at constant temperature.

  8. Modeling Proton Jumps in HY Zeolite: Effects of Acid Site Heterogeneity Usha Viswanathan, Justin T. Fermann, Leanna K. Toy, Scott M. Auerbach,*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Modeling Proton Jumps in HY Zeolite: Effects of Acid Site Heterogeneity Usha Viswanathan, Justin T; In Final Form: September 21, 2007 We have computed the total mean rate coefficient for proton transfer in bare H-Y zeolite, for comparison with NMR experiments and previous calculations. We computed proton

  9. Jump start your career with an MS degree at Northwestern, with an emphasis in energy and sustainability. This program is for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    to move into the increasingly critical energy/sustainability field. Dedicated, intensive and handsEfficientTechnology)* ME499ProjectsInEnergySystemsandSustainability* Contact Dr.Manohar Kulkarni, Assistant ChairJump start your career with an MS degree at Northwestern, with an emphasis in energy

  10. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Mariateresa, E-mail: mariateresa.mancuso@enea.it [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Leonardi, Simona [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela [Department of Radiation Physics, Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Tanori, Mirella [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); De Stefano, Ilaria [Department of Radiation Physics, Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Casciati, Arianna [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Naus, Christian C. [Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, The Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/?}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/?} and Cx43{sup +/?} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/?} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  11. Expression of esterase-2 in developing mouse embryos and neonates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deal, Frank Hans

    1981-01-01

    locus on mouse chromosome 8 was examined in developing embryos and neonates. A genetically defined congenic strain (B6'SK-R) was developed by directed selection of the Es-2a (null) allele from SK/Cam in'breds onto a C57BL/- 6J background for use... as maternal invironments in which the gene product can be assayed. The esterase-2 gene product (ES-2) was purified by means of isoelectric foc- using and gel filtration of C57BL/6J kidney homogenates. Purified ES-2 was used to elicit antisera from New...

  12. Comparative genome mapping of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) reveals greater similarity to rat (Rattus norvegicus) than to the lab mouse (Mus musculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsdell, Clifton M; Lewandowski, Adrienne A; Glenn, Julie Weston; Vrana, Paul B; O'Neill, Rachel J; Dewey, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The comprehensive mouse radiation hybrid map densely cross-link- age and radiation hybrid cell maps) [2]. As a result,radiation http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/8/65 hybrid maps

  13. POSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    -imaged mouse based only on the atlas data and the measured surface topography of the iPOSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA A. A Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, 2 Department of Biomedical

  14. RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Tao

    RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain by Tao Ju A Thesis Submitted in Partial, Texas April, 2005 #12;Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain Tao Ju Abstract Building and studying 3D representations of anatomical structures, such as the brain, plays an important role in modern biology and medical

  15. Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using a more complete understanding of the relationship of lung structure and function. We combined a special to separate individual acini in the mouse lung. Interior scans of the parenchyma at a resolution of 2 µm

  16. Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1 Edward P heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment. J Appl Physiol 97: 204­212, 2004. First to characterize heterogeneity of tissue elasticity of the lung. The model includes a parallel set of pathways

  17. Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

  18. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  19. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 µm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm-1 as the IR probe. The results

  20. Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis quantitate metastatic mouse lung tumors in a lung section using a H&E stain. Lung sections from a mouse lung of view from each slide representing a whole lung lobe with multiple lung metastases was selected

  1. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplication

  2. New Meadows Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio: EnergyHavenInformationMarket,

  3. Grand Meadow Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma EnergyGoogle lendsCoulee Transmission

  4. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queriesWindSite AnalysisDivision ofDixie

  5. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queriesWindSite AnalysisDivision

  6. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  7. Hoplopleura janzeni n. sp. (Phthiraptera: Anoplura), a new sucking louse from a Central American swimming mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durden, Lance A.; Timm, Robert M.

    2001-12-01

    Both sexes of a new species of sucking louse Hoplopleura janzeni (Phthiraptera: Hoplopleuridae) are described and illustrated from the Central American ichthyomyine swimming mouse Rheomys raptor (Rodentia: Muridae) collected ...

  8. Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPage, Michel J.

    The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

  9. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain Ken Sugino1,3, Chris M among forebrain neurons and permit the construction of an objective neuronal taxonomy on the basis

  10. Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Alyssa

    2013-02-04

    ABSTRACT Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells. (December 2013) Alyssa Crocker Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Golding Department of Veterinary Physiology...

  11. Mixed random walks with a trap in scale-free networks including nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Sheng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    Random walks including non-nearest-neighbor jumps appear in many real situations such as the diffusion of adatoms and have found numerous applications including PageRank search algorithm, however, related theoretical results are much less for this dynamical process. In this paper, we present a study of mixed random walks in a family of fractal scale-free networks, where both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps are included. We focus on trapping problem in the network family, which is a particular case of random walks with a perfect trap fixed at the central high-degree node. We derive analytical expressions for the average trapping time (ATT), a quantitative indicator measuring the efficiency of the trapping process, by using two different methods, the results of which are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we analytically determine all the eigenvalues and their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix characterizing the dynamical process. Our results show that although next-nearest-neighb...

  12. GBR 12909 administration as a mouse model of bipolar disorder mania: mimicking quantitative assessment of manic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Jared W.; Goey, Andrew K.; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    INVESTIGATION GBR 12909 administration as a mouse model ofstudies, acute administration of 2.5 mg/kg amphetamine toet al. 2009). Acute administration of the DAT selective

  13. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Lei, E-mail: yhchloech@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  14. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces ...

  15. Artificial leaf jumps developmental hurdle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2- toArthur J. NozikSeptember

  16. Laser-Assisted In Vitro Fertilization Facilitates Fertilization of Vitrified-Warmed C57BL/6 Mouse Oocytes with Fresh and Frozen-Thawed Spermatozoa, Producing Live Pups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Stephanie E.

    The utility of cryopreserved mouse gametes for reproduction of transgenic mice depends on development of assisted reproductive technologies, including vitrification of unfertilized mouse oocytes. Due to hardening of the ...

  17. Frictional lichenified dermatosis from prolonged use of a computer mouse: Case report and review of the literature of computer-related dermatoses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghasri, Pedram; Feldman, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The patient used the computer mouse with her right hand in aon her right palm after using her computer mouse 6 hours perof the right hand of a 32-year-old computer programmer who

  18. 388 nature genetics volume 22 august 1999 A YAC-based physical map of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguski, Mark S.

    goals of the Human Genome Project1. Here we report the results of a project at the Whitehead Institute of approximately 92% of the mouse genome. We also report the results of a project at the MRC UK Mouse Genome Centre assembling a physical map of the human genome3. The STSs used for screening came from several sources: simple

  19. Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, David D.

    Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye Kwan Jeong, Leilei Peng, John J. Turek, Michael R. Melloch, and David D. Nolte Fourier-domain holography (FDH) has the hologram in the Fourier plane significantly reduces background arising from reference light scattered from

  20. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  1. Characterization of Urinary Iron Loss in the fsn (flaky skin) Anemia Mouse Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kress, Robert Lee

    2014-08-31

    target to treat iron overload. The flaky–skin anemia (fsn) mouse possesses a mutation in the Ttc7 gene (tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7) and had been observed to excrete elevated iron levels in its urine. We hypothesized that the mutation in fsn...

  2. A Lentiviral RNAi Library for Human and Mouse Genes Applied to an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - able libraries of synthetic siRNAs targeting defined gene families have identified mResource A Lentiviral RNAi Library for Human and Mouse Genes Applied to an Arrayed Viral High short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries targeting the human and murine ge- nomes. The libraries currently

  3. Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance of Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has important roles in supporting the proliferation and/or survival) of the adult mouse forebrain. Retroviral overexpression of Sox6 in NSPCs increases the number of primary

  4. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  5. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2008-12-12

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  6. THE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL-COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    , FL 32306-4295, USA Abstract--Many species use chemical signals to convey in- formation relevantTHE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL chemical signals may be detected by the vomeronasal organ, which sends projections to the accessory

  7. Distinct impacts of Eda and Edar loss of function on the mouse dentition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Cyril; Pantalacci, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Headon, D; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The Eda-A1-Edar signaling pathway is involved in the development of organs with an ectodermal origin, including teeth. In mouse, mutants are known for both the ligand, Eda-A1 (Tabby), and the receptor, Edar (Downless). The ...

  8. Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural crest by the Editorial Board September 5, 2008 (received for review June 2, 2008) Disrupted ERK1/2 (MAPK3/MAPK1) MAPK signaling has been as- sociated with several developmental syndromes in humans; how- ever, mutations in ERK1

  9. Erk1 and Erk2 Regulate Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Migration during Mouse Embryonic Angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erk1 and Erk2 Regulate Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Migration during Mouse Embryonic membrane with subsequent migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. The Ras/ Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is required for EC function during angiogenesis. Although in vitro studies implicate ERK1 and ERK2

  10. Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Desmond J.

    Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease model of Parkinson's disease (PD) had been induced by methamphetamine. Quality-control analyses obscure (Owen et al. 2000). These diseases frequently have important genetic contributions, but it has

  11. A test for detecting long-term sensorimotor dysfunction in the mouse after focal cerebral ischemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schallert, Tim

    A test for detecting long-term sensorimotor dysfunction in the mouse after focal cerebral ischemia, therefore, developed a sensorimotor functional test (corner test) and applied this test to a model of focal after ischemia. The corner test, which is sensitive to chronic sensorimotor and postural symmetries

  12. JAP-00590-2004 Mechanics, nonlinearity, and failure strength of lung tissue in a mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    JAP-00590-2004 Mechanics, nonlinearity, and failure strength of lung tissue in a mouse model% higher in the PPE-treated group (P lung hydroxyproline content, which represents remodeling may play a significant role in all aspects of lung functional changes leading to progressive

  13. Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue

  14. Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell Tryptases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell an 150-kDa tetramer structure. Heparin was not required for this structural change. When incubated at 37 of this tryptase to form the enzymati- cally active tetramer was more dependent on a highly conserved Trp

  15. Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

  16. Increase in Sialylation and Branching in the Mouse Serum N-glycome Correlates with Inflammation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dublin, Ireland Abstract Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer and is often diagnosed, the described changes in the ovarian cancer mouse model are relevant to humans and serum N-glycome analysis Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in females and the second most common gynaecological cancer

  17. Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia, University of British Columbia · Laboratory rodents are commonly euthanized by exposure to carbon dioxide (CO Carly Moody, Beverly Chua, I. Joanna Makowska, Daniel M. Weary Faculty of Land and Food Systems

  18. Novel Sequential Protocols for a ERP Based BCI Mouse M. Salvaris, C. Cinel and R. Poli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poli, Riccardo

    Novel Sequential Protocols for a ERP Based BCI Mouse M. Salvaris, C. Cinel and R. Poli Abstract of this has been focused on trying to overcome observed irregularities in ERP classification due to temporal300 event-related potential (ERP). The P300 ERP has a centro-parietal focus and typically occurs

  19. Automouse: An improvement to the mouse computerized uncertainty analysis system operational manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klee, A.J.

    1992-08-01

    Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible for planning, implementing, and managing research development, and demonstration programs to provide an authoritative, defensible engineering basis in support of the policies, programs, and regulations of the EPA with respect to drinking water, wastewater, pesticides, toxic substances, solid and hazardous wastes, and Superfund-related activities. The publication is one of the products of that research and provides a vital communication link between the researcher and the user community. The manual describes a system, called MOUSE (for Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm), for dealing with the computational problems of uncertainty, specifically in models that consist of a set of one or more equations. Since such models are frequently encountered in the fields of environmental science, risk analysis, economics, and engineering, the system has broad application throughout these fields. An important part of the MOUSE system is AutoMOUSE which actually writes the computer programs required for the uncertainty analysis computations. Thus, no prior programming knowledge is needed to learn or use MOUSE and, because of its transportability and compactness, the system can be run on a wide variety of personal computers available to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and/or its contractors and grantees.

  20. Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes

  1. Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Jeffrey A.

    Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L May 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: MnSOD Superoxide dismutase Resveratrol Antioxidant enzyme Brain Heart Liver Mitochondria Reactive oxygen species a b s t r a c t trans-Resveratrol (3,40 ,5

  2. Mapping of the NEP receptor tyrosine kinase gene to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Sweetser, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) NEP, also called Ptk-3, is widely expressed, with high levels in proliferating neuroepithelia of mouse embryos. The recently described human discoidin domain receptor (DDR) has a predicted amino acid sequence 93% identical to that of murine NEP and may be its human homologue. We have mapped the gene encoding NEP in human and mouse by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a mouse cDNA probe. The NEP/Nep gene maps to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C, respectively. This places the NEP/Nep gene at, or near, the major histocompatibility (MHC) locus-HLA in human and H2 in mouse, respectively. Based on its pattern of expression during development, NEP and Nep represent candidate genes for several MHC-linked developmental abnormalities in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Physical and genetic localization of the gene encoding the AP-2 transcription factor to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, G. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Gordon, M.; Siracusa, L.D. [Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others] [Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    1996-01-15

    Transcription factors are a major determinant of developmental fate. The chromosomal localization of the genes encoding these proteins provides important information that can link them to known genetic abnormalities. Here, we report the mapping of the mouse gene for transcription factor AP-2, a protein that has been implicated in human oncogenesis. Using FISH, we have mapped the gene encoding the transcription factor AP-2, Tcfap2, to mouse Chromosome 13A5-B1. We have also extended this analysis by placing Tcfap2 on the mouse mutations that map in the vicinity of this transcription factor. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Rapid Structural Remodeling of Thalamocortical Synapses Parallels Experience-Dependent Functional Plasticity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Jason E.

    Monocular lid closure (MC) causes a profound shift in the ocular dominance (OD) of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). Anatomical studies in both cat and mouse V1 suggest that large-scale structural rearrangements of ...

  5. Induction of chloride secretory currents across mouse ileal tissues by rotavirus enterotoxic peptide in different age mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Virginia Waters

    2002-01-01

    ) is enterotoxic and induces a chloride efflux across neonatal mouse intestinal mucosa. Chloride ion efflux across mucosal tissue is measured as an electrical current in Ussing chambers and is the predominant electrolyte driving fluid secretion. Until recently a...

  6. The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

  7. Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

  8. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  9. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  10. A self-reconfiguring metamorphic nanoinjector for injection into mouse zygotes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aten, Quentin T. [Nexus Spine, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84124 (United States)] [Nexus Spine, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84124 (United States); Jensen, Brian D.; Howell, Larry L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Burnett, Sandra H. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents a surface-micromachined microelectromechanical system nanoinjector designed to inject DNA into mouse zygotes which are ?90??m in diameter. The proposed injection method requires that an electrically charged, DNA coated lance be inserted into the mouse zygote. The nanoinjector's principal design requirements are (1) it must penetrate the lance into the mouse zygote without tearing the cell membranes and (2) maintain electrical connectivity between the lance and a stationary bond pad. These requirements are satisfied through a two-phase, self-reconfiguring metamorphic mechanism. In the first motion subphase a change-point six-bar mechanism elevates the lance to ?45??m above the substrate. In the second motion subphase, a compliant folded-beam suspension allows the lance to translate in-plane at a constant height as it penetrates the cell membranes. The viability of embryos following nanoinjection is presented as a metric for quantifying how well the nanoinjector mechanism fulfills its design requirements of penetrating the zygote without causing membrane damage. Viability studies of nearly 3000 nanoinjections resulted in 71.9% of nanoinjected zygotes progressing to the two-cell stage compared to 79.6% of untreated embryos.

  11. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Marek [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Knight, Julia [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Mao-Draayer, Yang, E-mail: yang.mao-draayer@vtmednet.org [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  12. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintas

  13. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  14. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  15. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhoorn, Sander [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Jaarsma, Dick [Erasmus Univ. Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Neuroscience.; Vermeij, Wilbert P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Tresini, Maria [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Weymaere, Michael [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Menoni, Hervé [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Brandt, Renata M. C. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; de Waard, Monique C. [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Intensive Care.; Botter, Sander M. [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Sarker, Altaf H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Cooper, Priscilla K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics and Dept. of Vascular Surgery.; Niedernhofer, Laura J. [The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  16. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore »progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  17. Pointright: a system to redirect mouse and keyboard control among multiple machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, Bradley E. (Palo Alto, CA); Winograd, Terry A. (Stanford, CA); Hutchins, Gregory M. (Mountain View, CA)

    2008-09-30

    The present invention provides a software system, PointRight, that allows for smooth and effortless control of pointing and input devices among multiple displays. With PointRight, a single free-floating mouse and keyboard can be used to control multiple screens. When the cursor reaches the edge of a screen it seamlessly moves to the adjacent screen and keyboard control is simultaneously redirected to the appropriate machine. Laptops may also redirect their keyboard and pointing device, and multiple pointers are supported simultaneously. The system automatically reconfigures itself as displays go on, go off, or change the machine they display.

  18. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintas EnergyRAPID/About/FAQ

  19. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Hou, Lichao [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  20. Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G.; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2011-01-15

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

  1. Natural history and karyology of the Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genoways, Hugh H.; Timm, Robert M.; Engstrom, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen specimens of the rare Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti, are now known from Belize, Guatemala, and the Mexican states of Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Yucatán. We herein report a second specimen of O. hatti, from Belize, extending the known geographic range of the species 95 km to the southeast in the country. This is the first location at which O. hatti has been taken sympatrically with the Central American vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti. We also report data on three additional specimens of O. hatti from Campeche. Nyctomys and Otonyctomys share similar habits and habitat requirements, and might compete where they overlap. However, the distribution of O. hatti corresponds closely to that of other Yucatán endemics, and the distinct distributions of the two genera probably reflects biogeographic history and different habitat requirements, rather than result from direct competition. The karyotype of O. hatti is 2n = 50, FN = 58. Although superficially similar, it differs in important respects with the karyotypes reported for N. sumichrasti....Resumen--Diescisiete especímenes del ratón Otonyctomys hatti, especie rara de Yucatán, son ahora conocidos de Belice, Guatemala y los Estados de Campeche, Quintana Roo y Yucatán. Aquí, informamos de un segundo especímen de O. hatti de Belice...

  2. Mating system of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Xuhua

    in single litters conceived in the wild early in the breeding season. The proportion of litters sired breeding males are similar in age and size, resulting in small variation in competitive ability among males. This reduced variation in competitive ability reduces the possibility that some males defend several females

  3. Polymictic pool behavior in a montane meadow, Sierra Nevada, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Ryan Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    33. Depth (m) Temperature ( C) Pool Fluent Figure C-62—1994. Thermally stratified pools and their use by steelheadstratification within stream pools as a mechanism to provide

  4. Polymictic pool behavior in a montane meadow, Sierra Nevada, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Ryan Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    stratification. While solar energy, stream flow, and theenergy source available for heating up the stream and poolenergy, organic matter, and nutrients (Kattelmann and Embury, 1996). We set out to study stream

  5. Polymictic pool behavior in a montane meadow, Sierra Nevada, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Ryan Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    the onset of thermal stratification in shallow inland2007. Assessment of thermal stratification within streamTHE BUOYANT FORCES OF THERMAL STRATIFICATION. SOLAR LOADING

  6. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    remote outpost is not served by the electric utility grid and previously relied on a propane generator as the only source of power. 60516.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  7. Truckee Meadows Community College and Colorado School of Mines...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    School of Mines in Denver, Colorado-demonstrated exceptional rigor in their research and useful interpretation of technical geothermal concepts. Geothermal energy is an important...

  8. JLab Meadows Offer Environmental Benefits and Beauty | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Benefits and Beauty Just two years after Facilities Management and Logistics staff proposed seeding about 6.5 acres of the Jefferson Lab campus with wildflowers,...

  9. Polymictic pool behavior in a montane meadow, Sierra Nevada, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Ryan Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    33 PLOTTED WITH NET SOLAR RADIATION AND AIR TEMPERATURES FOR33 PLOTTED WITH NET SOLAR RADIATION AND AIR TEMPERATURE FORattenuation of incoming solar radiation and be a significant

  10. Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: EnergyLebanonTexas: Energy Resources

  11. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Departmentof5.4.407.Cascade reactionsUsing anCase Study:

  12. Meadow Town Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindII

  13. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCarib Energy (USA)civilEnergy Watertime |Yellowstone National

  14. Truckee Meadows Community College and Colorado School of Mines Win

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 Timeline of

  15. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Mouse CD4+ T Cell Activation by Modifying the Lipid Bilayer Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Tim Yu-Tien

    2014-12-05

    phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], which modulates actin remodeling, is perturbed by n-3 PUFA. Utilizing the transgenic Fat-1 mouse model that synthesizes n-3 PUFA de novo and enriches the plasma membrane with n-3 PUFA, and wild type (WT) mice fed...

  16. Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents the review of this article. Abstract--Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is a disease of the lung vasculature that is usually quantified by pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). However, a more complete description of lung

  17. Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    in the heart A. M. BRONIKOWSKI,1,7 P. A. CARTER,2 T. J. MORGAN,2 T. GARLAND, JR.,3 N. UNG,1 T. D. PUGH,4 R voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol changes that normally occur in the aging heart. Male mice (Mus domesticus) were sampled from the 16th

  18. Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Emily M.

    2010-07-14

    Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. Human disorders that arise...

  19. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for developmental closure of the ductus venosus in the neonatal mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    venosus in the neonatal mouse Authors: Garet P. Lahvis, Robert W. Pyzalski, Edward Glover, Henry C. Pitot: computerized tomography MR: magnetic resonance VEGF: vascular endothelial growth factor DA: ductus arteriosus of an embryonic structure and is not acquired after birth. We observed that the shunt is found in late stage wild-type

  20. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references.

  1. A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hubler, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

  2. Visualization of nitric oxide production in the mouse main olfactory bulb by a cell-trappable copper(II) fluorescent probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, Lindsey E.

    We report the visualization of NO production using fluorescence in tissue slices of the mouse main olfactory bulb. This discovery was possible through the use of a novel, cell-trappable probe for intracellular nitric oxide ...

  3. Human Neural Stem Cells Differentiate and Promote Locomotor Recovery in an Early Chronic Spinal coRd Injury NOD-scid Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Desiree L.; Uchida, Nobuko; Hamers, Frank T.; Cummings, Brian J.; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Spinal coRd Injury NOD-scid Mouse Model Desire´e L.in C57BL/6, BUB/ BnJ, and NOD-SCID mice after contusionresistant control strain for NOD mice. Diabetes 41: 60.

  4. A Novel Role of the WNT-Dishevelled-GSK3? Signaling Cascade in the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens in a Social Defeat Model of Depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Matthew B.

    Based on earlier gene expression and chromatin array data, we identified the protein, dishevelled (DVL)-2, as being regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain reward region, in the mouse social defeat model of ...

  5. The genomic and genetic basis of mammalian sexual reproduction : sequence of the mouse Y chromosome, and a gene regulatory program for meiotic prophase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, Ying Qi Shirleen

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sexual reproduction requires sexual determination, sexual differentiation, and the production of haploid gametes. In this thesis, I examined the genomic evolution of the mouse Y chromosome, which instructs sexual ...

  6. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links to Neurodegenerative Colette A. Sacksteder,, Wei-Jun Qian,,| Tatyana V. Knyushko, Haixing Wang,| Mark H. Chin, Goran Lacan,@

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Desmond J.

    proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or otherEndogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links to Neurodegenerative Disease Colette A Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, and Department of Human Genetics and Department of Molecular

  7. Chromosomal mapping of the human and mouse homologues of two new members of the AP-2 family of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, J.A.; Sheer, D. [ICRF, London (United Kingdom)] [ICRF, London (United Kingdom); Bosher, J.M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Longon (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Hammersmith Hospital, Longon (United Kingdom); and others

    1996-07-01

    The AP-2 transcription factor has been shown to play an important role in the development of tissues of ectodermal origin and has also been implicated in mammary oncogenesis. It has recently been found that AP-2 is encoded by a family of related genes, AP-2{alpha}, AP-2{beta}, and AP-2{gamma}. As a further step in understanding the role of each of these genes has in development, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the chromosomal locations of the mouse and human homologues of the newly isolated AP-2{beta} and AP-2{gamma} genes. Tcfap2b and Tcfap2c map to mouse chromosomes 1A2-4 and 2H3-4, respectively, while TFAP2B and TFAP2C map to human chromosomes 6p12 and 20q13.2, the later being a region that is frequently amplified in breast carcinoma. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Keisha M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5}) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24 hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1 hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1 ± 3.2 pg/mL to 83.9 ± 12.2 pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1 hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4 ± 7.6 pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1 hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5–1 hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure. -- Highlights: ? We studied very early events (0.5–1 hour) after giving wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} to mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly kills lung macrophages in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits oxidative stress in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits Clara cell CCSP secretion in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits TNF-? secretion into BALF in mice.

  9. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Jablons, David M.; Li, Hui; You, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore »in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of ?-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and ?-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  10. Construction plans jump; operations skid in 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1997-08-04

    Federally regulated oil and gas pipelines turned in mixed performances in 1996, a review of annual reports filed with the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) shows. Plans for new pipeline construction, filed with both the FERC and Canadian regulatory bodies, increased during a 12-month period ending June 30, 1997. Natural-gas pipeline operating companies increased their operating revenues but saw their incomes fall; oil pipelines saw both revenues and incomes fall sharply as deliveries were flat. Major natural-gas pipelines slightly increased the amounts of gas they moved for a fee and decreased gas sold out of their systems. In 1996, liquids pipelines moved fewer barrels than a year earlier and reduced in all categories the miles of line operated. Each year in this exclusive report, Oil and Gas Journal tracks revenues and incomes earned from operations along with volumes moved, as submitted to the FERC by US regulated interstate pipeline companies. Data are presented on the following: pipeline revenues, incomes--1996; North American pipeline-construction costs; US pipeline costs--estimated vs. actual; North American compressor construction costs; US compressor costs--estimated vs. actual; Canadian pipeline-construction costs, actual; US interstate mileage; investment in liquids pipelines; 10 years of land-construction costs; top 10 interstate liquids lines; top 10 interstate gas lines; liquids pipeline companies; and gas pipeline companies.

  11. Activation of a c-K-ras oncogene by somatic mutation in mouse lymphomas induced by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, I.; Villasante, A.; Corces, V.; Pellicer, A.

    1984-09-14

    Mouse tumors induced by gamma radiation are a useful model system for oncogenesis. DNA from such tumors contains an activated K-ras oncogene that can transform NIH 3T3 cells. This report describes the cloning of a fragment of the mouse K-ras oncogene containing the first exon from both a transformant in rat-2 cells and the brain of the same mouse that developed the tumor. Hybrid constructs containing one of the two pieces were made and only the plasmid including the first exon from the transformant gave rise to foci in NIH 3T3 cells. There was only a single base difference (G----A) in the exonic sequence, which changed glycine to aspartic acid in the transformant. By use of a synthetic oligonucleotide the presence of the mutation was demonstrated in the original tumor, ruling out modifications during DNA-mediated gene transfer and indicating that the alteration was present in the thymic lymphoma but absent from other nonmalignant tissue. The results are compatible with gamma radiation being a source of point mutations.

  12. Studies on glycoproteins produced by wild type and wheat germ agglutinin-resistant B16 mouse melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnaduwage, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two variants of B16 mouse melanoma cells have been selected in serum-free medium for their resistance to toxic levels of wheat germ agglutinin isolation 1 (WGA). Chromosome analysis and characteristic melanin production showed that the variants are derived from the parent mouse melanoma cell lines. However, the two variants were less tumorigenic in mice compared to the parent B16 mouse melanoma cells. The variants showed a marked decrease in cell agglutination with WGA. Cell agglutination with recin and peanut lectin was not different between the three cell lines, but the two variants showed a slight increase in agglutination with concanavalin A. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin to the two variant cells was reduced compared to that of the parent cell. Glycoproteins secreted or shed by the three lines were isolated after growth in serum-free medium in the presence of (/sup 3/He)glucosamine and bovine serum albumin (1%). These metabolically labeled products were fractionated on the basis of their interaction with WGA-Sepharose (2 mg/ml). The WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatographic data suggested a decrease in WGA-binding glycoprotein(s) secreted to the medium by the two variants. The WGA-bound glycoproteins from the two variants upon SDS-PAGE revealed three bands of approximate molecular weights, 92,000, 56,000, and 42,000, none of which were present in the parent cell line (50,000 molecular weight).

  13. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  14. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo, E-mail: jbyue@me.com

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ?Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ?Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ?B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required for LIF-induced sustained ERK activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required the survival and proliferation of mES cells.

  15. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. • No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. • Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  16. Methoxychlor reduces estradiol levels by altering steroidogenesis and metabolism in mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbasava2@illinois.edu; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel, E-mail: mihernandez@cinvestav.mx; Paulose, Tessie, E-mail: tessie@illinois.edu; Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: tleslie2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2011-06-15

    The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor that affects adult rodent females by causing reduced fertility, persistent estrus, and ovarian atrophy. Since MXC is also known to target antral follicles, the major producer of sex steroids in the ovary, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that MXC decreases estradiol (E{sub 2}) levels by altering steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in the antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mouse ovaries and cultured with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or MXC. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h for 96 h. In addition, sex steroid hormone levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes as well as the E{sub 2} metabolic enzyme Cyp1b1 were measured using qPCR. The results indicate that MXC decreased E{sub 2}, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone (P{sub 4}) levels compared to DMSO. In addition, MXC decreased expression of aromatase (Cyp19a1), 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd17b1), 17{alpha}-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), 3{beta} hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1), cholesterol side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1), steroid acute regulatory protein (Star), and increased expression of Cyp1b1 enzyme levels. Thus, these data suggest that MXC decreases steroidogenic enzyme levels, increases metabolic enzyme expression and this in turn leads to decreased sex steroid hormone levels. - Highlights: > MXC inhibits steroidogenesis > MXC inhibits steroidogenic enzymes > MXC induces metabolic enzymes

  17. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ? (C/EBP?) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBP? and PPAR?. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBP? and C/EBP? was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  18. Pharmacological and rAAV Gene Therapy Rescue of Visual Functions in a Blind Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batten, Matthew L.; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Tu, Daniel C.; Doan, Thuy; Zhu, Li; Pang, Jijing; Glushakova, Lyudmila; Moise, Alexander R.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Hauswirth, William W.; Rieke, Fred; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-11-01

    [20]. Whole mouse livers were removed from Lrat?/? mice after eye removal during the above experiments. Livers were weighed and then frozen in liquid N2. Frozen livers were transferred to a 15-ml glass centrifuge tube (Corex #8441 [Corning Life... of homogenate was transferred to an 8-ml glass tube on ice, and 1 ml of ice-cold ethanol and 5 ll of 5 M NaOH were added and vortexed. Finally, 4 ml of ice- cold hexane was added, and the mixture was vortexed and centrifuged for 5 min using a Beckman J2-HS...

  19. One Jump Ahead: Interspecies Interations and Distribution of Jumping Spiders on Mo'orea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Danielle L

    2009-01-01

    Unlike continents, an island system such as Mo’orea oftenflora and fauna. In island systems, these relationships can

  20. Cell Detection in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy Images of Nissl-stained Mouse and Rat Brain Samples Using Random Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal Das, Shashwat

    2014-11-26

    of images, use heuristics that are time consuming to develop, or do not generalize well to three dimensional data. In this thesis, I propose two methods based on random forests for detecting neuron bodies in the rat and mouse brain KESM data. The proposed...

  1. 4-D Micro-CT of the Mouse Heart Cristian T. Badea, Boma Fubara, Laurence W. Hedlund, and G. Allan Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the origin, progression, and treatment of the disease--the leading cause of death in the United States [1 high photon fluence rate and integrated motion control. Materials and Methods: Simul- taneous cardiac] and a major cause of death worldwide [2]. The mouse is a commonly studied animal for such research because

  2. DownloadedBy:[informainternalusers]At:09:176November2007 Changes in expression of P2X7 receptors in NOD mouse pancreas during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    in NOD mouse pancreas during the development of diabetes ROBSON COUTINHO-SILVA1,2 , TIM ROBSON1 , PHILIP This study examined the expression of P2X7 receptors in pancreatic islets of the non-obese diabetic (NOD examined P2X7 receptor expression in normal and diabetic spleens using flow cytometry. In non-diabetic NOD

  3. The Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse Chromosome 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    The Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse- phrosis in developing mice exposed to the pollutant 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin). Administration of 64 g/kg dioxin to C57BL/6J (B6) dams at embryonic day 9 (E9) led to palatal clefting

  4. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  5. Suppression of somatic expansion delays the onset of pathophysiology in a mouse model of Huntington’s Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Budworth, Helen; Harris, Faye R.; Williams, Paul; Lee, Do Yup; Holt, Amy; Pahnke, Jens; Szczesny, Bartosz; Acevedo-Torres, Karina; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; McMurray, Cynthia T.; et al

    2015-08-06

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. The inherited disease allele expresses a toxic protein, and whether further somatic expansion adds to toxicity is unknown. We have created an HD mouse model that resolves the effects of the inherited and somatic expansions. We show here that suppressing somatic expansion substantially delays the onset of disease in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor, XJB-5-131, inhibits the lengthening of the repeat tracks, and correlates with rescue of motormore »decline in these animals. The results provide evidence that pharmacological approaches to offset disease progression are possible.« less

  6. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerecke, Donald R. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), a Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Tong Weida [US FDA, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AK (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Georgopoulos, Panos G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  7. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol, E-mail: naratt@narattsys.com [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  8. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ? mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ? CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ? Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ? Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  9. Dioxin exposure reduces the steroidogenic capacity of mouse antral follicles mainly at the level of HSD17B1 without altering atresia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N., E-mail: bklement@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbshivapur@gmail.com; Hannon, Patrick, E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent ovarian toxicant. Previously, we demonstrated that in vitro TCDD (1 nM) exposure decreases production/secretion of the sex steroid hormones progesterone (P4), androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T), and 17?-estradiol (E2) in mouse antral follicles. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TCDD inhibits steroidogenesis. Specifically, we examined the effects of TCDD on the steroidogenic enzymes, atresia, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) protein. TCDD exposure for 48 h increased levels of A4, without changing HSD3B1 protein, HSD17B1 protein, estrone (E1), T or E2 levels. Further, TCDD did not alter atresia ratings compared to vehicle at 48 h. TCDD, however, did down regulate the AHR protein at 48 h. TCDD exposure for 96 h decreased transcript levels for Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, Hsd17b1, and Cyp19a1, but increased Hsd3b1 transcript. TCDD exposure particularly lowered both Hsd17b1 transcript and HSD17B1 protein. However, TCDD exposure did not affect levels of E1 in the media nor atresia ratings at 96 h. TCDD, however, decreased levels of the proapoptotic factor Bax. Collectively, these data suggest that TCDD exposure causes a major block in the steroidogenic enzyme conversion of A4 to T and E1 to E2 and that it regulates apoptotic pathways, favoring survival over death in antral follicles. Finally, the down?regulation of the AHR protein in TCDD exposed follicles persisted at 96 h, indicating that the activation and proteasomal degradation of this receptor likely plays a central role in the impaired steroidogenic capacity and altered apoptotic pathway of exposed antral follicles. -- Highlights: ? TCDD disrupts steroidogenic enzymes in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD particularly affects the HSD17B1 enzyme in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD does not affect atresia ratings in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD decreases levels of the proapoptitic factor Bax in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD down regulates the AHR protein in mouse antral follicles.

  10. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  11. Glomerular-specific imprinting of the mouse Gs{alpha} gene: How does this relate to hormone resistance in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, C.M.; Dutton, E.R.; Seymour, A.

    1996-09-01

    The gene for alpha-stimulating guanine-nucleotide binding polypeptide, Gnas, has been considered as a candidate for the imprinting effects ascribed to distal mouse Chromosome (Chr) 2. Its human homologue (GNAS1) appears, from clinical and biochemical studies of patients with Albright hereditary ostodystrophy, to be paternally imprinted. GNAS1 maps to 20q13, a region that shows linkage conservation with distal mouse Chr 2. We have mapped Gnas within the imprinting region on distal Chr 2 by linkage analysis. To establish if Gnas is imprinted, we have looked for expression differences in tissues taken from mice carrying maternal duplication/paternal deficiency for distal Chr 2 (MatDp2) and its reciprocal (PatDp2). RNA in situ hybridization revealed high levels of Gnas mRNA in glomeruli of PatDp2 embryos at late gestation and lower levels in glomeruli of MatDp2 embryos. These results strongly suggest that Gnas is maternally imprinted and suggest that the mouse gene may be imprinted in a manner opposite the predicted in human. 42 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore »Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  13. Metabolite Signatures in Hydrophilic Extracts of Mouse Lungs Exposed to Cigarette Smoke Revealed By 1H NMR Metabolomics Investigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations ofmore »adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.« less

  14. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  15. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Showing Reduced Unsaturated Lipid Content in the Hippocampus of a mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leskovjan, A.C.; Kretlow, A.; Miller, L.M.

    2010-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential to brain functions such as membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and cell survival. It is also thought that low levels of unsaturated lipid in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk or severity. However, it is not known how accumulation of unsaturated lipids is affected in different regions of the hippocampus, which is a central target of AD plaque pathology, during aging. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to visualize the unsaturated lipid content in specific regions of the hippocampus in the PSAPP mouse model of AD as a function of plaque formation. Specifically, the unsaturated lipid content was imaged using the olefinic {double_bond}CH stretching mode at 3012 cm{sup -1}. The axonal, dendritic, and somatic layers of the hippocampus were examined in the mice at 13, 24, 40, and 56 weeks old. Results showed that lipid unsaturation in the axonal layer was significantly increased with normal aging in control (CNT) mice (p < 0.01) but remained low and relatively constant in PSAPP mice. Thus, these findings indicate that unsaturated lipid content is reduced in hippocampal white matter during amyloid pathogenesis and that maintaining unsaturated lipid content early in the disease may be critical in avoiding progression of the disease.

  17. Final Report of project entitled "A metabolomics and mouse models approach to study inflammatory and immune responses to radiation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, Albert J.; Li, Henghong

    2013-12-02

    The three-year project entitled ?A Metabolomics and Mouse Models Approach to Study Inflammatory and Immune Responses to Radiation? was initiated in September 2009. The overall objectives of this project were to investigate the acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell lymphocyte function and physiology, as well the contributions of these cells to radiation-induced inflammatory responses. Inflammation after ionizing radiation (IR), even at low doses, may impact a variety of disease processes, including infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other potentially inflammatory disorders. There were three overall specific aims: 1. To investigate acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell subsets and function; 2. A genetic approach with mouse models to investigate p38 MAPK pathways that are involved in radiation-induced inflammatory signaling; 3. To investigate the effect of radiation quality on the inflammatory response. We have completed the work proposed in these aims. Below are our major accomplishments: ? Our data show that T cells from low dose irradiated animals have lower proliferation potency and cytokine production upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This effect was observed as early as 4 hours after radiation, and lasted up to two weeks. ? Using our ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with highly sensitive time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF) metabolomics method, we demonstrated the global changes of metabolites in T cells upon TCR stimulation in a time-dependent pattern. ? We found that the TCR activation induced metabolome changes are remarkably altered in a dose-dependent manner after radiation. At a dose of 0.5 Gy and above, IR mitigated TCR activation induced metabolome changes while at the dose of as low as 0.1Gy IR had a mild stimulatory effect on some of the metabolome changes. ? We revealed the mechanism for how radiation affects T cell activation by showing that the energy supply pathways in activated T cells are greatly compromised after radiation. ? We demonstrated that low dose ionizing radiation has a variety of effects on different T cell subsets, and p38 plays an important role in these effects. ? The study with low dose proton radiation shows similar effects on T cell proliferation upon TCR activation. Our dose rate study with proton radiation indicates that at low dose rates, proton exposure has less detrimental effects on T cell activation. ? We have one published paper and several manuscripts submitted or in preparation. ? We presented our findings at multiple DOE low dose program workshops, RRS annual meetings and other conferences. Our project is the first to apply a cutting-edge metabolomics approach to study the effects of radiation on immune cell function. Our findings demonstrate that metabolomics is a powerful method, which not only has higher sensitivity than the classical immune cell biology endpoints, but also helps to reveal the underlying mechanisms providing evidence that T cell activation is a metabolically dynamic process. Our T cell subset study sheds light on the effects of radiation on different T cell subsets and relevant signaling pathways mediating these effects. We have proved that our metabolomics platform and the T cell subset differentiation methods are useful and informative approaches for investigation and assessment of immune cell function after radiation. Our mechanistic findings on metabolic pathways may help to identify potential targets for intervention.

  18. Erratum for PNW 627 Meadow Voles and Pocket Gophers: Management in Lawns, Gardens, and Cropland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    , landscapes, lawns, and vegetable gardens. Both voles and gophers dam- age plants by eating roots, trunks, stems, tubers, and leaves. Their tunneling habits also cause dam- age. Large mounds of soil left and tails; small, rounded ears; and coarse, blackish to grayish brown fur with black-tipped hairs

  19. Above ground productivity and floristic structure of a high subalpine herbaceous meadow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    t c h e d a r e a s a re s t ands of tall willow (Salix sp . ) a n d k r u m m h o l z . T h e e p h e m e r a l s t r e a m f lowing nor th t h r o u g h the center of the s tudy a r e a is ou t l ined . Most of snow zone 3 a d j a c e n... m a i n e d until la te Ju ly . e x c e p t t h a t a r e a s o f t a l l w i l l o w (Salix s p . ) a n d k r u m m h o l z ( F i g u r e 1) w e r e n o t e x a m i n e d . T h e f i r s t q u a d r a t s w e r e e s t a b l i s h e d 1 8 J u n e...

  20. NAME: Damde Meadows Tidal Restoration Phase II LOCATION: World's End Reservation, Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , and increased production and export of organic detritus that forms the basis of the marine food web Protect

  1. ARCO Chemical Company Research and Engineering Center, "The Meadows" [The Inhabited Landscape: An Exhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ltd., Hanna/Olin

    1988-01-01

    D ARCO Chemical Company Research and Engineering C e n t eA R C O Chemical Company Research and Engineering Center, "A ARCO Chemical Company Research and Engineering Center, " T

  2. Wildflower Meadow Establishment Methods and Seedling Identification Guide Catherine Neal and Amy Papineau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    applications of glyphosate, (e) repeated tilling and (f) smothering with black plastic mulch. A mix of 21

  3. Soil Sampling At Lester Meadow Area (Vice, 2008) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolarProjectHill,EnergyEnergyEnergySoil

  4. Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Pickles, Et Al., 2003) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN)Open Energy

  5. Reds Meadow Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield Campus Geothermal AreaRedlandsRedondoOpen

  6. Variants of Jump Flooding Algorithm for Computing Discrete Voronoi Diagrams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Tiow Seng

    ] that builds a cone for every input (point) site and renders these cones to obtain the Voronoi diagram as the lower envelop of these cones. Denny [2] presents a similar method using a pre-computed texture in place, their speeds reduce with the increase in the number of sites. Recent advances in the graphics processing unit

  7. Jumping Neptune Can Explain the Kuiper Belt Kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesvorny, David

    2015-01-01

    The Kuiper belt is a population of icy bodies beyond the orbit of Neptune. A particularly puzzling and up-to-now unexplained feature of the Kuiper belt is the so-called `kernel', a concentration of orbits with semimajor axes a~44 AU, eccentricities e~0.05, and inclinations ibelt kernel can be explained if Neptune's otherwise smooth migration was interrupted by a discontinuous change of Neptune's semimajor axis when Neptune reached ~28 AU. Before the discontinuity happened, planetesimals located at ~40 AU were swept into Neptune's 2:1 resonance, and were carried with the migrating resonance outwards. The 2:1 resonance was at ~44 AU when Neptune reached ~28 AU. If Neptune's semimajor axis changed by fraction of AU at this point, perhaps because Neptune was scattered off of another planet, the 2:1 population would have been released at ~44 AU, and would remain there to this day. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies produced in this model provides a good match to...

  8. Acousto-optical coherence tomography using random phase jumps on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (cm). Up to now, several configurations have been studied, giving a millimetric axial resolution demonstration is performed with a self-adaptive holographic setup containing a photorefractive GaAs bulk crystal(5), 1151­1158 (1997). 4. S. Leveque, A. C. Boccara, M. Lebec, and H. Saint-Jalmes, "Ultrasonic tagging

  9. Queues Don’t Matter When You Can JUMP Them!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosvenor, Matthew P.; Schwarzkopf, Malte; Gog, Ionel; Watson, Robert N. M.; Moore, Andrew W.; Hand, Steven; Crowcroft, Jon

    2015-03-27

    by marking TCP packets. Our Arista 7050 switch implements ECN with Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED). The effectiveness of WRED depends on an administrator correctly configuring upper and lower marking thresholds. We investigated ten dif- ferent marking...

  10. Quantum Darwinism, Decoherence, and the Randomness of Quantum Jumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2014-06-05

    Tracing flows of information in our quantum Universe explains why we see the world as classical. Quantum principle of superposition decrees every combination of quantum states a legal quantum state. This is at odds with our experience. Decoherence selects preferred pointer states that survive interaction with the environment. They are localized and effectively classical. They persist while their superpositions decohere. Here we consider emergence of `the classical' starting at a more fundamental pre-decoherence level, tracing the origin of preferred pointer states and deducing their probabilities from the core quantum postulates. We also explore role of the environment as medium through which observers acquire information. This mode of information transfer leads to perception of objective classical reality.

  11. Operators jumping E and D spending in Nigerian programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    Nigeria's campaign to increase foreign investment in its petroleum industry and boost oil and gas productive capacity continues to gather steam. Critical to that effort is a continuing push by the government to offer more attractive fiscal and concession terms to private domestic and foreign companies. Nigeria's petroleum ministry has submitted a new draft petroleum policy for government approval. The campaign is getting results, if responses by key foreign operators are any indication. This paper reports that the changing investment climate in Nigeria is attracting more outside financing.

  12. Measurement of vertical ground reaction force in jumping dogs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanoff, Susan Rena

    1991-01-01

    , Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. I am grateful to Colonel Paul B. Jennings, Chief, Veterinary Division, for his endorsement of this project. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page nl DEDICATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES... Design Thirteen military working dogs, weighing 2741 kg, and greater than 1 year of age, were used in this study. The dogs were kenneled at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Seven dogs were German Shepherd Dogs and 6 were Belgian Malinois...

  13. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo F. Santos; Marcelo Terra Cunha; Rafael Chaves; Andre R. R. Carvalho

    2011-11-05

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify by showing how to teleport an unknown quantum state and how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  14. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Marcelo F; Chaves, Rafael; Carvalho, Andre R R

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify by showing how to teleport an unknown quantum state and how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  15. Side-Jump Effect in Paramagnetic Amorphous Metals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RHIE, K.; Naugle, Donald G.; O, BH; MARKERT, JT.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study of the resistivity (rho), the Hall coefficients (R(H)), and the magnetic susceptibilities (chi) of the Zr-based paramagnetic amorphous alloys suggests a self-consistent explanation for the frequently observed positive values of R...

  16. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

  17. Muscle performance during frog jumping: influence of elasticity on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azizi, Manny

    such as long hindlimbs, a stout vertebral column and a relatively small body size are considered-B204, Providence, RI 02912, USA A fundamental feature of vertebrate muscle is that maximal force can all vertebrate skeletal muscles, are governed in their mechan- ical function by well-known contractile

  18. Engineers, Tinkerers, and Innovators Are Invited to Join the JUMP

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996 EM HealthCybersecurity for EnergyEnergy| Department ofInitiative |

  19. Barbara McClintock, Jumping Genes, and Transposition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01Technical Information U.S.Technical

  20. Jump River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItron (California)JointJosephine, Texas:Gap Wind Farm

  1. DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominateEnergy U.S. Energy Secretary

  2. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: traci.leslie@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Hatfield, Kimberly P., E-mail: kpm9786@yahoo.co [Program in Toxicology and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  3. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

  4. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-?B)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-?B inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-?B. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-?B signaling pathway.

  5. White Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump

  6. Whitney, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine: Energy Resources Jump to:

  7. Whittier, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine: Energy Resources Jump

  8. Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine:RemovePDFImageDimensions Jump

  9. Willcox, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio: Energy Resources Jump

  10. Riparian and Upland Restoration at the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site - 12360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2012-07-01

    Remedial investigation and cleanup at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site was completed in 2005. Uplands, riparian, and wetland habitat were disturbed during cleanup and closure activities and required extensive revegetation. Unavoidable disturbances to habitat of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse (a federally listed species) and wetlands required consultation with regulatory agencies and mitigation. Mitigation wetlands were constructed in two drainages, and a third developed naturally where a soil borrow area intercepted the groundwater table. During the 50-plus years of site operations, 12 ponds were constructed in three drainages to manage and retain runoff and sewage treatment plant discharges prior to release off site. A batch-release protocol has been used for the past several decades at the terminal ponds, which has affected the riparian communities downstream. To return the hydrologic regime to a more natural flow-through system similar to the pre-industrial-use conditions, seven interior dams (of 12) have been breached, and the remaining five dams are scheduled for breaching between 2011 and 2020. At the breached dams, the former open water areas have transformed to emergent wetlands, and the stream reaches have returned to a flow-through system. Riparian and wetland vegetation has established very well. The valves of the terminal ponds were opened in fall 2011 to begin flow-through operations and provide water to the downstream plant communities while allowing reestablishment of vegetation in the former pond bottoms prior to breaching. A number of challenges and issues were addressed during the revegetation effort. These included reaching an agreement on revegetation goals, addressing poor substrate quality and soil compaction problems, using soil amendments and topsoil, selecting seeds, determining the timing and location of revegetation projects relative to continuing closure activities, weed control, erosion control, revegetation project field oversight, and contractual limitations. A variety of ecological restoration techniques were conducted at the site to meet these challenges. These efforts have resulted in vegetation becoming well established in most locations. (author)

  11. Identification of the human ERK gene as a putative receptor tyrosine kinase and its chromosomal localization to 1p36.1: A comparative mapping of human, mouse, and rat chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Toshiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi; Hori, Tada-aki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); and others

    1995-03-20

    From a newly determined cDNA sequence of the human ERK gene, a highly hydrophobic portion was identified upstream of the putative tyrosine kinase domain. This is the first evidence that the ERK protein possesses a receptor-like membrane-spanning structure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of R-banded metaphase chromosomes revealed that the ERK gene is located in chromosome region 1p36.1. This locus is near the frequent translocation breakpoint or deletion region of neuroblastoma and some other cancers. A comparative mapping study of the mouse and rat homologues indicated that each counterpart maps to the mouse chromosome 4D2.2-D3 and rat chromosome 5q36.13 regions, both of which have conserved linkage homology to human chromosome 1p. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, Jackye, E-mail: peretz@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3211 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3223 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  13. Pregnenolone co-treatment partially restores steroidogenesis, but does not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mouse ovarian antral follicles treated with mono-hydroxy methoxychlor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2013-11-01

    Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor (mono-OH MXC) is a metabolite of the pesticide, methoxychlor (MXC). Although MXC is known to decrease antral follicle numbers, and increase follicle death in rodents, not much is known about the ovarian effects of mono-OH MXC. Previous studies indicate that mono-OH MXC inhibits mouse antral follicle growth, increases follicle death, and inhibits steroidogenesis in vitro. Further, previous studies indicate that CYP11A1 expression and production of progesterone (P{sub 4}) may be the early targets of mono-OH MXC in the steroidogenic pathway. Thus, this study tested whether supplementing pregnenolone, the precursor of progesterone and the substrate for HSD3B, would prevent decreased steroidogenesis, inhibited follicle growth, and increased follicle atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Mouse antral follicles were exposed to vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide), mono-OH MXC (10 ?g/mL), pregnenolone (1 ?g/mL), or mono-OH MXC and pregnenolone together for 96 h. Levels of P{sub 4}, androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), estrone (E{sub 1}), and 17?-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in media were determined, and follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. Pregnenolone treatment alone stimulated production of all steroid hormones except E{sub 2}. Mono-OH MXC-treated follicles had decreased sex steroids, but when given pregnenolone, produced levels of P{sub 4}, A, T, and E{sub 1} that were comparable to those in vehicle-treated follicles. Pregnenolone treatment did not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Collectively, these data support the idea that the most upstream effect of mono-OH MXC on steroidogenesis is by reducing the availability of pregnenolone, and that adding pregnenolone may not be sufficient to prevent inhibited follicle growth and survival. - Highlights: • Mono-OH MXC inhibited antral follicle steroidogenesis, growth, and survival. • Pregnenolone partially restored steroidogenesis in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. • Pregnenolone did not prevent mono-OH MXC-induced inhibition of growth and survival.

  14. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  15. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Nunes-Correia, Isabel [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Flow Cytometry Unit, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Armanda E., E-mail: aesantos@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  16. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas age-matched mice fed standard rodent chow diet did not. Activities and mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase were significantly lower in native RPE cells freshly isolated from cholesterol-enriched chow fed mice compared to standard rodent chow fed mice. These findings suggest that cholesterol enhances subretinal A{beta} accumulation by modulating the activities of enzymes degrading and processing A{beta} in RPE cells in senescent subjects.

  17. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Wu, Xiaomeng [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver, E-mail: ohank@mednet.ucla.edu [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ? TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ? Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ? These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ? Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but not all of the increases.

  18. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  19. Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.D.; Rapp, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    The data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew- point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

  20. Native Tallgrass Prairie Remnants as "Living Museums": Landscape Context, Metacommunity Dynamics, and Private Management Practices of Native Prairie Hay Meadows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilroy Mollmann, Hayley A.

    2010-08-27

    In fragmented tallgrass prairie remnants within eastern Kansas, smaller patch area, greater isolation, and poorer matrix quality are predicted to result in (1) decreased species richness, (2) decreased site `quality,' and ...

  1. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Departmentof5.4.407.Cascade reactionsUsing anCase Study:Mobile

  2. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N., E-mail: bklement@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbshivapur@gmail.com; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 ?M) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ?TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ?Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ?TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  3. White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake, New Jersey: Energy Resources JumpWhite

  4. Whitney, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine: Energy Resources Jump to:Texas:

  5. Widget:RemovePDFImageDimensions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:Meadow Lake,Maine:RemovePDFImageDimensions Jump to:

  6. Willard, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio: Energy Resources Jump to:

  7. Willi Ernst and family members | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio: Energy Resources JumpWilli

  8. Williamson Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio:Florida: EnergyAct Jump to:

  9. Williamson County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio:Florida: EnergyAct Jump

  10. Meadville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop, IncSouth Dakota: EnergyMeadows

  11. Meagher County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop, IncSouth Dakota: EnergyMeadowsMeagher

  12. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol insects have been released to assist with control of different target weed species. Monitoring is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of control efforts and to provide information for future control efforts. The effective implementation of this integrated approach has reduced the infestation levels of many species and has kept several newly discovered invasive species from spreading and becoming larger problems at the site. (authors)

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity tests of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based varistor fabricated from ZnO micro and nanoparticle powders on L929 mouse cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendi, Rabab Khalid, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Mahmud, Shahrom, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Munshi, Ayman, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com [Nano-optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R.), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Seeni, Azman, E-mail: azanseeni@gmail.com [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Bertam, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-varistors. To this effect, ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} varistors fabricated from ZnO micro-and nanoparticle powders are prepared via conventional ceramic processing method. The effects of ZnO particle size on the properties of ZnO varistors are also investigated. The strong solid-state reaction during sintering may be attributed to the high surface area of the 20 nm ZnO nanoparticles that promote strong surface reaction. The intensity of XRD peaks reflected the high degree of crystallinity of the ZnO nanoparticles. However, the width of the peaks in case of ZnO nanoparticles has increased due to the quantum size effect. The cytotoxicity evaluation of ZnO varistor was conducted on mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells (L929) using Trypan Blue Exclusion Assay analysis. The results show that the four types of varistor samples lead to cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, morphological modifications and apoptosis at the various concentration range and the toxic effects are obviously displayed in high concentration samples. 20nm-VDR is the most toxic materials followed by 40nm-VDR, P8-VDR, and W4-VDR in a descending order.

  14. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01

    nodosa meadow in the Canary Islands: assemblage structure,of polychaete species Bay (Canary Islands) Brito et al. 4nodosa meadow in the Canary Islands: assemblage structure,

  15. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01

    nodosa meadow in the Canary Islands: assemblage structure,nodosa meadow in the Canary Islands: assemblage structure,Griffen et al. Bay (Canary Islands) Lagoon (Mexico)

  16. I-5project08-18parcelsdetailc.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moulton Meadow Meadow Glade Glade Lucia Lucia Yacolt Yacolt Lewisville Lewisville Lambert Lambert La Center La Center Kumtux Kumtux Highland Highland Heisson Heisson Hayes...

  17. The Inverting Effect of Curvature in Winter Terrain Park Jump Takeoffs J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a significantly greater head/neck injury risk to resort patrons than normal skiing activities [1­4]. One intentionally, curvature in the takeoff can lead to involuntary inversion. In this work we lay out the basic a potential injury risk. A mitigating takeoff design criterion adopted by the US Terrain Park Council based

  18. A cloud model interpretation of jumping cirrus above storm top Pao K. Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Middle atmosphere--constituent transport and chemistry (3334); 0320 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud physics and chemistry; 3314 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics of Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Received 18

  19. Jumping the Gun: Mapping Neural Correlates of Waiting Impulsivity and Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Laurel S.; Kundu, Prantik; Baek, Kwangyeol; Irvine, Michael A.; Mechelmans, Daisy J.; Wood, Jonathan; Harrison, Neil A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2015-06-12

    availability(14) and reduced nucleus accumbens core grey matter density(15). Furthermore, lesions of the rodent infra-limbic cortex and the STN also enhance premature responding(16-19). Special interest falls on the STN, a major relay structure within... responding across social drinkers, binge drinkers and those with alcohol use disorders (AUD) in the third. We have previously shown that AUD have elevated premature responding tested using the 4-CSRT(11). As young adult binge drinkers are at elevated risk...

  20. 0 0 Jumps of 2 -high e-degrees and properly 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shore, Richard A.

    associated computation function dominates every total recursive function (Theorem 2.1). The rele- vant

  1. PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES FOR CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT IN JUMP MODELS MASAHIKO EGAMI AND KAZUTOSHI YAMAZAKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egami, Masahiko

    requirements. In this paper, we model the tradeoff between avoiding costs of delay and premature capital the capital adequacy requirements. On the other hand, there is also a cost of premature undertaking of its important concerns is when to raise more capital so as not to violate capital adequacy

  2. On the pointwise jump condition at the free boundary in the 1-phase ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-02-09

    Brasil. Mat. (N. S. ) 32 (2001), no. 3,. 401-433. [Da] D. Danielli, A singular perturbation approach to a two phase parabolic free boundary problem arising in

  3. Quantum Jump Spectroscopy of a Single Electron in a New and Improved Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    , Massachusetts September 2013 #12;©2013 - Joshua Charles Dorr All rights reserved. #12;Thesis advisor Author electrodynamics and the Standard Model of particle physics. This thesis describes the installation of a new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.4 Helium Recovery System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 4 Low

  4. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces : fundamental study and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Daniel J. (Daniel John)

    2014-01-01

    Condensation is a ubiquitous process often observed in nature and harnessed in many industrial processes such as power generation, desalination, thermal management, and building environmental control. Recent advancements ...

  5. The temperature-jump problem for a variable collision frequency model L. B. Barichello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    -900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil M. Camargoa) Programa de Po´s-Graduac¸a~o em Engenharia Meca^nica, Universidade

  6. Thermodynamics of quantum jump trajectories in systems driven by classical fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian A. Budini

    2010-12-03

    The large-deviation method can be used to study the measurement trajectories of open quantum systems. For optical arrangements this formalism allows to describe the long time properties of the (non-equilibrium) photon counting statistics in the context of a (equilibrium) thermodynamic approach defined in terms of dynamical phases and transitions between them in the trajectory space [J.P. Garrahan and I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 160601 (2010)]. In this paper, we study the thermodynamic approach for fluorescent systems coupled to complex reservoirs that induce stochastic fluctuations in their dynamical parameters. In a fast modulation limit the thermodynamics corresponds to that of a Markovian two-level system. In a slow modulation limit, the thermodynamic properties are equivalent to those of a finite system that in an infinite-size limit is characterized by a first-order transition. The dynamical phases correspond to different intensity regimes, while the size of the system is measured by the transition rate of the bath fluctuations. As a function of a dimensionless intensive variable, the first and second derivative of the thermodynamic potential develop an abrupt change and a narrow peak respectively. Their scaling properties are consistent with a double-Gaussian probability distribution of the associated extensive variable.

  7. A model for jumping and bubble waves in the BelousovZhabotinsky-aerosol OT system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    of the Oregonator model in order to describe patterns in the BZ-AOT water-in-oil microemulsion system AOT. Vanaga and Irving R. Epsteinb Department of Chemistry, MS 015, Brandeis University, Waltham develop a four-variable model, based on the classic Field­Krös­Noyes mechanism for the oscillatory

  8. A SEMI-LAGRANGIAN APPROACH FOR AMERICAN ASIAN OPTIONS UNDER JUMP DIFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labahn, George

    .A. FORSYTH, AND G. LABAHN§ Abstract. A semi-Lagrangian method is presented to price continuously observed a payoff that depends on the average price of the underlying asset over a speci£ed period of time (12). Asian-style derivatives have a wide variety of applications in equity, energy, interest rate

  9. A Semi-Lagrangian Approach For American Asian Options Under Jump Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    to price continuously observed fixed strike Asian options. At each timestep a set of one dimensional on the average price of the underlying asset over a specified period of time. Asian-style derivatives have a wide variety of applications in equity, energy, interest rate, and insurance markets. To the best of our

  10. 60yearsofFluidMechanicsSeminarsatStanford From Jumping Drops to Thermal Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Drilling Muds Dr. Sourav Padhy Feb. 26 Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University Oil and Gas Releases in Deepwater: Processes, Behavior and Modeling Prof. Poojitha Yapa Mar. 5 Dept. of Civil

  11. Self-cleaning of superhydrophobic surfaces by self-propelled jumping condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    , or wind flow. Our findings offer insights for the development of self-cleaning materials. particle of the associated large contact angle and small hysteresis (4), which pro- motes the rolling motion carrying away enclosed or partially covered with the resulting liquid condensate. Building upon our previous publications

  12. Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerme, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

  13. QUEUES WITH SERVER VACATIONS AND LE VY PROCESSES WITH SECONDARY JUMP INPUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    * and Ward Whitt** November 16, 1989 Revision: June 5, 1990 American Mathematical Society 1980 subject Hill, NJ 07974­ 2070. #12; ABSTRACT Motivated by models of queues with server vacations, we consider

  14. ver 100 incoming freshmen and transfer students got a jump on their college career

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    International and the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard also participated and got a preview of potential future

  15. JumpStart: A Just-in-Time Signaling Architecture for WDM Burst-Switched Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and multicast natively. Another important feature is data transparency - the network infrastructure suited for the high- bandwidth, extremely low bit-error rate optical links. The round trip times, in dWDM networks data transparency (i.e. independence of the network in- frastructure from the data

  16. IEEE Communications Magazine February 200282 JumpStart: A Just-in-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    native- ly. Another important feature is data transparency -- the network infrastructure is independent hop. Data, on the other hand, travels transparently. The work we present in this article is being is the elimination of the round-trip waiting time Ilia Baldine, MCNC George N. Rouskas, North Carolina State

  17. Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996 EMBG-PLN-003611,DepartmentMaterial | Department of EnergyHanford's

  18. Educated and Equipped: Jump-Start Your Career in the Bioenergy Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EV Everywhere|MuscleEnergy

  19. Jump-Starting Zero Energy Home Design and Student Careers | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted Attic9: HSS

  20. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Depeartment of Pharmacy, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka 590-0132 ; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ? We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ? YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ? YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ? YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment in osteosarcoma.

  1. Sound Production in the Isolated Mouse Larynx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berquist, Sean

    2013-01-01

    of sound production. Sound traveling in a helium medium,production have been inconclusive, with one study using the effects of helium

  2. Dact genes in mouse kidney development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wen-Chin

    2009-01-01

    cultures, I hypothesize that Dact1 regulates cell proliferation while Dact2 governs cell migration. Experiments including siRNA transfection, BrdU proliferation assay, generation of stable cell lines expressing Dact2 shRNA and wound assay, are designed...

  3. Mouse models of osteoarthritis and joint injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avedillo, Jose Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 21 million Americans are affected by osteoarthritis, a complex disease characterized by degenerative lesions to the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. The complexity of the disease makes the use ...

  4. Tentative Schedule for the Weekend: September 2324, 2011 Friday Afternoon ETSU Fall Alumni Golf Classic Hosted at Cattails at the Marriott MeadowView

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Tentative Schedule for the Weekend: September 2324, 2011 · Friday Afternoon ­ ETSU Fall Alumni of the Alumni Divisions or against other Greek Two Person Teams For more information, http://etsu Contact you to join in! Email fulkersj@etsu.edu Phone 4234398328 Website http://www.etsu

  5. PRE-MATING COMMUNICATION AND HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN TWO MEADOW KATYDIDS, ORCHELIMUM NIGRIPES AND O. PULCHELLUM (ORTHOPTERA: TETTIGONIIDAE): MALE CALLING SONG AND ASYMMETRIC FEMALE PREFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ginger

    2010-12-06

    with several savvy and delightful post-doctoral researchers at KU that provided insightful feedback on my research in addition to encouragement and support: Leanna Birge, Anne Danielson- Francois, Gary Miller, and Yihong Zhou. Johannes Schul kindly opened...

  6. MICRON MOUSE IMAGING SYSTEM The Micron Mouse Imaging System is a Core Resource for the Moran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    light source/power supply (K) Micron camera base and mounting arm (E) Micron custom light guide (L, amplifier, light source, monitor power cables #12;3 SYSTEM PARTS LIGHT SOURCE CAMERA AMPLIFIER Quick keyB steps Press DISP to exit CAMERA NEUTRAL DENSITY KNOB LIGHT GUIDE DO NOT TOUCH LIGHT GUIDE CONNECTOR

  7. arXiv:submit/0673806[q-fin.TR]13Mar2013 Bubbles, Jumps, and Scaling from Properly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreiter, Andreas K.

    values [6]. Hence, bubbles and crashes do not disprove the EMH. Currently supported by the Volkswagen

  8. A parametric study of shock jump chemistry, electron temperature, and radiative heat transfer models in hypersonic flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greendyke, Robert Brian

    1988-01-01

    will examine the radiance model and various step models in order to determine their appropriateness to the flight regime of the AOTV. The final area to be investigated will be the effect of nonequilibrium corrections on the radiative heat transfer models... of T and e T will be valid as long as there is a reasonable amount vNs of nitrogen molecules in the flow. Radiative Heat Transfer Models For this study, four radiative heat transfer models were examined. One of these models is an optically thin radiance...

  9. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Molybdate Adsorption/Desorption at the Goethite/Water Interface Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics and Mechanisms of Molybdate Adsorption/Desorption at the Goethite/Water Interface Using/desorption on goethite. A postulated reaction mechanism consisting of two consecutive elementary steps was examined of ionic species on the goethite surface, in the a and 0 layers, and in the bulk solution at equilibriumand

  10. Rust disease of eucalypts, caused by Puccinia psidii, did not originate via host jump from guava in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Brazil RODRIGO N. GRACß A,*1 AMY L. ROSS-DAVIS, NED B. KLOPFENSTEIN, MEE-SOOK KIM, TOBIN L. PEEVER,§ PHIL Fitopatologia, Universidade Federal de Vicßosa, Vicßosa, MG 36570-000, Brazil, USDA Forest Service ­ Rocky, Puccinia psidii, is a devastating pathogen of introduced eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.) in Brazil where

  11. Ecology of the predator assemblage affecting nest success of passerines in Sierra Nevada, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocimano, Maria C.

    2010-07-14

    The endangered willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds in mountain meadows in the Sierra Nevada, which have been intensively modified, especially reducing meadow wetness, which favors easy access for mammalian predators to reach nesting areas...

  12. Quantifying Relationships Between Bird And Butterfly Community Shifts And Environmental Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.; VanNimwegen, Ron E.; Jakubauskas, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    in remotely sensed data with analyses of bird and butterfly community changes in montane meadow communities of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Landsat satellite imagery was used to classify these meadows into six types along a hydrological gradient...

  13. Carex cherokeensis (Native) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    The endangered willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds in mountain meadows in the Sierra Nevada, which have been intensively modified, especially reducing meadow wetness, which favors easy access for mammalian predators to reach nesting areas...

  14. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ? 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody-drug conjugates. Further exploration using the model will examine binding and radioisotope residence as antibody dose is increased to antigen saturation. The Center for Targeted Radioimmunotherapy and Theranostics, Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), NIH (R25-CA096945). Technical services provided by the MSK Small-Animal Imaging Core Facility were supported by the NIH (R24-CA83084, P30-CA08748, and P50-CA92629; Zanzonico). NCI, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparity (R21 CA153177-03; Osborne)

  15. Observations on feeding behavior in the vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Vriesendorp, Corine

    2003-04-01

    C77C97C109C109C46 C98C105C111C108C46 C54C56 C40._C50C48C48C51C41 C49C50C54C177C49C50C56 C77C97C109C109C97C108C105C97C110 C66C105C111C108C111C103C121 C227 C85C114C98C97C110 C38 C70C105C115C99C104C101C114 C86C101C114C108C97C103 C104C116C116C112C58C47C...47C119C119C119C46C117C114C98C97C110C102C105C115C99C104C101C114C46C100C101C47C106C111C117C114C110C97C108C115C47C109C97C109C109C98C105C111C108 C90C101C105C116C115C99C104C114C105C102C116 C102C117C200C114C83C97C200C117C103C101C116C105C101C114C107C117C110C...

  16. interactionsJanuary+February2011 Soft-Spiky Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Chris

    of the energy). One usage scenario is giving the Energy Memento as a gift of one's own energy. Energy Mementos-3438. Heekyoung Jung | School of Informatics and Computing.(HCI Design), Indiana University Bloomington | jung5@indiana.edu Altieri Youngsuk | School of Fine Arts (Digital Art), Indiana University Bloomington

  17. Characterization of Neuropeptide Y Expressing Cells in the Mouse Retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nirenberg, Sheila

    the reporter enzyme, -galactosidase, in the NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) cells. We found that NPY-IR cells were their processes in the sublamina of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) closest to the INL/IPL border, the presumptive OFF sublamina, and the cells in the GCL extended their processes in the sublamina near the GCL/IPL

  18. Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramhall, Naomi F

    2012-01-01

    Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

  19. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivas, Nicholas D; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    Callaway, E. M. (2000). Laminar sources of synap- tic inputSvoboda, K. , et al. (2011). Laminar analysis of excitatoryand Svoboda, K. (2005). Laminar and columnar organization of

  20. A robust automated system elucidates mouse home cage behavioral structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiggins, Francis

    sys- tems (e.g., energy balance, thermal status, osmotic/volume status, sleep, reproduction, defense processes. However, the capacity to identify and examine these patterns in terms of their discrete levels in mice with single gene mutations altering energy balance. The robust, automated, reproducible

  1. Neurogenomics in the mouse model : multivariate statistical methods and analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapala, Matthew Alan

    2007-01-01

    P -value proportion of variation in pair-wiseP -value proportion of variation explained abovevalue proportion of variation explained = 0.35;

  2. Characterisation of epithelial progenitor cells for human and mouse thymus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The thymus is a complex cellular structure made up of several interdependent cell types and is the primary site for T cell development. A population of fetal thymic epithelial cells (TEC), marked by MTS20 and MTS24, when ...

  3. Mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit precedes Alzheimer's pathology in female mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Ewen, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, and approved June 29, 2009 (received for review April 2, 2009 synthesis (5). Further, in AD there is a generalized shift from glycolytic energy production toward use of an alternative fuel, ketone bodies. This is evidenced by a 45% reduction in cerebral glucose utilization in AD

  4. Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilford, Sarah

    2008-08-24

    (7034):772-777. 44. Colina R, Costa-Mattioli M, Dowling RJO, Jaramillo M, Tai L-H, Breitbach CJ, Martineau Y, Larsson O, Rong L, Svitkin YV et al: Translational control of the innate immune response through IRF-7. Nature 2008. 45. Bratton DL, Fadok VA, Richter DA... in the maintenance of pregnancy [23]. 11 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (Oas2) Oas2 has an important role in viral RNA degradation, namely OAS2 cleaves viral mRNA from rRNA [55]. Other cellular roles include apoptosis induction and growth...

  5. Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloniowski, Slawomir

    2011-01-01

    Sci USA López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution5-6):141- López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution4041. López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution of

  6. Neurogenomics in the mouse model : multivariate statistical methods and analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapala, Matthew Alan

    2007-01-01

    development of the rat hypothalamus. Adv Anat Embryol Cellmidbrain, excluding hypothalamus (DiE-MD), entorhinalformation (HiF), hypothalamus (Hy), inferior colliculus (

  7. Transgenic mouse models of childhood-onset psychiatric disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Holly Rochelle

    Childhood-onset psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), mood disorders, obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD), and schizophrenia (SZ), affect ...

  8. Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history William and Liane Russell started groundbreaking program not long after World War II. William and Liane Russell in the early days of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's...

  9. Current Concepts : Mouse Models of Sjögren’s Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Cuong Q.

    Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) is a complex chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology which primarily targets the exocrine glands, resulting in eventual loss of secretory function. The disease can present as either primary ...

  10. The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elstrott, Justin Blake

    2009-01-01

    286. McLaughlin, T. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2005). MolecularC.L. , Feller, M.B. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2003). Retinotopic2006; McLaughlin and O'Leary, 2005), DSGCs at the same D-V,

  11. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J. F.; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2015-07-27

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of “wiring cost” explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost...

  12. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  13. Transcriptome signature of the adult mouse choroid plexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    glycolysis/gluconeogenesis) and in ribosomal function, whichdisorders Glycolysis/Gluconeogenesis Galactose metabolism

  14. Quantitative mouse renal perfusion using arterial spin labeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, R; Lew, SK; Yong, CX; Tan, J; Wang, DJJ; Chuang, KH

    2013-01-01

    NF, Graf H, ClaussenCD, Schick F. Magnetic resonanceNI, Kramer U, Claussen CD, Schick F. Perfusion MR imagingH, Claussen CD, Schlemmer HP, Schick F. High resolution MR

  15. SHAPE Analysis of 5’ Untranslated Region of Mouse Hepatitis Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masud, Faryal 1989-

    2011-04-18

    Benchtop SHAPE experiment ........................................... 19 Molecular cloning of A fragment ...................................... 20 Labeling primers with fluorescent dyes... Page 1 Forward and reverse PCR primers ....................................................................... 17 2 Sequencing primers .............................................................................................. 17 3 Single...

  16. Elastic and Viscoelastic Characterization of Mouse Oocytes Using Micropipette Indentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    ,1 JIAYI SHI,2 ZONG ZONG,2 KAI-TAK WAN,2 and YU SUN 3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mc(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, is utilized for measuring(dimeth- ylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, to measure

  17. Geometrically Decoupled Phased Array Coils for Mouse Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sahil

    2010-07-14

    Phased array surface coils offer high SNR over a large field of view. Phased array volume coils have high SNR at the surface and centre of the volume. Most array coil designs typically employ a combination of geometrical and additional techniques...

  18. The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elstrott, Justin Blake

    2009-01-01

    at each stage of visual processing- retinal, subcortical andvisual processing stream is combined with other retinalof visual processing. On-Off direction selective retinal

  19. Electrophysiological Characterization of Chemosensory Neurons from the Mouse Vomeronasal Organ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, David P.

    component was TTX-sensitive (Ki 3.6 nM). The outward K current activates at 30 mV with kinetics 10 times- duction; patch-clamp; voltage-gated channel; cyclic nucleotide-gated channel Chemosensation in terrestrial

  20. Protocol: Mouse Perfusion, CASL RARE, Page 1 of 3 Author: rgb 3/16/2012 Protocol: Mouse Perfusion, CASL RARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    and to estimate the bregma position. 4. Acquire an angiogram by locating the slice package posterior from isocenter, this would be labeled "Pos -7.88 mm." 5. Enter the tagging plane position in the ASL scan with "Edit Scan -> Research -> CASL -> `Labelling->Isocenter Distance'." Good results have been

  1. A model study of the effect of bucket dentations on a ski-jump spillway jet: with a mathematical analysis of critical bucket radius determination. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gladwell, John Stuart

    1961-01-01

    of 8s 8s reduction of velocity or increase of depth from point Qlto point Q2 was also a function of R; however, it should be noticed that the function 8V ttg PC)i ~1 g t' 8s Actually, however, the basic assumption made does not apply. That is... the darn to a point 1, 2, 14 where there is no danger to the dam due to erosion. ' ' The shape is such that the water falls with much diminished energy. Economy and safety are two of its advantages, if it is used in the proper 3 xnanner. A few...

  2. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergy 1 DOE

  3. Ecology of Owens Valley vole 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Fletcher Chris

    2005-08-29

    of vegetative cover types (sites 1 and 5 consisted of Rabbitbrush Meadow, sites 2 and 4 consisted of Riparian Forest, sites 3 and 7 consisted of Rush/Sedge Meadow, site 6 consisted of Irrigated Pasture [ungrazed], site 8 consisted of Riparian Scrub.... These mesic areas, including riparian corridors, meadows, and agricultural lands, are subject to more intensive and concentrated use (i.e., livestock grazing, recreation) than drier areas. Mesic environments are likely to support small mammal...

  4. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community...

  5. Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition Phil Ulibarri of Truckee Meadows Community...

  6. Publications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy in Federal Construction Renewable Energy Document Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park Renewable...

  7. Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeobotanicalRemoteSensingAppliedToTargetingNewGeothermalResourceLocationsInTheUsBasinAndRangeWithAFocusOnDixieMeadows,...

  8. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine...

  9. The Development of 70-Year-Old Wieslander Vegetation Type Maps and an Assessment of Landscape Change in the Central Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, James H; Kelsey, Rodd; Honig, Jacquelyn; Morgan, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Navarretia sp. Ribes sp. Salix sp. Tule Wild hay MonardellaTypes Annuals Grass Salix sp. Meadow Unidentified Code CAGResidence Water Ribes sp. Salix sp. Wild hay Unidentified

  10. ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELSR-00-8EnvironmentalLaboratory Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Sediment Resuspension Sediment Resuspension Dynamics in Canopy- and Meadow-Forming Submersed Macrophyte Communities by William F resuspension dynamics in canopy- and meadow-forming submersed macrophyte communities / by John W. Barko

  11. Axons Mediate the Distribution of Arylsulfatase A within the Mouse Hippocampus upon Gene Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongarzone, Ernesto R.

    Naldini,1,2 and Ernesto R. Bongarzone1,y 1 Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, San Raffaele Scientific-time observation and tracking of axon­dendritic transport of the enzyme after lentiviral gene therapy. Tagged ARSA brain after direct gene therapy, demonstrating the use of neural processes for enzyme transport. Key

  12. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 ?M CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential agent to improve liver function after liver surgery.

  13. Inhibition of Notch Signaling During Mouse Incisor Renewal Leads to Enamel Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in PBS and stained in 2% uranyl acetate in water for 2 hoursReynold’s lead citrate and 2% uranyl acetate in 50% ethanol

  14. Disentangling mental disorders: a mouse model for 15q duplication towards understanding the pathophysiology of autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    the pathophysiology of autism Toru Takumi, MD, PhD. RIKEN Brain Science Institute Autism is a complex psychiatric suggests that chromosomal abnormalities including copy number variations contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism

  15. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Institute of Oncology of Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidada del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidad de

  16. Scientific Abstract -Scientific Posters & Demonstrations Enhancing Medical Image Interaction By Specializing the Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Karon

    more quickly without reducing accuracy or thoroughness, and improving ergonomics at the same time. Evaluation: Early prototyping and participatory design: We observed several radiologists performing

  17. Quantifying the interactions between eye and mouse movements on spatial visual interfaces through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çöltekin, Arzu

    trajectory visualisations Urska Demsar1 , Arzu Çöltekin 2 1 Centre for Geoinformatics, School of Geography

  18. ANTI-Mac-1 SELECTIVELY INHIBITS THE MOUSE AND HUMAN TYPE THREE COMPLEMENT RECEPTOR*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    ; GVB, gelatin- containing veronal-buffered saline; HBSS, Hanks' balanced salt solution; MAb, monoclonal, CA) or A/St mice (West Seneca Laboratories, Buffalo, NY) by injection of 1.5 ml of protease peptone 3 d before cell harvest. PEC were harvested with Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) with 10 mM Hepes

  19. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelward, Bevin

    structural autocorrelation TPM , respectively. Mesoscale myofi- ber tracts were generated by alignment the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual super- imposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identifi- cation of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links

  20. Spectral Markers in Preneoplastic Intestinal Mucosa: An Accurate Predictor of Tumor Risk in the MIN Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young L.

    with celecoxib 1,500 ppm. Results: Spectral slope, fractal dimension, and principal component 3 were dramatically > colon). Short-term treatment with the potent chemopreventive agent, celecoxib, resulted in near, the reversal of spectral markers by celecoxib treatment supports the neoplastic relevance. (Cancer Epidemiol

  1. Inhibition of Notch Signaling During Mouse Incisor Renewal Leads to Enamel Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    is an emerging model for the study of renewal of mineralizedmodel for the study of tooth development and renewal. Thismodel system to dissect Jag-Notch signaling mechanisms in the context of mineralized tissue renewal.

  2. Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Atlas In Vector Graphics For Enhanced Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jinho

    2013-07-17

    loading time. Furthermore, we employed an open-source mapping JavaScript library, OpenLayers API [12], to visualize the KESM data sets on the web in place of the Google Maps API. Just like Google Maps API, OpenLayers API provides essential functions... and implemented the graphical user interface (GUI) using Flash, Java and AJAX (dHTML and JavaScript). As a result, they provide rapid web-based 19 navigation and visualization, aiming to provide a virtual microscopy service. They also provide 3D visualization...

  3. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, Ruben [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Miller, Kenneth E. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States)

    2005-09-09

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  4. Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenshtein, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

  5. Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khibnik, Lena A

    2011-01-01

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

  6. A new mouse model to probe the role of aflatoxin B? in liver carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouhenguel, Jason T

    2010-01-01

    One and a half million new cancer cases are reported each year in the United States. Despite this overwhelming burden of disease, current preventative treatments and early detection techniques are inadequate. With cancers, ...

  7. Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    age in C57BL/6, but not CBA/CaJ, mice. Hear Res 112: 158-of hair cell loss in CBA and C57BL/6 mice throughout theiryoung and aging C57BL/6J and CBA/J mice. Hear Res 53: 78-94,

  8. Investigating the consequences of chromosome abnormalities arising during pre-implantation development of the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Helen Louise

    2014-02-04

    . 16 5 4.2.3 Culture in low -energy KSOM ??????????????????????????????? ??5 4.2.4 Immunocytochemistry , TUNEL staining and confocal imaging?.???????????. ??6 4.2.5 Induction of DNA damage with ionizing radiation ???????????????????? ??6 4... sensitive to adverse culture conditions???????????????????????????????????? 17 1 4.3.3 Evaluating the DNA damage hypothesis ????????????????? ???????. ??4 4.3 .3.1 The atypical distribution of DDR foci throughout pre - implantation development...

  9. Mickey and the Mouse: The Motion Picture and Television Industry's Copyright Concerns on the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torpoco, Mark S.

    1997-01-01

    on-line services from liability for infringing transmissionsline service providers from direct or vicarious copyright liability for transmissions

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    initial potentiation to WTs, but the effect decayed for 1 hof slices from Fmr1-KOs and WTs that had been sectionedcomparable to that in the WTs. Significant group differences

  11. Abnormal Response of the Neuropeptide Y-Deficient Mouse Reproductive Axis to Food Deprivation But

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    types (WTs) in weight regulation and food consumption. Large-litter mothers had longer anestrous periods and smaller pups at weaning, but NPY KOs and WTs did not differ in either respect. We also examined the LH not. In contrast, WTs consistently showed fasting-induced suppression of LH. Our findings suggest

  12. Alterations of Thalamostriatal and Corticostriatal Projections in Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parievsky, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and BACHD mice compared to WTs. Thus, PLTS interneurons areusing optogenetics in both WTs and R6/2s, responses to PVR6/2 mice compared to WTs. Similarly, selective optogenetic

  13. Identification and Characterization of Modulators of Chemotherapeutic Response in Mouse Models of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doles, Jason (Jason David)

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a major cause of cancer treatment failure. While much attention has been focused on the genetics of tumor development, less is known about the genetic determinants of therapeutic outcome. ...

  14. EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim Sekeroglu Virtual Mouse Using a Webcam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koppelman, David M.

    EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim Sekeroglu and the center of the pointer and draw a bounding box around it #12;EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim

  15. Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

  16. THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LANGERHANS CELLS AND INTRAEPIDERMAL NERVE FIBERS IN THE MOUSE AND RAT FOOTPAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Argenia Lanisha Necole

    2011-12-31

    Skin disorders are often associated with immune and nervous system dysfunction. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) detect mechanical, thermal, and noxious stimuli. Although immune cells such as mast and T cells can alter ...

  17. TLE proteins in mouse embryonic stem cell self renewal and early lineage specification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laing, Adam

    2011-11-24

    TLE proteins are a closely related family of vertebrate corepressors. They have no intrinsic DNA binding ability, but are recruited as transcriptional repressors by other sequence specific proteins. TLE proteins and their ...

  18. Acquisition of renogenic competence in the early mouse embryo and embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeva, Veronika Veskova

    2011-11-25

    The acquisition of renogenic competence (the ability to give rise to kidney) during embryonic development is not yet fully understood. Clarifying the temporal and molecular aspects of this process is equally essential ...

  19. Effects of age and Pax6 deficiency on mouse limbal stem cell function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douvaras, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    The conventional view for corneal epithelial maintenance suggests that a stem cell population found in the limbus (at the rim of the cornea) produces daughter cells, called transient amplifying cells, which migrate ...

  20. Genome wide gene expression analysis of two ENU mouse models of major mental illness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sarah Mills

    2011-01-01

    Major mental illness is now recognised as one of the leading causes of adult morbidity. Of the adult onset psychiatric disorders, the functional psychoses (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression) ...

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF THE DRUG-PROCESSING GENOME IN MOUSE LIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yue

    2010-07-29

    Despite the recent progress in understanding the expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms of drug-processing genes, namely phase-I and -II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in adults, very little is known of ...

  2. Mouse models of lung cancer : understanding the molecular and cellular basis of lung tumorigenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Erica L. (Erica Lynn), 1973-

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Patients are typically diagnosed with advanced disease and have a high fatality:case ratio. Despite its prevalence, the identity of the cell of origin, precursor ...

  3. Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

  4. Response and Resistance to NF-?B Inhibitors in Mouse Models of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wen

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently showed that genetic inhibition of the NF-?B pathway affects both the initiation and the maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as ...

  5. Requirement for NF-?B signalling in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meylan, Etienne

    NF-?B transcription factors function as crucial regulators of inflammatory and immune responses as well as of cell survival. They have also been implicated in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. However, despite ...

  6. Core modular blood and brain biomarkers in social defeat mouse model for post traumatic stress disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    1998, 21(1):127–148. 45. Sriram K, Rodriguez-Fernandez M,301–320. 47. Yang R, Sriram K, Doyle FJ: Control circuitry

  7. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Piscataway, NJ. Anisomycin (ANI) was purchased from Pfizerbehavioral studies (6), ANI was administered subcutaneouslyml of 0.9% NaCl. ments, ANI was not administered; results

  8. Genomic Imprinting Variations in the Mouse Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Between Tissues and Brain Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M. Elena; Charalambous, Marika; Saferali, Aabida; Fiering, Steven; Naumova, Anna K.; St. Germain, Donald; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Hernandez, Arturo

    2014-09-18

    , Midbrain and pons; Th, thalamus; Cx#3;St#3;Hi, cortex, striatum and hippocampus; OB, olfactory bulb; CoC, corpus colliculus; H, hypothalamus. Data represent the mean #5; SEM of 8 determinations. *, #, P #4; .01 vs Dio3 #3;/#3; or Dio3 m-/p#3;, respectively...

  9. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    PLoS One 2009; 2: e895. Song CX, Szulwach KE, Fu Y, Dai Q,Szulwach KE, Li X, Li Y, Song CX, Wu H, Dai Q, et al. 5-hmC-cells), cerebral cortex (CX, CA1, CA3 and den- tate gyrus)

  10. FUNCTIONAL AND MECHANISTIC STUDY OF DOT1L IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC HEMATOPOIESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yi

    2012-12-31

    DOT1 is the histone 3 lysine 79 methyltransferase with both unique structure and substrate specificity. It plays critical role in telomere silencing maintenance, transcription regulation, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. DOT1L in mammals...

  11. Practical Vessel Imaging by Computed Tomography in Live Transgenic Mouse Models for Human Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    delivered by a generic fish tank pump. Volumetric CT of anesthetized mice was per- formed at 93 mm3 voxel

  12. Reflectance and Fluorescence Confocal Microscope for Imaging of the Mouse Colon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldua, Meagan Alyssa

    2012-02-14

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Kristen Carlson Maitland Committee Members, Javier Jo Robert Chapkin Head of Department, Gerard L. Cot? December 2010 Major... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Kristen Maitland, and my committee members, Dr. Javier Jo, and Dr. Robert Chapkin, for their guidance and support throughout the course of this research. I also want to thank my mother and father...

  13. Photo-environment affects disease progression in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) Huntington s disease mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUEI-BIN, WANG,

    2015-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Photo-environment affects diseaseABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Photo-environment affects diseaseshow that inappropriate photo-environment such as constant

  14. PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA IN THE IN VIVO MOUSE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staley, Jacob W.

    2010-07-15

    was struck by modulated light a perceptible sound was generated 35 . This phe- nomenon was later discovered to exist in other materials including liquid, gaseous, and biological tissue. As laser technology advanced, the field of photoacoustic spectroscopy... ? is the thermal conductivity of the the medium (?0.14 mm 2 s ?1 in tissue 38 ), we can conclude instantaneous heating of the medium since thermal diffusion can be ignored 39 . The second condition, stress confinement, describes the time for the stress generated...

  15. A mouse Mecp2-null mutation causes neurological symptoms that mimic Rett syndrome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guy, Jacky; Hendrich, Brian; Holmes, Megan; Martin, Joanne E; Bird, Adrian P

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder of females that occurs once in 10,000–15,000 births1,2. Affected females develop normally for 6–18 months, but then lose voluntary movements, including ...

  16. Functional and biochemical analysis of ERK2 in mouse embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, William

    2011-11-24

    The ERK-MAPK pathway is a dynamic signaling module, conserved across Eukarya, and capable of processing a myriad of environmental and cellular signals. It has been implicated in controlling important cell fate decisions ...

  17. Geometric representation of neuroanatomical data observed in mouse brain at cellular and gross levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonryull

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation studies two problems related to geometric representation of neuroanatomical data: (i) spatial representation and organization of individual neurons, and (ii) reconstruction of three-dimensional neuroanatomical ...

  18. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Blouet, Clémence; Ruiz, Henry H.; Buettner, Christoph; Chua, Streamson Jr; Schwartz, Gary J.; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-04-11

    Objective: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is critical in maintaining body temperature. The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) integrates cutaneous thermosensory signals and regulates adaptive thermogenesis. Here, we study the function...

  19. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    putamen, substantia nigra, hypothalamus, globus pallidus andÀ 0.90 to À 0.95), hypothalamus ( À 0.82), globus pallidus (

  20. Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouse CNS using microarray analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, SC; Sharman, EH; Sharman, KZ; Lahiri, D; Cotman, CW; Perreau, VM

    2007-01-01

    gene expression in the hypothalamus and cortex of mice. Procovine pre-mammillary hypothalamus: day-night variation innucleus of the hypothalamus (von Gall et al. , 2002), the

  1. Efferent Projections of Prokineticin 2 Expressing Neurons in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chengkang; Truong, Kimberly K.; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2009-01-01

    the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus: a reexaminationnucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus is the predominantnucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The SCN drives the

  2. Associations Between Paternal Responsiveness and Stress Responsiveness in the Biparental California Mouse, Peromyscus californicus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauke, Miyetani

    2012-01-01

    nucleus of the hypothalamus (mPVN), (C) central nucleus ofnucleus of the hypothalamus (mPVN) and the bed nucleus ofimmunoreactivity in the hypothalamus of lactating rats. J

  3. Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouseCNS using microarray analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2007-01-01

    on gene expression in the hypothalamus and cortex of mice.ovine pre-mammillary hypothalamus: day–night variation innucleus of the hypothalamus (von Gall et al. , 2002), the

  4. The Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Elizabeth Mary

    2013-02-04

    origin comes from alternations to the molecular mechanisms controlling development. In this study, we examined how gene regulation is affected when alcohol is introduced into the environment by looking at genomic imprints. Genomic imprinting is the unique...

  5. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  6. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egan, Kieren

    2014-07-05

    The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease poses a considerable socioeconomic challenge in the years ahead. There are few clinical treatments available and none capable of halting or slowing the progressive nature ...

  8. Sex-specific gene expression in embryonic mouse germ cells during commitment to spermatogenesis or oogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Luke John Emel

    2011-07-05

    The default developmental choice for both female and male Murine Germ Cells (GCs) is to commit to oogenesis and begin meiosis, which occurs in vivo in the developing ovary, and in vitro, at E12.5-E13.5. Prior to this commitment, female and male GCs...

  9. Suppression of Notch Signaling in the Neonatal Mouse Ovary Decreases Primordial Follicle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayo, Kelly E.

    Daniel J. Trombly, Teresa K. Woodruff, and Kelly E. Mayo Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology

  10. Genome Patterns of Selection and Introgression of Haplotypes in Natural Populations of the House Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Dmitri

    ), homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes) or in genetic diseases (e

  11. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mouse UPR responsive protein P58(IPK) TPR fragment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Jiahui; Wu, Yunkun [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Ron, David [Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain has been crystallized. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which can promote protein folding and misfolded protein degradation and attenuate protein translation and protein translocation into the ER. P58(IPK) has been proposed to function as a molecular chaperone to maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER under normal and stressed conditions. P58(IPK) contains nine TPR motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 2.5 Å resolution using a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.53, b = 92.75, c = 84.32 Å, ? = 90.00, ? = 119.36, ? = 90.00°. There are two P58(IPK) molecules in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 60%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  12. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19

    Iron is essential in nearly all organisms. It is a cofactor in many proteins and enzymes. This transition metal can also be toxic because it participates in reactions which produce reactive oxygen species. To avoid these ...

  13. The role of retinoic acid in germ cell development in embryonic mouse gonads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubová, Jana C

    2007-01-01

    Germ cells are the only cell type to undergo meiosis, a specialized cell division process necessary for the formation of haploid gametes. Timing of this process is sex-specific. Ovarian germ cells initiate meiosis during ...

  14. Zfp322a Regulates Mouse ES Cell Pluripotency and Enhances Reprogramming Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    binds to Pou5f1 and Nanog promoters and regulates their transcription. These data along with the results Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 Howard Hughes Medical Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for BioDynamics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

  15. Statistical approach for detection and localization of a fluorescing mouse tumor in Intralipid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a tissue-simulating lipid suspension. © 2005 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 170.6280, 290.7050, 100

  16. Photo-environment affects disease progression in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) Huntington s disease mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUEI-BIN, WANG,

    2015-01-01

    to the negative impact of light pollution and may be able tocan be considered as light pollution. The hypothesis whetherexposed to such light pollution because they spend more time

  17. Reproductive strategies and natural history of the arboreal Neotropical vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Andrea; Timm, Robert M.

    2013-10-01

    orifice, an enlarged uterus, or placen- tal/uterine scars were considered reproductive. We used a binary logistic regression to predict the probability of female reproductive state based on mass. Model fit was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test... to be reproductive. The binary logistic regression was found to be significant, with all coefficients in the model non-zero (log likelihood test, G1?=?43.884, p?

  18. Mouse Models for Studying Depression-Like States and Antidepressant Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    . Bergner, Amanda N. Smolinsky, Peter C. Hart, Brett D. Dufour, Rupert J. Egan, Justin L. LaPorte, and Allan- sistent behavioral measurement, standardization of experimental protocols, and increased throughput

  19. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  20. Comparing performance of keyboarding/mousing tasks using notebook computer flat panel displays vs. CRT monitors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventrca, Rachel Lynn

    2001-01-01

    cathode ray tube (CRT) computer monitors vs. a notebook computer flat panel display (FPD). Six combinations of typical CRT workstation configurations were presented to twenty-four subjects according to a Latin Square Crossover Design. The treatments...

  1. Parkin expression in the adult mouse brain Christine C. Stichel,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübbert, Hermann

    represent a genetic risk factor for the development of sporadic Parkinson's disease (Satoh & Kuroda, 1999-51377 Leverkusen, Germany Keywords: gene expression, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease studies suggest that Parkin contributes to the pathophysiol- ogy of Parkinson's disease. In patients

  2. Analysis of the Mouse Immunome Reactive against Schistosoma mansoni Egg Antigens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erder, Annalisa Augusta

    2014-09-12

    . If an anti-pathology vaccine were created, the rate of infection and reinfection of schistosomiasis would be significantly reduced. Humans with asymptomatic intestinal schistosomiasis and mice with moderate splenomegaly syndrome (MSS) share certain cross...

  3. A Novel Sensitive Method of Detecting Mnemonic Decline in Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Rebecca

    2011-01-11

    be used as an early diagnostic tool for such decline, and a rodent model that is sensitive to this deficit could be valuable in the search for therapies to prevent or reverse such impairments. The goal of this study is to develop an analogous animal model...

  4. Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    79 Figure 3.7 RTI is influenced by sweepHigh frequency inhibition RTI: Rate Tuning Index SP: Slow-the rate tuning index (RTI) was calculated for each neuron

  5. Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A rate tuning index (RTI) was quantified to determine theTrujillo et al. , 2011): RTI = [(n /(n-1)] x [1 – (mean/The rate tuning index (RTI) was used as a measure of FM rate

  6. Precision cancer mouse models through genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Haiwei

    The cancer genome is highly complex, with hundreds of point mutations, translocations, and chromosome gains and losses per tumor. To understand the effects of these alterations, precise models are needed. Traditional ...

  7. New Behavioral Insights Into Home Range Orientation of the House Mouse (Mus musculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Blythe Elizabeth

    2011-05-06

    . In Chapter 2, I trained mice to navigate to their home within a circular arena, with access to a visual beacon and an enriched visual background. The mice showed that to navigate home, they preferred to rely on the extra-arena (background) cues for compass...

  8. Semi-Automated Reconstruction of Vascular Networks in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileepkumar, Ananth

    2014-08-14

    , vascular reconstruction techniques focus either on tracing vessels at the macro-level in a whole brain or tracing micro vessels in a small section of the brain. In this thesis, I attempt to develop a new, more targeted approach to semi-automatically trace a...

  9. The mouse and human Ah receptor differ in recognition of LXXLL motifs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdew, Gary

    . All rights reserved. Keywords: Ah receptor; LXXLL; Coactivators; TCDD; Glutamine-rich; Dioxin The aryl ligands such as carbaryl and myristicin [1]. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD) is considered hydrocarbon receptor; TCDD, 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; ARNT, AhR nuclear translocator; DRE, dioxin

  10. Scanning Tranmission X-ray Microscopic Analysis of Purifed Melanosomes of the Mouse Iris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson,M.; Haraszti, T.; Peterson, G.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.; John, S.; Grunze, M.

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes are specialized intracellular membrane bound organelles that produce and store melanin pigment. The composition of melanin and distribution of melanosomes determine the color of many mammalian tissues, including the hair, skin, and iris. However, the presence of melanosomes within a tissue carries potentially detrimental risks related to the cytotoxic indole-quinone intermediates produced during melanin synthesis. In order to study melanosomal molecules, including melanin and melanin-related intermediates, we have refined methods allowing spectromicroscopic analysis of purified melanosomes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Here, we present for the first time absorption data for melanosomes at the carbon absorption edge ranging from 284 to 290 eV. High-resolution images of melanosomes at discrete energies demonstrate that fully melanized mature melanosomes are internally non-homogeneous, suggesting the presence of an organized internal sub-structure. Spectra of purified melanosomes are complex, partially described by a predominating absorption band at 288.4 eV with additional contributions from several minor bands. Differences in these spectra were detectable between samples from two strains of inbred mice known to harbor genetically determined melanosomal differences, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, and are likely to represent signatures arising from biologically relevant and tractable phenomena.

  11. Evaluation of unmarked deletion mutants as improved Brucella vaccine strains in the mouse and goat models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahl, Melissa Marie

    2006-10-30

    Historical data suggests that prolonged survival of Brucella vaccine organisms in the target host enhances immune protection. Recent research has focused upon the development of rough vaccine strains to avoid interference ...

  12. Embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of aflatoxin B1 during early pregnancy in the mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Hsu, Ying

    1990-01-01

    %, respectively. AFB1 reduced body weight in both pregnant and nonpregnant female mice. The target organs for AFB1 toxicity on female mice include liver and kidney. Histologic alteration on liver is characterized by loss of outline of lobules, closing sinusoids.... . . . . . . . . . Criteria for Histologic Evaluation . . Statistical Methods Page nl V1 vn 1x X1 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 34 IV RESULTS General Embryo toxicity 35 35 35 CHAPTER Results of Weight Measurements . . Histopathologic Examination...

  13. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Felicia S. L.; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-11-26

    -pairs with significant offset C Figure 2. Motif-pairs with preferential spacing are prevalent in haematopoietic TF-bound regions. (A) The pie chart shows all genomic regions in this study bound by at least one TF and the proportion of regions containing motifs or motif... as significant matches to de novo motifs in Figure 1A (step II). These motifs were used to scan TF-bound regions for binding sites and the pie chart highlights the proportion that participates in motif-pairs (with and without significant spacing). relevant...

  14. The Use of Mouse Models for Understanding the Pathogenesis of Anemia of Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Airie

    2013-01-01

    for events related to ovarian cancer. Carcinogenesis, 2000.lung cancer [53], and ovarian cancer [54]. Other cancers,slow-growing model of ovarian cancer developed a frank iron-

  15. Correlation between induction of meiotic delay and aneuploidy in male mouse germ cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, I.D.; Gassner, P.; Schriever-Schwemmer, G.; Min, Zhou Ru [Institut fuer Sauugetiergenetik, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    No aneuploidy assays are prescribed in any international guidelines for chemical safety testing up to now. The CEC-sponsored Aneuploidy Project has the aim to validate test methods for aneuploidy induction which could be used as screening tests. Furthermore, one of the major goals is to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which aneuploidy is induced. The present paper describes the investigation of meiotic delay and aneuploidy induction with the drug diazepam (DZ), the environmentally important mutagen acrylamide (AA) and the spindle poison colchicine (COL), which is used as a positive control. The time course of events was investigated. It is concluded that the assessment of meiotic delay can be used to preselect chemicals which require evaluation of aneuploidy induction during MMI in male germ cells.

  16. Investigations into arsenate-induced neural tube defects in a mouse model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Denise Suzanne

    2009-05-15

    . Of the many environmental agents considered to potentially contribute to NTD risk, arsenic is one that is surrounded in controversy. We have developed a model system utilizing maternal intraperitoneal (I.P.) exposure on E7.5 and E8.5 to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium...

  17. Phenotypic Evolution of Therapeutic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium after Invasion of TRAMP Mouse Prostate Tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choe, Elizabeth

    Salmonella has been of interest in cancer research due to its intrinsic ability to selectively target and colonize within tumors, leading to tumor cell death. Current research indicates promising use of Salmonella in regular ...

  18. In situ mechanical characterization of mouse oocytes using a cell holding Xinyu Liu,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    ,a Roxanne Fernandes,b Andrea Jurisicova,b Robert F. Casperb and Yu Sun*ac Received 29th March 2010, Accepted and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm to resolve cellular forces in real time with a nanonewton been used for characterizing cellular traction forces by visually tracking local deformations

  19. Eye-opening and control of visual synapse development in the mouse superior colliculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Marnie A. (Marnie Ann)

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) coordinates visual, somatosensory, and auditory stimuli to guide animal behavior. The superficial layers (sSC) receive visual information via two major afferent projections: 1) A ...

  20. The use of mouse models to elucidate the genetic and environmental components of neural tube defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gefrides, Lisa Anne

    1998-01-01

    Neural tub defects (NTDs) rank among the most common phics. congenital anomalies affecting human infants worldwide. Unfortunately, the: etiology is poorly understood accuse the genetic and environmental components contributing to their expression...