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1

CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependent upon maintenance of a healthy and functioning riparian system and associated uplands. AlterationsCONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ON THE U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Suite 40 USAF Academy, CO 80840-2400 October 26, 1999 #12;CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE

2

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Meadow Mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

They also will eat flesh if available. A meadow mouse will actually swim under water and dive to underwater holes. It is a vest-pocket edition of its close relative, the muskrat...

4

Meadow Creek | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Creek Meadow Creek Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Creek Facility Meadow Creek Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Ridgeline Energy Developer Ridgeline Energy Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp (Rocky Mountain Power) Location Idaho Falls ID Coordinates 43.50492362°, -111.8366146° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.50492362,"lon":-111.8366146,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Martin, Et Al.,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Martin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Dixie...

6

Green Meadows, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Green Meadows, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia...

7

Meadow Ridge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Ridge Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Ridge Facility Meadow Ridge Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Meadow Ridge Wind Energy LLC (community owned) Energy Purchaser Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Greenfield IA Coordinates 41.39004255°, -94.44637299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.39004255,"lon":-94.44637299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

New Meadows Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadows Biomass Facility Meadows Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name New Meadows Biomass Facility Facility New Meadows Sector Biomass Owner Tamarack Energy Location New Meadows, Idaho Coordinates 44.9712808°, -116.2840176° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9712808,"lon":-116.2840176,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Grand Meadow Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grand Meadow Wind Farm Grand Meadow Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Grand Meadow Wind Farm Facility Grand Meadow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EnXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Dexter MN Coordinates 43.707798°, -92.654071° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.707798,"lon":-92.654071,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

11

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

12

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

13

Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Exploration of the Lester Hot Springs for geothermal potential found that a natural meadow adjacent to the hot springs represents a geothermal anomaly. This conclusion is supported by an anomaly in a thermal infrared survey, high levels of fluorine and boron from a soil survey, and the lack forest cover in the Lester meadow. These vegetation anomalies may be more common in the Cascade Mountains than realized and may be a useful indicator of the extent of geothermal activity at a location. Burlington Northern (BN) started conducting geothermal exploration in 1974 once the

14

Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake III Lake III Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake III Facility Meadow Lake III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Pickles, Et Al., 2003) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Area (Pickles, Et Al., 2003) Dixie Meadows Area (Pickles, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Dixie Meadows Area (Pickles, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Meadows Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References W. L. Pickles, G. D. Nash, W. M. Calvin, B. A. Martini, P. A. Cocks, T. Kenedy-Bowdoin, R. B. Mac Knight, E. A. Silver, D. C. Potts, W. Foxall, P. Kasamayer, A. F. Waibel (2003) Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal Resource Locations In The Us Basin And Range With A Focus On Dixie Meadows, Nv Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Dixie_Meadows_Area_(Pickles,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=511005"

16

Jumping fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jumping fish Name: Roy Bates Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do fish jump more in the summer than in the fall? Replies: One reason may be the number of...

17

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.966944444444°, -117.85527777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.966944444444,"lon":-117.85527777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Reds Meadow Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reds Meadow Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Reds Meadow Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reds Meadow Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Reds Meadow Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Devils Postpile Nat'l Monument, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

19

Meadow Town Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Town Corporation (Utility Company) Town Corporation (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Town Corporation Place Utah Utility Id 12289 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0835/kWh Commercial: $0.0800/kWh Industrial: $0.0823/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Meadow_Town_Corporation_(Utility_Company)&oldid=411060"

20

Meadow Lake II (3Q10) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q10) Q10) Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake II (3Q10) Facility Meadow Lake II (3Q10) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Lester Meadow Area (Vice, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Lester Meadow Area (Vice, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Lester Meadow Area (Vice, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lester Meadow Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The first TIR survey BN conducted was over the Lester Hot Springs area to see if it would help outline the area of geothermal activity. These studies found extensive thermal springs and a grassland area caused by the thermal

22

Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Lake IV Meadow Lake IV Facility Meadow Lake IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Lake II Meadow Lake II Facility Meadow Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Microsoft Word - LuckiamuteMeadows_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Luckiamute Meadows property funding. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract # BPA-007071 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real Property transfers for cultural protection, habitat preservation and wildlife management. Location: Kings Valley quadrangle, in Benton County, Oregon (near Kings Valley, Oregon) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The BPA is proposing to fund the Greenbelt Trust's purchase of the Luckiamute Meadows property (Property), a 73.6-acre parcel of land located just east of Kings Valley

25

Meadow Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Facility Meadow Lake Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Hydraulic jumps on an incline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a fluid jet strikes an inclined solid surface at normal incidence, gravity creates a flow pattern with a thick outer rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory or experiments describing simple aspects of this phenomenon, such as the maximum rise height of the fluid above the impact point, and its dependence on jet velocity and inclination angle. We address this with experiments, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its scaling, though without describing the shape of the parabolic envelope.

Jean-Luc Thiffeault; Andrew Belmonte

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydraulic jumps on an incline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a fluid jet strikes an inclined solid surface at normal incidence, gravity creates a flow pattern with a thick outer rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory or experiments describing simple aspects of this phenomenon, such as the maximum rise height of the fluid above the impact point, and its dependence on jet velocity and inclination angle. We address this with experiments, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its scaling, though without describing the shape of the parabolic envelope.

Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Microsoft Word - FarmPowerMistyMeadows_CX_2012.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Integration of the Farm Power Misty Meadows Generating Facility Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 - Electric equipment Location: Tillamook County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: In response to Farm Power Misty Meadow's (Farm Power's) small generator interconnection request, BPA is planning to integrate their 1-MW biomass generation project into its balancing authority (BA). The proposed point of interconnection is Tillamook PUD's Feeder Circuit #63, which is connected to the Tillamook PUD's Wilson River Substation. In order to integrate the

29

Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect

The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Dynamics of the West African Monsoon Jump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed abrupt latitudinal shift of maximum precipitation from the Guinean coast into the Sahel region in June, known as the West African monsoon jump, is studied using a regional climate model. Moisture, momentum, and energy budget analyses ...

Samson M. Hagos; Kerry H. Cook

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Elevation Gradient Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: September 25, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Release or uptake of soil carbon has the potential to affect atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and hence feedback to greenhouse gas forced climate change. We conducted extensive observations of soil carbon cycling in three montane meadows spaced at elevation intervals (~300 m) that effect average temperature variations in the range expected under a doubled CO2 climate (~2 C). We find that carbon in the top 10 cm of soil can be explained (R2~0.7) by a simple function of plant productivity, litter quality, and soil microclimate that is derived from a steady-state model of carbon pools and flows. Because the variables used in this

33

The hydraulic jump as a white hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

G. E. Volovik

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Jumping ant routing algorithm for sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises that may rely on critical equipments which are constantly moving around, for example, hospitals - need to ensure they can know the current location of vital but mobile assets. Besides, the sensor node on each device should inform us whether ... Keywords: ARAMA (Ant Routing Algorithm for Mobile Ad-hoc Networks), Ad-hoc, JARA (Jumping Ant Routing Algorithm), MANET

Wei-Ming Chen; Chung-Sheng Li; Fu-Yu Chiang; Han-Chieh Chao

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydraulic/Shock-Jumps in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the nonlinear outcome of spiral shocks in protoplanetary disks. Spiral shocks, for most protoplanetary disk conditions, create a loss of vertical force balance in the post-shock region and result in rapid expansion of the gas perpendicular to the disk midplane. This expansion has characteristics similar to hydraulic jumps, which occur in incompressible fluids. We present a theory to describe the behavior of these hybrids between shocks and hydraulic jumps (shock bores) and then compare the theory to three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We discuss the fully three-dimensional shock structures that shock bores produce and discuss possible consequences for disk mixing, turbulence, and evolution of solids.

A. C. Boley; R. H. Durisen

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nonclassical Phase Space Jumps and Optimal Spawning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant attempts have been made toward the intuitive understanding of nonclassical Franck-Condon factors that govern many important molecular processes from radiationless transitions to electronic spectroscopy. In the classical picture, i.e., Condon approximation, nuclear motion is assumed frozen throughout the duration of electronic transitions. However, as is demonstrated in this chapter, position and momentum jumps can compete in determining the Franck-Condon factor such that the conventional propensity rule can be misleading. We present a new method in this chapter where both position and momenta are simultaneously altered to achieve an improved description of nonadiabatic events. This optimal spawning procedure reduces to simpler approaches such as the strict momentum jump in appropriate limits, but is sufficiently flexible to describe cases where both position and momentum adjustments are important.

Yang, S; Yang, Sandy; Martinez, Todd J.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Rolling Meadows, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois: Energy Resources Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0841936°, -88.0131275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0841936,"lon":-88.0131275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Hidden Meadows, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California: Energy Resources California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.2253141°, -117.112532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2253141,"lon":-117.112532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Homestead Meadows North, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North, Texas: Energy Resources North, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.851497°, -106.1716463° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.851497,"lon":-106.1716463,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

White Meadow Lake, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey: Energy Resources Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9237098°, -74.5107121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9237098,"lon":-74.5107121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

New Meadows, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho: Energy Resources Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.9712808°, -116.2840176° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9712808,"lon":-116.2840176,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Meadow Woods, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Woods, Florida: Energy Resources Woods, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.3855632°, -81.366459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.3855632,"lon":-81.366459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Meadows Place, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas: Energy Resources Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.6513439°, -95.5880005° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.6513439,"lon":-95.5880005,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Princeton Meadows, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey: Energy Resources New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3317745°, -74.5637662° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3317745,"lon":-74.5637662,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Bell's Jump Process in Discrete Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The jump process introduced by J. S. Bell in 1986, for defining a quantum field theory without observers, presupposes that space is discrete whereas time is continuous. In this letter, our interest is to find an analogous process in discrete time. We argue that a genuine analog does not exist, but provide examples of processes in discrete time that could be used as a replacement.

Jonathan Barrett; Matthew Leifer; Roderich Tumulka

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Security of jump controlled sequence generators for stream ciphers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of jump control technique provides efficient and secure ways for generating key-stream for stream ciphers. This design approach was recently implemented in some algorithms submitted to eSTREAM, the ECRYPT Stream Cipher Project. However, inappropriately ... Keywords: Pomaranch, cryptanalysis, jump register, key-stream generator, linear relations, stream cipher

Tor Helleseth; Cees J. A. Jansen; Shahram Khazaei; Alexander Kholosha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal Prospecting using Hyperspectral Imaging and Field Observations, Dixie Meadows, NV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an ongoing project to relate surface hydrothermal alteration to structurally controlled geothermal aquifers, we mapped a 16 km swath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Range using Hyperspectral fault and mineral mapping techniques. The Dixie Valley Fault system produces a large fractured aquifer heating Pleistocene aged groundwater to a temperature of 285 C at 5-6 km. Periodically over the last several thousand years, seismic events have pushed these heated fluids to the surface, leaving a rich history of hydrothermal alteration in the Stillwater Mountains. At Dixie Hot Springs, the potentiometric surface of the aquifer intersects the surface, and 75 C waters flow into the valley. We find a high concentration of alunite, kaolinite, and dickite on the exposed fault surface directly adjacent to a series of active fumaroles on the range front fault. This assemblage of minerals implies interaction with water in excess of 200 C. Field spectra support the location of the high temperature mineralization. Fault mapping using a Digital Elevation Model in combination with mineral lineation and field studies shows that complex fault interactions in this region are improving permeability in the region leading to unconfined fluid flow to the surface. Seismic studies conducted 10 km to the south of Dixie Meadows show that the range front fault dips 25-30 to the southeast (Abbott et al., 2001). At Dixie Meadows, the fault dips 35 to the southeast, demonstrating that this region is part of the low angle normal fault system that produced the Dixie Valley Earthquake in 1954 (M=6.8). We conclude that this unusually low angle faulting may have been accommodated by the presence of heated fluids, increasing pore pressure within the fault zone. We also find that younger synthetic faulting is occurring at more typical high angles. In an effort to present these findings visually, we created a cross-section, illustrating our interpretation of the subsurface structure and the hypothesized locations of increased permeability. The success of these methods at Dixie Meadows will greatly improve our understanding of other Basin and Range geothermal systems.

Kennedy-Bowdoin, T; Silver, E; Martini, B; Pickles, W

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jump Steady Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buena Vista, Colorado Coordinates 38.8422178°, -106.1311288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

49

Jumping Out of the Light-Higgs Conformal Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate generic properties of the conformal phase transition in gauge theories featuring Higgs-like fundamental particles. These theories provide an excellent arena to properly investigate conformal dynamics and discover novel features. We show that the phase transition at the boundary of the Higgs conformal window is not smooth but a jumping one for the known perturbative examples. In addition the general conditions under which the transition is either jumping or smooth are provided. Jumping implies that the massive spectrum of the theory will jump at the phase transition. It, however, still allows for one of the states, the would be dilaton of the theory, to be lighter than the heaviest states in the broken phase. Finally we exhibit a calculable Higgs model in which we can, in perturbation theory, determine the Higgs conformal window, the spectrum in the conformally broken phase and demonstrate it to possess a jumping type conformal phase transition.

Oleg Antipin; Matin Mojaza; Francesco Sannino

2012-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

50

Microsoft Word - CX_FINAL_FOG_MEMALOOSE_MEADOWS_LAND_ACQUISITION_06-03-13  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Emanuel Jaramillo Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Memaloose Meadows Land Acquisition Project Work Order No.: Work Order #327332 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Township 12 North, Range 12 East, Section 6; Tax Lots 100 and 200, Wasco County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two contiguous parcels consisting of a total of 14.07 acres in Wasco County, Oregon. The funding would be

51

Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of hatchery three-year-olds collected indicated that the current stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year-olds. However, supplemental creel data indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee 30-45 days after release. Supplemental creel data should continue to be collected to accurately evaluate hatchery contributions to the creel.

McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Shelf Wave Scattering due to Longshore Jump in Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of barotropic shelf waves by an abrupt jump in longshore topography is examined for unbounded and bounded exponential shelves by matching modal representations for longshore transport and sea level. Estimates of the ratio of ...

John F. Middleton; Daniel G. Wright

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chemical Potential Jump during Evaporation of a Quantum Bose Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of the chemical potential jump coefficient on the evaporation coefficient is analyzed for the case in which the evaporating component is a Bose gas. The concentration of the evaporating component is assumed to be much lower than the concentration of the carrier gas. The expression for the chemical potential jump is derived from the analytic solution of the problem for the case in which the collision frequency of molecules of the evaporating component is constant.

E. A. Bedrikova; A. V. Latyshev

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Circular hydraulic jump in generalized-Newtonian fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carry out an analytical study of laminar circular hydraulic jumps, in generalized-Newtonian fluids obeying the two-parametric power-law model of Ostwald-de Waele. Under the boundary-layer approximation we obtained exact expressions determining the flow, an implicit relation for the jump radius is derived. Corresponding results for Newtonian fluids can be retrieved as a limiting case for the flow behavior index n=1, predictions are made for fluids deviating from Newtonian behavior.

Rai, Ashutosh; Poria, Swarup

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers 30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers DOE Provides $30 Million to Jump Start Bioenergy Research Centers October 1, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis DOE Bioenergy Research Center Investment Tops $400 Million WASHINGTON, DC-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has invested nearly $30 million in end-of-fiscal-year (2007) funds to accelerate the start-up of its three new Bioenergy Research Centers, bringing total DOE Bioenergy Research Center investment to over $400 million. The three DOE Bioenergy Research Centers-located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Madison, Wisconsin; and near Berkeley, California-selected by DOE this June, bring together multidisciplinary teams of leading scientists to advance research needed to make cellulosic ethanol and other biofuels

58

Condensation and jumping relay of droplets on lotus leaf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic behavior of micro water droplet condensed on a lotus leaf with two-tier roughness is studied. Under laboratory environment, the contact angle of the micro droplet on single micro papilla increases smoothly from 80 deg to 160 deg during the growth of condensed water. The best-known "self-clean" phenomenon, will be lost. A striking observation is the out-of-plane jumping relay of condensed droplets triggered by falling droplets, as well as its sustained speed obtained in continuous jumping relays, enhance the automatic removal of dropwise condensation without the help from any external force. The surface tension energy dissipation is the main reason controlling the critical size of jumping droplet and its onset velocity of rebounding.

Cunjing Lv; Pengfei Hao; Zhaohui Yao; Yu Song; Xiwen Zhang; Feng He

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quantum Capacity Approaching Codes for the Detected-Jump Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum channel capacity gives the ultimate limit for the rate at which quantum data can be reliably transmitted through a noisy quantum channel. Degradable quantum channels are among the few channels whose quantum capacities are known. Given the quantum capacity of a degradable channel, it remains challenging to find a practical coding scheme which approaches capacity. Here we discuss code designs for the detected-jump channel, a degradable channel with practical relevance describing the physics of spontaneous decay of atoms with detected photon emission. We show that this channel can be used to simulate a binary classical channel with both erasures and bit-flips. The capacity of the simulated classical channel gives a lower bound on the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel. When the jump probability is small, it almost equals the quantum capacity. Hence using a classical capacity approaching code for the simulated classical channel yields a quantum code which approaches the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel.

Markus Grassl; Zhengfeng Ji; Zhaohui Wei; Bei Zeng

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

AGS tune jump system to cross horizontal depolarization resonances overview  

SciTech Connect

Two partial snakes overcome the vertical depolarizing resonances in the AGS. But a new type of depolarizing intrinsic resonance from horizontal motion appeared. We reduce these using horizontal tune jumps timed to these resonances. We gain a factor of six in crossing rate with a tune jump of 0.05 in 100 {micro}s. Two quadrapoles, we described in 2009, pulse 42 times, the current matching beam energy. The power supplies for these quads are described in detail elsewhere in this conference. The controls for the Jump Quad system is based on a BNL designed Quad Function Generator. Two modules are used; one for timing, and one to supply reference voltages. Synchronization is provided by a proprietary serial bus, the Event Link. The AgsTuneJump application predicts the times of the resonances during the AGS cycle and calculates the power supply trigger times from externally collected tune and energy versus time data and the Low and High PS voltage functions from a voltage to current model of the power supply. The system was commissioned during runs 09 & 10 and is operational. Many beam effects are described elsewhere. The TuneJump system has worked well and has caused little trouble save for the perturbations in the lattice having such a large effect due to our need to run with the vertical tune within a few thousandths of the integer tune. As these problems were mostly sorted out by correcting the 6th harmonic orbit distortions which caused a large 18 theta beta wave. Also running with minimal chromaticity reduces emittance growth. There are still small beta waves which are being addressed. The timing of the pulses is still being investigated, but as each crossing causes minimal polarization loss, this is a lengthy process.

Glenn, J.W.; Ahrens, L.; Fu, W.; Mi, J.L.; Rosas, P.; Schoefer, V.; Theisen, C.; Altinbas, Z.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

A rigid cone in the truth-table degrees with jump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automorphism group of the truth-table degrees with order and jump is fixed on the set of degrees above the fourth jump of 0.

Kjos-Hanssen, Bjrn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

McLellan, Holly

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Jump River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Electric Coop Inc River Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Jump River Electric Coop Inc Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9922 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Dual Fuel Heat Commercial Dusk to Dawn Lighting- Unmetered Member Owned Lighting Dusk to Dawn Lighting- Unmetered Rental Lighting Electric Thermal Storage Heat Commercial Large Power Peak Alert- Single Phase Commercial Large Power Peak Alert- Three Phase Commercial Single Phase Residential Three Phase Small Commercial Three-Season Heat Commercial

65

Insider Models with Finite Utility in Markets with Jumps  

SciTech Connect

In this article we consider, under a Levy process model for the stock price, the utility optimization problem for an insider agent whose additional information is the final price of the stock blurred with an additional independent noise which vanishes as the final time approaches. Our main interest is establishing conditions under which the utility of the insider is finite. Mathematically, the problem entails the study of a 'progressive' enlargement of filtration with respect to random measures. We study the jump structure of the process which leads to the conclusion that in most cases the utility of the insider is finite and his optimal portfolio is bounded. This can be explained financially by the high risks involved in models with jumps.

Kohatsu-Higa, Arturo, E-mail: arturokohatsu@gmail.com [Ritsumeikan University, Department of Mathematical Sciences (Japan); Yamazato, Makoto, E-mail: yamazato@math.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science (Japan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces can not only allow for easy droplet removal at micrometric length scales during condensation but also promise to enhance heat transfer performance. However, the rationale for the design of an ideal nanostructured surface as well as heat transfer experiments demonstrating the advantage of this jumping behavior are lacking. Here, we show that silanized copper oxide surfaces created via a simple fabrication method can achieve highly efficient jumping-droplet condensation heat transfer. We experimentally demonstrated a 25% higher overall heat flux and 30% higher condensation heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art hydrophobic condensing surfaces at low supersaturations (heat transfer enhancement but also promises a low cost and scalable approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification. Furthermore, the results offer insights and an avenue to achieve high flux superhydrophobic condensation.

Miljkovic, N; Enright, R; Nam, Y; Lopez, K; Dou, N; Sack, J; Wang, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fringe tracking and spatial filtering: phase jumps and dropouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fringe tracking in interferometers is typically analyzed with the implicit assumption that there is a single phase associated with each telescope in the array. If the telescopes have apertures significantly larger than r0 and only partial adaptive optics correction, then the phase measured by a fringe sensor may differ significantly from the "piston" component of the aperture phase. In some cases, speckle noise will cause "branch points" in the measured phase as a function of time, causing large and sudden jumps in the phase. We present simulations showing these effects in order to understand their implications for the design of fringe tracking algorithms.

David F. Buscher; John S. Young; Fabien Baron; Christopher A. Haniff

2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

68

By Joseph F. C. DiMento and Carrie Menkel-Meadow he U.S. Geographical Survey last year estimated that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By Joseph F. C. DiMento and Carrie Menkel-Meadow T he U.S. Geographical Survey last year estimated and oil have both been discovered and more fields are likely to be found. One area, Tamar, is outside management and oil spills. Historically, under what is sometimes called second and third track diplomacy

Rose, Michael R.

69

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Single Particle Jumps in a Binary Lennard-Jones System Below The Glass Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a binary Lennard-Jones system below the glass transition with molecular dynamics simulations. To investigate the dynamics we focus on events ("jumps") where a particle escapes the cage formed by its neighbors. Using single particle trajectories we define a jump by comparing for each particle its fluctuations with its changes in average position. We find two kinds of jumps: "reversible jumps," where a particle jumps back and forth between two or more average positions, and "irreversible jumps," where a particle does not return to any of its former average positions. For all investigated temperatures both kinds of particles jump and both irreversible and reversible jumps occur. With increasing temperature relaxation is enhanced by an increasing number of jumps, and growing jump lengths in position and potential energy. However, the waiting time between two successive jumps is independent of temperature. This temperature independence might be due to aging, which is present in our system. The ratio of irreversible to reversible jumps is also increasing with increasing temperature, which we interpret as a consequence of the increased likelihood of changes in the cages, i.e. a blocking of the "entrance" back into the previous cage. A comparison of the fluctuations of jumping particles and non-jumping particles indicates that jumping particles are more mobile even when not jumping. The jumps in energy normalized by their fluctuations are decreasing with increasing temperature, which is consistent with relaxation being increasingly driven by thermal fluctuations. In accordance with subdiffusive behavior are the distributions of waiting times and jump lengths in position.

K. Vollmayr-Lee

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Bubbles, Jumps, and Scaling from Properly Anticipated Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices in financial markets exhibit extreme jumps far more often than can be accounted for by external news. Further, magnitudes of price changes are correlated over long times. These so called stylized facts are quantified by scaling laws similar to, for example, turbulent fluids. They are believed to reflect the complex interactions of heterogenous agents which give rise to irrational herding. Therefore, the stylized facts have been argued to provide evidence against the efficient market hypothesis which states that prices rapidly reflect available information and therefore are described by a martingale. Here we show, that in very simple bidding processes efficiency is not opposed to, but causative to scaling properties observed in real markets. Thereby, we link the stylized facts not only to price efficiency, but also to the economic theory of rational bubbles. We then demonstrate effects predicted from our normative model in the dynamics of groups of real human subjects playing a modified minority game. A...

Patzelt, Felix

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Robust Fuzzy Control Approach for a Class of Markovian Jump Nonlinear Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of stabilizing a class of nonlinear systems subject to Markovian jump parameters using a robust stochastic fuzzy controller with Hinfin performance. The class of jump nonlinear systems considered is described ... Keywords: $H_{infty}$ controller, Coupled Lyapunov function, Markovian jump systems, fuzzy system models, stabilizing controller

N. S.D. Arrifano; V. A. Oliveira

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mouse heart rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse heart rate Name: amj Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Is it possible to get the heart rate of a mouse without special equipment?...

75

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A DEVS fire jumps model and associated simulations using ForeFire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple physical model of the phenomenon of fire jumps. The model behaviour is developed using DEVS Formalism and simulated in Discrete Event fashion. The aim of this work is to be able to simulate this phenomenon within the ForeFire ... Keywords: discrete events simulation, fire spread, firebrand model, fires jumps, forest

Bahaa Nader; Jean Baptiste Filippi; Paul Antoine Bisgambiglia

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

BPA-Solicited Technical Review of "Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline", Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to provide, at BPA's request, a technical review of interim products received for Project 2001-015-00 under contract 6925. BPA sometimes solicits technical reviews for Fish and Wildlife products or issues where outside expertise is required. External review of complex project deliverables assures BPA as a funding agency that the contractor is continuing with scientifically-credible experimental techniques envisioned in the original proposal. If the project's methodology proves feasible, there could be potential applications beyond the project area to similar situations in the Columbia Basin. The Experiment involves artificial flooding during high flow periods and a determination of the portion of the return flows that end up in the Umatilla River during low flow months and within acceptable water quality parameters (e.g., low temperature, few contaminants). Flooding could be a critical water source for aquatic organisms at times of the year when flows in the lower reaches of the Umatilla River are low and water is warmer than would be desired. The experiment was proposed to test whether 'this process, recharges the shallow aquifers of the old flood plain, for natural filtration through the alluvial soils as it returns to the Umatilla River, cleaner and cooler (about 50 degree Fahrenheit) five to six month later (about July and August) substantially cooling the river and [making it] more beneficial to anadromous [fish]'. A substantial amount of preliminary data had been collected and preliminary results were submitted in an interim report 'Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline (December 2002)'. A substantial amount of addition funding was provided for the last cycle of flooding (Phases II) and final analyses of the full compliment of data collected over the life of the contract (Phase III). Third party scientific review may assist the contractor in producing a higher quality Final Report with completion of the final 2 phases of the project.

Morgan, David

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Upstream Internal Jumps in Stratified Sill Flow: Observations of Formation, Evolution, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent response of upstream undular bores and internal hydraulic jumps from initial formation to eventual release is documented. Two events, characterized by qualitatively different responses, are discussed. In the first case, an ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Laurence Armi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Descending Stratified Flow and Internal Hydraulic Jump in the Lee of the Sierras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross-barrier density differences and westerly flow established a descending stratified flow across the Sierra Nevada (United States) on 910 April 2006. Downslope flow and an internal hydraulic jump occurred only when the potential temperature of ...

Laurence Armi; Georg J. Mayr

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Native Meadow Restoration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mono-culture switchgrass Additional areas added for switchgrass with acceptance into Biofuel Initiative Program Roundup application to remove existing non-native grasses and...

82

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Program EIS - Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration (08/09/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2004 9, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-167) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration Project No: 1997-056-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 7.18 Road Closures, 8.10 Stream Channel Protection

83

Orbits and reversals of a drop rolling inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the complex dynamics of a non-coalescing drop of moderate size inside a circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid formed on a horizontal disk. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

Alexis Duchesne; Clment Savaro; Luc Lebon; Christophe Pirat; Laurent Limat

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

Control Improvement for Jump-Diffusion Processes with Applications to Finance  

SciTech Connect

We consider stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes and formulate an algorithm which produces, starting from a given admissible control {pi}, a new control with a better value. If no improvement is possible, then {pi} is optimal. Such an algorithm is well-known for discrete-time Markov Decision Problems under the name Howard's policy improvement algorithm. The idea can be traced back to Bellman. Here we show with the help of martingale techniques that such an algorithm can also be formulated for stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes. As an application we derive some interesting results in financial portfolio optimization.

Baeuerle, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.baeuerle@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Stochastics (Germany); Rieder, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.rieder@uni-ulm.de [University of Ulm, Department of Optimization and Operations Research (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied to Targeting New Geothermal Resource Locations in the U.S. Basin and Range with a Focus on Dixie Meadows, NV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the work our collaboration is doing to increase the detailed mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We are imaging several large areas in the western US with high resolution airborne hyperspectral and satellite multispectral sensors. We have now entered the phase where the remote sensing techniques and tools we are developing are mature enough to be combined with other geothermal exploration techniques such as aeromagnetic, seismic, well logging and coring data. The imaging sensors and analysis techniques we have developed have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, altered minerals, subtle hidden faults. Large regions are being imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping hidden faults, high temperature altered mineralization, clays, hot and cold springs and CO2 effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California. The areas that have been imaged include Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera, Dixie Meadows NV, Fish Lake Valley NV, and Brady Hot Springs. Areas that are being imaged in the summer of 2003 are the south moat of the Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Mountain western Pickles, Nash, Kasameyer, Foxall, Martini, Cocks, Kennedy-Bowdoin, McKnight, Silver, Potts, flanks, Mono Inyo chain north of Mammoth Mountain in CA, and the Humboldt Block in NV. This paper focuses on presenting the overview of the high-resolution airborne hyperspectral image acquisition that was done at Dixie Meadows NV in August 2002. This new imagery is currently being analyzed and combined with other field data by all of the authors on this paper. Results of their work up until the time of the conference will be presented in papers in the remote sensing session.

Pickles, W. L.; Nash, G. D.; Calvin, W. M.; Martini, B. A.; Cocks, P. A.; Kenedy-Bowdoin, T.; Mac Knight, R. B.; Silver, E. A.; Potts, D. C.; Foxall, W.; Kasameyer, P.; Waibel, A. F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Controlled jump Markov processes with local transitions and their fluid approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic jump processes, especially birth-and-death processes, are widely used in the queuing theory, computer networks and information transmission. The state of such process describes the instant length of the queues (numbers of packets at different ... Keywords: C-rule, birth-and-death process, continuous time Markov chain, dynamic programming, fluid model, inventory, optimal control, queuing system

Alexey Piunovskiy

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Resilin and cuticle form a composite structure for energy storage in jumping by froghopper insects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the movement is at least 100 ?m. Conclusion Calculations showed that the resilin itself could only store 1% to 2% of the energy required for jumping. The stiffer cuticular parts of the pleural arches could, however, easily meet all the energy storage needs...

Burrows, Malcolm; Shaw, Stephen R; Sutton, Gregory P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Velocity-jump processes with a finite number of speeds and their asymptotically parabolic nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Velocity-jump processes with a finite number of speeds and their asymptotically parabolic nature-time behavior is described by a corresponding scalar diffusive equation of parabolic type, defined, alternative to the tradi- tional parabolic heat equation, which, on the contrary, mantains the inherent

Recanati, Catherine

89

Vorticity Generation in the Shallow-Water Equations as Applied to Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors attempt to find a bridge between the vorticity dynamics of a finite cross-stream length hydraulic jump implied by the Navier-Stokes equations and that given by the shallow-water approximation (SWA) with the turbulence of the hydraulic ...

Richard Rotunno; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Quantum-capacity-approaching codes for the detected-jump channel  

SciTech Connect

The quantum-channel capacity gives the ultimate limit for the rate at which quantum data can be reliably transmitted through a noisy quantum channel. Degradable quantum channels are among the few channels whose quantum capacities are known. Given the quantum capacity of a degradable channel, it remains challenging to find a practical coding scheme which approaches capacity. Here we discuss code designs for the detected-jump channel, a degradable channel with practical relevance describing the physics of spontaneous decay of atoms with detected photon emission. We show that this channel can be used to simulate a binary classical channel with both erasures and bit flips. The capacity of the simulated classical channel gives a lower bound on the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel. When the jump probability is small, it almost equals the quantum capacity. Hence using a classical capacity-approaching code for the simulated classical channel yields a quantum code which approaches the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel.

Grassl, Markus; Wei Zhaohui [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Ji Zhengfeng [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Computer Science, Institute of Software, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zeng Bei [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Combinatorics and Optimization, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hit-or-Jump: An Algorithm for Embedded Testing with Applications to in Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm, Hit-or-Jump, for embedded testing of components of communication systems that can be modeled by communicating extended finite state machines. It constructs test sequences efficiently with a high fault coverage. It does not have state space explosion, as is often encountered in exhaustive search, and it quickly covers the system components under test without being "trapped", as is experienced by random walks. Furthermore, it is a generalization and unification of both exhaustive search and random walks; both are special cases of Hit-or-Jump. The algorithm has been implemented and applied to embedded testing of telephone services in an Intelligent Network (IN) architecture, including the Basic Call Service and five supplementary services. Keywords: conformance testing, embedded testing, communicating extended finite state machines, IN. 1.

Ana Cavalli; David Lee; Christian Rinderknecht; Fatiha Zadi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Neural networks letter: Delay-dependent stability analysis for continuous-time BAM neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the problem of stability analysis for bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters. Some new delay-dependent stochastic stability criteria are derived based on a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii ... Keywords: BAM neural networks, Delay-dependence, Linear matrix inequality (LMI), Markovian jump

Hongyang Liu; Yan Ou; Jun Hu; Tingting Liu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Horizon effects for surface waves in wave channels and circular jumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface waves in classical fluids experience a rich array of black/white hole horizon effects. The dispersion relation depends on the characteristics of the fluid (in our case, water and silicon oil) as well as on the fluid depth and the wavelength regime. In some cases, it can be tuned to obtain a relativistic regime plus high-frequency dispersive effects. We discuss two types of ongoing analogue white-hole experiments: deep water waves propagating against a counter-current in a wave channel and shallow waves on a circular hydraulic jump.

Jannes, Gil; Chaline, Jennifer; Massa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian; Rousseaux, Germain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The jump-off velocity of an impulsively loaded spherical shell  

SciTech Connect

We consider a constant temperature spherical shell of isotropic, homogeneous, linearly elastic material with density {rho} and Lame coefficients {lambda} and {mu}. The inner and outer radii of the shell are r{sub i} and r{sub o}, respectively. We assume that the inside of the shell is a void. On the outside of the shell, we apply a uniform, time-varying pressure p(t). We also assume that the shell is initially at rest. We want to compute the jump-off time and velocity of the pressure wave, which are the first time after t = 0 at which the pressure wave from the outer surface reaches the inner surface. This analysis computes the jump-off velocity and time for both compressible and incompressible materials. This differs substantially from [3], where only incompressible materials are considered. We will consider the behavior of an impulsively loaded, exponentially decaying pressure wave p(t) = P{sub 0{sup e}}{sup -{alpha}t}, where {alpha} {ge} 0. We notice that a constant pressure wave P(t) = P{sub 0} is a special case ({alpha} = 0) of a decaying pressure wave. Both of these boundary conditions are considered in [3].

Chabaud, Brandon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Jerry S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modeling the Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer within a Zero-Order Jump Approach: An Extended Theoretical Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents an extended theoretical background for applied modeling of the atmospheric convective boundary layer within the so-called zero-order jump approach, which implies vertical homogeneity of meteorological fields in the bulk of ...

Evgeni Fedorovich

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6 6 and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's meadow jumping mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's meadow jumping mouse and wetland mitigation work, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS ® compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different time frames, including pre- and post-closure. 3.4 Validation and Data Quality Assessment Data validation and verification (V&V) during CY 2009 was performed by Legacy Management Support contractor personnel at the Grand Junction, Colorado, office. Data quality assessment (DQA) is performed by personnel at the Site. The following section distinguishes DQA from

97

Questions and Answers - If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is there anything colderthan liquid nitrogen? Is there anything colder<br>than liquid nitrogen? Previous Question (Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What's the melting point of steel?) What's the melting point of steel? If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize? Nothing happens instantly. The first thing would be frostbite to the skin followed by the onset of hypothermia to the internal organs. No doubt everything would "freeze up" with time. What this really brings up though is safety issues with cryogenic fluids, that is, those substances that are normally gases (like oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, or helium) at room temperature but can be changed to liquid form through the use of

98

Fringe jump analysis and electronic corrections for the Tore Supra far infrared interferometer  

SciTech Connect

On the Tore Supra tokamak, the ten-channel far infrared interferometer consists of a double color (119 and 195 {mu}m) system with two detectors for each channel to measure the plasma density. The phase measurement is obtained by combining a 100 kHz shifted reference beam with the probing beam that has crossed the plasma. The achieved precision--a few percent of a fringe--is very good compared with the expected variations due to plasma, which are on the order of several fringes. However, the counting of the fringe variations can be affected when the signal is perturbed by electromagnetic interferences or when it deviates in the presence of strong plasma refraction changes occurring during ICRH breakdowns, pellet injections, or disruptions. This induces a strong decrease in the reliability of the measurement, which is an important concern when the diagnostic is used for density control. We describe in this paper the renewing of the electronics that has been achieved to reduce and correct the number of the so-called fringe jumps. A new zero crossing method for phase measurement is used, together with a field programable gate array semiconductor integration, to measure the phase and activate the algorithm of corrections every 10 {mu}s. Comparisons between a numerical oscilloscope analysis and the corrected acquired data in the case of laboratory amplitude modulation tests and in the case of real plasma perturbations are also discussed.

Gil, C.; Barbuti, A.; Elbeze, D.; Pastor, P.; Philip, J.; Toulouse, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Threshold jumping and wrap-around scan techniques toward efficient tag identification in high density RFID systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the emergence of wireless RFID technologies, the problem of Anti-Collision has been arousing attention and instigated researchers to propose different heuristic algorithms for advancing RFID systems operated in more efficient manner. However, there ... Keywords: Query tree, Tag anti-collision, Threshold jumping, Wrap-around scan

Ching-Hsien Hsu; Han-Chieh Chao; Jong Hyuk Park

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Orientational relaxation in a dispersive dynamic medium : Generalization of the Kubo-Ivanov-Anderson jump diffusion model to include fractional environmental dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ivanov-Anderson (IA) model (and an earlier treatment by Kubo) envisages a decay of the orientational correlation by random but large amplitude molecular jumps, as opposed to infinitesimal small jumps assumed in Brownian diffusion. Recent computer simulation studies on water and supercooled liquids have shown that large amplitude motions may indeed be more of a rule than exception. Existing theoretical studies on jump diffusion mostly assume an exponential (Poissonian) waiting time distribution for jumps, thereby again leading to an exponential decay. Here we extend the existing formalism of Ivanov and Anderson to include an algebraic waiting time distribution between two jumps. As a result, the first and second rank orientational time correlation functions show the same long time power law, but their short time decay behavior is quite different. The predicted Cole-Cole plot of dielectric relaxation reproduces various features of non-Debye behaviour observed experimentally. We also developed a theory where both unrestricted small jumps and large angular jumps coexist simultaneously. The small jumps are shown to have a large effect on the long time decay, particularly in mitigating the effects of algebraic waiting time distribution, and in giving rise to an exponential-like decay, with a time constant, surprisingly, less than the time constant that arises from small amplitude decay alone.

K. Seki; B. Bagchi; M. Tachiya

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Persistent entanglement in two coupled SQUID rings in the quantum to classical transition - A quantum jumps approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the quantum-classical crossover of two coupled, identical, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) rings. The motivation for this work is based on a series of recent papers. In ~[1] we showed that the entanglement characteristics of chaotic and periodic (entrained) solutions of the Duffing oscillator differed significantly and that in the classical limit entanglement was preserved only in the chaotic-like solutions. However, Duffing oscillators are a highly idealised toy system. Motivated by a wish to explore more experimentally realisable systems we extended our work in [2,3] to an analysis of SQUID rings. In [3] we showed that the two systems share a common feature. That is, when the SQUID ring's trajectories appear to follow (semi) classical orbits entanglement persists. Our analysis in[3] was restricted to the quantum state diffusion unravelling of the master equation - representing unit efficiency heterodyne detection (or ambi-quadrature homodyne detection). Here we show that very similar behaviour occurs using the quantum jumps unravelling of the master equation. Quantum jumps represents a discontinuous photon counting measurement process. Hence, the results presented here imply that such persistent entanglement is independent of measurement process and that our results may well be quite general in nature.

M. J. Everitt

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Upstream Internal Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In stratified tidal flow over a sill, the character of the upstream response is determined by a Froude number Fs based on the stratification near the surface. This is distinguished from the Froude number governing the response in the neighborhood ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Laurence Armi; Svein Vagle

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Can we trust the transgenic mouse? insights from computer simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several decades, the mouse has gained prominence in the cardiac electrophysiology literature as the animal model of choice. Using computer models of the mouse and human ECG, this paper is a step toward understanding when themouse succeeds ...

Joseph Tranquillo; Adhira Sunkara

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was directed at developing a murine model for the investigation of Lyme disease. This study sought to define the route of inoculation necessary to establish infection or disease in susceptible C3H/HeJ mice and also, to determine the virulence of four Borrelia burgdorferi isolates. Further, the influence of MHC Class I and Class 11 genes of the mouse H-2 complex on the susceptibility and/or resistance to Lyme disease was studied. This thesis demonstrates the development of multisysternic infection in the mouse model, namely, dermatological, cardiac, and arthritic lesions in C3HJHeJ mouse. It also demonstrates the involvement of Class I genes (K and D regions) and Class 11 genes (I-A and I-E regions) of the mouse H-2 complex on the quantitative antibody titers. This was achieved by using genetically stable B IO congenic and recombinant strains. The data presented in this thesis strongly supports use of C3HJHeJ and BIO congenic and recombinant strains as potential laboratory animal models for Lyme disease research.

Reddy, Sunitha

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Characterization of the mouse thrombospondin 2 gene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have characterized the exon/intron organization, complete 3[prime] untranslated region (3[prime]-UTR), and approximately 2.5 kb of the promoter/5[prime] flanking region of the mouse thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) gene. The sizes of exons and the pattern of interruption of the reading frame by introns are highly conserved in mouse TSP2 in comparison with mouse or human TSP1, a finding that suggests a close evolutionary relationship between the two genes. The TSP2 and TSP1 genes are also similar in that the 3[prime]-UTRs of both genes contain multiple TATT and ATTT(A) motifs that might function as mediators of mRNA stability. However, the sequences of the promoter regions in TSP1 and TSP2 are very different; in particular, the TSP2 gene lacks the serum response element and the NF-Y binding site that have been implicated in the serum response of the human TSP1 gene. The structure of the TSP2 gene is consistent with emerging evidence supporting the view that TSP1 and TSP2 perform overlapping but distinct functions. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Tetsuji Shingu; Bornstein, P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign SUBJECT NUMBER ...  

SUBJECT: Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign Partners NUMBER: 4501 RESPONSIBILITY: Fermilab Chief Operating Officer REVISION: 01 APPROVED BY: Fermilab Chief ...

107

Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether ...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009  

SciTech Connect

The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable source of mouse models for human genetic disorders.

Russell, Liane B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

Pennacchio, Len A.

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

383 383 3.2 Ecological Monitoring 3.2.1 Introduction The Ecology group conducts ecological monitoring of the Site's ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Ecological monitoring is an integral aspect of determining whether the management objectives and goals for the natural resources at the Site are being achieved. This report summarizes the results of the ecological monitoring that was conducted at the Site during 2011. It includes a brief summary of the monitoring conducted for Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei; Preble's mouse) mitigation and wetland mitigation activities; however, the details of those monitoring efforts are summarized in separate regulatory reports provided to the

111

Bayesian approach to the study of white dwarf binaries in LISA data: The application of a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) defines new demands on data analysis efforts in its all-sky gravitational wave survey, recording simultaneously thousands of galactic compact object binary foreground sources and tens to hundreds of background sources like binary black hole mergers and extreme-mass ratio inspirals. We approach this problem with an adaptive and fully automatic Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler, able to sample from the joint posterior density function (as established by Bayes theorem) for a given mixture of signals ''out of the box'', handling the total number of signals as an additional unknown parameter beside the unknown parameters of each individual source and the noise floor. We show in examples from the LISA Mock Data Challenge implementing the full response of LISA in its TDI description that this sampler is able to extract monochromatic Double White Dwarf signals out of colored instrumental noise and additional foreground and background noise successfully in a global fitting approach. We introduce 2 examples with fixed number of signals (MCMC sampling), and 1 example with unknown number of signals (RJ-MCMC), the latter further promoting the idea behind an experimental adaptation of the model indicator proposal densities in the main sampling stage. We note that the experienced runtimes and degeneracies in parameter extraction limit the shown examples to the extraction of a low but realistic number of signals.

Stroeer, Alexander; Veitch, John [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

113

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse January 10, 2012 - 4:19pm Addthis A look at tools that can help consumers save money and...

114

Young children's ability to use a computer mouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because there is little empirical data available on how well young children are able to use a computer mouse, the present study examined their proficiency in clicking on small objects at various positions on the screen and their skill in moving objects ... Keywords: Elementary education, Human-computer interaction, Interface, Media in education, Navigation

Afke Donker; Pieter Reitsma

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Experimental Cerenkov luminescence tomography of the mouse model with SPECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Cerenkov luminescence tomography of the mouse model with SPECT imaging validation imaging resulting from Cerenkov radiation has become a motivating topic recently and will potentially open new avenues for the study of small animal imaging. Cerenkov-based optical imaging taken from living

Tian, Jie

116

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

117

Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Soldatow, Valerie Y. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Kosyk, Oksana; Sandot, Amelia [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S. [CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

97 97 3.2 Ecological Monitoring 3.2.1 Introduction The Ecology Group conducts ecological monitoring of the Site's ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Ecological monitoring is an integral aspect of determining whether the management objectives and goals for the natural resources at the Site are being achieved. This report summarizes the results of the ecological monitoring that was conducted at the Site during 2009. It does not include monitoring conducted for Preble's meadow jumping mouse mitigation and wetland mitigation activities. Those data are summarized in separate regulatory reports provided to the appropriate agencies. At an elevation of approximately 6,000 feet, the Site contains a unique ecotonal mixture of

119

Stem Cell Marker Expression in Mouse Lung after Exposure to Acute...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stem cell specific marker expression in mouse lung after whole-body exposure to irradiation with either photons or protons and evaluate modulating effects of preirradiation...

120

Population genetics of the striped-mouse, Rhabdomys Pumilio (Sparrman, 1784).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The striped-mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio, is widely distributed throughout southern Africa within a variety of habitats and rainfall regimes. It is found at sea level in (more)

Mahida, Harendra.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Diarrhea as a cause of mortality in a mouse model of infectious colitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Comparative characterization of genome-wide transcriptional changes during infection can help elucidate the mechanisms underlying host susceptibility. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the mouse colon ...

Borenshtein, Diana

122

526 CARCINOMA OF THE SEMINAL VESICLE IN THE MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRIMARY carcinoma of the seminal vesicle is very rare. Dalgaard and Giertsen (1956) in a critical assessment accepted 23 out of a total of 34 published cases in man and there have been 5 cases reported since (Ewell, 1963 (2 cases) ; Rodriguez Kees, 1964; Balint, 1965; Dawson and Mekie, 1965). Spontaneous malignant tumours of the seminal vesicle are also rare in rodents, although carcinoma of the seminal vesicle has been induced experimentally in rats (Bielschowsky and Hall, 1951). The Flexner-Jobling tumour was originally described as a mixed cell sarcoma (Flexner and Jobling, 1907), later as a teratoma from which an adenocarcinoma developed (Flexner and Jobling, 1910) and now is considered to be a carcinosarcoma (Stewart et al., 1959). A papillary adenoma was found (Upton et al., 1960) in a mouse 19 months after irradiation during the atomic-bomb tests at Eniwetok and 2 spontaneous sarcomas have been reported (Slye, Holmes and Wells, 1919; Guerin, 1954). In the present paper a carcinoma of seminal vesicle in a mouse is described. MATERIALS AND METHODS The tumour was found in an apparently healthy C57B1 male mouse killed at 30 months. Tissue for light microscopy was fixed in Zenker's fluid and paraffin sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. FINDINGS To the naked eye the prostate appeared normal but both seminal vesicles were enlarged to approximately 4 cm. in length and about 0 5 cm. in their greatest diameter. The left seminal vesicle contained normal white opalescent rather viscous secretion while in the right the secretion was pale fawn in colour although of normal consistency. On section there was a papillary tumour in the right seminal vesicle (Fig. 1). The structure was varied and included relatively well differentiated papillary (Fig. 1) and small acinar areas (Fig. 2). Another area was anaplastic and the pattern could be described as pseudosarcomatous (Fig. 3). Mitoses were frequent in this area. Dilated blood vessels were found throughout the tumour, and there were areas of degeneration. There was some endothelial EXPLANATION OF PLATE FIG. 1. General view of the papillary adenocarcinoma projecting into the lumen of the seminal vesicle. H. & E. 33 x.

C. Rowlatt

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome  

SciTech Connect

Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0516-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

516-EA 516-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0516-EA EA at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Dixie Meadows Geothermal Exploration Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Consultant JBR Environmental Consultants, Inc. Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) Application Time 308 NEPA Process Time 510 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City

125

Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined and defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.

Gayle Woloschak

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The south-eastern house mouse Mus musculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the biogeographic history and precise characterization of the genetic make-up of a taxon are essential to investigate speciation processes and achieve sound evolutionary comparisons. A case in point is the house mouse Mus musculus and its three parapatric subspecies, which have become a model for such studies. However, although Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus constitute genetically wellcharacterized homogeneous entities, the case of Mus musculus castaneus remains poorly documented. Using mtDNA control region variation in a sample of 402 individuals, covering much of the distribution range of this subspecies, we identify four haplogroups that show largely non-overlapping geographic distributions. They appear to have undergone post-Neolithic expansions, presumably through commensalism with humans, but exhibit a much more ancient divergence. These results point towards a strong past subdivision and a vicariant origin of the different haplogroups, with each retaining a subfraction of the total variability. The genomic consequences of this spatial heterogeneity on the present taxonomic partition will have to be appraised, and may challenge the use of this subspecies as a single entity in evolutionary studies. 2012 The Linnean Society of London, Biological

Pierre Boursot; Jamshid Darvish; Franois Bonhomme

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains J.R. Brogan Colorado State University Abstract We have recently developed a ‘low dose rate’ gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding heterozygous genotypes(1, 2). The assay is also capable of distinguishing mild hypersensitivities for cells from an appreciable proportion of apparently normal individuals(3). We used this assay to determine whether the genetic background of four commonly used

129

Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity  

SciTech Connect

L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

Dever, Joseph T. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Elfarra, Adnan A. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)], E-mail: aelfarra@wisc.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

MouseLight: bimanual interactions on digital paper using a pen and a spatially-aware mobile projector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MouseLight is a spatially-aware standalone mobile projector with the form factor of a mouse that can be used in combination with digital pens on paper. By interacting with the projector and the pen bimanually, users can visualize and modify the virtually ... Keywords: digital pen input, mobile projector, spatially-aware display

Hyunyoung Song; Francois Guimbretiere; Tovi Grossman; George Fitzmaurice

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Kinematics and Mechanics of Jumping Lizards: the Modulation of Jump Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NC, USA) fitted with a carbon-fiber top plate (DragonPlate,destination was a carbon fiber plate of similar dimensions

Olberding, Jeffrey Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT  

SciTech Connect

Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

Smith, Carolyn Beebe

134

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

SciTech Connect

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

Aiming and clicking in young children's use of the computer mouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study investigated the abilities of young children to aim and click with a computer mouse. Young children have not yet fully developed their motor skills and they are therefore more likely than adults to click next to targets on the computer ... Keywords: Elementary education, Human-computer interaction, Input device, Interface, Media in education, Navigation

Afke Donker; Pieter Reitsma

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOD protein level (140%) and activity (75%). The increase in MnSOD was not due to a substantial proliferationDietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L oxidative stress. In vitro studies have shown an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities following

Stuart, Jeffrey A.

138

Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity  

SciTech Connect

The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

Guindon, Katherine A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Massey, Thomas E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)], E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A filtered database search algorithm for endogenous serum protein carbonyl modifications in a mouse model of inflammation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During inflammation, the resulting oxidative stress can damage surrounding host tissue, forming protein-carbonyls. The SJL mouse is an experimental animal model used to assess in vivo toxicological responses to reactive ...

Slade, Peter G.

140

Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

Kellis, Manolis

142

Gene Expression Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain After Low-dose and Acute Radiation Exposure Daila Gridley Loma Linda University & Medical Center Abstract Purpose: 1) To examine the induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis-associated gene expression profiles in brain after whole-body irradiation with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) photons and acute exposure to photons 2) to compare these radiation-induced effects with those produced by LDR and acute exposure to protons. Material and Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 Gy of photons or protons at 0.8 Gy/min and 0.9 Gy/min, respectively, both with and without pre-exposure to 0.01 Gy LDR γ-rays (57Co) at 0.03 cGy/h. Brain tissues were harvested and quick-frozen for analyses by quantitative RTPCR at 56

143

Low LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse Randy Jirtle Duke University Medical Center Abstract Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation significantly alters the epigenome in somatic cells and gametes (Filkowski and others, 2009), yet it has not been determined if epigenomic modifications occur below 10 cGy. Epigenetic dysregulation during early development is mechanistically linked to the pathogenesis of adult-onset diseases (Jirtle and Skinner, 2007). Thus, we sought to determine whether low doses of ionizing radiation during early gestation affect susceptibility to adult-onset diseases by deregulating the establishment of DNA methylation patterns. Agouti viable yellow (Avy) mice were used to test this novel postulate because they are

144

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

145

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer. Background and Significance: It is increasingly believed that individuals differ in their genetic susceptibilities to environmental insults for diseases such as cancer. This concern is especially important for the large numbers of individuals receiving low-dose exposures in the nuclear energy

146

Imaging and differentiation of mouse embryo tissues by ToF-SIMS  

SciTech Connect

Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) equipped with a gold ion gun was used to image mouse embryos and differentiate tissue types (brain, spinal cord, skull, rib, heart and liver). Embryos were paraffin-embedded and then de-paraffinized. The robustness and repeatability of the method was determined by analyzing nine tissue slices from three different embryos over a period of several weeks. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the spectral data generated by ToF-SIMS, histopathologically identified tissue types of the mouse embryos can be differentiated based on the characteristic differences in their mass spectra. These results demonstrate the ability of ToF-SIMS to determine subtle chemical differences even in fixed histological specimens.

Wu, L; Lu, X; Kulp, K; Knize, M; Berman, E; Nelson, E; Felton, J; Wu, K J

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

The mouse angiogenin gene family: Structures of an angiogenin-related protein gene and two pseudogenes  

SciTech Connect

Angiogenin, a homologue of pancreatic ribonuclease, is a potent inducer of blood vessel formation. As an initial step toward investigating the in vivo functional role of this protein via gene disruption, we undertook the isolation of the angiogenin gene (Ang) from the 129 strain mouse, which will be used for generating targeting constructs. Unexpectedly, screening of a genomic library with an Ang gene probe obtained previously from the BALB/c strain yielded two new genes closely similar to Ang rather than Ang itself. One of these encodes a protein with 78% sequence identity to angiogenin and is designated {open_quotes}Angrp{close_quotes} for {open_quotes}angiogenin-related protein.{close_quotes} The ribonucleolytic active site of angiogenin, which is critical for angiogenic activity, is completely conserved in Angrp, whereas a second essential site, thought to bind cellular receptors, is considerably different. Thus, the Angrp product may have a function distinct from that of angiogenin. The second gene obtained by library screening is a pseudogene, designated {open_quotes}Ang-ps1,{close_quotes} that contains a frame shift mutation in the early part of the coding region. Although the Ang gene was not isolated from this library, it was possible to amplify this gene from 129 mouse genomic DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis showed that the 129 strain Ang gene is identical to the BALB/c gene throughout the coding region. PCR cloning also yielded a second Ang-like pseudogene, designated {open_quotes}Ang-ps2.{close_quotes} Southern blotting of genomic DNA confirmed the presence of Ang, Angrp, and at least one of the pseudogenes in an individual mouse and suggested that the mouse Ang gene family may contain more than the four members identified here. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Brown, W.E.; Nobile, V.; Shapiro, R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Structural comparison and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse IL-13 genes  

SciTech Connect

The genomic structure of the recently described cytokine IL-13 has been determined for both human and mouse genes. The nucleotide sequence of a 4.6-kb DNA segment of the human gene is described. The human IL-13 gene (IL 13) occurs as a single copy in the haploid genome and maps to human chromosome 5. A 4.3-kb DNA fragment of the mouse IL-13 gene (Il 13) has been sequenced and found to occur as a single copy, mapping to mouse chromosome 11. Intrachromosomal mapping studies revealed that both genes contain four exons and three introns and show a high degree of sequence identify throughout their length. Potential recognition sequences for transcription factors that are present in the 5'-flanking region and are conserved between both genes include IFN-responsive elements, binding sites for AP-1, AP-2, and AP-3, an NF-lL 6 site, and a TATA-like sequence. Both genes map to chromosomal locations adjacent to genes encoding other cytokines, including IL-3, GM-CSF, IL-5, and IL-4 suggesting that IL-13 is another member of this cytokine gene family that may have arisen by gene duplication. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

McKenzie, A.N.J.; Sato, A.; Doyle, E.L.; Zurawski, G. (DNAX Research Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Li, X.; Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. (Stanford Univ. Medical School, CA (United States)); Largaespada, D.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States))

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse January 10, 2012 - 4:19pm Addthis A look at tools that can help consumers save money and fuel, whether you’re in the market for a new vehicle or trying to make the most of your current one. | Photo courtesy of Auto Guide. A look at tools that can help consumers save money and fuel, whether you're in the market for a new vehicle or trying to make the most of your current one. | Photo courtesy of Auto Guide. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this mean for me? Quickly compare cars based on their projected fuel costs, price, safety ratings and MPG. Calculate the long-term costs of your next vehicle. Discover simple tips and tricks that can start saving you fuel and

150

TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasia and increases mammary stem-like cells in an inducible transgenic mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study, we created doxycycline inducible double transgenicexpression of TBX3 in our doxycycline inducible mouse modelthe mammary glands of doxycycline induced double transgenic

Liu, Jing; Esmailpour, Taraneh; Shang, Xiying; Gulsen, Gultekin; Liu, Andy; Huang, Taosheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Retention of plutonium in mouse tissues as affected by antiviral compounds and their analogs  

SciTech Connect

The chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is an effective therapeutic substance for decorporation of extracellar monomeric plutonium in the mouse and dog, but is much less effective in removing intracellular polymeric plutonium (Pu-P). In the absence of effective therapy, this intracellular plutonium is long retained in the body, particularly in reticuloendothelial tissues like the liver. Our interest, therefore, turned to the development of adjunct substances capable of removing additional plutonium from the liver beyond that removable by DTPA alone. We showed that glucan, a yeast cell wall polysaccharide, is a useful adjunct to DTPA for removal of Pu-P from the mouse liver. Its toxicity, however, makes it a less than desirable drug for potential human use. Therefore, we initiated a search for more soluble (and presumably less hazardous) therapeutic agents similar to glucan, i.e., capable of adjunct action with DTPA. Of over 20 substances tested the most successful results were obtained with two antiviral, antitumor compounds, the pyran copolymers XA-124-177 and XA-146-85-2. These are condensation products of divinyl ether and maleic anhydride. Another analog, EMH-227, prepared by condensation of acrylic acid and itaconic acid, was similarly successful. Maximal removal of plutonium from mouse liver was obtained with a single intravenous (I.V.) injection of 10 to 90 mg/kg of pyran copolymer given 5 days after I.V. Pu-P administration. Although these doses increased splenic uptake of plutonium, a dose of 10 mg/kg produced a minimal increase in the splenic burden while producing maximal removal of hepatic plutonium. (auth)

Lindenbaum, A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Guilmette, R.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mouse Infestations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would like to trap them or drive them out without killing them if possible. We have two cats in the house so we can't use an open poison. We have been trapping them with Havahart...

155

Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Moreira, Estefania G. [Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Physiological Sciences, State University of Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Hong, Sungwoo [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Faustman, Elaine M., E-mail: faustman@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center on Human Development and Disability, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Phytoestrogens are partial estrogen agonists in the adult male mouse, Environ. Health Perspect. 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intake, as well as serum and urinary concentrations, of phytoestrogens is high in countries where incidence of prostate cancer is low, suggesting a chemopreventive role for phytoestrogens. Their significance could be explained by the ability to antagonize the action of more potent endogenous estrogens in initiation or promotion of tumor formation. We have studied estrogenicity and antiestrogenicity of dietary soy and two phytoestrogens, coumestrol and daidzein, in our neoDES mouse model for the study of prostatic neoplasia. Soy was chosen because it is rich in phytoestrogens, is widely used in Oriental diets, and has antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties in the neoDES mouse when given from fertilization onward. In short-term tests with adult animals, no evidence for estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity (capability to antagonize the action of 1 7,B-estradiol) of soy was found when development of epithelial metaplasia and expression of c-fos protooncogene in prostate were used as end points of estrogen action. Estrogenic activity of coumestrol and daidzein on c-fos expression was subtle. Coumestrol, either given alone or in combination with 17,B-estradiol, had no effect on development of epithelial metaplasia. These marginal or missing effects in adult males could be interpreted by assuming that the neonatal period is more critical for estrogenic or antiestrogenic action of soy and phytoestrogens. Once initiated, estrogen-related lesions would develop spontaneously. Alternatively, the chemopreventive action of soy is not due to antiestrogenicity of soyderived

Sari Makela; Risto Santti; Leena Salo; John A. Mclachlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the heart A. M. BRONIKOWSKI,1,7 P. A. CARTER,2 T. J. MORGAN,2 T. GARLAND, JR.,3 N. UNG,1 T. D. PUGH,4 R voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol changes that normally occur in the aging heart. Male mice (Mus domesticus) were sampled from the 16th

Bronikowski, Anne

158

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A vy Mouse Autumn Bernal 1,2,3 , Dale Huang 1 , Yue Li 4 , Dana Dolinoy 5 , and Randy Jirtle 1 Department of Radiation Oncology 1 , University Program in Genetics and Genomic 2 , Integrated Toxicology & Environmental Health Program 3 , Department of Community and Family Medicine 4 , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, Department of Environmental and Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4 Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the frequency of exposures to low doses of radiation is increasing due to man-made sources such as diagnostic imaging and nuclear power. This increased exposure has led to concerns amongst the general public and the government about the

159

A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse  

SciTech Connect

Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

Gintautas, Vadas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hubler, Alfred [UIUC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Generation and Characterization of the Anp32e-Deficient Mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Accumulated literature suggests that the acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32 kilodalton (Anp32) proteins control multiple cellular activities through different molecular mechanisms. Like other Anp32 family members, Anp32e (a.k.a. Cpd1, PhapIII) has been conserved throughout vertebrate evolution, suggesting that it has an important function in organismal survival. Principal Findings: Here, we demonstrate that the Anp32e gene can be deleted in mice without any apparent effect on their wellbeing. No defects in thymocyte apoptosis in response to various stresses, fibroblast growth, gross behaviour, physical ability, or pathogenesis were defined. Furthermore, combined deletion of Anp32a and Anp32e also resulted in a viable and apparently healthy mouse. Significance: These results provide evidence that significant functional redundancy exists among Anp32 family members.

Patrick T. Reilly; Samia Afzal; Andrew Wakeham; Jillian Haight; Annick You-ten; Joanna Dembowy b; Ashley Young; Tak W. Mak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0008-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0-0008-CX 0-0008-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0008-CX CX at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Dixie Meadows Seismic Survey General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 209 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 6/30/2009

162

MONICA: a compact, portable dual gamma camera system for mouse whole-body imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named "MONICA" for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed ?looking up? through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using a photopeak energy window of 140 keV?10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1 cm), 2.2 mm; sensitivity, 149 cps (counts per seconds)/MBq (5.5 cps/?Ci); energy resolution (FWHM, full width at half maximum), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2=0.99 for 0?185 MBq (0?5 mCi) in the field of view (FOV); spatial uniformity, <3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-min images acquired throughout the 168-h study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g., limited imaging space, portability and, potentially, cost are important.

Choyke, Peter L.; Xia, Wenze; Seidel, Jurgen; Kakareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Proffitt, James; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Green, Michael V.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Barbara McClintock, Jumping Genes, and Transposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barbara McClintock and Transposable Genetic Elements McClintock Honored · Woman of Science · Educational Material · Resources with Additional Information Barbara McClintock's remarkable life spanned the history of genetics in the twentieth century. ... [T]he science of genetics, to which McClintock made seminal contributions both experimental and conceptual, has come to dominate all of the biological sciences, from molecular biology, through cell and developmental biology, to medicine and agriculture. ... Barbara McClintock Courtesy of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Archives McClintock made her first significant contribution as a graduate student, developing cytological techniques that allowed her to identify each of the ten maize chromosomes. These early experiments laid the groundwork for a remarkable series of cytogenetic discoveries ... [for which] McClintock was the intellectual driving force ... . These include identification of maize linkage groups with individual chromosomes, the well-known cytological proof of genetic crossing-over, evidence of chromatid crossing-over, cytological determination of the physical location of genes within chromosomes, identification of the genetic consequences of nonhomologous pairing, establishment of the causal relationship between the instability of ring-shaped chromosomes and phenotypic variegation, discovery that the centromere is divisible, and identification of a chromosomal site essential for the formation of the nucleolus. ...

164

One Jump Ahead: Computer Perfection at Checkers, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new edition of this extraordinary book depicts the creation of the world champion checkers computer program, Chinook. In only two years, Chinook had become a worthy opponent to the world champion, and within four years had defeated all the world's ...

Jonathan Schaeffer

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Can preapproval jump-start the allowance market  

SciTech Connect

With compliance deadlines approaching in three years, utility, environmental and financial planners and their regulators are in the process of grappling with the requirements imposed, and opportunities created, by the acid rain program established under Title 4 of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. The novel element of the program - emissions or allowance trading through a nationwide allowance market - presents great challenges for utilities and their regulators. Perhaps the foremost challenge is establishing the allowance market. If state utility commissions subject utilities' compliance strategies to traditional after-the-fact prudence reviews, as tradition would impel them to do, the attendant regulatory risks are likely to push utilities toward more conservative compliance schemes that underuse allowance trading (as the exchange at the head of this article demonstrates). If that happens, the market will fail to develop, and its full potential for environmental benefit at least cost will go unrealized. This, in turn, is likely to strengthen the case for non-market regulatory mechanisms - a vicious circle. In this paper, the authors suggest a way out of this.

Dudek, D.J.; Goffman, J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Jumping on the Mommy Track: A Tax for Working Mothers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a 30% wage growth rate increase in the last half of theirthat the effective tax rate increases as the amount to whichof them, the proposed tax rates increase the tax benefits to

Kornberg, Jessica C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Hydraulic Jump and Undular Bore Formation on a Shelf Break  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the semidiurnal internal tide as it propagates across the Australian North West Shelf is discussed analytically. As the tide is of long wavelength and small amplitude, this evolution is described by a perturbed extended Korteweg-...

N. F. Smyth; P. E. Holloway

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent ... Indeed price impact of large trades have been considered as one of the main...

169

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2012 ... A major source of the execution cost comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent institutional trades.

170

Jet Jumping: Low-Frequency Variability in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study intrinsic variability in the position of jets in a ?-plane channel ocean with simple topography using a quasigeostrophic numerical model. This study links the variability in jet position with abyssal anticyclones that form as a ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Andrew McC. Hogg

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office's (RL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act payments at Hanford recently surpassed 1 billion. RL was allocated 1.63 billion from the Recovery Act...

173

Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's (RL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act payments at Hanford recently surpassed $1 billion. RL was allocated $1.63 billion from the Recovery Act in 2009 in order to create jobs and reduce the footprint of active cleanup at Hanford. In key Recovery Act accomplishments, RL: * Reduced Hanford's cleanup footprint by a total of 143 square miles by re- moving more than 20 facilities and hundreds of debris sites on the Hanford Reach National Monument, a 300-square mile area around Hanford formerly used for military activity and research. * Demolished 56 facilities, which reduces surveillance and maintenance costs. * Completed expansion of Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facil- ity (ERDF) ahead of schedule and under budget, increasing its capacity to

174

TEN YEARS OF CHANGE IN SIERRAN STRINGER MEADOWS: AN EVALUATION OF RANGE CONDITION MODELS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-watersheds of the intermoun- tain region. Ogden, UT: Agriculture Hdbk. #19. In- termountain Forest and Range Experiment

Standiford, Richard B.

175

Descriptors of Posidonia oceanica meadows: Use and application C. Pergent-Martini a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zoologia, Universita` di Genova, Via Balbi 5, 16126 Genova, Italy t Departamenot d'Ecologia, Universitad de

Boudouresque, Charles F.

176

Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages  

SciTech Connect

The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel oxides and nickel-copper oxides to rat, mouse, and dog pulmonary alveolar macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Metal oxides containing either Ni alone (NiO's) or both Ni and Cu (Ni-CuO's) are encountered during Ni refining. Six NiO compounds calcined at temperatures ranging from < 650 to 1045/sup 0/ and four Ni-CuO's containing from 6.9 to 28% Cu and 44 to 69% Ni were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages (AM). NiO's were less toxic to rat AM than were the Ni-CuO compounds. The toxicity of the Ni-CuO compounds increased with increasing Cu content and decreasing Ni content of the molecules, indicating that the toxicity was due to the Cu content of the molecules. AM obtained from beagle dogs, F344/N rats, and B6C3F/sub 1/ mice displayed the following species sensitivities: dog > rat approx. = mouse, with dog AM being most sensitive. The observed differences in species sensitivities correlated with differences in the phagocytic abilities of dog, rat, and mouse AM, with the ranking of phagocytic abilities of the AM in decreasing order of ability being dog > rat > mouse.

Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Successful radioimmunotherapy for micro and occult metastases in a SCID mouse model  

SciTech Connect

It is often addressed that the most appropriate candidate, theoretically, for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is not bulky tumor burden but for micro or occult metastatic foci, The major obstacles in the verification for veracious efficacy of RIT had been clinically and preclinically the difficulty in obtaining such a model. We have developed the model of testicular tumor (primary site) with visible small metastases to the lymph nodes (LNs) and non-visible (occult) lesions to distant organs in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. And thus, the suppression of minute tumor depositions after RIT was evaluated. One week after hemilateral intratesticular injection of 2 million of HELA Hep 2 cells that expressed placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), the group of the mice were treated with a single dose of I-131 labeled HPMS-1, anti-PLAP MoAb or with saline control. The I-131 labeled HPMS-1 (5.6 MBq / 150 {mu}g) was intravenously administered and at 2 weeks after, the testis, retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal LNs and other gans were removed. For the control group, the testicular tumor and LNs metastases were found in 100% and 86% of the mice. The metastases in the liver and lung were not observed by histological examination but in all mouse samples, the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay could identify the human {beta}-globin gene derived from HeLa cells, indicating the presence of definitive metastases. For the treated group, the average testicular tumor weight was significantly reduced by the factor of 2.4 (132 mg vs 311 mg, p<0.01). The LNs metastases were even more distinctively suppressed by the factor of 45.7 (13 mg vs 599 mg, p,0.05). Remarkably, the PCR products from the occult metastases were almost completely controlled; 97% suppression found for the liver and 81% for the lung. Thus, we conclude that using I-131 as a label, RIT is justified to used for targeting and killing minute tumor foci.

Yokoyama, K.; Koshida, K.; Kinuya, S. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan)]|[Asahikawa Medical College (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Dose-dependent transitions in Nrf2-mediated adaptive response and related stress responses to hypochlorous acid in mouse macrophages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is potentially an important source of cellular oxidative stress. Human HOCl exposure can occur from chlorine gas inhalation or from endogenous sources of HOCl, such as respiratory burst by phagocytes. Transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of cellular redox status and serves as a primary source of defense against oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response in cultured mouse macrophages in a biphasic manner. In an effort to determine whether Nrf2 pathways overlap with other stress pathways, gene expression profiling was performed in RAW 264.7 macrophages exposed to HOCl using whole genome mouse microarrays. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis on gene expression data revealed that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response and protein ubiquitination were the most sensitive biological pathways that were activated in response to low concentrations of HOCl (< 0.35 mM). Genes involved in chromatin architecture maintenance and DNA-dependent transcription were also sensitive to very low doses. Moderate concentrations of HOCl (0.35 to 1.4 mM) caused maximal activation of the Nrf2 pathway and innate immune response genes, such as IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10 and chemokines. At even higher concentrations of HOCl (2.8 to 3.5 mM) there was a loss of Nrf2-target gene expression with increased expression of numerous heat shock and histone cluster genes, AP-1-family genes, cFos and Fra1 and DNA damage-inducible Gadd45 genes. These findings confirm an Nrf2-centric mechanism of action of HOCl in mouse macrophages and provide evidence of interactions between Nrf2, inflammatory, and other stress pathways.

Woods, Courtney G. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences Incorporated, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Fu Jingqi; Xue Peng; Hou Yongyong [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Pluta, Linda J.; Yang Longlong; Zhang Qiang; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi Jingbo [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. Human disorders that arise from mutations in this voltage dependent calcium channel are familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia-2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6. The tg/tgla mouse exhibits ataxia, movement disorders and memory impairment, suggesting that both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected. To gain greater understanding of the many neurological abnormalities that are exhibited by the 90-120 day old tg/tgla mouse the following aspects were investigated: 1) the morphology of the cerebellum and hippocampus, 2) proliferation and death in cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 3) changes in basic biochemical parameters in granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. This study revealed no volume abnormalities within the hippocampus of the mutant mice, but a decrease in cell density with the pyramidal layer of CA3 and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Cell size in the CA3 region was unaffected, but cell size in the hilus of the dentate gyrus did not exhibit the gender difference seen in the wild type mouse. The cerebellum showed a decrease in volume without any decrease in cerebellar cellular density. Cell proliferation and differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus remained normal. This region also revealed a decrease in cell death in the tg/tgla mice. Basal intracellular calcium levels in granule cells show no difference within the hippocampus, but an increase in the tg/tgla male cerebellum compared to the wild type male cerebellum. There was no significant difference in granule cell mitochondrial membrane potential within the wild type and mutant animals in either the hippocampus or cerebellum. The rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in granule cells revealed no variation within the hippocampus or cerebellum. The amount of ROS was decreased in cerebellar granule cells, but not granule cells of the hippocampus. Inducing ROS showed no alteration in production or amount of ROS produced in the hippocampus, but did show a ceiling in the amount of ROS produced, but not rate of production, in the cerebellum.

Murawski, Emily M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Diet (TWD). Neurobiol Dis 2007, 28:16-29. 9. Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L: Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease. J Biol Chem... Diets, Inc, so as to avoid diets associated with predictable organ toxicity. Mice were supplied with food and water ad libi- tum and were weighed weekly. At the age of 18 weeks, mice were sacrificed via isoflurane inhalation, and the brains were removed...

Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Dickstein, Dara L; Hof, Patrick R; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Gandy, Sam

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

Diurnal Variations of Mouse Plasma and Hepatic Bile Acid Concentrations as well as Expression of Biosynthetic Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA) concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. Methods and Results: The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin). Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR) null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90 % of BAs with b-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. Conclusion: BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the

Transporters; Yu-kun Jennifer Zhang; Grace L. Guo; Curtis D. Klaassen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Genome-wide identification of Ago2 binding sites from mouse embryonic stem cells with and without mature microRNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 1922-nucleotide noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate mRNA targets. We have identified endogenous miRNA binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), by performing photo-cross-linking ...

Leung, Anthony K. L.

188

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation CarcinogenesisA Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

Leena Rivina; Robert Schiestl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

STUDIES ON THE EFFECTOR CELL OF ANTI-TUMOUR IMMUNITY IN A CHEMICALLY INDUCED MOUSE TUMOUR SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Spleen cells from mice immunized against a methylcholanthrene induced rhabdomyosarcoma inhibited tumour cell colony formation in vitro and prevented tumour development in vivo in an adoptive transfer test. Treatment of the immune spleen cells with anti-mouse immunoglobulin serum or passage through a nylon wool column, both of which reduced the percentage of immunoglobulin bearing cells in the population to less than 3-4%, did not alter their antitumour effects. In contrast, treatment of the spleen cells with anti-BAO serum abolished their anti-tumour effects both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that T cells are the mediators of tumour immunity in this chemically induced tumour system. THE EFFECTOR cell(s) in anti-tumour immune responses has not yet been clearly identified. A previous study using Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV) induced tumours indicated that non-T cells were responsible

R. B. Whitney; J. G. Levy; A. G. Smith

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Reasor, R. Scott [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Campbell, Claire L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

Smetanina, Mariya A., E-mail: maria.smetanina@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Group of Pharmacogenomics, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 8, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pakharukova, Mariya Y. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurinna, Svitlana M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Unit 1000, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Merkulova, Tatyana I. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary glandas a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Ju Han 1 , Sandhya Bhatnagar 1 , Nadire Duru 1 , Zhi Hu 1 , Jian-Hua Mao 1 , Mina Bissell 1 , Joe Gray 1,2 , Gary H. Karpen 1 , Priscilla K. Cooper 1 and Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 1 Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Current affiliation: Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science Univ, Portland, OR Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer.

193

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using 16O /18O labeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) hold great promise for regenerative medicine as well as for investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. Understanding of key intracellular signaling pathways and protein targets that control development of iPSC from somatic cells is essential for designing new approaches to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here we report the development and application of an integrated quantitative proteomics platform for investigating differences in protein expressions between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and MEF-derived iPSC. This platform consists of 16O/18O labeling, multidimensional peptide separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and data analysis with UNiquant software. Using this platform a total of 2,481 proteins were identified and quantified from the 16O/18O-labeled MEF-iPSC proteome mixtures with a false discovery rate of 0.01. Among them, 218 proteins were significantly upregulated, while 247 proteins were significantly downregulated in iPSC compared to MEF. Many nuclear proteins, including Hdac1, Dnmt1, Pcna, Ccnd1, Smarcc1, and subunits in DNA replication and RNA polymerase II complex were found to be enhanced in iPSC. Protein network analysis revealed that Pcna functions as a hub orchestrating complicated mechanisms including DNA replication, epigenetic inheritance (Dnmt1) and chromatin remodeling (Smarcc1) to reprogram MEF and maintain stemness of iPSC.

Huang, Xin; Tian, Changhai; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yongxiang; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Sharma, Seema; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Jialin; Ding, Shi-Jian

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

Process-level controls on CO2 fluxes from a seasonally snow-covered subalpine meadow soil, Niwot Ridge, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA e-mail:of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA B.Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0057-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CX CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0057-CX CX at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) Application Time 25 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 5/24/2012 Decision Document Date 6/18/2012

197

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0058-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0058-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0058-DNA DNA at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Observation Wells Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

198

DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0009-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10-0009-CX 10-0009-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-CO1000-2010-0009-CX CX at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Electromagnetic Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 209 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Date 6/30/2009

199

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0022-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22-DNA 22-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0022-DNA DNA at Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Comments Core hole/TGH Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Document Type NOI

200

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal Resource Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal Resource Locations In The Us Basin And Range With A Focus On Dixie Meadows, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal Resource Locations In The Us Basin And Range With A Focus On Dixie Meadows, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents an overview of the work our collaboration is doing to increase the detailed mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We are imaging several large areas in the western US with high resolution airborne hyperspectral and satellite multispectral sensors. We have now entered the phase where the remote sensing techniques and tools we are developing are mature enough to be

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201

Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a new modulatory cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit from mouse retina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a key role in olfactory and visual transduction. Native CNG channels are heteromeric complexes consisting of the principal ? subunits (CNG13), which can form functional channels by themselves, and the modulatory ? subunits (CNG45). The individual ? and ? subunits that combine to form the CNG channels in rod photoreceptors (CNG1 ? CNG4) and olfactory neurons (CNG2 ? CNG4 ? CNG5) have been characterized. In contrast, only an ? subunit (CNG3) has been identified so far in cone photoreceptors. Here we report the molecular cloning of a new CNG channel subunit (CNG6) from mouse retina. The cDNA of CNG6 encodes a peptide of 694 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 80 kDa. Among the CNG channel subunits, CNG6 has the highest overall similarity to the CNG4 ? subunit (47% sequence identity). CNG6 transcripts are present in a small subset of retinal photoreceptor cells and also in testis. Heterologous expression of CNG6 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells did not lead to detectable currents. However, when coexpressed with the cone photoreceptor ? subunit, CNG6 induced a flickering channel gating, weakened the outward rectification in the presence of extracellular Ca 2 ? , increased the sensitivity for L-cis diltiazem, and enhanced the cAMP efficacy of the channel. Taken together, the data indicate that CNG6 represents a new CNG channel ? subunit that may associate with the CNG3 ? subunit to form the native cone channel. Key words: cone photoreceptor; cyclic nucleotide; cation channel; L-cis diltiazem; single-channel recording Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are expressed in various cell types and tissues. Although the functional significance of CNG channel expression in most nonsensory tissues is still unclear, the role of the channels in signal transduction pathways of vertebrate sensory neurons has been well defined (Baylor, 1996;

Andrea Gerstner; Xiangang Zong; Franz Hofmann; Martin Biel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Physical analysis of the region deleted in the t{sup w18} allele of the mouse tcl-4 complementation group  

SciTech Connect

We have generated a YAC config of at least 3.3 Mb from the proximal region of In(17)4 of mouse chromosome 17. This region corresponds to DNA lost in the gastrulation mutant t{sup w18}, which belongs to the tcl-4 complementation group. Our most proximal and distal probes lie within the deletion-3.3 Mb apart-indicating that we have not cloned the entire region. The deleted region is contained in a genetic interval of less than 1 cM, suggesting that some suppression of recombination must occur. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Barclay, J.; King, T.F.; Crossley, P.H. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); and others

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Three conazoles increase hepatic microsomal retinoic acid metabolism and decrease mouse hepatic retinoic acid levels in vivo  

SciTech Connect

Conazoles are fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. In a previous toxicogenomic study of triazole-containing conazoles we found gene expression changes consistent with the alteration of the metabolism of all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), a vitamin A metabolite with cancer-preventative properties (Ward et al., Toxicol. Pathol. 2006; 34:863-78). The goals of this study were to examine effects of propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil, three triazole-containing conazoles, on the microsomal metabolism of atRA, the associated hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme(s) involved in atRA metabolism, and their effects on hepatic atRA levels in vivo. The in vitro metabolism of atRA was quantitatively measured in liver microsomes from male CD-1 mice following four daily intraperitoneal injections of propiconazole (210 mg/kg/d), triadimefon (257 mg/kg/d) or myclobutanil (270 mg/kg/d). The formation of both 4-hydroxy-atRA and 4-oxo-atRA were significantly increased by all three conazoles. Propiconazole-induced microsomes possessed slightly greater metabolizing activities compared to myclobutanil-induced microsomes. Both propiconazole and triadimefon treatment induced greater formation of 4-hydroxy-atRA compared to myclobutanil treatment. Chemical and immuno-inhibition metabolism studies suggested that Cyp26a1, Cyp2b, and Cyp3a, but not Cyp1a1 proteins were involved in atRA metabolism. Cyp2b10/20 and Cyp3a11 genes were significantly over-expressed in the livers of both triadimefon- and propiconazole-treated mice while Cyp26a1, Cyp2c65 and Cyp1a2 genes were over-expressed in the livers of either triadimefon- or propiconazole-treated mice, and Cyp2b10/20 and Cyp3a13 genes were over-expressed in the livers of myclobutanil-treated mice. Western blot analyses indicated conazole induced-increases in Cyp2b and Cyp3a proteins. All three conazoles decreased hepatic atRA tissue levels ranging from 45-67%. The possible implications of these changes in hepatic atRA levels on cell proliferation in the mouse tumorigenesis process are discussed.

Chen, P.-J. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Padgett, William T.; Moore, Tanya; Winnik, Witold; Lambert, Guy R.; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Hester, Susan D. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Nesnow, Stephen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

755 THE CARCINOGENIC ACTION OF 2-AMINODIPHENYLENE OXIDE ANTD 4-AMINODIPHENYL ON THE BLADDER AND LIVER OF THE C57 x IF MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLAYSON, Lawson, Santana and Bonser (1965) suggested that in the mouse the oral administration of chemical bladder carcinogens induced hyperplasia of the bladder epithelium in the first days or weeks of the experiment. Subsequently, Clayson and Pringle (1966) showed that the number of mitoses in the normal adult mouse bladder epithelium is very low and suggested that it is necessary to increase the mitotic rate in order to induce tumours. They showed that the implantation of a paraffin wax or cholesterol pellet, or a small glass bead, into the lumen of the bladder increased the mitotic rate. Subsequently, Clayson, Pringle and Bonser (1967) found that a single oral administration of 4-ethylsulphonylnaphthalene-1sulphonamide, a murine bladder carcinogen, greatly increased the number of mitoses in the bladder epithelium, while Wood (personal communication) observed a smaller increase in mice given 2-acetamidofluorene in the diet. Thus, the correlation of early hyperplasia and subsequent malignancy can be explained on the grounds of an initial increase in the number of mitoses in the bladder epithelium. In the course of the experiments of Clayson et al. (1965) a number of chemicals

D. B. Clayson; T. A. Lawson; J. A. S. Pringle

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Cytotoxic Effects of CdSe Quantum Dots on Maturation of Mouse Oocytes, Fertilization, and Fetal Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) are useful novel luminescent markers, but their embryonic toxicity is yet to be fully established, particularly in oocyte maturation and sperm fertilization. Earlier experiments by our group show that CdSe-core QDs have cytotoxic effects on mouse blastocysts and are associated with defects in subsequent development. Here, we further investigate the influence of CdSe-core QDs on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and subsequent pre- and postimplantation development. CdSe-core QDs induced a significant reduction in the rates of oocyte maturation, fertilization, and in vitro embryo development, but not ZnS-coated CdSe QDs. Treatment of oocytes with 500 nM CdSe-core QDs during in vitro maturation (IVM) led to increased resorption of postimplantation embryos and decreased placental and fetal weights. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the negative impact of CdSe-core QDs on mouse oocyte development. Moreover, surface modification of CdSe-core QDs with ZnS effectively prevented this cytotoxicity.

Ming-shu Hsieh; Nion-heng Shiao; Wen-hsiung Chan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Immunochemical approach to indoor aeroallergen quantitation with a new volumetric air sampler: studies with mite, roach, cat, mouse, and guinea pig antigens  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new high-volume air sampler for determining antigen concentrations in homes and illustrate its use for quantitating airborne house dust mite, cat, cockroach, mouse, and guinea pig antigens. The concentration of house dust-mite antigen was similar from houses in Rochester, Minn. and tenement apartments in Harlem, N. Y., but cockroach and mouse urinary proteins were present only in Harlem. The amount of cat or guinea pig antigen varied as expected with the number of pets in the home. In calm air the airborne concentration of mite and cat antigen was similar throughout the house but increased greatly in a bedroom when bedding was changed. In calm air most of the cat and mite antigens were associated with respirable particles less than 5 microns mean aerodynamic mass diameter, but in air sampled after the bedding was changed, more cat antigen was found in particles greater than 5 microns. The apparatus and technique described can provide objective data concerning the magnitude and the relative distribution and duration of suspended particles of defined sizes, which contain allergen activity.

Swanson, M.C.; Agarwal, M.K.; Reed, C.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles  

SciTech Connect

Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: traci.leslie@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Hatfield, Kimberly P., E-mail: kpm9786@yahoo.co [Program in Toxicology and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties  

SciTech Connect

Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite increasing knowledge about its enzymatic properties and the regulation of its expression, little is known about its function. We have generated transgenic animals that express an autoactivating mutant of rat SL1 targeted to the epithelial compartment of the mammary gland. Phenotypically, SL1 transgenic mice display increased branching morphogenesis and lactogenic differentiation at prepubertal stages and premature involution during late pregnancy. Branching morphogenesis requires the invasion of epithelial cells into the adipose tissue, a process reminiscent of invasion of stromal compartments by tumor cells. Strikingly, a large number of SL1 transgenic animals also develop mammary tumors of various histotypes, including invasive adenocarcinomas. Because tumor development is a late response of SL1 transgenic mice to overexpression of the transgene, it remains unclear whether SL1 plays a direct role in tumor growth and/or invasion or whether the observed tumors are a consequence of other molecular alterations in the microenvironment of the mammary gland before the onset of tumor growth. Studies performed with synthetic inhibitors of MMP activity and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) have shown that suppression of MMP activity also suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. In many cases, the level of SL1 expression in tumors of the mammary gland and other tissues is positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. However, the only direct evidence for the nature of the MMPs involved was provided by the demonstration that function-blocking antibodies against gelatinase A and antisense inhibition of matrilysin expression decreased the invasiveness of tumor cells in a reconstituted basement membrane assay. These studies encouraged us to investigate whether SL1 plays a direct role in invasion of ECM. We used two carcinoma cell lines, TCL1 and SCg6 that formed rapidly growing, invasive tumors in vivo and migrated through Matrigel and collagen gels in culture. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against SL1 inhibited Matrigel invasion by TCL1 and SCg

Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binds synthetic and chemoprotective phytochemicals, and research in this laboratory has developed selective AhR modulators (SAhRMs) for treatment of breast cancer. Activation of the AhR through agonists such as TCDD inhibits hormone activation of several E2-responsive genes in breast cancer cell lines. In this study, inhibition of E2-induced proliferation and gene expression by TCDD has been investigated in the uterus of wildtype, ERKO and AhRKO mice. Cyclin D1, DNA polymerase ?, and VEGF mRNA levels are induced by E2 through ER? in the uterus as determined by in situ hybridization studies. TCDD down-regulated E2-induced cyclin D1 and DNA polymerase ? expression, but not E2-induced VEGF expression, in wild-type mice, but not AhRKO mice, confirming the role of the AhR. Furthermore, protein synthesis was not necessary for induction of cyclin D1 or DNA polymerase ?gene expression by E2 or inhibition of these responses by TCDD. Therefore, AhR-ER? crosstalk directly regulates the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation in vivo. AhR agonists induce down-regulation of ErbB family receptors in multiple tissues/organs suggesting possible inhibitory interactions with chemotherapeutic potential. Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells that express functional AhR and exhibit constitutive activation of MAPK and PI3-K pathways. Therefore, 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane-induced inhibition of ErbB2 signaling was investigated in these cells lines and in the MMTV-c-neu mouse mammary tumor model, which overexpresses ErbB2 in the mammary gland. The growth of ErbB2 overexpressing cell lines and mammary tumors was inhibited by 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane; however, modulation of MAPK or PI3-K pathways and cell cycle proteins nor induction of apoptosis by 1,1',2,2'-tetramethyldiindolylmethane was observed in the ErbB2overexpressing cell lines. Current studies are investigating mitochondrial effects of 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane in the ErbB2-overexpressing cell lines, as well as continuing studies on gene expression profiles in the mammary glands of MMTV-c-neu mice to better understand and identify critical genes that are responsible for ErbB2-mediated transformation and growth of cancer cells/tumors.

Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0010-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EA EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0010-EA EA at Dixie Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Coyote Canyon and Dixie Meadows Geothermal Exploration General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Terra-Gen Power LLC Consultant CH2M Hill Ltd Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Downhole Techniques, Drilling Techniques, Exploration Drilling, Well Testing Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 265 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater

211

Interference by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin with cultured mouse submandibular gland branching morphogenesis involves reduced epidermal growth factor receptor signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to mouse embryonic teeth, sharing features of early development with salivary glands in common, involves enhanced apoptosis and depends on the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF receptor signaling, on the other hand, is essential for salivary gland branching morphogenesis. To see if TCDD impairs salivary gland morphogenesis and if the impairment is associated with EGF receptor signaling, we cultured mouse (NMRI) E13 submandibular glands with TCDD or TCDD in combination with EGF or fibronectin (FN), both previously found to enhance branching morphogenesis. Explants were examined stereomicroscopically and processed to paraffin sections. TCDD exposure impaired epithelial branching and cleft formation, resulting in enlarged buds. The glands were smaller than normal. EGF and FN alone concentration-dependently stimulated or inhibited branching morphogenesis but when co-administered with TCDD, failed to compensate for its effect. TCDD induced cytochrome P4501A1 expression in the glandular epithelium, indicating activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. TCDD somewhat increased epithelial apoptosis as observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end-labeling method but the increase could not be correlated with morphological changes. The frequency of proliferating cells was not altered. Corresponding to the reduced cleft sites in TCDD-exposed explants, FN immunoreactivity in the epithelium was reduced. The results show that TCDD, comparably with EGF and FN at morphogenesis-inhibiting concentrations, impaired salivary gland branching morphogenesis in vitro. Together with the failure of EGF and FN at morphogenesis-stimulating concentrations to compensate for the effect of TCDD this implies that TCDD toxicity to developing salivary gland involves reduced EGF receptor signaling.

Kiukkonen, Anu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) and Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: anummela@mappi.helsinki.fi; Sahlberg, Carin [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Partanen, Anna-Maija [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Alaluusua, Satu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Tuomisto, Jouko [Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland); Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa [Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Propagators and ridge jumps in a back-arc basin, the West Philippine Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Earth Sciences, University of the Ryukyus, Senbaru-1, Okinawa 903-02313, Japan; 3 Institute of Applied

Demouchy, Sylvie

213

Internal Hydraulic Jumps and Overturning Generated by Tidal Flow over a Tall Steep Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations from the Hawaiian Ridge indicate episodes of overturning and strong dissipation coupled with the tidal cycle near the top of the ridge. Simulations with realistic topography and stratification suggest that this overturning has ...

Sonya Legg; Jody Klymak

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The temperature-jump problem for a variable collision frequency model L. B. Barichello  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil M. Camargoa) Programa de Po´s-Graduac¸a~o em Engenharia Meca^nica, Universidade

Siewert, Charles E.

215

Jumping scale, mapping space: feminist geographies at work in the art of Mona Hatoum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the home is associated with oneness, security, stabilityhome and that of place, which has been equated with identity, belonging, security,security borders, as evoking the Palestinian condition, or a personal condition, her [Hatoums] ambivalent relationship towards home,

Khullar, Sonal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

Richerme, Philip J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Sulfate Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Zhang and Sparks, 1989). A digitizer (DIA-RRC, Dia-Log Co.) was then triggered and the relative changes

Sparks, Donald L.

218

Nonstationarity in multifactor models of discrete jump processes, memory and application to cloud modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and in ocean (phase transitions between water and ice). Reasons for these intrinsic limi- tations of standard of nonstationary Markov model parameterization (J. Atmos. Sci., 66, 2059-2072, (2009)) (that are constrained

Krause, Rolf

219

Thermodynamics of quantum jump trajectories in systems driven by classical fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The large-deviation method can be used to study the measurement trajectories of open quantum systems. For optical arrangements this formalism allows to describe the long time properties of the (non-equilibrium) photon counting statistics in the context of a (equilibrium) thermodynamic approach defined in terms of dynamical phases and transitions between them in the trajectory space [J.P. Garrahan and I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 160601 (2010)]. In this paper, we study the thermodynamic approach for fluorescent systems coupled to complex reservoirs that induce stochastic fluctuations in their dynamical parameters. In a fast modulation limit the thermodynamics corresponds to that of a Markovian two-level system. In a slow modulation limit, the thermodynamic properties are equivalent to those of a finite system that in an infinite-size limit is characterized by a first-order transition. The dynamical phases correspond to different intensity regimes, while the size of the system is measured by the transition rate of the bath fluctuations. As a function of a dimensionless intensive variable, the first and second derivative of the thermodynamic potential develop an abrupt change and a narrow peak respectively. Their scaling properties are consistent with a double-Gaussian probability distribution of the associated extensive variable.

Adrian A. Budini

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

220

Banner Student Self Service Tools Click on a question below to jump to the answer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

channel click Add or Drop Classes 3. Choose the term from the dropdown box and click Submit 4. Enter your Alternate PIN and click Submit #12;5. To register for a new class click Class Search 6. To change the Class Search button. 5 6 6 If you are searching for Internet classes you can select "Internet Only

Heller, Barbara

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221

Jump Frequency of Cd Tracer Atoms in -Mn Matthew O. Zacate and Gary S. Collinsa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the second excited state of 111 Cd via electron capture. The Cd nucleus subsequently decays to its ground) is present at the Cd nucleus, the intermediate state is perturbed and populations of its magnetic substates

Collins, Gary S.

222

Why Hasnt the Jump in Oil Prices Led to a Recession?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices have increased substantially over the last several years.When oil price increases of this magnitude occurred during the 1970s, they were associated with severe recessions.Why hasnt that happened this time around? This Letter explores some answers to that question. Why should oil affect the economy? When the price of oil rises, U.S. households and businesses who purchase fuel oil, gasoline, and other petroleum-based products have less disposable income to spend on other goods and services. However, for domestically produced oil, oil producers receive the extra income from the products they sell, so total U.S. income is not directly affected.Therefore, for domestic oil, a price increase

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Edge structure preserving 2-D and 3-D image denoising by jump surface estimation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. August 2011. Major: Statistics. Advisor: Peihua Qiu. 1 computer file (PDF); viii, 134 pages, appendix A. Image denoising is often (more)

Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Jump-Start Your Plant's Energy Savings with Quick PEP (Plant Energy Profiler)  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program fact sheet describes a new, easy-to-use software tool that can help manufacturing firms identify ways to save energy and money in their plants.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Using ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance Alvin Lo, Joni D. Mott, Jian-Hua Mao, and Mina J. Bissell Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Low Dose SFA, as part of Project 2, we are using a systems genetics approach to determine the contribution of non-targeted and targeted radiation effects for risk of mammary carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to characterize the mammary gland of the parental mouse strains, and the F1 and F2 generations used in these studies with respect to tissue

226

HH Domain of Alzheimers Disease Ab Provides Structural Basis for Neuronal Binding in PC12 and Mouse Cortical/Hippocampal Neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key question in understanding AD is whether extracellular Ab deposition of parenchymal amyloid plaques or intraneuronal Ab accumulation initiates the AD process. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is endocytosed from the cell surface into endosomes where it is cleaved to produce soluble Ab which is then released into the brain interstitial fluid. Intraneuronal Ab accumulation is hypothesized to predominate from the neuronal uptake of this soluble extracellular Ab rather than from ER/Golgi processing of APP. We demonstrate that substitution of the two adjacent histidine residues of Ab40 results in a significant decrease in its binding with PC12 cells and mouse cortical/hippocampal neurons. These substitutions also result in a dramatic enhancement of both thioflavin-T positive fibril formation and binding to preformed Ab fibrils while maintaining its plaque-binding ability in AD transgenic mice. Hence, alteration of the histidine domain of Ab prevented neuronal binding and drove Ab to enhanced fibril formation and subsequent amyloid plaque deposition- a potential mechanism for removing toxic species of Ab. Substitution or even masking of these Ab histidine residues might provide a new therapeutic direction for minimizing neuronal uptake and subsequent neuronal degeneration and

Joseph F. Poduslo; Emily J. Gilles; Muthu Ramakrishnan; Kyle G. Howell; Thomas M. Wengenack; Geoffry L. Curran; Karunya K. K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

In vivo immunomodulatory effects of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model for inhibiting infection of Schistosoma mansoni  

SciTech Connect

Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus commonly used for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer in Chinese folk medicine. Extract of A. camphorate is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antihepatitis B virus and anticancer activities. In this study, we tested the in vivo effects of polysaccharides derived from A. camphorata (AC-PS) on immune function by detection of cytokine expression and evaluation of the immune phenotype in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model. The protective effect of AC-PS in mice was tested by infection with Schistosoma mansoni. The induction of large amounts of IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and TNF-a mRNA were detected after 2 and 4 weeks of oral AC-PS administration in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In transgenic mice, 3 to 6 weeks of oral AC-PS administration increased the proportion of CD4{sup +} T cells and B cells within the spleen. More specifically, there was an increase of Th1 CD4{sup +} T cells and Be1 cells among spleen cells as observed by detection the of Type1/Type2 marker molecules. By using a disease model of parasitic infection, we found that AC-PS treatment inhibited infection with S. mansoni in BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice. AC-PS appears to influence the immune system of mice into developing Th1 responses and have potential for preventing infection with S. mansoni.

Cheng, P.-C. [Institute of Tropical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, C.-Y. [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-C. [Biotechnology Center, Grape King Inc., Chungli, Taiwan (China); Lee, K.-M. [Institute of Tropical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kmlee@ctust.edu.tw

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ZIP4H (TEX11) Deficiency in the Mouse Impairs Meiotic Double Strand Break Repair and the Regulation of Crossing Over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently shown that hypomorphic Mre11 complex mouse mutants exhibit defects in the repair of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs). This is associated with perturbation of synaptonemal complex morphogenesis, repair and regulation of crossover formation. To further assess the Mre11 complexs role in meiotic progression, we identified testis-specific NBS1interacting proteins via two-hybrid screening in yeast. In this screen, Zip4h (Tex11), a male germ cell specific X-linked gene was isolated. Based on sequence and predicted structural similarity to the S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana Zip4 orthologs, ZIP4H appears to be the mammalian ortholog. In S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana, Zip4 is a meiosis-specific protein that regulates the level of meiotic crossovers, thus influencing homologous chromosome segregation in these organisms. As is true for hypomorphic Nbs1 (Nbs1 DB/DB) mice, Zip4h 2/Y mutant mice were fertile. Analysis of spermatocytes revealed a delay in meiotic double strand break repair and decreased crossover formation as inferred from DMC1 and MLH1 staining patterns, respectively. Achiasmate chromosomes at the first meiotic division were also observed in Zip4h 2/Y mutants, consistent with the observed reduction in MLH1 focus formation. These results indicate that meiotic functions of Zip4 family members are conserved and support the view that the Mre11 complex and ZIP4H interact functionally during the execution of the

Carrie A. Adelman; John H. J. Petrini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Molecular analysis of the mouse agouti gene and the role of dominant agouti-locus mutations in obesity and insulin resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lethal yellow (A{sup y/-}) and viable yellow (A{sup vy/-}) mouse agouti mutants have a predominantly yellow pelage and display a complex syndrome that includes obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, hallmark features of obesity-associated noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. A new dominant agouti allele, A{sup iapy}, has recently been identified; like the A{sup vy} allele, it is homozygous viable and confers obesity and yellow fur in heterozygotes. The agouti gene was cloned and characterized at the molecular level. The gene is expressed in the skin during hair growth and is predicted to encode a 131 amino acid protein, that is likely to be a secreted factor. In both Ay/- and A{sup iapy}/- mice, the obesity and other dominant pleiotropic effects are associated with an ectopic expression of agouti in many tissues where the gene product is normally not produced. In Ay, a 170-kb deletion has occurred that causes an upstream promoter to drive the ectopic expression of the wild-type agouti coding exons. In A{sup iapy}, the coding region of the gene is expressed from a cryptic promoter within the LTR of an intracisternal A-particle (IAP), which has integrated within the region just upstream of the first agouti coding exon. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the cloned agouti gene under the influence of the beta-actin and phosphoglycerate kinase promoters display obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and yellow coat color. This demonstrates unequivocally that ectopic expression of agouti is responsible for the yellow obese syndrome.

Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Winter and summer nitrous oxide and nitrogen oxides fluxes from a seasonally snow-covered subalpine meadow at Niwot Ridge, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA M. W.Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA D.Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA B. Hall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Exclusion Zone The University must comply with its obligations under section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eustace Road Platt Meadow Field Close Rectory Close Fitzjohn Close Redwing Rise Foxglove Gardens Ringmore

Doran, Simon J.

233

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

Russell, Liane B [ORNL; Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

9. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect

This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Preliminary Development and Evaluation of Lightning Jump Algorithms for the Real-Time Detection of Severe Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in total lightning activity (intracloud + cloud-to-ground) are often observed tens of minutes in advance of the occurrence of severe weather at the ground. These rapid increases in lightning ...

Christopher J. Schultz; Walter A. Petersen; Lawrence D. Carey

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

WorkExcel.com E117 If dealing with irate customers makes you want to drive home, jump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers. The company keeps a number of offices in a variety of cities and locations within each city. Each a vehicle, the company records the customer name, address, phone number (with the area code). A customer is usually identified by their phone number. The company also maintains a list of the SuperRent Club members

Oliver, Douglas L.

239

Jump-Start Your Plant's Energy Savings with Quick PEP, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Quick Plant Energy Profiler (Quick PEP) can help industrial plants identify energy use and find ways to save money and energy.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning  

SciTech Connect

mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

After a Storm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After a Storm After a Storm Nature Bulletin No. 47 January 5, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation AFTER A STORM At daybreak on Monday, December 24, a blinding blizzard raged. About eight o'clock the snow ceased. Immediately the woods and meadows became alive with hungry animals and birds. The rabbits came out of their snug hiding places to cruise the thickets, gnawing the bark of young trees and shrubs, or racing about for exercise and play. The squirrels came down from their den trees and zigzagged here and there, digging out acorns from beneath the snow. The killers of the foxes, mink and weasel -- came out hunting for mice and any luckless bird or animal they could surprise. Everywhere in the tall grass and weeds of the meadows, the field mice had made telltale holes from their runways up to the surface, for air. Flocks of song sparrows hopped about, jumping up to seize the choice weed seeds. Pheasants stalked along, eating seeds and hunting patches of burdock or nubbins left in cornfields, where they could get a real meal. The juncoes cleaned up what the pheasants wasted.

242

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Hyperspectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Hyperspectral data was also used to successfully map soil-mineral anomalies that are structurally related in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In the area of the power plant, 20 m spatial resolution AVIRIS data were used. For Dixie Meadows, Nevada, 3 m spatial resolution HyVista HyMap hyperspectral data

243

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Railroad Valley Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Railroad Valley Area (Laney, 2005) Railroad Valley Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Railroad Valley Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Railroad Valley Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Objectives for FY 2004 were to map mineralogy in Dixie Meadows, NV and thermal anomalies in Railroad Valley, NV. The first objective relates to the project goal of testing hyperspectral imagery for applications in soil-mineralogy mapping to detect hidden faults and buried geothermal phenomena. The second objective relates to testing satellite thermal

244

Zim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Zim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Zim's Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location New Meadows, Idaho Coordinates 44.9712808°, -116.2840176° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

245

Jim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jim's Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jim's Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location New Meadows, Idaho Coordinates 44.9712808°, -116.2840176° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

246

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains. J.R.Brogan 1 , H. Nagasawa 1 , T.A Kato 1 , C.Fallgren 1 , T.Wade 1 . P.Genik 1 , J.B.Little 2 , J.S.Bedford 1 , and M.M.Weil 1 1 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523; 2 Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA 02115 We have recently developed a 'low dose rate' gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding

247

Physical Geography, 2007, 28, 5, pp. 397418. DOI: 10.2747/0272-3646.28.5.397 Copyright 2007 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at treeline on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana. #12;8 Tree islands at alpine and bog meadow ecotones

Resler, Lynn M.

248

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

Guo Dongsheng [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sarkar, Joy [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed R. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Viswakarma, Navin [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jia Yuzhi [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Yu Songtao [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sambasiva Rao, M. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Reddy, Janardan K. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

I N T R O D U C T I O N Serendipity is jumping into a haystack to search for a needle, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­4 0 2 4 6 8 Figure 1.1. The first gamma-ray burst, GRB 670702, detected by the Vela 3a,b and 4a the burst is not zero due to persistent gamma-ray sources in the sky and random instrumental events second. Adapted from J. Bonnell, A Brief History of the Discovery of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. http

Landweber, Laura

250

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING BUILDING BRIDGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SHARING KNOWLEDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 WINNING THE FUTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ON THE HORIZON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 LEADING THE CHARGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 "Tribal communities, entrepreneurs, and small businesses will benefit greatly from the technical resources and expertise provided by DOE. START will help Native American and Alaska Native communities increase local generation capacity, enhance energy efficiency and conservation measures, and create job opportunities in the new clean energy economy." -DOE-IE Director Tracey A. LeBeau The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes-five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States-to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable

251

Jump-Start Your Plant's Energy Savings with Quick PEP, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Quick Plant Energy Profiler (Quick PEP) can help industrial plants identify energy use and find ways to save money and energy.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

San Francisquit LosTrancosCreek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VETERANS BLVD LATHAM ST IVY DR E MEADOW DR CLARKEAV NEW ELL RD SOUTH CT AVY AV REDW O O D AV W BAYSHORE RD

Prinz, Friedrich B.

253

San Francisquit LosTrancosCreek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VETERANS BLVD LATHAM ST IVY DR E MEADOW DR VAEKRALC NEW ELL RD SOUTH CT AVY AV REDW O O D AV W BAYSHORE RD

Straight, Aaron

254

A Phenomenal Spring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and insects are more than a month ahead of normal. Bluebirds, meadow larks and redwing blackbirds were seen on February 27. Skunk cabbage bloomed in Black Partridge forest...

255

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Jersey Grants for State-Sponsored Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects - NJ Meadows Commission Installation of 3 MWdc ground mounted, non-penetrating solar panels...

256

(DOE/EIS-0265/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Watershed Management Program EIS, (DOEEIS-0265SA-99) Dorothy Welch (KEWU - 4) TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, COTR Proposed Action: Longley Meadows Restoration Project...

257

STRATEGIC PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tabletop exercises were conducted for incidents at Shea and Yankee Stadiums, the US Open in Flushing Meadow Park and John F. Kennedy ...

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Prediction of species composition of plant communities in a rural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

traits in forest communities, but 3356% in the meadow and weed .... the exception of several areas where city governments ..... Hawaii and other Pacific islands.

259

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meadow Road, Wilton, CT Geothermal Incentive Program Installation of a closed loop ground source geothermal heat pump system at the Theodore Robinson home, an existing single...

260

BNL Environmental Restoration Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Several cleanup activities were taking place during the summer of 2003. Meadow Marsh Ash Pit Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility A fact sheet is now available giving...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Changes in Prehistoric Land Use in the Alpine Sierra Nevada: A Regional Exploration Using Temperature-Adjusted Obsidian Hydration Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Crane Valley Hydroelectric Project Area, Maderaand Balsam Meadow Hydroelectric Project. Report submitted toCaliforniaBishop Creek Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project

Stevens, Nathan E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Bureau Veritas North America, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3380 Chastain Meadows Pkwy., Suite 300 Kennesaw, GA 30144 Contact: Mr. Alan M. Segrave Phone: 770-499-7500 Fax: 770-499-7511 E-Mail ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Investigating Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Byron Meadows - NASALangley Research Center May 14, 1991 Demonstrations of weather forecasting tools and techniques for experiments in the atmosphere and of lasers used to...

264

Archaeology and California's Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meadows, Sierra Nevada, California. UnpubUshed Ph.D.Berkeley: University of California Archaeological SurveyNo. 34. THE JOURNAL O F CALIFORNIA ANTHROPOLOGY Cahfomia

Moratto, Michael J.; King, Thomas F.; Woolfenden, Wallace B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Weatherking Heating & Air conditioning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Weatherking Heating & Air conditioning Jump to: navigation, search Name Weatherking Heating & Air conditioning Address 51 Meadow Lane Place Northfield, Ohio Zip 44067 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Geothermal energy, Renewable Energy, Services Product Business and legal services; Energy audits/weatherization; Energy provider: power production;Energy provider: wholesale;Engineering/architectural/design;Installation;Investment/finances;Maintenance and repair; Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 330-908-0281 Website http://www.weatherking1.com Coordinates 41.3340869°, -81.530299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3340869,"lon":-81.530299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

266

Property:NEPA Decision | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Decision Decision Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Decision Property Type Page Description Files documenting decisions on NEPA Docs This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "NEPA Decision" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310 EA DR and FONSI.pdf + D DOE-EA-1621 + CX-001816.pdf + DOE-EA-1733 + CX-002924.pdf + DOE-EA-1961 + Kalispell-Kerr EA Determination Memo.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0006-EA + DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2010-0006-EA DECISION.pdf +, DOI-BLM-NV-W030-2010-0006-EA CONDITIONS.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0001-EA + Coyote Canyon Decision Record March 2011.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0514-EA + DOI-BLM-C010-2011-0514-EA-DR.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0516-EA + DixieMeadows DecisionRecord 01 17 12.pdf +

267

Tracks in the Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracks in the Snow Tracks in the Snow Nature Bulletin No. 98 January 11, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation TRACKS IN THE SNOW Tracks in the snow tell fascinating stories of the secret lives of the wild animals that are abroad in wintertime -- stories of their search for food and the never-ending warfare between the hunter and the hunted. Walking through the woods, we came upon the trail of a red fox. The footprints of a fox are more pointed than those of a dog, more nearly in a straight line, and the hind foot is placed exactly on the print of the corresponding front foot. More-over, this fox had walked out across a meadow to a big ant hill on top of which he sat to listen and test the wind for scent. A dog will not do that. Later, back in the woods, he had jumped on a fallen tree and trotted along its length. A dog will not do that, either. The fox was traveling leisurely, pausing here and there to sniff at tufts of grass and other possible hiding places for mice.

268

www.midlothiansciencefestival.com 5th -20th October 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danderhall GeoSciences Day Vogrie Tue 15th Oct Solar Meadows (Tour) Dalkeith Electric Future: Dalkeith Cars Squeeze Bonnyrigg Solar Meadows Dalkeith Electric Future: Dalkeith Cars and Engineering Sweet Perfection Electric cars and engineering fun (drop in) Edinburgh College, Dalkeith Campus 1) 15th Oct 10:00-12:30 2

Maizels, Rick

269

4, 277316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks et al greenhouse gas balance of an abandoned peat meadow D. M. D. Hendriks, J. van Huissteden, A. J. Dolman, and M (dimmie.hendriks@falw.vu.nl) 277 #12;BGD 4, 277­316, 2007 Full greenhouse gas balance of abandoned peat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

Developmental transitions of germ cell lineage of the mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mammalian germ cells arise during early embryogenesis and migrate to the developing gonad where, under the direction of the somatic environment, they initiate distinct sex-specific developmental programs resulting in the ...

Baltus, Andrew Edmund

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mouse Work: New Insights on a Fundamental DNA Repair ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of chemistry that keeps living cells alive, a team of researchers from the University of Vermont (UVM), the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

From Mechanism to Mouse: A Tale of Two Bioorthogonal Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ioorthogonal reactions are chemical reactions that neither interact with nor interfere with a biological system. The participating functional groups must be inert to biological moieties, must selectively reactive with each other under biocompatible conditions, and, for in vivo applications, must be nontoxic to cells and organisms. Additionally, it is helpful if one reactive group is small and therefore minimally perturbing of a biomolecule into which it has been introduced either chemically or biosynthetically. Examples from the past decade suggest that a promising strategy for bioorthogonal reaction development begins with an analysis of functional group and reactivity space outside those defined by Nature. Issues such as stability of reactants and products (particularly in water), kinetics, and unwanted side reactivity with biofunctionalities must be addressed, ideally guided by detailed mechanistic studies. Finally, the reaction must be tested in a variety of environments, escalating from aqueous media to biomolecule solutions to cultured cells and, for the most optimized transformations, to live organisms. Work in our laboratory led to the development of two bioorthogonal transformations that exploit the azide as a small, abiotic, and bioinert reaction partner: the Staudinger ligation and strain-promoted azide alkyne cycloaddition. The Staudinger ligation is based on the classic Staudinger reduction of azides with triarylphosphines first reported in 1919. In the ligation reaction, the intermediate aza-ylide undergoes intramolecular reaction with an ester, forming an amide bond faster than aza-ylide hydrolysis would otherwise occur in water. The Staudinger ligation is highly selective and reliably forms its product in environs as demanding as live mice. However, the Staudinger ligation has some liabilities, such as the propensity of phosphine reagents to undergo air oxidation and the relatively slow kinetics of the reaction.

Ellen M. Sletten; Carolyn; R. Bertozzi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Monitoring transient repolarization segment morphology deviations in mouse ECG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the design, implementation and validation of a system that facilitates partial automation for detection of anomalous repolarization segment morphologies in the ECG of mice. The technology consists of ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Investigation of the dog and mouse tissue archives using complementary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1952 and 1991 beagle dog experiments were carried out and the effects of external irradiation with Cobalt-60 were the main focus of this study. Numerous different 'standard'...

276

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Pathology of EMT in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of experimental cancer research. A review. New York:London: Imperial Cancer Research Fund; 1911. 17. Jensen CO.of The Imperial Cancer Research Fund. London: Taylor and

Cardiff, Robert Darrell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effects of radiation as the developing Cold War provoked concern about radioactive fallout. William Russell's discovery of the factors that affect the frequency and nature of...

279

Conservation of exon scrambling in human and mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exon scrambling is a phenomenon in which the exons of an mRNA transcript are spliced in an order inconsistent with that of the genome. In this thesis, I present a computational analysis of scrambled exons in human and ...

Hamilton, Monica L. (Monica Lauren)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Money Point Sustainable Revitalization Plan - Chesapeake, VA by Crisman+Petrus; UVA School of Architecture [EDRA/Places Awards 2007 -- Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meadow restoration on CITGOs Money Point site. The companymodel. Crisman+Petrus & UVA / Money Point 2007 EDRA/PlacesThe Money Point Sustainable Revitalization PlanChesapeake,

Moffat, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Service/Product Provider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson Controls, Inc. Ford Motor Company 2875 High Meadow Cir. 550 Town Center Dr., Ste 200 Auburn Hills, MI 48326-2773 Dearborn, MI 48126 Business: Building Automation, Facility...

282

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Install a manure digester to convert 12,000 gald of manure into 8,000 cubic feet of biogas that will be used to generate electricity at Meadow Spring Farm. Concrete pit, small...

283

Geobotanical Remote Sensing Applied To Targeting New Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

been imaged include Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera, Dixie Meadows NV, Fish Lake Valley NV, and Brady Hot Springs. Areas that are being imaged in the summer of...

284

CX-000695: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a manure digester to convert 12,000 gallons per day of manure into 8,000 cubic feet of biogas that will be used to generate electricity at Meadow Spring Farm. Concrete pit, small...

285

Assessment of plant-derived hydrocarbons. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of hydrocarbon producing plants are evaluated as possible sources of rubber, liquid fuels, and industrial lubricants. The plants considered are Euphorbia lathyris or gopher plant, milkweeds, guayule, rabbit brush, jojoba, and meadow foam. (ACR)

McFadden, K.; Nelson, S.H.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Journal for the College of Natural Resources 76th Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities, and enhance the health and well-being of our citizens through superior professional education Williams, Kyle Meadows, Mija Nichols, Ross Snotherly, Bradley Hulin, Dr. Moorman, William Wood, Melana

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

287

The Cultivar newsletter, Fall/Winter 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for juice, studying worm compost, shucking corn to grind fornative plant meadow; worm and compost bins; an observa- tioninch layer of organic compost, topped by an inch of mulch to

Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Quackgrass and Crabgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is one of the pesky weeds that are benefited by the foolish practice of annually burning the dead vegetation on vacant lots and on meadows in outlying subdivisions. Its...

289

Sweet Violets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most of the world: in rich woodlands, prairies and meadows, marshy places, bogs, dry sandy plains, on high mountains, and even in the arctic and Antarctic regions, Usually, each...

290

Transmission/Resource Library/MOU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library/MOU < Transmission‎ | Resource Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs)for Interstate Transmission Projects Multi-state transmission siting and permitting projects benefit from effective collaboration between government entities, tribes, project

291

Recombinant Production and Properties of Binding of the Full Set of Mouse Secreted Phospholipases A2 to the Mouse M-Type Receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is recommendations range from 10-80cm/d (Morel, 2006). Effect of surfactant such as LAS on irrigated soils and CWs feeding. 4. This study used Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) as an indicator of surfactant in greywater. Effects of varying HLR (10-30cm/d), WL (0.3-0.5m) and N concentration (5-20mg/L) were determined 5

Gelb, Michael

292

Uterine deletion of Trp53 compromises antioxidant responses in mouse decidua  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preterm birth is a global health issue impacting both mothers and children. However, the etiology of preterm birth is not clearly understood. From our recent finding that premature decidual senescence with terminal differentiation is a cause of preterm birth in mice with uterine Trp53 deletion, encoding p53 protein, led us to explore other potential factors that are related to preterm birth. Utilizing proteomics approaches, here we show that 183 candidate proteins cause significant changes in decidua with Trp53 deletion as compared to normal decidua. Functional categorization of these proteins unveiled new pathways that are influenced by p53. In particular, downregulation of a cluster of antioxidant proteins in p53 deficient decidua suggests that increased oxidative stress could be one cause of preterm birth in mice with uterine deletion of Trp53.

Burnum, Kristin E.; Hirota, Yasushi; Baker, Erin Shammel; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Daikoku, Takiko; Dey, Sudhansu K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synuclein shows improvement in motor function and reductionof XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance. Biology ofand XYY: metabolism and motor performance Xuqi Chen 1,3 ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

Khibnik, Lena A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Dicer deletion and short RNA expression analysis in mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNA interference (RNAi) manages many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression through sequence-specific interactions with RNA. Short RNAs, 20-30 nucleotides in length, guide the various effector proteins of RNAi to silence ...

Calabrese, Joseph Mauro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A rate tuning index (RTI) was quantified to determine theTrujillo et al. , 2011): RTI = [(n /(n-1)] x [1 (mean/The rate tuning index (RTI) was used as a measure of FM rate

Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

79 Figure 3.7 RTI is influenced by sweepHigh frequency inhibition RTI: Rate Tuning Index SP: Slow-the rate tuning index (RTI) was calculated for each neuron

Trujillo, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Neuroinformatics for Genome-Wide 3-D Gene Expression Mapping in the Mouse Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit ... Keywords: Bioinformatics (genome or protein) databases, Data mining, Registration, Segmentation, Information Visualization

Lydia Ng; Sayan Pathak; Chihchau Kuan; Chris Lau; Hong-wei Dong; Andrew Sodt; Chinh Dang; Brian Avants; Paul Yushkevich; James Gee; David Haynor; Ed Lein; Allan Jones; Mike Hawrylycz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A new mouse model to probe the role of aflatoxin B? in liver carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One and a half million new cancer cases are reported each year in the United States. Despite this overwhelming burden of disease, current preventative treatments and early detection techniques are inadequate. With cancers, ...

Bouhenguel, Jason T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

Borenshtein, Diana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Behavior of Tritium in the Mouse Body After Oral Intake and Estimation of the Absorbed Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biology / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Masahiro Saito

302

Analysis of pluripotent mouse stem cell proteomes : insights into post- transcriptional regulation of pluripotency and differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX24 D19Bwg1357e D19Bwg1357eof Probable ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX27 Nol10 NucleolarDdx18 ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX18 Nolc1 Plk1 Rrp12

O'Brien, Robert Norman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Predicted mouse peroxisome-targeted proteins and their actual subcellular locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sequences that con- tained only motifs incompatible with peroxisomal locali- zation (e.g., RNA-helicase (IPR0006050)), or that were supported by an unequivocal PSORT II [17] nuclear local- ization were eliminated. In addition, we predicted protein solubility...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Interspecies Scaling of Self-Organ Doses from a Voxel Mouse to Voxel Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dose/Dose Rate / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 1) / Radiation Protection

Sakae Kinase; Shinpei Matsuhashi; Kimiaki Saito

305

System for remote multichannel real-time monitoring of mouse ECG via the Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hardware/software system was developed to allow real-time monitoring of multiple physiological signals simultaneously via the Internet. The hardware is specifically designed for measuring ECG signals from mice, while the ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Inactivation of mouse Twisted gastrulation reveals its role in promoting Bmp4 activity during forebrain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1452. Meyers, E. N. , Lewandoski, M. and Martin, G. R. (Sun, X. , Meyers, E. N. , Lewandoski, M. and Martin, G. R. (

De Robertis, Edward M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE An Fgf8 mouse mutant phenocopies human 22q11 deletion syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a lifethreatening array of birth defects. Although 90 % of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormalities. Because ablation of neural crest in chicks produces many features of the deletion 22q11 syndrome, it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency in this region impacts neural crest function during cardiac and pharyngeal arch development. Few factors required for migration, survival, proliferation and subsequent differentiation of pharyngeal arch neural crest and

Deborah U. Frank; Lori K. Fotheringham; Judson A. Brewer; Louis J. Muglia; Martin Tristani-firouzi; Mario R. Capecchi; Anne M. Moon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Early tissue patterning recreated by mouse embryonic fibroblasts in a three-dimensional environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular self-organization studies have been mainly focused on models such as Volvox, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and animal (metazoan) embryos. Moreover, animal tissues undergoing regeneration also exhibit ...

Quintana, Lluis

309

Comparative meta-analysis between human and mouse cancer microarray data reveals critical pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of deregulated biomolecular pathways in cancer may be more important than identification of individual genes through differential expression. We have analysed data from 87 microarray datasets, spanning 25 different types of cancer, and ...

Pankaj Chopra; Jaewoo Kang; Seung-Mo Hong

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Eye-opening and control of visual synapse development in the mouse superior colliculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) coordinates visual, somatosensory, and auditory stimuli to guide animal behavior. The superficial layers (sSC) receive visual information via two major afferent projections: 1) A ...

Phillips, Marnie A. (Marnie Ann)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cognitive dysfunction and prefrontal synaptic abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the hallmark phenotypes reported in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are deficits in attentional function, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility, a set of cognitive skills thought to be associated ...

Krueger, Dilja D.

312

16 January 09 MHVUniversity College London Nick 07Mouse Health Monitoring Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are controlled through a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan are controlled through a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan Laboratories, Inc

Richardson, William D.

313

The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora Connor Randall,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the maximum load is used in instrumented inden- tation analysis, as discussed by Oliver and Pharr,3 for obtain and distance are monitored by transducers, which are then analyzed through OSTEOPROBE IITM software. Each cycle and to minimize the effect of the remaining creep during the linear decrease in load. This type of hold

Hansma, Paul

314

MOUSE ORGAN HARVEST PROTOCOL 10/01 TO FREEZE TISSUES FOR FROZEN SECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bits of dry ice and 2 methyl butane. This will be the freezing mixture which will freeze the organs OCT turns white 9. Remove plastic molds with frozen organs from dry ice/ 2 methyl butane and let them No 15160-215 3. Frozen sample write-on bags: VWR Cat. No: 01-002-37 4. 2 methyl butane: Fisher Cat. No

Abagyan, Ruben

315

Regionalisation of the mouse visceral endoderm as the blastocyst transforms into the egg cylinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, respectively E5.5L and E5.5D. Green fluorescent projection of a confocal z series merged with a transmitted light section are shown. (B, E) VE clones labelled with a red nuclear marker. The two sides of the conceptus are shown as a red fluorescent projection... with labelled VE cells. Only E4.7-E5.0 conceptuses which had a clearly visible extra-embryonic region (EEC stage) were considered. *Frequencies as in Weber et al., 1999 A B C D ...

Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Meilhac, Sigolene M; Piotrowska-Nitsche, Karolina; Gray, Dionne; Collignon, Jerome; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mouse and touchscreen selection in the upper and lower visual fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuroanatomical evidence indicates the human eye's visual field can be functionally divided into two vertical hemifields, each specialized for specific functions. The upper visual field (UVF) is specialized to support perceptual tasks in the distance, ... Keywords: Fitts Law, interactive displays, mice, pointing, touchscreens, visual fields

Barry A. Po; Brian D. Fisher; Kellogg S. Booth

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Center Abstract Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the...

318

Particulate Matter in Polluted Air May IncreaseBiomarkers of Inflammation in Mouse Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sample and unlabelled NF-kB consensus oligonu- cleotide, NSCendothelial cells: role of NF-kB activation. J Immunol 2001;EN, Krappmann D, Scheidereit C. NF-kB and the innate immune

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouseCNS using microarray analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gene contains an activation site for NF-kB (Cowland et al. ,and levels of activated NF-kB increase in murine cortex withThus, increased levels of NF-kB activation in the aged brain

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inmaculada Spiteri1, Konstantina Karagavriilidou1, Christine J Watson6, Simon Tavar2,5, Eric A Miska*4 and Carlos Caldas*1 Address: 1Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute and Department of Oncology... .spiteri@cancer.org.uk; Konstantina Karagavriilidou - kk406@cam.ac.uk; Christine J Watson - cjw53@mole.bio.cam.ac.uk; Simon Tavar - simon.tavare@cancer.org.uk; Eric A Miska* - e.miska@gurdon.cam.ac.uk; Carlos Caldas* - carlos.caldas@cancer.org.uk * Corresponding authors Equal...

Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Histone deacetylase 2 is required for chromatin condensation and subsequent enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: During the final stages of differentiation of mammalian erythroid cells, the chromatin is condensed and enucleated. We previously reported that Rac GTPases and their downstream target, mammalian homolog of ...

Ji, Peng

322

Spatial Arrangement of Microglia in the Mouse Hippocampus: A Stereological Study in Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solitons Fractals 7, 585 (1996); P. Kastanek, J. Kosek, D. Snita, I. Schreiber, and M. Marek, Physica (Amsterdam) 84D, 79 (1995); H. Sevciková, J. Kosek, and M. Marek, J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1666 (1996); M. Gómez

Schmidt, Volker

323

The role of vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 in thioacetamide-induced mouse hepatotoxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thioacetamide (TA) is a commonly used drug that can trigger acute hepatic failure (AHF) through generation of oxidative stress. Vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 (VDUP1) is an endogenous inhibitor of thioredoxin, a ubiquitous thiol oxidoreductase, that regulates cellular redox status. In this study, we investigated the role of VDUP1 in AHF using a TA-induced liver injury model. VDUP1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a single intraperitoneal TA injection, and various parameters of hepatic injury were assessed. VDUP1 KO mice displayed a significantly higher survival rate, lower serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, and less hepatic damage, compared to WT mice. In addition, induction of apoptosis was decreased in VDUP1 KO mice, with the alteration of caspase-3 and -9 activities, Bax-to-Bcl-2 expression ratios, and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Importantly, analysis of TA bioactivation revealed lower plasma clearance of TA and covalent binding of [{sup 14}C]TA to liver macromolecules in VDUP1 KO mice. Furthermore, the level of oxidative stress was significantly less in VDUP1 KO mice than in their WT counterparts, as evident from lipid peroxidation assay. These results collectively indicate that VDUP1 deficiency protects against TA-induced acute liver injury via lower bioactivation of TA and antioxidant effects.

Kwon, Hyo-Jung [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jong-Hwan [B and C Biopharm, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong-Tak; Lee, Sae-Bhom; Yoon, Won-Kee; Nam, Ki-Hoan [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Pyo [Cell Therapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Yong [Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Young-Suk, E-mail: yswon@kribb.re.k [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-Chin, E-mail: hckim@kribb.re.k [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work... % of group 1 embryos (n = 11), Lefty-1 expression was found at or close to the DVE (f') (E6.5 n = 3/6; E7.5 n = 3/5). Accordingly, the expression of Cer-l was also found to be restricted to the DVE in all defective embryos essayed (n') (n = 5). In over 50...

Soares, Miguel L; Haraguchi, Seiki; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Kalmar, Tibor; Carpenter, Lee; Bell, Graham; Morrison, Alastair; Ring, Christopher J A; Clarke, Neil J; Glover, David M; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gene copy number studies in archived and fresh mouse tissue samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sections from archived samples were used for DNA isolation and quantitative real time PCR amplification that revealed variations in mitochondrial gene copy numbers in different...

326

Conservation and divergence in the transcriptional programs of the human and mouse immune systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the knowledge about cell differentiation and function in the immune system has come from studies in mice, but the relevance to human immunology, diseases, and therapy has been challenged, perhaps more from anecdotal ...

Shay, Tal

327

A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for approxi- mately 20 passages. No change in phenotype is observed with careful handling. Immunocytochemistry Cells were grown subconfluently on collagen-coated glass coverslips in four-well plates or on plastic slide flasks (Nunc/Nalge Europe, Hereford, UK... ). The cells were fixed in methanol:acetone for 10 min, washed with Tris-buffered saline (TBS) pH 7.6, blocked in TBS + 20% goat serum for 1 h, and then immunostained with a panel of primary antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies to cytokeratin 18 and 19 were from...

Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Bobolink  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bobolink Bobolink Nature Bulletin No. 496-A June 2, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BOBOLINK Most of our songbirds nest and find their food in woodlands, along woodland borders, or in old orchards. Some, like the robins, house wrens, martins and bluebirds, usually prefer to live near human habitations -- even in villages and cities. Others, notably the redwing blackbird, are found only around marshes and swampy places. But there is a small group of songbirds which are seen and heard only in open country: prairies, meadows, hayfields and abandoned farm lands. In addition to some native sparrows, the horned lark, the killdeer and the familiar meadow larks, this group includes that happy-go-lucky "harlequin of the meadows": the Bobolink.

329

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NREL: Environment, Safety, Health and Quality Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of meadow and trees with Flatirons in background. Photo of meadow and trees with Flatirons in background. For years NREL has successfully maintained an outstanding record of safety and sustainability within the Department of Energy's national labs. The laboratory has supplemented this performance record with the achievement of several prestigious, internationally recognized certifications that illustrate NREL's environmental, safety, and quality leadership. In 2011, NREL received International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001: 2004 (environment) certification and OHSAS 18001 (health and safety) certification. In addition, NREL achieved ISO 9001:2008 certification covering a portion of its operations, including Environment, Health, Safety, Security, Quality, Performance Measurement, and Requirements

331

Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ContentAssist ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the page, presenting their definitions to users on mouse-over. Additionally, the template will generate a list of recommended additional reading based on the content of the page. This template requires the ContentAssist widget to be functional. Parameters No parameters Dependencies Widget:ContentAssist Usage It should be called in the following format: {{ContentAssist}} Example In addition to highlighting extracted energy terms and presenting their definitions, this template will produce the following: Dictionary.png Error loading definition! OpenEI-ribbon.png Edit the page to see the template text.

332

Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools < Transmission‎ | Resource Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Planning Public Involvement GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database ACEII.jpg ACE-II: Areas of Conservation Emphasis Provides an easily-accessible and standardized way to view the best available statewide data on California's biological richness and biodiversity CAPS.jpg CAPS: Crucial Areas Planning System Online tool that maps crucial habitat as well as key wildlife connectivity areas in Montana. The aim of the mapping system is to consider fish,

333

Transmission/Resource Library/Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library/Resources < Transmission‎ | Resource Library(Redirected from Transmission/Resource Library/Public Involvement) Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database Public Participation for Interstate Transmission Public participation is a requirement of any project that must comply with

334

Transmission/Resource Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library < Transmission Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database About Transmission Electricity Transmission: A Primer Overview of the grid system and the role of states in overseeing this system. The Design, Construction, and Operation of Long-Distance High-Voltage

335

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships (Redirected from Brazil-NETL Cooperation) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL Cooperation Name Brazil-NETL Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner Brazil Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.netl.doe.gov/techno Program Start 2007 Program End 2012 Country Brazil South America References NETL Technologies Programs[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships with Brazil ORD International Research Agreements Brazilian Coal Gasification and CCS MOUs References ↑ NETL Technologies Programs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brazil-NETL_Advanced_Fossil_Fuels_Partnerships&oldid=375248"

336

March 26, 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additionally, 11 custom building lots were leased to faculty and eventually were built on. A homeowners association, now called the Cardiff Terrace Homeowners Association, was created. In 1992, an additional 19 new two-bedroom, faculty for-sale units at Hagar Meadow were annexed to the Cardiff Terrace Homeowners

California at Santa Cruz, University of

337

Tree inspection and control of infestations of Oak Processionary Moth Thaumetopoea processionea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deer Park Sports Club, Richmond 2 9 52 19 Old Deer Park, Richmond 9 23 35 9 Petersham Meadows, Richmond 1 13 43 107 Petersham Common, Richmond - 0 26 187 Barnes Common, Richmond - - 28 120 Richmond Park. There were significant increases in the south of the borough (Petersham, Petersham Common, Barnes Common

338

Conceptual Combination Stimuli (Swinney et al, 2007 Psych Science)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it difficult to conceal themselves in the dry1 grass2 along the river. Compound property ­ brown Noun property The only trace of the lost hunting party was a knife found in the burnt1 meadow2 across the river. Compound ­ crystal No

339

Switzerland.MySwitzerland.com Zurich,viewfromtheQuaibrcke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alpine meadows, ski on glacial ice or relax on the banks of crystal-clear mountain lakes. Meet genuine plurality, university, and bridges over the River Sarine that links the French-speaking and German mountains from the crystal-clear lakes. www.interlaken.ch 8 Watch Valley Let yourself be charmed

Pfeifer, Holger

340

Walla Walla Subbasin Plan May 2004 Version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fork Walla Walla (Elbow to access limit) X Skiphorton & Reser Creek Drainages X Lower South Fork Walla Walla Tributaries X Upper South Fork Walla Walla Tributaries X North Fork Walla Walla (L. Meadows water temperature, bedscour and flow. Decreasing the effect of these limiting factors through habitat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A guide to writing articles in energy science Martin Weiss a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV Kingbird Solar Lower West Wind Energy Project Catalina Renewable Energy High Desert Solar Alta Solar Meadows Field Solar Project US Topco Energy Horn PV Manzana Wind Project Lake Hughes Wind AV Solar Palms PV Project GWF Tracy Amendment Gray Butte Solar PV Golden Hills (Altamont Repower II) North

342

Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb Life Span Study ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

343

The characterization of a mouse model of transient stroke using ex vivo MR microscopy and in vivo MR imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disrupted blood-brain barrier after an ischemic attack can cause vasogenic edema and increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, early detection and monitoring of BBB damage is important in the pathological ...

Huang, Shuning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

345

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--October 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable? Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells? What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate? During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

Oliver, Trudy Gale

347

Underlying mitochondrial dysfunction triggers flutamide-induced oxidative liver injury in a mouse model of idiosyncratic drug toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Flutamide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-androgen, but not its bioisostere bicalutamide, has been associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Although the susceptibility factors are unknown, mitochondrial injury has emerged as a putative hazard of flutamide. To explore the role of mitochondrial sensitization in flutamide hepatotoxicity, we determined the effects of superimposed drug stress in a murine model of underlying mitochondrial abnormalities. Male wild-type or heterozygous Sod2{sup +/-} mice were injected intraperitoneously with flutamide (0, 30 or 100 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. A kinetic pilot study revealed that flutamide (100 mg/kg/day) caused approximately 10-fold greater exposure than the reported therapeutic mean plasma levels. Mutant (5/10), but not wild-type, mice in the high-dose group exhibited small foci of hepatocellular necrosis and an increased number of apoptotic hepatocytes. Hepatic GSSG/GSH, protein carbonyl levels, and serum lactate levels were significantly increased, suggesting oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Measurement of mitochondrial superoxide in cultured hepatocytes demonstrated that mitochondria were a significant source of flutamide-enhanced oxidant stress. Indeed, mitochondria isolated from flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited decreased aconitase activity as compared to vehicle controls. A transcriptomics analysis using MitoChips revealed that flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited a selective decrease in the expression of all complexes I and III subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA. In contrast, Sod2{sup +/-} mice receiving bicalutamide (50 mg/kg/day) did not reveal any hepatic changes. These results are compatible with our concept that flutamide targets hepatic mitochondria and exerts oxidant stress that can lead to overt hepatic injury in the presence of an underlying mitochondrial abnormality.

Kashimshetty, Rohini [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Desai, Varsha G. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); Kale, Vijay M. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Korea University, Department of Information and Mathematics, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); New, Lee S.; Chan, Eric C.Y. [National University of Singapore, Department of Pharmacy, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Younis, Husam [Pfizer Global Research and Development, San Diego, CA, 92121 (United States); Boelsterli, Urs A. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States)], E-mail: urs.boelsterli@uconn.edu

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Response of the mouse fetus to radiation from Na/sup 99m/TcO$sub 4$  

SciTech Connect

The element technetium has recently assumed ecological importance as a source of low-level radiation, with the use of /sup 99m/Tc in nuclear medicine and production of /sup 99m/Tc during generation of electricity by nuclear reaction. When technetium is introduced as pertechnetate into the blood stream of pregnant females, it is transported across the placental barrier to the fetus, where a portion appears to be incorporated into biomolecules. When combined as biomolecules, radionuclides that decay by electron capture or isomeric transition show a lethality greater than that predicted in cell cultures and radiation therapy. The decay of /sup 99m/Tc by isomeric transition, together with the other considerations, places a high priority on the investigation of its radiation effects due to clinical doses of up to 25 mCi. Female mice were given daily i.v. injections of 0, 5, 50, and 500 $mu$ Ci of /sup 99m/Tc as pertechnetate in isotonic saline throughout gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation. At two months of age, the progeny were mated with randomly selected litter mates to produce a second generation; the process was repeated with their progeny for production of the third generation.Preliminary results reinforce the existing concern about use of /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate in pregnant or potentially pregnant subjects. (auth)

Lathrop, K.A.; Gloria, I.V.; Harper, P.V.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS  

SciTech Connect

In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

2008 Special Issue: Combining experts in order to identify binding sites in yeast and mouse genomic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of cis-regulatory binding sites in DNA is a difficult problem in computational biology. To obtain a full understanding of the complex machinery embodied in genetic regulatory networks it is necessary to know both the identity of the ... Keywords: Computational biology, Imbalanced data, Sampling, Support vector machine, Transcription factor binding sites

Mark Robinson; Cristina Gonzlez Castellano; Faisal Rezwan; Rod Adams; Neil Davey; Alastair Rust; Yi Sun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recombinant stromelysin-1 (SL-1) on invasion and migration?2, ?6, or ?1 integrin subunits with (+ SL-1, black bars)or without (- SL-1, white bars) the addition of recombinant

Lochter, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

Marchetti, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Epigenetic Effects on Integration of Limb Lengths in a Mouse Model: Selective Breeding for High Voluntary Locomotor Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physiology, 65, 12311237. Herring, S. W. , Decker, J. D. ,doi:10.1002/ar.10049. Herring, S. W. , & Teng, S. (2000).relate to strains on bone (Herring and Teng 2000), and that

Young, Nathan M.; Hallgrmsson, Benedikt; Garland, Theodore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

Mathur, Divya

355

Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

smoke for 2 weeks. Arch Bio- chem Biophys 465:336346 Genessupplementation. J Nutr Bio- chem 16:385397 66. Siler U,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Multiple nuclear loci reveal patterns of incomplete lineage sorting and complex species history within western mouse lemurs (Microcebus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of karyotypic fission theory. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 97: 9493­9497. KOUYOS, R.D., OTTO, S.P. & BONHOEFFER, S

Yoder, Anne

357

Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation  

SciTech Connect

Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

High concentrations of morphine sensitize and activate mouse dorsal root ganglia via TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nature 1980, 284:351-353. 19. Coggeshall RE, Zhou S, Carlton SM: Opioid receptors on periph- eral sensory axons. Brain Res 1997, 764:126-132. 20. Truong W, Cheng C, Xu QG, Li XQ, Zochodne DW: Mu opioid receptors and analgesia at the site of a peripheral...

Forster, Alexander B; Reeh, Peter; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Relationship between the tissue-specificity of mouse gene expression and the evolutionary origin and function of the proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to few tissues [9]. In germ cells, where lactate is a preferred energy source [10], we observe specific expression of Ldhc (testis-specific expression). The expression of Ldhc is an example of a function occurring in the ancestral unicellular cell... , Schaffer AA, Zhang J, Zhang Z, Miller W, Lip- man DJ: Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res 1997, 25:3389-3402. 25. Janssen P, Enright AJ, Audit B, Cases I, Goldovsky L, Harte N, Kunin V...

Freilich, Shiri; Massingham, Tim; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Ponstingl, Hannes; Lyons, Paul A; Freeman, Tom C; Thornton, Janet M

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

362

Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.T. (2004) To the 30-nm chromatin fiber and beyond. BiochimC.D. ( 2005) RNA meets chromatin. Genes Dev, 19, 1635-1655.proteins induce large-scale chromatin reorganization during

Popova, Evgenya Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Integrin alpha 5 beta 1 is necessary for regulation of radial migration of cortical neurons during mouse brain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During cerebral cortex development, post-mitotic neurons interact with radial glial fibers and the extracellular environment to migrate away from the ventricular region and form a correct laminar structure. Integrin receptors ...

Marchetti, Giovanni

365

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival of Mouse Mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival and incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C, 100% humidity and 5% CO2 . The efficacies of the drug only and ultrasound-activated 24 hoursof treat- ment using the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. The combined therapy resulted in 60

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

366

Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a particle. (b) EFTEM carbon jump ratio (c) oxygen jumpof agglomerate. (b) EFTEM carbon jump ratio (c) oxygen jump? = 1.54 ). Elemental carbon analysis was performed by

Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CX-007748: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48: Categorical Exclusion Determination 48: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007748: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of the Farm Power Misty Meadows Generating Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01/11/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration In response to Farm Power Misty Meadow's (Farm Power's) small generator interconnection request, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is planning to integrate their 1-megawatt biomass generation project into its balancing authority (BA). The proposed point of interconnection is Tillamook Peoples Utility District's (PUD) Feeder Circuit #63, which is connected to the Tillamook PUD's Wilson River Substation. In order to integrate the proposed generation, BPA would provide Farm Power with parts for installing a standard BPA JEMSTAR revenue meter, along with example design drawings.

368

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sensitivity Analysis Plant Sensitivity Analysis Abstract NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Tool Sensitivity Analysis and Results Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado Introduction OFFSHORE WINDPOWER 2012, Virginia Beach, October 911, 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PO-5000-56411

369

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records Name Contact Information Area of Responsibility Troy Manigault Phone: 301-903-9926 Email: doerm@hq.doe.gov Director, Records Management Division Ivan King Phone: 202-586-4060 Email: ivan.king@hq.doe.gov Records Management Program (Lead) Tonya Meadows Phone: 301-903-1146 Email: tonya.meadows@hq.doe.gov Forms Management Program (Lead) Christina "Chris" Rouleau Phone: 301-903-6227 Email: Christina.Rouleau@hq.doe.gov Information Collection Management Program (Lead) Deidra "Dee Dee" Wilkinson Phone: 202-586-2398 Email: deidre.wilkinson@hq.doe.gov Records Management Program

370

NPP Tundra: Point Barrow, Alaska [U.S.A.]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972 Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Tieszen, L. L. 2001. NPP Tundra: Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a wet arctic tundra meadow was studied from 1970 to 1972 at Point Barrow, Alaska, U.S.A. Measurements of peak above-ground live biomass and leaf area index were made on 43 permanent plots, 1 m x 10 m, representing the spectrum of undisturbed vegetation. In addition, temporal variation in standing crop was assessed for the 1971 growing season for a sedge meadow only. The study area (71.30 N 156.67 W) is located 3 km inland from the Chukchi

371

Why sequence Marinomonas?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marine bacterial genus Marinomonas? marine bacterial genus Marinomonas? In the Mediterranean Sea, the perennial Neptune grass (Posidonia oceanica) forms meadows that cover about 15,000 square miles of rocks and sand and is a key part of the marine ecosystem. About 30 percent of the bacteria found in Neptune grass is composed of Marinomonas strains, which include M. posidonica, considered to be the most abundant Marinomonas species, and M. mediterranea, the only species in the genus that has melanins. Marinomonas P. oceanica meadows such as this one off Formentera Island, Spain play host to Marinomonas bacteria. Photo by Manu Sanfelix M. mediterranea has enzymes that can break down compounds in industrial and oil refinery emissions. The bacterial enzymes might also be useful in breaking down lignocellulosic material in sea grass, and thus might have

372

South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

Siddall, Phoebe

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Protect and Restore Red River Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Red River Watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2001. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. From completing a watershed assessment to two NEPA efforts and a final stream restoration design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Red River to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Another major, and extremely, important component of this project is the Red River Meadow Conservation Easement. We have begun the process of pursuing a conservation easement on approximately 270 acres of prime meadow habitat (Red River runs through this meadow and is prime spawning and rearing habitat).

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Primordial Germ Cell Differentiation in Vitro: A Model for Understanding Epigenetic Reprogramming and Genome-Wide DNA Demethylation in Mouse Primordial Germ Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Merge C IAP ESC e10.5 Oct4 D iPGC A Figure 2-2. iPGCs haveBlimp1 fl/fl G Fold Change in iPGC Differentiation F 2 Ab %Library CG CHG CHH CA CC CT iPGC mBS44 ES mBS47 iPGC mBS48

Vincent, John J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium  

SciTech Connect

Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Construction and analysis of tag single nucleotide polymorphism maps for six human-mouse orthologous candidate genes in type 1 diabetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acad Sci U S A 100:14982-14987, 2003 4. Lyons PA, Hancock WW, Denny P, Lord CJ, Hill NJ, Armitage N, Siegmund T, Todd JA, Phillips MS, Hess JF, Chen SL, Fischer PA, Peterson LB, Wicker LS: The NOD Idd9 genetic interval influences the pathogenicity... AV, Alt FW, Faccio R, Brown T, Hoog J, Fredericks J, Nishi S, Mildiner S, Moores SL, Brugge J, Rosen FS, Swat W: Vav1/2/3-null mice define an essential role for Vav family proteins in lymphocyte development and activation but a differential...

Maier, Lisa M; Smyth, Deborah J; Vella, Adrian; Payne, Felicity; Cooper, Jason D; Pask, Rebecca; Lowe, Christopher E; Hulme, John S; Smink, Luc J; Fraser, Heather; Moule, Carolyn; Hunter, Kara M; Chamberlain, Giselle; Walker, Neil M; Nutland, Sarah; Undlien, Dag E; Ronningen, Kjersti S; Guja, Cristian; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Savage, David A; Strachan, David P; Peterson, Laurence B; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S; Twells, Rebecca C J

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integrated analyses of chromatin accessibility and gene expression data for elucidating the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms during early hematopoietic development in mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given cellular differentiation state. Acknowledgements MS Vijayabaskar presents the computational part of the work on behalf of the group. Author details 1School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. 2School... 2013 1School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Viiavabaskar et al. Epigenetics & Chromatin 2013, 6(Suppl 1):P50 http...

Viiavabaskar, Mahalingam S; Obier, Nadine; Pearson, Stella; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Lichtinger, Monika; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; Gottgens, Bertie; Bonifer, Constanze; Westhead, David R

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

CELL POPULATIONS AND CELL PROLIFERATION IN THE IN VITRO RESPONSE OF NORMAL MOUSE SPLEEN TO HETEROLOGOUS ERYTHROCYTES*,$ ANALYSIS BY "1i1 ~ HOT PULSE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown in the accompanying paper (1) that spleen cell suspensions from normal mice can be immunized to heterologous erythrocytes in an in vitro system. When sheep erythrocytes are added at the initiation of culture, the number of antibody-forming cells (as determined by the hemolytic plaque assay) rises from an initial value of approximately 1 per 106 to 1,000 per 10 e recovered cells 4 days later in a typical experiment. The kinetics of the response follow an approximately exponential form at least in the later time periods. The assay system measures 19S antibodyforming cells (2) and the response is "primary " in the sense that it follows the first experimental exposure to antigen. Previous in vivo studies have indicated that the increase is largely the result of proliferation of precursor cells and they have further suggested that cell proliferation begins after an 18-24 hr lag period (for a review see reference 3). These studies, however, leave some room for doubt, as will be discussed below, and the problem has been reinvestigated in this in vitro system as part of a more general analysis of the cellular response to antigen. The questions asked here are: (a) at what times during the

W. Dutton, Ph.D.; Robert; I. Mishell

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Parity induces differentiation and reduces Wnt/Notch signaling ratio and proliferation potential of basal stem/progenitor cells isolated from mouse mammary epithelium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://epithelium. Breast Cancer Research 2013 15:R36. Submit your

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate causes limited transcriptional change in mouse embryonic stem cells but selectively overrides Polycomb-mediated Hoxb silencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, perhaps because this facilitates the transient attachment of HATs and HDACs [21]. Gene silencing is a multi-layered process, involving the combinatorial actions of histone and DNA modifications, chromatin condensation, DNA binding proteins, small RNAs... of other antisera are shown in Additional file 1: Table S4. Specificities were assayed by inhibition ELISA for all in-house and commercial antisera [55] and checked by western blotting. Protein analysis Histones were extracted from ES cells by acid...

Boudadi, Elsa; Stower, Hannah; Halsall, John A; Rutledge, Charlotte E; Leeb, Martin; Wutz, Anton; ONeill, Laura P; Nightingale, Karl P; Turner, Bryan M

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the ob/ob mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, consistent with this receptor being involved in regulating white adipose tissue storage of triglycerides and adipocyte expandability [25]. The glucogenic amino acids (those that are precursors of glucose in gluconeogenesis), glycine, glutamate, glutamine... HDL cholesterol concentrations. Activation of PPAR? increases the expres- sion of the cholesterol efflux pump ATP-binding cassette transporter1, promoting the efflux of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, which may lead to the observed increase in HDL...

Roberts, Lee D; Hassall, David G; Winegar, Deborah A; Haselden, John N; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Frictional lichenified dermatosis from prolonged use of a computer mouse: Case report and review of the literature of computer-related dermatoses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dermatitis possible caused by computer wrist rest. ContactS, Phillips RM, et al. Computer palms. J Am Acad DermatolGoksugur N, Cakici H. A new computer-associated occupational

Ghasri, Pedram; Feldman, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A lentiviral system for RNAi transgenesis and the Ena/VASP triple-knockout defines neuronal and non-neuronal functions in mouse development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mammalian development extends and exploits signaling pathways that function exclusively in axon guidance in lower organisms. This emerging paradigm employs complex expression patterns of expanded protein families to achieve ...

Rubinson, Douglas A. (Douglas Adam), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Astroglial Inhibition of NF-kB Does Not Ameliorate Disease Onset and Progression in a Mouse Model for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is considered a non-cell autonomous process, with astrocytes playing a critical role in disease progression. Glial cells are activated early in transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1, suggesting that neuroinflammation has a relevant role in the cascade of events that trigger the death of motor neurons. An inflammatory cascade including COX2 expression, secretion of cytokines and release of NO from astrocytes may descend from activation of a NF-kB-mediated pathway observed in astrocytes from ALS patients and in experimental models. We have attempted rescue of transgenic mutant SOD1 mice through the inhibition of the NF-kB pathway selectively in astrocytes. Here we show that despite efficient inhibition of this major pathway, double transgenic mice expressing the mutant SOD1 G93A ubiquitously and the dominant negative form of IkBa (IkBaAA) in astrocytes under control of the GFAP promoter show no benefit in terms of onset and progression of disease. Our data indicate that motor neuron death in ALS cannot be prevented by inhibition of a single inflammatory pathway because alternative pathways are activated in the

Claudia Crosio; Cristiana Valle; Arianna Casciati; Ciro Iaccarino; Maria Teresa Carr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. Alpha-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to beta-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. Alpha imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a beta-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 ?Ci of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an alpha-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

Pagel, John M.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Park, Steven I.; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K.; Green, Damian J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Selective HDAC 1/2 Inhibitor Modulates Chromatin and Gene Expression in Brain and Alters Mouse Behavior in Two Mood-Related Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, are projected to lead global disease burden within the next decade. Pharmacotherapy, the primary albeit often ineffective treatment ...

Schroeder, Frederick A.

388

Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples. Environ. Health Perspect. 47  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures.

S. Nesnow; L. L. Triplettt; T. J. Slagat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of age (Fig. 2B; wheel running: F [1, 25] = 0.40, P = 0.72; 2-way ANOVA). At 5 months, an effect of the HD BMC Neuroscience 2008, 9:34 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/9/34 mutation on performance was observed (Fig. 2B; HD: F[1, 28] = 8.58, P < 0... in activity on the second day of testing (2nd blocks in Fig. 3B) in non-enriched HD mice (F[1,38] = 38.25, P < 0.001; 2-way ANOVA). Thus environmental enrichment and wheel running both rescued the abnor- mal habituation of rearing behavior in HD mice...

van Dellen, Anton; Cordery, Patricia M; Spires, Tara L; Blakemore, Colin; Hannan, Anthony J

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 1998 Baseline Review Subsystem MOUs and SOWs Subsystem MOUs for M&O Institution Budget Reports Subsystem MS Project Files and Reports Endcap Muon Hadron Calorimeter Trigger...

391

Retrieving and Processing BT-1 Files  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... p pipe output to stout rather than create an ... The right mouse button zooms out and the middle mouse button opens a window for manual scaling. ...

392

Non-Human Cell Line Authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... BMC Biotechnology 2011, 11:102. Mouse STR markers: Submitted for publication. A patent is pending on the mouse primer sequences.

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vacancy Mechanism Davydov I.?.  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9404, P.O. Box 0969, Livermore, CA 94551, USA Summary: Computations of jump activation energy DH j and diffusion jump frequency n have been carried out using the Density Functional...

394

The Value of Model Based Analysis in Complex Engineering Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

395

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

396

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

397

Solving Initial Value Problems using Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

398

Maximizing LBNL's Partnership with the East Bay Green Corridor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

399

LBNL Wireless LAN Deployment and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

400

Wildland Fires and LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The LBNL Leadership Program - EETD's first graduating class  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

402

LBNL Electrical Equipment Inspection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

403

Subcontracting at LBNL: New Close-out Process and Tips for Faster...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

404

Energy Crossroads: Market Data | Environmental Energy Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a technology...

405

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip messages Jump to page content Jump to page footer LBNL Home Environmental Energy Technologies Division Emergency Contacts Intranet A-Z Index Staff How Do I? License a...

406

Data Acquisition-Manipulation (Verma & Santoyo, 1997) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation (Verma & Santoyo, 1997) Exploration Activity Details Location...

407

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2007)...

408

Forest Service Special Use Authorization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Service Special Use Authorization Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Forest Service Special Use Authorization Details...

409

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) (Redirected from Stockholm Environment Institute) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stockholm Environment Institute Name Stockholm Environment...

410

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Ozkocak, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location...

411

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

412

Renewable Energy Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE) Place Brasilia, Brazil Phone number...

413

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration...

414

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In...

415

Finding Meaning on YouTube: Tag Recommendation and Category Discovery George Toderici Hrishikesh Aradhye Marius Pasca Luciano Sbaiz Jay Yagnik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the description and the terms waverunner, big jump, superman and porn in the tags (in a typical scenario). Yet

Cortes, Corinna

416

Non-Double-Couple Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California, Provide Evidence For Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

417

Colorado/Transmission/Agencies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ColoradoTransmissionAgencies < Colorado | Transmission Jump to: navigation, search Colorado Transmission Roadmap Agency Links Local Regulations State Regulations Summary...

418

Alternative Carriers For Remote Renewable Energy Sources Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alternative Carriers For Remote Renewable Energy Sources Using Existing Cng Infrastructure...

419

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

420

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

422

Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Drilling for Geothermal Resources Rules - Idaho Details...

423

Geographic Information System (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System...

424

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

425

Biofuels International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels International Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels International Place Indiana Sector Biofuels Product Pittsburgh based biofuels project developer presently...

426

PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Name Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center...

427

Florida Solar Energy Center (Building America Partnership for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Improved Residential Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name Florida Solar Energy Center (Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction...

428

Metering Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Metering Technology Corporation Place Scotts Valley, California Product Engineering related to communicating meters....

429

Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

430

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration...

431

Partnerships | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Partnerships LEDS...

432

Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

433

NREL-Renewable Energy Optimization Presentation | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Optimization Presentation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Optimization Presentation Name Renewable Energy Optimization Presentation Agency...

434

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region (Redirected from Holocene Magmatic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Details...

435

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product String representation...

436

Water Quantity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantity Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQuantity&oldid612364...

437

Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

438

User:Clarknd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clarknd Jump to: navigation, search Edits 1960 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleUser:Clarknd&oldid508286...

439

User:Nmatin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nmatin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleUser:Nmatin&oldid658628"...

440

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating that NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP.

Mota, Linda C. [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Barfield, Christina [Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Hernandez, Juan P. [University of Texas at El Paso, Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

Conley, Will

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tracking multiple mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring mouse social behaviors over long periods of time is essential for neurobehavioral analysis of social mouse phenotypes. Currently, the primary method of social behavioral plienotyping utilizes human labelers, ...

Braun, Stav

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

House Shrews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have a mouse problem each winter as the field mice enter from the 120 acres around the house. I read the answer in the archives on mouse house infestation. My question is are the...

446

Overview of LInC Course Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Files to and from a Server; and of course, Writing Web Pages Also, Shockwave animations with video and sound are available that provide mouse-click by mouse-click...

447

Feiqiao Brian Yu 2012.03.16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

individual cell (5). Another example deals with the study of NF-kB expression in mouse fibroblast cells (5). (B) Contrary to previous studies, NF-kB expression in mouse fibroblast cells occur digitally

Bejerano, Gill

448

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is a sample Memorandum of Understanding for DOE laboratories to use as guidance in drafting lab MOUs.

449

The Rockefeller University Press $30.00 J. Cell Biol. Vol. 191 No. 5 915922  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Gly-Asn­enriched protein; mInsc, mouse Insc; SCD, symmetric cell division; TRE, tetracycline/doxycycline

Rockey, Don

450

Aspect Ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with the mouse. Use the {mlx - false color - directional palette} menu. DOG - Direction of Gradient top. This display is useful ...

451

Microsoft 2.4GHz Wireless Protocol White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to turn on the light-emitting diode in the keyboard's Caps Lock, or change the functions of the mouse

Narasayya, Vivek

452

Available Technologies: Rapid Discovery and Optimization of Enzyme ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

453

Available Technologies: Synthesis of High Quality Graphene  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

454

Available Technologies: Nanometer Precision Manipulation and ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

455

Available Technologies: Black Ge-based On Crystalline Amorphous ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

456

Cathodic Arc Plasma System with Twist Filter - Triggerless method ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

457

Nanoparticles for Highly Detectable Contrast Agents in Medical Imaging  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

458

Available Technologies: Acid Hydrolysis of Biomass and Increased ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

459

Available Technologies: Acid-Degradeable and Bioerodible Materials  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

460

Available Technologies: Membrane-Electrode Structures for Low Cost ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Available Technologies: Cell-based Therapy for Neurological Disorders  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

462

User performance with trackball-mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trackball-mice are devices that include both a trackball and a mouse. In this paper we discuss our experiences in building and testing trackball-mouse prototypes. We report four experiments on user performance with the prototypes used as trackball-mice, ... Keywords: Dual-stream input, Fitts' Law, Optical mouse, Pointing device, Trackball, Trackmouse, Two-cursor, Two-handed interaction

Poika Isokoski; Roope Raisamo; Benot Martin; Grigori Evreinov

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Shackelford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shackelford, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.6138199, -120.9927111 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

464

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Preservation Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Address Kakuhihewa Building 601...

465

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Address 1151 Punchbowl St Place...

466

Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

467

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Browse wiki Jump to: navigation, search Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility CommercialOnlineDate 1989 + Coordinates 33.7174708,...

468

Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

469

Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Hartford Steam Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Steam Co Place Connecticut Utility Id...

470

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Browse wiki Jump to: navigation, search New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Coordinates 42.3917598, -71.5661769Latitude: 42.3917598...

471

Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

472

Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers" New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Jump to:...

473

Club for Rural Electrification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Club for Rural Electrification Jump to: navigation, search Name Club for Rural Electrification Place Freiburg, Germany Zip 79114 Sector Solar Product An industry association of...

474

Columbia Rural Elec Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia Rural Elec Assn, Inc Place Washington Utility Id 4041 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity...

475

South Kentucky Rural Electric Coop Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky Rural Electric Coop Corp (Tennessee) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Kentucky Rural Electric Coop Corp Place Tennessee Utility Id 17564 References EIA Form EIA-861...

476

Butler Public Power District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Power District (Redirected from Butler County Rural P P D) Jump to: navigation, search Name Butler Public Power District Place Nebraska Utility Id 2643 Utility Location Yes...

477

Grundy County Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Rural Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Grundy County Rural Elec Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 7864 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO Activity...

478

Multispectral Imaging At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (Prakash, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Multispectral Imaging At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (Prakash, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

479

FLIR At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (Prakash, Et Al., 2010) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon FLIR At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (Prakash, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

480

Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Pilgrim, Alaska- First Results From Remote Sensing Studies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Poster: Geothermal Exploration In Pilgrim, Alaska- First...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "meadow jumping mouse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

BLM Alaska State Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Alaska State Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BLM Alaska State Office Name BLM Alaska State Office Short Name Alaska Parent Organization Bureau of Land Management...

482

State Farm Insurance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Farm Insurance Jump to: navigation, search Name State Farm Insurance Place Bloomington, IL Website http:www.statefarminsurance. References State Farm Insurance1...

483

Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California, inferred from satellite radar interferometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

484

Oregon State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office Name Oregon State Historic Preservation Office Address 725 Summer St NE, Ste C Place Salem,...

485

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

486

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

487

Oregon Department of State Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of State Lands Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of State Lands Name Oregon Department of State Lands Address 775 Summer Street, Suite 100 Place...

488

BLM Wyoming State Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BLM Wyoming State Office Name BLM Wyoming State Office Short Name Wyoming Parent Organization Bureau of Land Management Address 5353...

489

Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hampshire) Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite State Electric Co Place New Hampshire Utility Id 26510 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

490

BLM Montana State Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BLM Montana State Office Name BLM Montana State Office Short Name Montana Parent Organization Bureau of Land Management Address 5001...

491

Arizona State University TUV Rheinland JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TUV Rheinland JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Arizona State University & TUV Rheinland JV Sector Solar Product Solar JV formed for technology testing and certification....

492

Guidelines for Leasing State Highway Right of Way Tracts | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Guidelines for Leasing State Highway Right of Way Tracts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

493

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

494

Application for State Highway Approach | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Highway Approach Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Highway Approach Details Activities (0) Areas (0)...

495

MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State...

496

Grover Hot Springs State Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grover Hot Springs State Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Grover Hot Springs State Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

497

BLM Arizona State Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BLM Arizona State Office Name BLM Arizona State Office Short Name Arizona Parent Organization Bureau of Land Management Address One North...

498

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

499

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith,...

500

World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Revenue Generating-Entities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities Agency...