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1

"1. William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",822  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "1. William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",822 "2. Westbrook Energy Center","Gas","Calpine Operating Services Company Inc",506 "3. Maine Independence Station","Gas","Casco Bay Energy Co LLC",490 "4. Rumford Power Associates","Gas","Rumford Power",254 "5. Verso Paper","Gas","Verso Bucksport LLC",250 "6. Androscoggin Energy Center","Gas","Verso Paper Androscoggin LLC",137 "7. Kibby Mountain Wind","Other Renewables","TransCanada Maine Wind Development Inc",132 "8. Great Lakes Hydro America - ME","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",130

2

McKenzie Solar Power Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKenzie Solar Power Facility McKenzie Solar Power Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name McKenzie Solar Power Facility Facility McKenzie Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Facility Status In Service Owner Recurrent Energy Developer Recurrent Energy Energy Purchaser Sacramento Municipal Utility District Location Galt, California Coordinates 38.3102818°, -121.3012755° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3102818,"lon":-121.3012755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

McKenzie Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana Montana Utility Id 12087 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0899/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for McKenzie Electric Coop Inc (Montana). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 4.139 55.309 113 0.083 0.047 2 4.222 55.356 115 2009-02 5.066 56.074 114 0.083 0.044 2 5.149 56.118 116

4

McKenzie County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKenzie County, North Dakota: Energy Resources McKenzie County, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.7714179°, -103.4122495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7714179,"lon":-103.4122495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations, supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. A primary goal of the Council's program is to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. The MWC will always have a baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. This watershed program is strengthened by the completion of the BPA funded Sub-basin Assessment, Conservation Strategy and the establishment of a Benchmarks system, thus, providing the MWC a prioritized framework for restoration efforts. Objectives for FY03 included: (1) Continued coordination of McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups that restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though a strategic and comprehensive outreach and education program, utilizing Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

McKenzie River Watershed Coordination, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations and grant funds supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's (MWC) efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. Primary goals of the MWC are to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. Underpinning the goals is the MWC's baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. Objectives for FY02 included: (1) Continue to coordinate McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups to restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the middle to lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though an outreach and education program, utilizing (BPA funded) Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and Council operations.

Thrailkil, Jim

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

McKenzie Electric Coop Inc (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2087 2087 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0706/kWh Commercial: $0.0876/kWh Industrial: $0.0524/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for McKenzie Electric Coop Inc (North Dakota). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

9

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

HL Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HL Power Company HL Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name HL Power Company Place Wendel, California Sector Biomass Product A power company located in California, the company main focus of energy is directed to biomass production. Coordinates 40.293339°, -79.687036° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.293339,"lon":-79.687036,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HL&P/Du Pont Cogeneration Project is an arrangement between Houston Lighting & Power Company and E. I. Du Pont de Nemours whereby the utility-owned cogeneration facility supplies a portion of the Du Pont process steam requirements. The facility consists of two cogeneration systems, each comprised of a natural gas fired GE 80 MW Frame 7EA, or equivalent, exhausting into a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Gas turhines are equipped with steam injection capability for power augmentation. Supplementary fireable HRSG's provide additional supply reliability for the steam host. Electricity from the project is delivered into HL&P's System through a new 138 KY substation. Such an arrangement offers Du Pont a significant cost saving opportunity as less efficient steam raising equipment is displaced. It also provides HL&P ratepayers with significant benefits, given the fuel efficiencies associated with cogeneration projects.

Vadie, H. H.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

HL Power Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » HL Power Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home HL Power Geothermal Facility General Information Name HL Power Geothermal Facility Facility HL Power Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Wendel, California Coordinates 40.3482346°, -120.2335461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3482346,"lon":-120.2335461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Improving Building Comfort and Energy Savings of the McKenzie Airport Terminal by Maintaining and Improving Pneumatic Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McKenzie Airport Terminal is located at Easterwood Airport, which is owned and operated by Texas A&M University. It was built in 1988. Most all HVAC equipment, which includes boiler, chiller, pumps, AHUs and exhaust fans, due to lack of maintenance, had some form of deteriorated controls, components, and operational function. For example, most of pneumatic controls were failed due to bad components, wrong settings, and disconnection before the Continuous CommissioningR (CCSM). This caused humid and hot problems of the building, and wasted energy. After maintaining and improving the pneumatic controls, the boiler and hot water pump is now turned off when outside air temperature is higher than 80F. The chiller is now shut off when the outside air temperature is below 55 F, and the economizers activate to maintain discharge air temperature when the outside air temperature is below 60 F. The building comfort in temperature and relative humidity (RH) is improved after CCSM. For example, average space temperature of the building was above 75 F most of the time before CCSM and is now 73 F after CCSM. The relative humidity in the baggage claim area was 70% before CCSM and is now 55% after CCSM. The annual savings of electricity for chiller and natural gas for boiler are $5,040 and $12,090 respectively. The total annual energy savings are $17,130.

Liu, C.; Bruner, H. L.; Deng, S.; Brundidge, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

RESOLVING THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK OF HL TAURI AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS  

SciTech Connect

We present results of high-resolution imaging toward HL Tau by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We have obtained {lambda} = 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm dust continua with an angular resolution down to 0.''13. Through simultaneous model fitting to the two wavelength data sets in Bayesian inference using a flared viscous accretion disk model, we estimate the physical properties of HL Tau, such as density distribution, dust opacity spectral index, disk mass, disk size, inclination angle, position angle, and disk thickness. HL Tau has a circumstellar disk mass of 0.13 M{sub sun}, a characteristic radius of 79 AU, an inclination of 40{sup 0}, and a position angle of 136{sup 0}. Although a thin disk model is preferred by our two wavelength data sets, a thick disk model is needed to explain the high mid- and far-infrared emission of the HL Tau spectral energy distribution. This could imply large dust grains settled down on the midplane with fine dust grains mixed with gas. The HL Tau disk is likely gravitationally unstable and can be fragmented between 50 and 100 AU of radius. However, we did not detect dust thermal continuum supporting the protoplanet candidate claimed by a previous study using observations of the Very Large Array at {lambda} = 1.3 cm.

Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mundy, Lee G., E-mail: wkwon@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

First Neutron Spectrometry Measurement at the HL-2A Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact neutron spectrometer based on the liquid scintillator is presented for neutron energy spectrum measurements at the HL-2A tokamak. The spectrometer was well characterized and a fast digital pulse shape discrimination software was developed using the charge comparison method. A digitizer data acquisition system with a maximum frequency of 1 MHz can work under an environment with a high count rate at HL-2A tokamak. Specific radiation and magnetic shielding for the spectrometer were designed for the neutron spectrum measurement at the HL-2A tokamak. For pulse height spectrum analysis, dedicated numerical simulation utilizing NUBEAM combined with GENESIS was performed to obtain the neutron energy spectrum. Subsequently, the transportation process from the plasma to the detector was evaluated with Monte Carlo calculations. The distorted neutron energy spectrum was folded with the response matrix of the liquid scintillation spectrometer, and good consistency was found between the simulated and measured pulse height spectra. This neutron spectrometer based on a digital acquisition system could be well adopted for the investigation of the auxiliary heating behavior and the fast-ion related phenomenon on different tokamak devices.

Yuan Xi; Zhang Xing; Xie Xufei; Chen Zhongjing; Peng Xingyu; Fan Tieshuan; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Discharge Design of HL-2M with the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results on the discharge design of the HL-2M tokamak, which is to be an upgrade to the existing HL-2A tokamak. We present simulation results for complete 5-sec. discharges, both double null and lower single null, for both ohmic and auxiliary heated discharges. We also discuss the vertical stability properties of the device. __________________________________________________

Yudong Pan, S.C. Jardin, and C. Kes

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

The effect of P-selectin pattern width on HL-60 cell rolling behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of varying the width of P-selectin band patterns on the rolling behavior of HL- 60 myeloid cells along edges of the band patterns was studied. The P-selectin and polyethylene glycol (PEG) pattern was produced ...

Sung, Minhee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ageing studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resistive-anode Micromegas detectors are in development since several years, in an effort to solve the problem of sparks when working in high flux and high radiations environment like in the HL-LHC (ten times the luminosity of the LHC). They have been chosen as one of the technologies that will be part of the ATLAS New Small Wheel project (forward muon system). An ageing study is mandatory to assess their capabilities to handle the HL-LHC environment on a long-term period. A prototype has been exposed to several types of irradiations (X-rays, cold neutrons, 60 Co gammas) up to an equivalent HL-LHC time of more than five years without showing any degradation of the performances in terms of gain and energy resolution. Beam test studies took place in October 2012 to assess the tracking performances (efficiency, spatial resolution,...). Results of ageing studies and beam test performances are reported in this paper.

J. Galan; D. Attie; E. Ferrer-Ribas; A. Giganon; I. Giomataris; S. Herlant; F. Jeanneau; A. Peyaud; Ph. Schune; T. Alexopoulos; M. Byszewski; G. Iakovidis; P. Iengo; K. Ntekas; S. Leontsinis; R. de Oliveira; Y. Tsipolitis; J. Wotschack

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

A new neutral particle analyzer diagnostic and its first commissioning on HL-2A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new neutral particle analyzer diagnostic has been developed for HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A), which can provide the neutral particle flux measurement along 11 separate sightlines, simultaneously, within a wider energy range (1-70 keV). It is an electrostatic type analyzer with a removable pinhole and special-shape condenser. The energy analysis can be flexibly achieved by controlling a preset stepwise high voltage on the condenser. It is compact and its field of view covers HL-2A cross section from -33 cm to 33 cm without 'cross-talk.' The energy spectra and ion temperature profile have been obtained during its commissioning.

Li, W.; Xia, Z. W.; Lu, J.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Forward Silicon Strip System for the ATLAS HL-LHC Upgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC is successfully accumulating luminosity at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV this year. At the same time, plans are rapidly progressing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly eight years from now in the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project. The HL-LHC is expected to deliver approximately five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity, resulting in a total integrated luminosity of around 3000 fb-1 by 2030. The ATLAS experiment has a rather well advanced plan to build and install a completely new Inner Tracker (IT) system entirely based on silicon detectors by 2020. This new IT will be made from several pixel and strip layers. The silicon strip detector system will consist of single-sided p-type detectors with five barrel layers and six endcap (EC) disks on each forward side. Each disk will consist of 32 trapezoidal objects dubbed petals, with all services (cooling, read-out, command lines, LV and HV power) integrated into the petal. Each petal will contain 18 silicon sensors grouped in...

Wonsak, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synchro-betatron effects in the presence of large Piwinski angle and crab cavities at the HL-LHC  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of {beta}* at the collision points for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) requires an increment in the crossing angle to maintain the normalized beam separation to suppress the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions. However, an increase in the crossing angle may give rise to synchro-betatron resonances which may negatively affect the beam emittance and lifetime. 6D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations were performed to study the effect of synchro-betatron resonances in the context of the HL-LHC layout and its suppression via crab crossing.

White S.; Calaga, R.; Miyamoto, R.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

New Detector Technologies for the LHC Experiments: Prospects, Strategies and Technologies for the HL-LHC Upgrades  

SciTech Connect

We review the prospects, strategies and technologies for the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, in the light of a very successful two year-long first physics run, and the discovery of a new 126 GeV boson with properties consistent with those of the Standard Model Higgs boson.

Mannelli, Marcello [CERN

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Influence of the ATS Optics on Intra-Beam Scattering for HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the future High Luminosity (HL-)LHC the influence of intra-beam scattering (IBS) will be stronger than in the present LHC, because of higher bunch intensity, small emittance and new optics. The new ATS-optics scheme [1] modifies the lattice in the arcs around the main interaction points (IP) to provide ?? values as small as 0.15m at the IP but these modifications affect the IBS growth rates. In this paper proton IBS emittance growth rates are calculated with MADX [2] and the Collider Time Evolution (CTE) program [3] for two ATS-optics versions, different settings of the crossing angles and required corrections and various beam conditions at injection (450 GeV) and collision (7 TeV) energy. CTE simulations of the expected luminosity, intensity, emittance and bunch length evolution during fills are also presented.

Schaumann, M; Jowett, J M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Interview of Dan McKenzie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

school in Kensington; mother's background was completely different; she was brought up in Leeds and father was a labourer; she got a State Scholarship and applied to come to Newnham to read English; at her interview made her read aloud which emphasized...

McKenzie, Dan

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Silicon strip prototypes for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS tracker for the HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the integration structures for the silicon strips tracker of the ATLAS detector proposed for the Phase-II upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), also referred to as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In this proposed detector Silicon strip sensors are arranged in highly modular structures, called `staves' and `petals'. This paper presents performance results from the latest prototype stave built at Berkeley. This new, double-sided prototype is composed of a specialized core structure, in which a shield-less bus tape is embedded in between carbon fiber lay-ups. A detailed description of the prototype and its electrical performance are discussed in detail.

Diez, Sergio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Silicon strip prototypes for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS tracker for the HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the integration structures for the silicon strips tracker of the ATLAS detector proposed for the Phase-II upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), also referred to as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In this proposed detector Silicon strip sensors are arranged in highly modular structures, called `staves' and `petals'. This paper presents performance results from the latest prototype stave built at Berkeley. This new, double-sided prototype is composed of a specialized core structure, in which a shield-less bus tape is embedded in between carbon fiber lay-ups. A detailed description of the prototype and its electrical performance are discussed in detail.

Sergio Diez

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Irradiation Tests and Expected Performance of Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter for the HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC) will have to withstand an about 3-5 times larger radiation environment at the future high-luminosity LHC (HLLHC) compared to their design values. The preamplifier and summing boards (PSBs), which are equipped with GaAs ASICs and comprise the heart of the readout electronics, were irradiated with neutrons and protons with fluences surpassing several times ten years of operation of the HL-LHC. Neutron tests were performed at the NPI in Rez, Czech Republic, where a 36 MeV proton beam was directed on a thick heavy water target to produce neutrons. The proton irradiation was done with 200 MeV protons at the PROSCAN area of the Proton Irradiation Facility at the PSI in Villigen, Switzerland. In-situ measurements of S-parameters in both tests allow the evaluation of frequency dependent performance parameters, like gain and input impedance, as a function of fluence. The linearity of the ASIC response was measured directly in the neutron tests with a triangular input pulse of varying amplitude. The results obtained allow an estimation of the expected performance degradation of the HEC. For a possible replacement of the PSB chips, alternative technologies were investigated and exposed to similar neutron radiation levels. In particular, IHP 250 nm Si CMOS technology has turned out to show good performance and match the specifications required. The performance measurements of the current PSB devices, the expected performance degradations under HL-LHC conditions, and results from alternative technologies will be presented.

Martin Nagel

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Engineering of a high-throughput screening system to identify cellulosic biomass, pretreatments, and enzyme formulations that enhance sugar release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass, Pretreatments, and Enzyme Formulations That Enhance Sugar Release Michael H. Studer, Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Simone Brethauer, Heather L. McKenzie, Charles E. Wyman Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: þ951-781-5791; fax: þ951-781-5790; e-mail: charles.wyman@ucr.edu Received 7 April 2009; revision received 21 August 2009; accepted 31 August 2009 Published online 3 September 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22527 ABSTRACT: The recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the only abundant, sustainable feedstock for making liquid fuels, is a primary

30

Prospects on the search for invisible Higgs decays in the ZH channel at the LHC and HL-LHC: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show prospects on a search for invisible decays of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This search is performed on a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson. We expect that the branching ratio of 17-22% (6-14%) could be excluded at 95% confidence level with 300 fb^{-1} (3000 fb^{-1}) of data at sqrt(s)=14 TeV. The range indicates different assumptions on the control of systematic uncertainties. Interpretations with Higgs-portal dark matter models are also considered.

Hideki Okawa; Josh Kunkle; Elliot Lipeles

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Review: Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production Simone Brethauer, Charles E. Wyman *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precede the grain. Wheat flour, enriched wheat flour and unbleached wheat flour are not whole grain of these essential oils to increase flavor and satisfaction. Whole Grains Whole grain breads Whole wheat English muffins Whole wheat bagels, mini bagels Whole wheat or corn tortillas Whole wheat pitas Cereal

California at Riverside, University of

32

Biocommodity Engineering Lee R. Lynd,* Charles E. Wyman, and Tillman U. Gerngross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as grains and sugar beet for bioethanol and oil seed crops (e.g. oil palm) for biodiesel. Second generation (Saccharum spp.), sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), cassava (Manihot esculenta) and maize (Zea mays) for bioethanol comprises three modules which describe (i) socioe- conomics and consumption, (ii) conversion and trade

California at Riverside, University of

33

Hydrolysis of different chain length xylooliogmers by cellulase and hemicellulase Qing Qing, Charles E. Wyman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Grupo de Conversion de Energia, Bogotá, Colombia a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 11 process for the conversion of corn stover to ethanol. Cellulose 16 (4), 535­545. Alvira, P., Tomás-Pejó, E., Ballesteros, M., Negro, M.J., 2010. Pretreatment technologies for an efficient bioethanol production process

California at Riverside, University of

34

DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES IN ANDRA'S ASSESSMENT OF ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT BY RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATORS AND AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF IL-LL SHORT-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES AND HL-IL LONG-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In both cases of packages for either low-level and intermediate-level short-lived (LL-IL/SL) or high-level and intermediate-level long-lived (HL-IL/LL) radioactive waste, Andra has defined a quality reference system, manages it, follows up its appropriate implementation in production plants and verifies its effectiveness in production. The purpose of such a reference system is to ensure, in the first case, that waste packages comply with the Centre de l'Aube's acceptance criteria and, in the second case, that the characteristics submitted by the waste generators to Andra as input data for the deep geological repository project reflect the actual production conditions. In that context, the three management steps of the quality reference system include differences due to the fact that HL-IL/SL packages have not been submitted yet to any technical acceptance criterion. Compliance with any such criterion should be the subject of a characterization report during the qualification phase and of a examination during the verification phase. The management of the quality reference system also involves similarities that facilitate the joint work carried out by Andra with the waste generators, especially in the facilities where both package types are produced.

Trentesaux, C.; Cairon, P.; Dumont, J.-N.; Felix, B.; Losada, F.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel Etanol from Cellulosic Biomass LEE R. LYND, JANET H. CusHmAN, ROBERTA J. NICHOLS, CHARLES E. WYMAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is with the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755. J. H. Cushman manages the Biofuels. At the 1989 average wholesale gasoline price of $0.655 per gallon (2), the selling price required for neat), gasoline can be expected to have a wholesale price of about $0.88 per gallon (25), and a price of $0.70 per

California at Riverside, University of

36

Frederic (Rick) D. McKenzie Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization Engineering Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................13 3.4.1. Starting the Installation Program ........................................................................................14 3.5.2. Run the Installation Program.................................................192 14.3.4. Session Startup with a Client Supplied Start Program

McKenzie, Rick

37

Mm HL1800E CD) Bedienungsanleitung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chairman of the Compensation Committee, Solera Holdings, Inc. All sessions will take place at Northwestern

Kleinfeld, David

38

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2004 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE >100,000 MBOE Study Area Outline Basin Number of Fields Total Liquid Reserves (Mbbls) Total Gas Reserves (MMcf) Total BOE Reserves (Mbbls) WILLISTON BASIN 955 769,007 840,561 909,101 The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and

39

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Study Area Outline Basin Number of Fields Total Liquid Reserves (Mbbls) Total Gas Reserves (MMcf) Total BOE Reserves (Mbbls) WILLISTON BASIN 955 769,007 840,561 909,101 The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and

40

EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billngs, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

USDA Rural Utilities Service is preparing this EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing, operating, and maintaining a proposed transmission line and associated facilities in western North Dakota. DOEs Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, would modify its existing Williston Substation to allow a connection of the proposed new transmission line to Westerns transmission system.

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41

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

42

Letters/Tanker safety  

SciTech Connect

In response to an earlier article by L. J. Carter, T. S. Wyman (Chevron Shipp. Co.) indicated that proper operation of the segregated ballast tank (SBT) system would require heavy reliance on vessel personnel to prevent pollution. Routine washing of cargo tanks on ballast voyages after cargo has been discharged and periodic ballasting of cargo tanks especially during heavy weather would create a potential for marine pollution with SBT's. On the other hand, crude oil washing conducted in port under close supervision avoids this possibility of marine pollution. However, according to A. McKenzie (Tanker Advisory Cent. Inc.), the U.S. tanker industry requires firm government action to establish standards for tanker construction and operation that are considerably more effective than those presently in force. The U.S. should unilaterally pass legislation to, e.g., stop using water in the cargo tanks of tankers for washing and ballasting, retrofit existing tankers with SBT's and require new tankers to have double-hull segregated ballast systems. Other maritime nations will quickly adopt these actions.

Wyman, T.S. (Chevron Shipp. Co.); McKenzie, A.; Carter, L.J.

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cellulosic biomass could help meet Californias transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be competitive with corn ethanol (which today costs closecosts for producing ethanol from corn (Wyman 2001). Many of

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

HL7 Role-Based Access Control (RBAC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 1: Role Structure. ... a user possessing that role to participate in a work profile. ... used in the roadmap to illustrate the breakdown or partitioning of ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

From HITSP to HL7 EHR System Function and Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HITSP C32 Continuity of Care Document (CCD) had 16 Data Modules ... End Manage Schedules Manage Business Rules Manage Terminology ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Aging studies of Micromegas prototypes for the HL-LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The micromegas technology is a promising candidate to replace the forward muon chambers for the luminosity upgrade of ATLAS. The LHC accelerator luminosity will be five times the nominal one, increasing background and pile-up event probability. This requires detector performances which are currently under study in intensive R&D activities. Aging is one of the key issues for a high-luminosity LHC application. For this reason, we study the properties of resistive micromegas detectors under intense X-ray radiation and under thermal neutrons in different CEA-Saclay facilities. This study is complementary to those already performed using fast neutrons.

J. Galan; D. Attie; J. Derre; E. Ferrer Ribas; A. Giganon; I. Giomataris; F. Jeanneau; J. Manjarres; R. de Oliveira; P. Schune; M. Titov; J. Wotschack

2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

FPL Energy Wyman LLC 2. Westbrook Energy Center Gas Calpine Operating Services Company Inc 3. ... Verso Paper Verso Bucksport LLC 6. Androscoggin Energy Center

48

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

170. Bertaud F, Holmbom B. Chemical Composition of EarlywoodV, Wyman CE. Physical and Chemical Characterizations of CornRapid Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Agricultural

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wyman C: Handbook on bioethanol: production and utilization.In Book Handbook on bioethanol: production and utilization (Balat H, Oz C: Progress in bioethanol processing. Prog Energ

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

AEM.00958-10v1.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure, function and applications, p. 144-161. In C. E. Wyman (ed.), Handbook on Bioethanol. Taylor & Francis. 10. Hong, J., Ye X, Y....

51

Fundamentals of Biomass Pretreatment at Low pH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 2425 (1), 1-14. 4. Wyman, C.E. (ed.) (1996) Handbook on Bioethanol: Production and Utilization, Taylor and Francis, United States of...

52

Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

145. Wyman C, Huber G: Biomass and America's energy futuredevelopment of leading biomass pretreatment technologies.U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and

Gao, Xiadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effect of Microstructure (and Heat Treatment) on the 649C ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 45 kilograms of powder was placed into steel containers for subsequent hot compaction and extrusion at. Wyman Gordon's facilities in Houston,...

54

High Quality, High Strength Alloy 718 Billet Material Using Fine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Murray Kaufman and Charles J. Scholl. General Electric. Co. Wyman-Gordon Co. ... Occasional car- bide stringers up to a maximum of 0.0075" long were seen.

55

A Simulator for high level Petri Nets: Model based design and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 ­ Present: Graduate Program Director, Old Dominion University, Modeling, Simulation-time. #12;Dr. McKenzie 3 SUMMARY STATEMENT Dr. McKenzie is the Graduate Program Director in the new Modeling: Initial Phase, PI Jiang Li, Co-PI Rick McKenzie Fall 2008 to Summer 2009. $41,397. · Health iManage (Hi

56

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING THE INTELLIGENT MACHINE ARCHITECTURE VERSION 2.5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 ­ Present: Graduate Program Director, Old Dominion University, Modeling, Simulation-time. #12;Dr. McKenzie 3 SUMMARY STATEMENT Dr. McKenzie is the Graduate Program Director in the new Modeling: Initial Phase, PI Jiang Li, Co-PI Rick McKenzie Fall 2008 to Summer 2009. $41,397. · Health iManage (Hi

57

Witherspoon Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Course New South West Garage (Lot 7) Cogen Plant Thermal Energy Cooling Towers Lenz Tennis Center Poe6) Computer Science Building (K3) Computing Center (L5) Cooling Towers (F8) Cordish Family Pavilion Berlind Theatre GRADUATE COLLEGE 26 West Lodge Wyman House Wyman Cottage Cleveland Tower Springdale Golf

Rowley, Clarence W.

58

MIGP: medical image grid platform based on HL7 grid middleware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MIGP (Medical Image Grid Platform) realizes information retrieval and integration in extensive distributed medical information systems, which adapts to the essential requirement for the development of healthcare information infrastructure. But ...

Hai Jin; Aobing Sun; Qin Zhang; Ran Zheng; Ruhan He

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Figure HL1. U.S. Sales of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene in 2009 . ... the need for electric utilities to consume distillate fuel to meet peak summer generation loads remained ...

60

FINISHED CORRECTIONS for the reprint of Barton H. Barbour, Fort Union and the Upper Missouri Fur Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackfeet torched Fort Piegan in 1832, and the Company built a new post, Fort McKenzie, a few miles away

Barrash, Warren

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Physical and Chemical Features of Pretreated Biomass that Influence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical and Chemical Features of Pretreated Biomass that Influence Macro-Micro-accessibility and Biological Processing Rajeev Kumar 1,3 and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for...

62

Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulosic biomass to ethanol __________________ 3 Hemicellulose hydrolysis ________________________________________ 5 Thesis objectives _______________________________________________ 6 References ____________________________________________________ 7 Chapter 2 - Literature Review _____________________________________________ 9 Bioethanol Feedstock ___________________________________________feedstock that are inexpensive and abundant(Wyman 1999). In addition, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, cellulosic

Tsai, Yueh-Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biotech can transform biofuels. Nature Biotechnology 2008,Qing and Wyman Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011, 4:18 http://stover. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011 4:18. Submit your

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Projected Performance of an Upgraded CMS Detector at the LHC and HL-LHC: Contribution to the Snowmass Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics reach of the CMS detector achievable with 300(0) inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions recorded at sqrt(s)=14 TeV is presented. Ultimate precision on measurements of Higgs boson properties, top quark physics, and electroweak processes are discussed, as well as the discovery potential for new particles beyond the standard model. In addition, the potential for future heavy ion physics is presented. This document has been submitted as a white paper to the Snowmass process, an exercise initiated by the American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields to assess the long-term physics aspirations of the US high energy physics community.

CMS Collaboration

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

65

Enabling Technologies Lead: Mark Davis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Lead: Mark Davis 3.2 Omics Platforms for Systems Biology Lead: Tim Tschaplinski 3.3 Advanced Pretreatment Configuration and Conditions Lead: Charles Wyman 3.1 Characterization of Biomass Features that Enhance Sugar Release Lead: Art Ragauskas 3.1.1 Support for Identification of the TOP40 Recalcitrant Lines (Gjersing) 3.1.2 In-Depth Cell Wall Characterization (Ragauskas) 3.2.1 Transcriptomics & Resequencing (Brown) 3.2.2 Proteomics (Hettich) 3.3.4 Demonstration of Improved Plants with CBP Organisms (Yee) 3.4 Computational Biology Lead: Ying Xu 3.3.1 Enhance Understanding of Pretreatment Fundamentals and Control Recalcitrance (Wyman) 3.3.2 Integrate, Optimize, and Understand Pretreatment with Advanced Plants (Wyman) 3.4.1 An Integrated Omics Data Analysis and

66

Bakken Formation Producing Wells W il sto nBa North Dakota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

USA CANADA SD MT ND Saskatchewan Manitoba Dunn Ward Dawson McLean McKenzie Morton W il ams Stark Richland R os ev lt Mountrail Divide Prairie McHenry Burke Sheridan

67

EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND To address an increase in the electric load forecast for western North Dakota, the USDA Rural Utilities Service issued a notice of intent...

68

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

McIntosh Sioux Dunn McKenzie Slope Emmons Mercer Stark Golden Valley Morton Windows Insulation Foundation Fenestration U-Factor Skylight U-Factor Glazed Fenestration SHGC Ceiling...

69

Ultrafine Grained Materials III TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R.Ye. Lapovok and P.W.J. Mckenzie. The Effect on Grain Refinement of Developing a Strong Texture in an UFGAl-0.13 Mg Alloy Severly Deformed by ECAE [pp.

70

How do attitudes of habitual high-technology entrepreneurs to early-stage failure differ in Silicon Valley, Cambridge and Munich?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Cannon and Edmonson 2004: 7). McKenzie and Sud highlight the potential inadequacy of quantitative research methods to deal with this (McKenzie and Sud 2008: 124) and propose examining personal stories told by entrepreneurs about their failed ventures... and reasons for failed ventures yet failure remains hard to define. It may be objective, defined in terms of bankruptcy or dissolution (Warren and Westbrook 1999; Thornhill and Amit 2003; Ooghe and De Prijcker 2008; Primo and Green 2011); or subjective...

Cotterill, Keith

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE?s EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

Clark, Sue

2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

High-risk sexual behaviours among drug users in Pakistan: implications for prevention of STDs and HlV/AlDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated disorders in Pakistan. AIDS Res Hum RetrovirusesHIV/AIDS policy in Pakistan. Health Policy Plan 2001;16;AA, Khan OA. HIV/AIDS in Pakistan: the context and magnitude

Haque, N; Zafar, T; Brahmbhatt, H; Imam, G; ul Hassan, S; Strathdee, Steffanie A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...James A. Rossow Wyman-Gordon Company C.P. Royer Exxon Production Research Company Mamdouh M. Salama Conoco Inc. Norman L. Samways Association of Iron and Steel Engineers Gregory D. Sander Ring Screw Works J.A. Schmidt Joseph T. Ryerson and Sons, Inc. Michael Schmidt Carpenter Technology Corporation W....

74

Hot-Die Forging of P/M Ni-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

slow strain rates and high temperatures (slightly below the v solvus) [ 1,2]. ... environment, and slow ram speeds for successful .... Metals and Wyman Gordon for this study. The compositions .... Production heat treatment cycles typically contain a ..... performance are key design criteria. Conclusions ... General Electric Co. 2.

75

Annu. Rev. Energy Environ. 1999. 24:189226 Copyright c 1999 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reserved BIOMASS ETHANOL: Technical Progress, Opportunities, and Commercial Challenges Charles E. Wyman, hydrolysis, transportation s Abstract Ethanol made from lignocellulosic biomass sources, such as agricul, the estimated cost of biomass ethanol production has dropped from $4.63/gallon in 1980 to $1.22/gallon today

California at Riverside, University of

76

Partial flow of compressed-hot water through corn stover to enhance hemicellulose sugar recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in biological conversion of cellulosics to ethanol and other products; therefore, advanced pretreatment SSF conversion while applying extremely dilute sulfuric acid (0.07 wt %) in a counter- current. (2) Wyman, C. E., Ed. Handbook on Bioethanol: Production and Utilization, Applied Energy Technology

California at Riverside, University of

77

Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The primary obstacle to producing liquid transportation fuels by bio- conversion methods is the release. Nat Biotechnol 25:759­761. 9. Dien BS, et al. (2009) Improved sugar conversion and ethanol yield release. Biotechnol Bioeng 105: 231­238. 19. Wyman C, ed (1996) Handbook on Bioethanol: Production

California at Riverside, University of

78

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IL-County-Tazewell IL-County-Tazewell Location: County Tazewell IL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) HVAC retrofits in Tazewell Building (built in 1800-1900's), 3) HVAC retrofits in Old Post Office Building (NRHP-built in 1909), 4) EMA Building window retrofits, 5) EMA Building HVAC retrofits, 6) insulation and furnace retrofits in Command Center, 7) boiler retrofits in McKenzie Courthouse Building (built approximately 1961) Conditions: Historic preservation clause applies to this application (Tazewell Building [built 1800-1900's], Old Post Office [NRHP 1909], and McKenzie Courthouse Building [approx 1961])

79

Smallscale and automatable highthroughput compositional analysis of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Small-Scale and Automatable High-Throughput Compositional Analysis of Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Michael H. Studer, Charles E. Wyman Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: 951-781-5703; fax: 951-781-5790; e-mail: charles.wyman@ucr.edu Received 26 May 2010; revision received 26 August 2010; accepted 3 September 2010 Published online 9 September 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22937 ABSTRACT: Conventional wet chemistry methods to deter- mine biomass composition are labor- and time-intensive and require larger amounts of biomass (300 mg) than is often available. To overcome these limitations and to sup- port a high-throughput pretreatment and hydrolysis (HTPH) screening system,

80

URBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water produced that does not reach water board customers. Unaccounted for water results both from for water accounts for 25-40% of water produced by utilities in the main urban areas in India. WhileURBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS David McKenzie Development

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity of the [salmon 1956 12 MW Chief Joseph Columbia, WA 1958 2,458 MW Cougar McKenzie, OR 1963 25 MW Detroit Santiam

82

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Briefing Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retrofitted with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity Joseph Columbia, WA 1958 2,458 MW Cougar McKenzie, OR 1963 25 MW Detroit Santiam, OR 1953 100 MW Dexter and 3) in Washington state. The Hanford N-reactor turbine generator, built by WPPSS, also came on line

83

Joan Stevens Hall 1st-year students. 242 242 single rooms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

single rooms, 38 twin-share places. $170­$213 Yes Yes # Gym area Music room 15 free off-street car parks fee* Electricity included in fee Internet included in fee Facilities available #12;uStay McKenzies = 1

Frean, Marcus

84

Community Forestry E-News 2005.09 September 2006 WHAT WE ARE READING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

certification and eco-labeling of forest products in developing countries Authors: Durst, P.B; McKenzie, P percent of certified forests located in the tropics. This paper by Durst et al. gives a helpful overview to Durst et.al, are: q Insufficient demand for certified products in global markets, with the present

85

Few subpowers, congruence distributivity and near-unanimity terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few subpowers, congruence distributivity and near-unanimity terms Petar Markovi´c and Ralph McKenzie Abstract. We prove that for any variety V, the existence of an edge-term (defined in [1]) and J´onsson terms is equivalent to the existence of a near-unanimity term. We also characterize the idempotent

Markoviæ, Petar

86

04/02/13 14:38Giacomo D'Ariano -Google Scholar Citations Page 2 of 4http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=WRGm7mEAAAAJ&hl=en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

04/02/13 14:38Giacomo D'Ariano - Google Scholar Citations Page 2 of 4http://scholar.google Paris 132 2001 #12;04/02/13 14:38Giacomo D'Ariano - Google Scholar Citations Page 3 of 4http://scholar.google are estimated and are determined automatically by a computer program. ©2012 Google - About Google Scholar - All

D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

87

fleetappforms04f1298.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R R e t u r n C o p y t o : Bank of America Government Card Services Unit P.O. Box 1637 Norfolk, VA 23501-1637 Facsimile: 757.624.6323 Toll Free Fax: 877.217.1033 Form S04F1298 Revised: 05/9/99 Fleet Account Setup (Fields in Bold are Mandatory) ___ Driver Assigned ___ Vehicle Assigned Account Hierarchy Hierarchy Point HL1 HL2 HL3 HL4 HL5 HL6 HL7 HL8 General Information : Agency/Organization Name Business Phone Central Account Number Billing Address, Line 1 Master Accounting Code Billing Address, Line 2 Tax Exempt Number City Driver/Contact Name State Embossing Name 1 Zip/Postal Code Embossing Name 2 Account Information and Spending Limits: a) Driver ID f) Max. cycle dollar limit $ b) Credit limit g) Max. cycle number of

88

Rain Attenuation of Radar Echoes Considering Finite-Range Resolution and Using Drop Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical rain attenuation correction scheme of Hitschfeld and Bordan (HIBO) and the newer iterative approach by Hildebrand (HL) are reconsidered. Although the motivation for the HL algorithm was an extension into ranges, where HIBO tends to ...

Gerhard Peters; Bernd Fischer; Marco Clemens

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Microsoft Word - MI.01-8.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORNL/RASA-96/7 ORNL/RASA-96/7 Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the Remedial Action Performed at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Adrian, Michigan (AD001V) M. E. Murray S. P. McKenzie R. F. Carrier C. A. Johnson ORNL/RASA-96/7 LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Certification Documentation Review, Investigation, and Completion: Internal Activity No. 14B477101) Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the Remedial Action Performed at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Adrian, Michigan (AD001V) M. E. Murray, S. P. McKenzie, R. F. Carrier and C. A. Johnson Date Final issued - August 2002 Date Draft issued - July 1997

90

EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, 8: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billngs, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billngs, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND SUMMARY USDA Rural Utilities Service is preparing this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of constructing, operating, and maintaining a proposed transmission line and associated facilities in western North Dakota. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (WAPA), a cooperating agency, would modify its existing Williston Substation to allow a connection of the proposed new transmission line to Western's transmission system. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES No Public Comment Opportunities at this time

91

CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Categorical Exclusion Determination 65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 58-acre Melevin property by The McKenzie River Trust (MRT). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The Melevin tract being considered for purchase is currently an active aggregate mine on Green Island, operated by Oakridge Sand and Gravel. BPA will also be funding Oakridge Sand and Gravel to leave the native gravel of a particular type and amount

92

CX-002527: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27: Categorical Exclusion Determination 27: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002527: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of funds to McKenzie River Trust for purchase of Big Island Addition (Hunsaker) Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund the acquisition of the 92-acre Hunsaker property by the McKenzie River Trust (MRT). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of its outstanding riparian and floodplain natural resource values. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002527.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination

93

DATE: REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY Memorandum January 17, 2013 John McKenzie, NA-30 FY 2013 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY ro Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel Attached please find the 2013 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary for Naval Reactors ( NR). This is in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1 B, Section 4.d. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program is

94

here are many exciting things going on at the School of Education--and no one is more excited than its new dean,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alexander Mark MD'631 Robert Page BAH'63, MA'65 John Roy BSc(Eng)'63 Robert Shaw BA'631 and Jean Shaw BA'63 Bernstein BSc(Eng)'48 William M Campbell BSc(Eng)'48 James Donald BSc(Eng)'481 Ernest Hachborn BSc(Eng)'481 William McKenzie BSc(Eng)'481 Margaret Noakes BNSc'481 and John Noakes MD'451 James Stirling BSc(Eng)'48

Qiu, Weigang

95

Universit Paris XIII U.F.R. des Lettres, des Sciences de l'Homme et des Socits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rartl-mnd-iopo-iopl-mnd-hm-pr-ht-pr-hl-iop-ho-ihm-h-abdo-sopo-opo-cl Fig.4.Continued © 2011 The Authors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

i~f~.~..!:@'i~jgI ;0"'~S'"e.~-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rartl-mnd-iopo-iopl-mnd-hm-pr-ht-pr-hl-iop-ho-ihm-h-abdo-sopo-opo-cl Fig.4.Continued © 2011 The Authors

Sereno, Martin

97

Overview of the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Health Research provides organizational and dataHealth Research in Portland, Oregon (U01 HL 105233, Principal Investigator (PI ) Victor Stevens). The CHART organizational

Riley, William T; Stevens, Victor J; Zhu, Shu-Hong; Morgan, Glen; Grossman, Debra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) - October 2013 With Data for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Highlights. Figure HL1. Crude oil and petroleum product wholesale prices figure data. Highlights Crude Oil. July monthly average prices for crude oil show firm ...

99

Party Discipline with Electoral and Institutional Variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with different, fixed platforms TTL TTL) )- Write X) = B (XL(X HL) -with ideal points between TTL \\/BJOL TTL + T/BJOTL and

Ashworth, Scott; Bueno de Mesquita, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Journal of Research Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Efficiency of machinists' vises, p. 191 Whittemore, HL; Sweetman, LR http://dx.doi ... Data on ultra-violet solar radiation and the solarization of window ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Journal of Research Volume 43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume dilatometry, p. 145 Bekkedahl, Norman http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres ... nozzles with hydrocarbons and with air, p. 449 Shafer, MR; Bovey, HL ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Brief scales to assess physical activity and sedentary equipment in the home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SL, Berry CC, Taras HL: Home environmental influences onsedentary equipment in the home Dori E Rosenberg 1* , Jamesweight. The role of the home environment in shaping these

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2/15/10 11:16 AMtumbarumba australia -Google Maps Page 1 of 1http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q...=-27.839076,135.703125&spn=37.813743,79.013672&t=h&z=4&pw=2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/15/10 11:16 AMtumbarumba australia - Google Maps Page 1 of 1http://maps.google.com/maps:19 AMtumbarumba australia - Google Maps Page 1 of 1http://maps.google.com/maps?fCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne #12;Page 1 of 1http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q

Zürich, Universität

104

Present State and Future Plan of MCF Research in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering capability Main experimental results Research Plan in next 2-5 years ITER-CN Activities Future were achieved on HL-2A tokamak #12;Outline EAST HL-2A Tokamak EAST Tokamak Physical engineering System(50%), HV Substation Materials (100%), AC-DC Converter (62%) · SWIP: Blanket FW (10%) &Shield (40

105

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2010 8/2010 WTB & SPECTRUM ACCESS OVERVIEW Michael McKenzie Roger Noel Department of Energy December 8, 2010 12/8/2010 Wireless Telecommunications Bureau 2 Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) * Second largest FCC Bureau * Develops and administers U.S. wireless telecommunications programs and policies * Key WTB roles and responsibilities: * Executes FCC's spectrum auction authority * Licenses and oversees U.S. commercial wireless services * Provides analysis of wireless industry competition * Develops IT tools and resources for license and spectrum management * Some major WTB policy objectives: * Facilitate the introduction of new and innovative services * Maximize the efficient use of spectrum * Foster wireless competition

106

Discovery in Cambridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, scanners, cameras, their attitude is tolerant. In practical terms the college and university have always supported what can be a costly involvement with gadgets to record and analyse a changing world. I recently interviewed the astronomer Martin Rees... to be developed in the last 50 years and Michael Pepper, whose team in 1997 discovered a new standard for electric currents. The work of Dan McKenzie and other geo-physicists has had a great effect on oil exploration and it is also worth remembering Frank Whittle...

Macfarlane, Alan

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

04JBMBE04-1104  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARTICLE Copyright © 2010 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America Journal of Biobased Materials and Bioenergy Vol. 4, 1-6, 2010 Near Infrared Spectroscopy as a Screening Tool for Sugar Release and Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw J. Lindedam 1 2 ∗ , S. Bruun 1 , J. DeMartini 3 , H. Jørgensen 2 , C. Felby 2 , B. Yang 3 4 , C. E. Wyman 3 , and J. Magid 1 1 Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark 2 Wood and Biomass Science, Forest and Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark 3 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside CA 92507, USA 4 Now at Center for Bioproducts

108

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

109

pnas201009252 1..6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lignin Lignin content in natural Populus variants affects sugar release Michael H. Studer a,b,1 , Jaclyn D. DeMartini a,b , Mark F. Davis b,c , Robert W. Sykes b,c , Brian Davison b,d , Martin Keller b,d , Gerald A. Tuskan b,e , and Charles E. Wyman a,b,2 a University of California, Bourns College of Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Riverside, CA 92507; b BESC BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422; c National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401- 3305; d Energy and Environmental Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422; and e Plant Systems Biology Group, BioSciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 Edited* by Ronald R. Sederoff, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, and approved March 3, 2011 (received for review

110

Changes in composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composition composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Charles E. Wyman ⇑ Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 July 2010 Received in revised form 30 August 2010 Accepted 31 August 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Pretreatment Enzymatic hydrolysis Biomass recalcitrance Age effects Populus wood a b s t r a c t Understanding structural characteristics that are responsible for biomass recalcitrance by identifying why it is more difficult for some plants, or portions of plants, to release their sugars would be extremely valuable in overcoming this barrier. With this in mind, this study investigated the recalcitrance of wood

111

Determination of porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons⠒ stain and NMR techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

porosity porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons' stain and NMR techniques Xianzhi Meng a , Marcus Foston a,1 , Johannes Leisen b , Jaclyn DeMartini c , Charles E. Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,⇑ a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, BioEnergy Science Center, Riverside, CA 92507, USA h i g h l i g h t s  Cellulose accessibility was tested by Simons' stain and multiple NMR techniques.  Pretreatment increases the pore size and overall surface area of the

112

Carbohydrate derivedpseudolignin can retard cellulose biological conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar, 1,2,3 Fan Hu, 3,4 Poulomi Sannigrahi, 3,4 Seokwon Jung, 3,4 Arthur J. Ragauskas, 3,4 Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: 951-781-5668; fax: 951-781-5790; e-mail: rajeev.dartmouth@gmail.com 2 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, 446 Winston Chung Hall, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92507 3 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6422 4 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT: Dilute acid as well as water only (hydrother- mal) pretreatments often lead to a significant

113

Fermentation of soybean hulls to ethanol while preserving protein value  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermentation Fermentation of soybean hulls to ethanol while preserving protein value Jonathan R. Mielenz a,b, * , John S. Bardsley a,c , Charles E. Wyman a,d a Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, United States b BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States c Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766, United States d Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92507, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 12 August 2008 Received in revised form 11 February 2009 Accepted 11 February 2009 Available online 27 March 2009 Keywords: Ethanol SSF Biomass Agricultural residue Animal feed a b s t r a c t Soybean hulls were evaluated as a resource for production of ethanol by the simultaneous saccharifica- tion and fermentation (SSF) process, and no pretreatment

114

c1ee02112e 1..8  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monoclonal monoclonal antibodies to investigate plant cell wall deconstruction for biofuels production† Jaclyn D. DeMartini, abe Sivakumar Pattathil, ce Utku Avci, ce Kaitlyn Szekalski, c Koushik Mazumder, ce Michael G. Hahn cde and Charles E. Wyman * abe Received 10th July 2011, Accepted 17th August 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02112e To better understand how hydrothermal pretreatment reduces plant cell wall recalcitrance, we applied a high throughput approach (''glycome profiling'') using a comprehensive suite of plant glycan-directed monoclonal antibodies to monitor structural/extractability changes in Populus biomass. The results of glycome profiling studies were verified by immunolabeling using selected antibodies from the same toolkit. The array of monoclonal antibodies employed in these studies is large enough to monitor changes occurring in most plant cell wall polysaccharides.

115

c3fb13dd06a8704143923ce0a744bf57  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) 13 C- 1 H correlation spectra of whole biomass in perdeuterated pyridinium chloride-DMSO system: An effective tool for evaluating pretreatment Reichel Samuel a,c , Marcus Foston a,c , Nan Jaing a,c , Shilin Cao a , Lenong Allison a,c , Michael Studer c , Charles Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,c,⇑ a School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United States b Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United States c BioEnergy Science Center, CE-CERT and Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 5 May 2010 Received in revised form 12 April 2011 Accepted 18 April 2011 Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords:

116

Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charles Charles E. Wyman 1,2 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA Welcome to "Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass for Biological and Chemical Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals." This book provides insights into thermochemical preparation of cellulosic biomass such as wood, grass, and agricultural and forestry residues for aqueous conversion to fuels and chemicals as well as economic and analysis information that is broadly applicable to a wide range of aqueous biomass opera- tions. Historically, acid catalyzed hydrolysis of biomass goes back to the early nineteenth century [1], when the emphasis was on aqueous-processing of biomass in concentrated acid or dilute acid at higher tempera- ture to break down cellulose

117

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

118

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Calendar Monday, Jan. 28 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: M. Wyman, Perimeter Institute Title: Magnetogenesis from Cosmic String Loops 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: Rapid Transfers to the Recycler Ring; 11 Batch Main Injector Operation Tuesday, Jan. 29 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Weather Weather Chance of rain showers 48°/44° Extended Forecast Weather at Fermilab Current Security Status Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe

119

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transformations transformations of Populus trichocarpa during dilute acid pretreatment Shilin Cao,{ ae Yunqiao Pu,* be Michael Studer,{ ce Charles Wyman cde and Arthur J. Ragauskas* abe Received 4th September 2012, Accepted 4th September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2ra22045h In this study, Populus trichocarpa was subjected to dilute acid pretreatment at varying pretreatment times. The three major components of lignocellulosic biomass, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, were isolated from the starting and dilute acid pretreated poplar. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were utilized to elucidate structural transformations of poplar during dilute acid pretreatment. The results demonstrated that the pretreatment dissolved hemicelluloses and disrupted structural features of lignin and polysaccharides. As revealed by NMR, the

120

Comparison of laboratory delignification methods, their selectivity, and impacts on physiochemical characteristics of cellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laboratory laboratory delignification methods, their selectivity, and impacts on physiochemical characteristics of cellulosic biomass Rajeev Kumar a,b,d,⇑ , Fan Hu c,d , Christopher A. Hubbell c,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas c,d , Charles E. Wyman a,b,d a Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, United States b Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, 446 Winston Chung Hall, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521, United States c School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States d BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422, United States h i g h l i g h t s " Delignification was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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121

Response evolution of the CMS ECAL and R&D studies for electromagnetic calorimetry at the High-Luminosity LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the CMS experiment is currently harvesting LHC collision data at CERN, the performance of its electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being constantly monitored, and work has started to assess the need for changes to the detector to ensure an adequate performance for High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) running, which is planned for 2022 and beyond. In this paper, results from CMS running, beam tests and laboratory measurements are combined to anticipate the detector performance evolution at the HL-LHC. Further, various R&D studies are illustrated, that will provide a useful choice for electromagnetic calorimetry at the HL-LHC.

Francesca Nessi Tedaldi; for the CMS Collaboration

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

eCopy, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"f'hl '""",.,;.,'l.":'4>d lrt.e""USC 'pt has been authored ;)y a contra 'tor of the U. S. Government ".del' contract No. W31109-ENG38 . ..... ccordiogly, the U. S....

124

Journal of Research Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 006.042. Wind pressure on a model of a mill building, p. 735 Dryden, HL; Hill, GC http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres.006.043. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Corporate Achievement Award Recognizing industry achievement for an outstanding process, product, or contribution that has made the greatest impact on its industry segment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Schroepfer Medal The award recognizes scientists who have made major advance in the steroid or sterol field. Year Recipient 2012 Michael R. Waterman, Vanderbilt University, USA 2010 Cedric H.L. Shackleton, University of Birmingham, United Kingdo

126

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H $2,000 hl S z % Reduction in Total Space Conditioning LoadAppliances and Space Conditioning Equipment. Arthur D.3.1 and 3.4. The space conditioning loads are based on the

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NREL: Energy Analysis - Yimin Zhang  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spatari, S., Zhang, Y., MacLean, H.L. 2005. Life cycle assessment of switchgrass and corn stover-derived ethanol fueled automobiles. Environmental Science and Technology 39:...

128

A New Formulation for the Bowen Ratio over Saturated Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical expressions are presented for calculating the Bowen ratio, Bo = Hs/HL, from a quantity Bo* that is derived primarily from the surface temperature Ts and the assumption that the near-surface air is saturated (but not supersaturated) ...

Edgar L. Andreas; Beniamin A. Cash

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analysis and Documentation of Roadway Incident Using Software and Photogrammetric Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve_02.html 4. Definition of a B-Spline Curve : http://CAGDNo tes/B-Spline-Curve-Definition.pdf+what+is+a+b-spline%3F&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 5. B-Spline Curves :

Su, Ray J.; Chan, Ching-Yao

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Estimation of Three-Dimensional Error Covariances. Part II: Analysis of Wind Innovation Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of statistical analysis of wind innovation (observation minus forecast) vectors is refined upon the work of Hollingsworth and Lnnberg (HL). The new refinements include (i) improved spectral representations of wind forecast error ...

Qin Xu; Li Wei

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

quality of the 480 VAC power input to the 3H evaporator flash tank VFDs, HL-242009-LC-SIC-10252 & 10254. B1.3 - Routine maintenance Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew...

132

Radiation Damping of Shallow Foundations on Nonlinear Soil Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanics Division, ASCE, 102(EM2): 249-263. Wong, H.L. andGeotechnical Engineering, ASCE, 119(5):893-911. Borja, R.I.Geotechnical Engineering, ASCE, 120(9):1570-1592. Faccioli,

Zhang, Jian; Tang, Yuchuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hongtao Zhang  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wang, J. Xie, J. Zou, E. Lui, D. Li, F. Fang, H.-L. Cui, and X. Wang, in 21st International Conference on Optical Fiber Sensors (SPIE, Ottawa, Canada ...

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Convex relaxation for finding planted influential nodes in a social ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... Thus, the expected size of Hl lies in the range [nle?1.1q,nle?0.9q]. ...... on Web search and data mining, pages 6574. ACM Press, 2011.

135

Next-to-leading order static gluon self-energy for anisotropic plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the structure of the next-to-leading order static gluon self-energy for an anisotropic plasma is investigated in the limit of a small momentum space anisotropy. Using the Ward identities for the static hard-loop (HL) gluon polarization tensor and the (nontrivial) static HL vertices, we derive a comparatively compact form for the complete next-to-leading order correction to the structure function containing the spacelike pole associated with magnetic instabilities. On the basis of a calculation without HL vertices, it has been conjectured that the imaginary part of this structure function is nonzero, rendering the spacelike poles integrable. We show that there are both positive and negative contributions when HL vertices are included, highlighting the necessity of a complete numerical evaluation, for which the present work provides the basis.

Carrington, M. E.; Rebhan, A. [Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, R7A 6A9 (Canada); Winnipeg Institute for Theoretical Physics, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

EA-1644: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1644: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1644: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1644: Final Environmental Assessment Kildeer to Mountain Transmission Project McKenzie Electric Cooperative (MEC), through Upper Missouri Generation and Transmission Electric Cooperative, Inc. (UMGT), has applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Western Area Power Administration (Western) for a new electrical interconnection. This project would require the construction of temporary interconnection at Western's Killdeer Substation and a new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line which would extend about 13 miles northward from Western's Killdeer Substation to a new MEC Mountain Substation, all in Dunn County, North Dakota. The Pre-Decisional Environmental Assessment was issued, without changes, as the Final Environmental Assessment.

137

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.25 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 9, 2010 December 9, 2010 CX-004744: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for Purchase of the Conrad Drive Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 12/09/2010 Location(s): Flathead County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 8, 2010 CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 21, 2010 CX-004259: Categorical Exclusion Determination Funding the Acquisition by the State of Montana of Habitat in the West Swan Valley CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 10/21/2010 Location(s): Lake County, Montana

138

Microsoft Word - Green_Island_Addition__Melevin__CX_10-21.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-068-00, Contract # BPA-005027 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 16 South, Range 3 West, Section 31 of the Coburg Quad, in Lane County,

139

Microsoft Word - Green_Island_Addition__Melevin__CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-068-00, Contract # BPA-005027 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 16 South, Range 3 West, Section 31 of the Coburg Quad, in Lane County,

140

Microsoft Word - 7A1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Figure 1 Crystal structure of the 7A1 Fab' cocaine complex with the secondary structure of the antibody light (L) and heavy (H) chains colored in cyan. Substrate cocaine is also shown in spheres with yellow carbons, blue nitrogen, and red oxygens in the active site. High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu 1 , Tobin J. Dickerson 2,3 , Claude J. Rogers 2,3 , Gunnar F. Kaufmann 2,3 , Jenny M. Mee 2,3 , Kathleen M. McKenzie 2,3 , Kim D. Janda 2,3,4,* and Ian A. Wilson 1,4,* Departments of Molecular Biology 1 and Chemistry 2 and Immunology 3 , and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology 4 , The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Cocaine is a powerful addictive stimulant that affects the brain, and abuse of cocaine has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact Killdeer to Mountain Transmission Project McKenzie Electric Cooperative (MEC), through Upper MIssouri Generation and Transmission Electric Cooperative (UMGT), has applied to the U.S. Department of Energy Western Power Administration (Western) for a new electrical interconnection. This project would require the construction of temporary interconnection (Killdeer interconnection) at Western's Killdeer Substation and a new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission live which would extend about 13 miles northward from Western Killdeer's Substation to a new MEC Mountain Substation, all in Dunn County, North Dakota. DOE/EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kildeer to Mountain Transmission Project, Richland County, Montana (06/17/09)

142

EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact Killdeer to Mountain Transmission Project McKenzie Electric Cooperative (MEC), through Upper MIssouri Generation and Transmission Electric Cooperative (UMGT), has applied to the U.S. Department of Energy Western Power Administration (Western) for a new electrical interconnection. This project would require the construction of temporary interconnection (Killdeer interconnection) at Western's Killdeer Substation and a new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission live which would extend about 13 miles northward from Western Killdeer's Substation to a new MEC Mountain Substation, all in Dunn County, North Dakota. DOE/EA-1644: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kildeer to Mountain

143

Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ROOM ROOM MONDAY, DECEMBER 19 1:00pm WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS AND OPENING REMARKS Chairman Richard Milanovich, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Will Micklin, CEO, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians (CA), DOE Indian Country Energy & Infrastructure Working Group Todd Hooks, Director, Agua Caliente Economic Development Department 1:15pm - 1:30pm UPDATE ON DOE ENERGY PROGRAMS & DOE OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY DOE Initiatives and Activities; Indian Country Energy & Infrastructure Working Group; Overview of Tribal Leader Forums and Approach to Solar Forum Tracey A. LeBeau, Director, DOE Office of Indian Energy 1:30pm - 3:35pm SOLAR POWER MARKET OVERVIEW Recent Trends in the Solar Marketplace and Commercial Technology Mona Dajani, Partner, Baker & McKenzie

144

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 19660 of 26,764 results. 51 - 19660 of 26,764 results. Download CX-004745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquisition of a Conservation Easement for Fish Habitat Mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Okanogan County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004745-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004465-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004381: Categorical Exclusion Determination

145

Microsoft Word - BIAddition_Hunsaker__CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: Israel Duran KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to McKenzie River Trust for purchase of Big Island Addition (Hunsaker) Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-068-00, Contract # BPA-005027 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment.

146

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 2013 August 16, 2013 EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billngs, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 9, 2013 EA-1949: FERC Notice of Availability Errata Sheet Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA August 9, 2013 EA-1949: FERC Final Environmental Assessment

147

SIMULATION OF DESCENDING MULTIPLE SUPRA-ARCADE RECONNECTION OUTFLOWS IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After recent Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations by Savage, McKenzie, and Reeves, we revisit the scenario proposed by us in previous papers. We have shown that sunward, generally dark plasma features that originated above posteruption flare arcades are consistent with a scenario where plasma voids (which we identify as supra-arcade reconnection outflows, SAROs) generate the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves upstream of an initial localized deposition of energy that is collimated in the magnetic field direction. In this paper, we analyze the multiple production and interaction of SAROs and their individual structures that make them relatively stable features while moving. We compare our results with observations and with the scenarios proposed by other authors.

Cecere, M.; Schneiter, M.; Costa, A.; Elaskar, S. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Maglione, S. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billngs, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, ND To address an increase in the electric load forecast for western North Dakota, the USDA Rural Utilities Service issued a notice of intent to prepare a supplement to its December 2012 Draft EIS. The supplement will analyze a new alternative for a proposed transmission line from Antelope Valley to Neset, North Dakota. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (WAPA), a cooperating agency, would modify its existing Williston Substation to allow a connection of the proposed new transmission line to

149

Black hole phase transitions in Horava-Lifshitz gravity  

SciTech Connect

We study black hole phase transitions in (deformed) Horava-Lifshitz (H-L) gravity, including the charged/uncharged topological black holes and KS black hole. Stability analysis and state space geometry are both used. We find interesting phase structures in these black holes, some of the properties are never observed in Einstein gravity. Particularly, the stability properties of black holes in H-L gravity with small radius change dramatically, which can be considered as a leak of information about the small scale behavior of spacetime. A new black hole local phase transition in H-L gravity which cannot be revealed by thermodynamical metrics has been found. There is an infinite discontinuity at the specific heat curve for charged black hole in H-L gravity with hyperbolic event horizon. However, this discontinuity does not have a corresponding curvature singularity of thermodynamical metrics. Our results may provide new insights towards a better understanding of the H-L gravity, as well as black hole thermodynamics.

Cao Qiaojun; Chen Yixin; Shao Kainan [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Predictive Factors for Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to quantify the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) and to identify predictive factors for RP. Methods and Materials: We identified 75 patients with newly diagnosed HL treated with mediastinal RT and 17 patients with relapsed/refractory HL treated with mediastinal RT before or after transplant. Lung dose-volumetric parameters including mean lung dose and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy were calculated. Factors associated with RP were explored by use of the Fisher exact test. Results: RP developed in 7 patients (10%) who received mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1 in 6 cases). A mean lung dose of 13.5 Gy or greater (p = 0.04) and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy of 33.5% or greater (p = 0.009) significantly predicted for RP. RP developed in 6 patients (35%) with relapsed/refractory HL treated with peri-transplant mediastinal RT (Grade 3 in 4 cases). Pre-transplant mediastinal RT, compared with post-transplant mediastinal RT, significantly predicted for Grade 3 RP (57% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Conclusions: We identified threshold lung metrics predicting for RP in HL patients receiving mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy, with the majority of cases being of mild severity. The risk of RP is significantly higher with peri-transplant mediastinal RT, especially among those who receive pre-transplant RT.

Fox, Amy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Dosoretz, Arie P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Fisher, David C.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Freedman, Arnold S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Open Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments Symptom: After the 1/18 system maintenance, C++ code compilation gets an error if the default hdf5/1.8.5.0 module is loaded: "/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp". 0 comments | Read the full post "module: command not found" in batch jobs January 6, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments Sympotom: Users with csh/tcsh as default login shells will get this error when trying to use bash syntax in the batch scripts. The following batch script will get the "module: command not found" error at run time. 0 comments | Read the full post Resolved -- Job cannot be executed January 3, 2012 by Helen He | 0 Comments

153

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

154

Trigger and Data Acquisition for hadron colliders at the Energy Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC trigger and data acquisition systems will need significant modifications to operate at the HL-LHC. Due to the increased occupancy of each crossing, Level-1 trigger systems would experience degraded performance of the LHC algorithms presently selecting up to 100 kHz of crossings from the LHC input rate of 40 MHz. The DAQ systems will experience larger event sizes due to greater occupancy and higher channel counts of new detectors. This paper summarizes findings and recommendations to upgrade the LHC experiments trigger and data acquisition systems for operation at the HL-HLC.

Smith, Wesley H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Trigger and Data Acquisition for hadron colliders at the Energy Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC trigger and data acquisition systems will need significant modifications to operate at the HL-LHC. Due to the increased occupancy of each crossing, Level-1 trigger systems would experience degraded performance of the LHC algorithms presently selecting up to 100 kHz of crossings from the LHC input rate of 40 MHz. The DAQ systems will experience larger event sizes due to greater occupancy and higher channel counts of new detectors. This paper summarizes findings and recommendations to upgrade the LHC experiments trigger and data acquisition systems for operation at the HL-HLC.

Wesley H. Smith

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reactive and internal contributions to the thermal conductivity of local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma: The effect of electronically excited states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal and reactive contributions to the thermal conductivity of a local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma have been calculated using the Chapman-Enskog method. Low-lying (LL) electronically excited states (i.e., states with the same principal quantum number of the ground state) and high-lying (HL) ones (i.e., states with principal quantum number n> 2) have been considered. Several models have been developed, the most accurate being a model that treats the LL states as separate species while disregarding the presence of HL states, on account of their enormous transport cross sections.

Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Laricchiuta, A. [CNR IMIP Bari, Bari (Italy); Capitelli, M. [CNR IMIP Bari, Bari (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Bari, Italy and CNR IMIP Bari, Bari (Italy)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Visualization of Power Systems Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRM P L SUCSPH L SUCS SHORE RD SHORE RD NEWBRGE BRRT PH RULND RD PILGRIM NRTHPRT1 ELWOOD 1 NRTHPRT2 BRIDGWTR WWALP345 NEA 336 NEA PILGRIM CANAL JORDN RD CARP HL BELCH301 ALPS345 MANY393 DETROIT MAXCYS AUG E NEWBRGE BRRT PH RULND RD PILGRIM NRTHPRT1 ELWOOD 1 NRTHPRT2 SYOSSET GRENLAWN LCST GRV HOLTS GT HOL BRAN

158

HLDB: location-based services in databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces HLDB, the first practical system that can answer exact spatial queries on continental road networks entirely within a database. HLDB is based on hub labels (HL), the fastest point-to-point algorithm for road networks, and ... Keywords: SQL, databases, large road networks, location services

Ittai Abraham; Daniel Delling; Amos Fiat; Andrew V. Goldberg; Renato F. Werneck

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Transect 15:2 (fall 1997)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H .L." .3NO 51H.L3}11' '5}1." .0 ~uOI~ '(A~oIO! H ;)U!rew pue 'U! 1 -nIOAa '~OIO~ JO . )d;)a HSJru II~q~W ;):JruH~UOI ~ un~ -;)q ;)A~q '(~OIO -! H ;)u! J~W pu~ 'u! 1nIOAa '

UC Natural Reserve System

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

d::;":,",:::,, ST. LOUIS.7. MO,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IS EXCELLENT. THE USE OF PPOTEC' TlVf EQUIPMENT IS DISCUSSED IN P HEALTH AiUD SAFETY HANDBoOK Ir' HlC IS CUiiRENTLY IN A LATE STAGE OF PRE?ARAT I ' 3N. CUR IN: THE CoUHSE OF A '...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Numerical Investigation of Tetroon versus Fluid Particle Dispersion in the Convective Planetary Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from Deardorff's (1974) turbulence model are used in simulations of fluid particle and tetroon dispersion in the convective atmospheric boundary layer with ?h/L ? 1, where h is the mixed-layer depth. It is found that the lateral spread ?y(t) ...

Robert G. Lamb

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Recent Sediments of Monterey Bay: Additional Mineralogical Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I i I 'lll,! l, II ~ !! j~ ttl I '1'" (F J' .i..i:1. . ".1 J. ; 1,,':1- . : :: IT Ttl 1'1'1: f l:l~HI! ~' :. :: 40 ~60 t !! Hj >U. (nli~Hl1 ttl. tllHtH o % Composite Gr. and

Yancey, T.; Wilde, Pat

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

554 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1993, 115, 554-562 161.12, 163.64;MS 248 (Mt +2), 246 (M+), 155, 126,84 (base peak).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak). HRMS Calcd for C8Hl,N202Br:246.00039. Found: 246.0001. 3-[3-[[2-(Trimethylsilyl procedure as used for the synthesis of compound 32 and obtained as a colorless oil (32%) alone with 221 (8

Jones, William D.

164

Powerhouses Insidethe2010Sydney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

images: Map of Sydney - Avian Surnames 2009: Kate Sweetapple; Urchin Bowl 2010: Berto Pandolfo; Dimensional paper- portrait: Bert Simons, 2006; Walter Van Beirendonck, Technothreads Exhibition, Science: finding uTs 4 Around u: back To The fuTure 5 stAff profile: kühl science 12 Alumni profile: sound fu

University of Technology, Sydney

165

Corruption: A Psychosocial Issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

". in Kathmandu Post antlpur Publications, PVI. Lid., Kantipur Complex' Subhldhanagar, Kathmandu, Nepal. ' James, G.S. (19:'9). "The eglect of GrOWing Povel1y Poses a Global Threal. III The Imernational Herald, P.6. Mansukhanl, H.L. (1979). "Corruption and Public...

Upadhyay, Niranjan Prasad

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Imaginary part of the next-to-leading-order static gluon self-energy in an anisotropic plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using hard-loop (HL) effective theory for an anisotropic non-Abelian plasma, which even in the static limit involves nonvanishing HL vertices, we calculate the imaginary part of the static next-to-leading-order gluon self-energy in the limit of a small anisotropy and with external momentum parallel to the anisotropy direction. At leading order, the static propagator has spacelike poles corresponding to plasma instabilities. On the basis of a calculation using bare vertices, it has been conjectured that, at next-to-leading order, the static gluon self-energy acquires an imaginary part which regulates these spacelike poles. We find that the one-loop resummed expression taken over naively from the imaginary-time formalism does yield a nonvanishing imaginary part even after including all HL vertices. However, this result is not correct. Starting from the real-time formalism, which is required in a nonequilibrium situation, we construct a resummed retarded HL propagator with correct causality properties and show that the static limit of the retarded one-loop-resummed gluon self-energy is real. This result is also required for the time-ordered propagator to exist at next-to-leading order.

Carrington, M. E.; Rebhan, A. [Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, R7A 6A9 (Canada) and Winnipeg Institute for Theoretical Physics, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

A national public healthcare framework using grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework for public healthcare by making a grid over public infrastructure such as Internet. It clearly illustrates the need and viability of such grids. The paper gives in details the technology required behind building such global ... Keywords: DICOM, HL7, SAN, component, grid, healthcare, national, security, state, taluka

Rekha Singhal

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluating the DSM Potential for Industrial Electrotechnologies and Management Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to help balance load requirements and generating capacity, Houston Lighting & Power Company (HL&P) contracted with SRI International (SRI) to identify existing and emerging electrotechnologies and management practices (technologies) for possible inclusion in an industrial demand side management (DSM) program. This paper outlines the procedures used to evaluate technologies that may impact oil refining, pulp & paper production, and 26 major chemical processes of industrial customers within HL&P's service area. Each technology was reviewed with regard to its electricity requirements and applicability to various industries. In addition, each technology's basic principles, existing industrial applications, possible new applications, product or process limitations, and representative economics were investigated. Where applicable, concerns other than economic attractiveness such as environmental issues, worker safety, and product quality were identified. Additional information was also obtained from preliminary efforts to project the commercial penetration of each of these technologies. Factors affecting commercial penetration include the existing level of market penetration, fuel prices, electricity prices, capital investment requirements, perceived risk, and internal hurdles rates for investment. In order to fully determine which of these technologies should be included in an industrial DSM program, various HL&P industrial customers were interviewed with regard to their knowledge and/or acceptance levels of selected electrotechnologies and management practices. This enabled HL&P to better understand the specific needs of industrial customers within their service area. This survey data, along with the information provided by SRI and other sources, formed the basis for initial selection of technologies to include in an industrial DSM program. The value of encouraging HL&P's industrial customers to use any of these technologies will be compared to DSM programs for other customer classes, as well as more traditional generating resource options, before the final selection of electrotechnologies and management practices is made.

Harrell, P. J.; Pavone, A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixthgrader Ian Morgan how to use red cabbage to indicate if a watery solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixthgrader Ian Morgan how to use red cabbage to indicate if a watery solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Heath Middle School eighth-grader Travis Crouch performs a pH (acidity-basicity) test using red cabbage. Heath Middle School eighth-grader Travis Crouch performs a pH (acidity-basicity) test using red cabbage. Kelly Layne of the LATA Kentucky team tells Heath Middle School students how to use zinc pennies in an experiment with differing known and unknown solutions. Facing, from left, are students Atherton Milford, McKenzie Moss, Trevor Kendall, Max Kolb, and James Michael Dodd.

170

High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Resolution Snapshots for the High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu1, Tobin J. Dickerson2,3, Claude J. Rogers2,3, Gunnar F. Kaufmann2,3, Jenny M. Mee2,3, Kathleen M. McKenzie2,3, Kim D. Janda2,3,4,* and Ian A. Wilson1,4,* Departments of Molecular Biology1 and Chemistry2 and Immunology3, and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology4, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Cocaine is a powerful addictive stimulant that affects the brain, and abuse of cocaine has been a substantial social problem. Unfortunately, no FDA-approved treatments exist for cocaine abuse, addiction, and overdose. Development of effective treatment for cocaine abuse has been frustrated by the complex neurochemistry in inhibiting a blocking agent. Nevertheless, within the past decade, immunotherapy for cocaine abuse has been evaluated in pre-clinical and human clinical trials.

171

Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs This page intentionally left blank WELL INSTALLATION BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58 WATER LEVEL (FT BGS) SURFACE SEAL: LOGGED BY P. McKenzie REMARKS Drillers hit water at 5 fl: well point removed. LITHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION LOCATION SHIPROCK, NM SURFACE ELEV. ( FT NGVD) 4890.00 SITE SHIPROCK TOP OF CASING (FT) 4890.00 WELL NUMBER 0602 MEAS. PT. ELEV. (FT) 4890.00 SLOT SIZE (IN) 0.125 WELL INSTALLATION INTERVAL (FT) DRILLING METHOD BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58

172

Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

1988-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

Williston basin. Milestone test renews interest in Red Wing Creek field's meteor crater  

SciTech Connect

New drilling in the vicinity of Red Wing Creek field in McKenzie County, North Dakota has renewed interest in an area that has intrigued geologists for a number of years. Red Wing Creek was discovered in 1972 by True Oil Co. and has demonstrated better per-acre oil recovery than any other oil field in the Williston Basin. Fully developed several years ago, the field produces from what has been described as the central peak of an astrobleme, within a meteor crater. The current test by Milestone Petroleum Inc. is permitted to 14,200 ft and is being drilled on the rim of the crater, in SW SW 35-148n-101w, approx. a mile south of Red Wing production. The primary objective is the Ordovician Red River; but plans call for drilling deeper, through the Winnipeg, to below the Mississippian sediments that produce at Red Wing Creek field. At least 3 unsuccessful Red River tests have been drilled in or near the field in earlier years, but not in the area where Milestone is drilling. Production at Red Wing has come from porosity zones in a Mississippian oil column that measured 2600 ft in the original well; the better wells are in the heart of the field, on a rebound cone in the center of the crater.

Rountree, R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 20092010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

National Fertilizer Development Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h-L h-L National Fertilizer Development Center May 15, 1980 nww Hr. William Et Mott, Director Environmental Control Technology Division Office of Environment Dcpartiaent of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: This is in response to your letter of May 5 requesting ccmments on a report dated Xarct; 1930 which summarizes a preliminary radiological survey of facilities used in the early 1950's for studies of recovery of uranium from leached zone ore. I have made a few suggested changes to the report, which is being returned to you. * Thaul, you for the opportunity to review this report. Sincerely, , Enclosure Development Branch . 1 -a' . I . . . PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY MUSCLE SHOALS, ALA&A Work .performed by the Health and Safety Research Division

176

Data:6338c690-fc02-4958-83ee-e5272066e4d0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0-fc02-4958-83ee-e5272066e4d0 0-fc02-4958-83ee-e5272066e4d0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE HL: Highway Lighting (116W-150W) Sector: Lighting Description: SCHEDULE HL: Highway Lighting (116W-150W) Source or reference: http://www.tipmont.org/about-us/rates Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

177

Sowitec | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sowitec Sowitec Jump to: navigation, search Name Sowitec Place Sonnenbühl, Germany Zip 72820 Sector Wind energy Product Sowitec is especialized in development, operation and maintenance of wind farms References Sowitec[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sowitec is a company located in Sonnenbühl, Germany . References ↑ "[ Sowitec]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sowitec&oldid=351587" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

178

Study of ttH (H -> mu mu) in the three lepton channel at sqrt(s) = 14 TeV; A Snowmass white paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The H -> mu mu signature provides excellent mass resolution for Higgs bosons, and is therefore an important Higgs boson decay channel despite the small dimuon branching ratio. We present an optimization of selection criteria in a search for trilepton ttH (H -> mu mu) events, in which the top quark pair decays semi-leptonically, at a simulated High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) running at 14 TeV. The study is performed with 3000 fb^(-1) of simulated data with an average pileup of = 140. In this ultimate HL-LHC data set, we find that ttH (H -> mu mu) will be a very difficult signature to observe due to the very small expected signal.

Jared Vasquez; Jahred Adelman; Andrey Loginov; Paul Tipton

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Conservation and Management for Electric Utility Industrial Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive energy management assistance within the industrial section is currently being offered by a growing number of electric utilities as part of their efforts to - provide additonal demand side services to their industrial customers. One of the keys to these enhanced services is the availability of a unique Industrial Energy Conservation and Management (EC&M) computer model that can be used to evaluate the technical and economic benefits of installing proposed process related energy management systems within an industrial plant. Details of an EPRI sponsored pilot program are summarized and results presented on the use of the computer model to provide comprehensive EC&M system evaluations of potential energy management opportunities in HL&P's and other utility service areas. This capability is currently being offered to HL&P's industrial customers and is primarily concerned with identifying and evaluating possible process heat recovery and other energy management opportunities to show how a plant's energy related operating costs can be reduced.

McChesney, H. R.; Obee, T. N.; Mangum, G. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodging Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodgings (AEDG-HL or the Guide), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in highway lodging properties over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-HL is the fifth in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Jiang, Wei; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Gowri, Krishnan; McBride, M.; Liu, Bing

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Thyroid V30 Predicts Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism in Patients Treated With Sequential Chemo-Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Hypothyroidism (HT) is a frequent late side effect of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine dose-volume constraints that correlate with functional impairment of the thyroid gland in HL patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 consecutive patients undergoing antiblastic chemotherapy and involved field radiation treatment (median dose, 32 Gy; range, 30-36 Gy) for HL were retrospectively considered. Their median age was 28 years (range, 14-70 years). Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodo-thyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroglobulin antibody (ATG) were recorded basally and at different times after the end of therapy. For the thyroid gland, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), dosimetric parameters, and the percentage of thyroid volume exceeding 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V10, V20, and V30) were calculated in all patients. To evaluate clinical and dosimetric factors possibly associated with HT, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Eight of 61 (13.1%) patients had HT before treatment and were excluded from further evaluation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 6-99 months), 41.5% (22/53) of patients developed HT after treatment. Univariate analyses showed that all dosimetric factors were associated with HT (p 62.5%, the risk was 70.8% (p < 0.0001). A Cox regression curve stratified by two levels of V30 value was created (odds ratio, 12.6). Conclusions: The thyroid V30 predicts the risk of developing HT after sequential chemo-radiotherapy and defines a useful constraint to consider for more accurate HL treatment planning.

Cella, Laura [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel; Caterino, Michele; De Rosa, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Picardi, Marco; Grimaldi, Francesco [Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Solla, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Farella, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Pacelli, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.pacelli@cnr.it [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

New Directions for Stochastic Open Economy Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i? L4? @*@}iUL? t|h@? |c|tTL*U)t h@|L? @*uLhtUi? |*)t4@**ttL? @? _@? `? _@? `?Mih}i? E bHb5i? ttL? @? _@? `? Mih}i?EbHbcM*_? }L? 5i? ttL?

Obstfeld, Maurice; Rogoff, Kenneth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 25 Number 1 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-brtsan by twenty-two \\('dl'S. Th,!l :-:U,~ that she was very young when she l:dlfln t'l i hl:t dnd dispels the aura attached to her name dB ttl(; i"II[Hlp1' of the Jo-khang. A little more can be glean (:d f l'fl!! 111' "Ill :J~y in the Chronicle which relates...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

184

Generic integration of content-based image retrieval in computer-aided diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers approved benefits for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), but is still not well established in radiological routine yet. An essential factor is the integration gap between CBIR systems and clinical information ... Keywords: Computer-aided diagnosis, Computer-assisted diagnosis, Content-based image retrieval (CBIR), Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), Picture archiving and communication system (PACS (Radiology)), Systems integration

Petra Welter; Benedikt Fischer; Rolf W. GNther; Thomas M. Deserno (N Lehmann)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Peer Reviewed Archival Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (Roger) Chen Chen, H.L. and Y. He* . 2001. Analysis of an acoustic surface waveguide for AE monitoring, and A.L. Miller. 2001. SO2 removal by leaching coal pyrite. Energy and Fuels 15: 470-476. Dady B. Dadyburjor Zhu+ , J.S., L.P. Norcio, E.L. Kugler, D.B. Dadyburjor, J.L. Yang+ , Z.Y. Liu+ , and B. Zhong

Mohaghegh, Shahab

186

Gas Purchasing Strategies for the '90s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of my talk today is to: 1. provide a brief summary of the structural changes which have occurred in the natural gas market over the last several years 2. discuss some of the effects of these changes and some of the potential issues that could result from these changes, and 3. finally to offer some advice on how to develop an effective strategy for purchasing natural gas in the '90s given these changes. To set the stage for my talk today, I need to give you some of the more significant facts relative to our Company and its use of natural gas. Houston Lighting & Power Company (HL&P) is an investor-owned electric utility which serves the city of Houston and the surrounding area. This area is highly industrialized and home to a significant portion of the nation's refining in petrochemical capacity. HL&P has 12,855 MW of generating capacity and sells approximately 25% of Texas' total electric utility sales. As a gas purchaser, HL&P is situated in "pipeline alley" and now has pipeline connections to eight different pipelines and, as a result, access to virtually every major pipeline system that operates within the state of Texas.

Schuler, S. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A First Principles Density-Functional Calculation of the Electronic and Vibrational Structure of the Key Melanin Monomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report first principles density functional calculations for hydroquinone (HQ), indolequinone (IQ) and semiquinone (SQ). These molecules are believed to be the basic building blocks of the eumelanins, a class of bio-macromolecules with important biological functions (including photoprotection) and with potential for certain bioengineering applications. We have used the DeltaSCF (difference of self consistent fields) method to study the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), Delta_HL. We show that Delta_HL is similar in IQ and SQ but approximately twice as large in HQ. This may have important implications for our understanding of the observed broad band optical absorption of the eumelanins. The possibility of using this difference in Delta_HL to molecularly engineer the electronic properties of eumelanins is discussed. We calculate the infrared and Raman spectra of the three redox forms from first principles. Each of the molecules have significantly different infrared and Raman signatures, and so these spectra could be used in situ to non-destructively identify the monomeric content of macromolecules. It is hoped that this may be a helpful analytical tool in determining the structure of eumelanin macromolecules and hence in helping to determine the structure-property-function relationships that control the behaviour of the eumelanins.

B. J. Powell; T. Baruah; N. Bernstein; K. Brake; Ross H. McKenzie; P. Meredith; M. R. Pederson

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Separation of americium from europium by solvent extraction from aqueous phosphonate media  

SciTech Connect

Complexes between Am{sup 3+} or Eu{sup 3+} and phosphonoacetic acid differ in relative stability in accord with the electrostatic model of cation binding. The smaller Eu{sup 3+} cation forms stronger complexes with PAA than the larger Am{sup 3+} cation. The observed metal complexes in the acid range from 0.005 M to 0.02 M (at I= 0.5 M) are Eu(HL){sup +}, Eu(H{sub 3}L){sub 2}{sup +}, Eu(HL){sub 2}{sup {minus}} and Am(H{sub 2}L){sup 2+}, Am(HL){sup +}, Am(H{sub 2}L){sub 2}{sup +}. When used as a holdback reagent, PAA slightly enhances the separation of Am/Eu when used with sulfonic acids or CMPO/nitrate, but reduces separation efficiency with HDEHP. In a CMPO/SCN{sup {minus}} extraction system which favors extraction of Am over Eu, addition of PAA increases the separation efficiency by a factor of 2-3 at 0.3 M PAA/0.5 M SCN{sup {minus}}. The calculated stability constants can be used to explain the separation factors, but do not always accurately predict metal distribution ratios in the CMPO systems, implying that there are details of this system which have not been fully elucidated.

Ensor, D.D. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cogeneration Markets: An Industry in Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The year 1986 saw three fundamental changes in the character of development of cogeneration on the U.S. Gulf Coast. First, numerous large projects were cancelled, delayed, or drastically down-sized during 1986. Most capacity reduction or delay was accountable to very large, multiple gas turbine combined cycle systems, including much more electric generating capability than was matched with or needed to serve a useful process steam demand. Second, previously initiated projects designed wholly or largely to supply legitimate thermal demands generally sent forward. Third, there was a threefold increase in wheeling of cogenerated electricity out of HL&Ps service area to the service areas of other utilities. All of these effects are traceable to rapidly declining rates at which HL&P purchases electricity and to increased demand for electricity by some other utilities. These trends imply a future for cogeneration in the HL&P service area characterized by construction of small projects intended to serve plant internal thermal and electrical loads only and/or development of a few relatively large projects for sale to other electric utilities.

Breuer, C. T.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Seismic Response Of Masonry Plane Walls: A Numerical Study On Spandrel Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper reports the results of a numerical investigation on masonry walls subjected to in-plane seismic loads. This research aims to verify the formulae of shear and flexural strength of masonry spandrels which are given in the recent Italian Standards. Seismic pushover analyses have been carried out using finite element models of unreinforced walls and strengthened walls introducing reinforced concrete (RC) beams at the floor levels. Two typologies of walls have been considered distinguished for the height to length ratio h/l of the spandrels: a) short beams (h/l = 1.33) and b) slender beams (h/l = 0.5). Results obtained for the unreinforced and the strengthened walls are compared with equations for shear and flexural strength provided in Standards [1]. The numerical analyses show that the reliability of these equations is at least questionable especially for the prediction of the flexural strength. In the cases in which the axial force has not been determined by the structural analysis, Standards seems to overestimate the flexural strength of short spandrels both for the unreinforced and the strengthened wall.

Betti, Michele; Galano, Luciano; Vignoli, Andrea [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (DICeA) University of Florence, Via di S. Marta 3, I-50139, Florence (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes of Involved-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy After Chemotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma With Mediastinal Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and clinical outcomes of involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IF-IMRT) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with early-stage HL that involved the mediastinum were reviewed. Eight patients had Stage I disease, and 44 patients had Stage II disease. Twenty-three patients (44%) presented with a bulky mediastinum, whereas 42 patients (81%) had involvement of both the mediastinum and either cervical or axillary nodes. All patients received combination chemotherapy followed by IF-IMRT. The prescribed radiation dose was 30-40 Gy. The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The median mean dose to the primary involved regions (planning target volume, PTV1) and boost area (PTV2) was 37.5 Gy and 42.1 Gy, respectively. Only 0.4% and 1.3% of the PTV1 and 0.1% and 0.5% of the PTV2 received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent PTV coverage. The median mean lung dose and V20 to the lungs were 13.8 Gy and 25.9%, respectively. The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 100%, 97.9%, and 96%, respectively. No Grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Despite the large target volume, IF-IMRT gave excellent dose coverage and a favorable prognosis, with mild toxicity in patients with early-stage mediastinal HL.

Lu Ningning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wu Runye; Zhang Ximei; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Fang Hui; Ren Hua; Wang Shulian; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Chen Bo; Dai Jianrong; Yu Zihao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning  

SciTech Connect

Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo II{alpha} activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 0.9 {mu}M, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC{sub 50} of 9.6 {mu}M, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 {mu}M. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC{sub 50} about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design.

Huang, C.-P. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Robin Y. [Department of Food Science, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Kan, L.-S. [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, S.-B. [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: sblin@ntu.edu.tw

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Houston Lighting and Power Company's evaluation of coal gasification coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from Integral ed Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants, the Electric Power Research Institute has embarked on a program to evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based coproduction energy facility. Houston Lighting Power Company (HL P) responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel. Coparticipant utilities with HL P were Central and South West Services and TU Electric. Two sites were selected for study, a Houston Ship Channel site, utilizing barge-delivered Illinois No. 6 coal blended with petroleum coke, and to satisfy C SWS and TU needs, a central Texas site utilizing Texas lignite. Stone Webster Engineering and InterFact, Inc. were engineers and consulting partners in the study.Eight cases were developed to cover the various possibilities for coproduction. Four cases involved utilizing Texas lignite and four cases involved utilizing Illinois No. 6 as fuel blended with petroleum coke. The eight cases are described. Each of the cases utilized the Shell coal gasification process and were evaluated for either base load operation using two G.E. 7F gas turbines and a spare gasifier for chemicals production or for cyclic operationusing four G.E. 7EA gas turbines and no spare gasifier. The sum of the coproducts produced over all eight cases were electricity, methanol, ammonia, and urea, depending on location and economics.

Kern, E.E.; Havemann, S.D.; Chmielewski, R.G. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)); Baumann, P. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Goelzer, A.R.; Karayel, R.; Keady, G.S.; Chernoff, B. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

K.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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197

Help:External searches | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

searches searches Jump to: navigation, search 50px Move proposal : It has been suggested that this page be moved to a new name : '(new name to be decided)'. Use the talk page to discuss this action. It is possible to create an external searches of a topic using key words using a template. For example, this is something that would work for Google: [[Image:GoogleIcon.PNG]] [http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q={{{1|Wiki}}}&btnG=Search&meta= {{{1|Google}}}] ==Usage== Allows to establish a link to a search query at the Google search engine: {{Google|Term1+Term2+Term3}}

198

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Centers for National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site F. Yang, H-L. Pan, S. Moorthi, and S. Lord Environmental Modeling Center, National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland S. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Abstract Since 2001 output from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global weather forecast system (GFS) has been routinely processed to produce single column profiles at locations corresponding to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites. In the present study, GFS forecast was examined and compared with ARM observations at the Southern Great Plain Central Facility for the

199

Nostratic Dictionary - Third Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Gwd ?apu!yya, Gln ?api!yya, Brj abuy?ya2 'maternal uncle' Bl. 1OO, 112, 174, Ss. PEC 15, Ss. B 21, Hn. S 51, PG 58, Grg. 4, Brl. 2-3, Hw. A 336, Oo. 67, HL 59, AMS 31 (Dl apu!yya api!yya 'avunculus' interpreted as 'weiblicher Vater', sc... . (after Bhtlingk) tried to explain the Yk word as a loan from M bicin ? becin , but the latter word means 'ape, monkey', and hence the hyp. is untenable || HS : ?? S *?bX > Ar baaX-, buX- 'lamb' (if *-X- < *-TX-) BK I 1OO ?? ECh: Ll {Grgs} bi...

Dolgopolsky, Aharon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC  

SciTech Connect

A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Identification and analysis of serpin-family genes by homology and synteny across the 12 sequenced Drosophilid genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spn42Dd 9456 R/A + 3 S S LHS S SS SS ISR Spn42De 9460 E/S + 3 H H H H H H H SL Spn43Aa 12172 M/S + 3 H H H H H H H H H H H Spn43Ab 1865 - + 3 H S H H H H H H H H H Spn43Ac 1857 L/S + 2 H H H H H H H H HL H H Spn43Ad 1859 - + 2 H S H H H H H H H H Spn47...

Garrett, Matthew; Fullaondo, Ane; Troxler, Laurent; Micklem, Gos; Gubb, David

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

COMPILATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ORP GLASS FORMULATION DATABASE, VSL-12R2470-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect

The present report describes the first steps in the development of a glass property-composition database for WTP LAW and HL W glasses that includes all of the data that were used in the development of the WTP baseline models and all of the data collected subsequently as part of WTP enhancement studies perfonned for ORP. The data were reviewed to identifY some of the more significant gaps in the composition space that will need to be filled to support waste processing at Hanford. The WTP baseline models have been evaluated against the new data in terms of range of validity and prediction perfonnance.

Kruger, Albert A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pasieka, Holly K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Perez-Cardenas, Fernando [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit, Maysville, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new, 368-MW E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit at the H.L. Spurlock Power Station in Maysville isn't just the cleanest coal-burning plant in Kentucky. Thanks to its circulating liquidized bed boiler from Alstom, it is one of the cleanest in the US. The boiler's ability to burn a wide variety of coals and even pet coke, biomass, or tire-derived fuels - also was a factor in Power's decision to name E.A. Gilbert a Top Plant of 2005. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Charge separation in photosynthesis via a spin exchange coupling mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new mechanism for the primary photoinduced charge separation in photosynthesis is proposed. It involves as real intermediate between the excited special pair state P* and the primary charge separated state P+HL- a trip-trip-singlet PTBLT, which consists of a triplet on the dimer P and a further triplet on the monomer BL. Both combine to a singlet. The electron transfer is caused by spin exchange couplings. The transient spectrum of the short lived intermediate, formerly taken as evidence for the charge transfer state P+BL-, is reinterpreted as a transient excitation of this trip-trip singlet.

S. F. Fischer; P. O. J. Scherer

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Crystal Reports - sum4.rpt  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste/Contaminated Media Waste/Contaminated Media and SNF Inventories By Program (Sum-4) Current Year: 2000 Pr o g r am HL W HL W -V i trifie d * T RU M L L W L L W O T HER ** S N F *** Qu a n t ity (m 3) Qu an tit y (NC ) Qu an tity (m 3) Qu a n tity (m 3 ) Qu an tit y (m 3) Qu an tity (m 3) Qu an tit y (M T HM ) Office of Defense Programs 0.00 0.00 628.20 391.82 1,843.59 0.00 2.44 Office of Environmental Management 353,500.78 1,201.00 110,447.25 45,869.38 156,965.74 3,946.00 2,442.12 Nuclear Energy 0.00 0.00 60.90 226.20 0.00 0.00 22.10 Non-DOE sources 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Office of Science 0.00 0.00 100.29 60.50 100.25 0.00 0.61 *Vitrified HLW quantites are reported in # of HLW Canisters. **Other includes "Unspecified" and 11(e)2 waste types.

206

Crystal structure of complexes of bivalent Co, Ni, and Cd with anions of benzoic and 2-(acetylamino)-5-nitrobenzoic acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of three complexes of bivalent metals (cobalt, nickel, and cadmium) with anions of benzoic (HL{sup 1}) and 2-(acetylamino)-5-nitrobenzoic (HL{sup 2}) acids, namely, [Co{sub 2}{sup 1} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}({mu}-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2})]{sub n} (I), [NiL{sup 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]L{sup 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (II), and [Cd({mu}-L{sup 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} {center_dot} 2nH{sub 2}O (III), is determined. In chainlike structure I, cobalt atoms are connected by bridging pyrazine molecules; structure II contains isolated complexes. In structure III, centrosymmetric (CdOCO){sub 2} cycles and polymeric ribbons are formed due to the coordination of the carboxylate group of the L{sup 2} ligand to two cadmium atoms.

Rzaeva, M. F. [Azerbaijan State Agricultural University (Azerbaijan); Askerov, R. K. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Movsumov, E. M. [Azerbaijan State Agricultural University (Azerbaijan); Sergienko, V. S.; Ilyukhin, A. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: Extending the Discovery Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb?1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb?1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data a...

Vankov, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: extending the discovery potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, cul- minating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous lumi- nosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb?1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb?1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and inte- grated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and d...

Valero, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: extending the discovery potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisi...

Valero, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Field Tolerances for the Triplet Quadrupoles of the LHC High Luminosity Lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed to implement the so-called Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme in the LHC high luminosity (HL) lattice to reduce beta functions at the Interaction Points (IP) up to a factor of 8. As a result, the nominal 4.5 km peak beta functions reached in the Inner Triplets (IT) at collision will be increased by the same factor. This, therefore, justifies the installation of new, larger aperture, superconducting IT quadrupoles. The higher beta functions will enhance the effects of the triplet quadrupole field errors leading to smaller beam dynamic aperture (DA). To maintain the acceptable DA, the effects of the triplet field errors must be re-evaluated, thus specifying new tolerances. Such a study has been performed for the so-called '4444' collision option of the HL-LHC layout version SLHCV3.01, where the IP beta functions are reduced by a factor of 4 in both planes with respect to a pre-squeezed value of 60 cm at two collision points. The dynamic aperture calculations were performed using SixTrack. The impact on the triplet field quality is presented.

Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Y.; Jiao, Y.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Maria, R.de; McIntosh, E.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0  

SciTech Connect

Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150?C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

Kruger, A A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Joseph, Innocent [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Callow, Richard A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Abramowitz, Howard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Brandys, Marek [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Metal-organic coordination architectures of azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

Four new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups, [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [CuL{sup 1}N{sub 3}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(L{sup 2}){sub 2}.0.5C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH.H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (3) and [Co(L{sup 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) (here, HL{sup 1}=1H-imidazole-1-yl-acetic acid, HL{sup 2}=1H-benzimidazole-1-yl-acetic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal structure analysis shows that 3 and 4 are 2D complexes with 4{sup 4}-sql topologies, while another 2D complex 1 has a (4{sup 3}){sub 2}(4{sup 6})-kgd topology. And 2 is a 3D complex composed dinuclear mu{sub 1,1}-bridging azido Cu{sup II} entities with distorted rutile topology. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. - Graphical Abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups are reported.

Hu Bowen; Zhao Jiongpeng; Yang Qian; Hu Tongliang; Du Wenping [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Bu Xianhe, E-mail: buxh@nankai.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Alcator C-Mod Experiments in Support of the ITER Baseline 15 MA Scenario  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on Alcator C-Mod have addressed several issues for the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario from 2009-2012. Rampup studies show ICRF can save significant V-s, and that an H-mode in the ramp can be utilized to save 50% more. ICRF modifications to li(1) are minimal, although the Te profile is peaked relative to ohmic in the plasma center, and alter sawtooth onset times. Rampdown studies show H-modes can be routinely sustained, avoiding an OH coil over-current associated with the H-L transition, that fast rampdowns are preferred, the density drops with Ip, and that the H-L transition occurs at Ploss/Pthr,LH ~ 1.0-1.3 at n/nGr ~ 0.85. Flattop plasmas targeting ITER baseline parameters have been sustained for 20 ?E or 8-13 ?CR, but only reach H98 ~ 0.6 at n/nGr = 0.85, rising to 0.9 at n/nGr = 0.65.

C Kessel, et al

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

HLW MELTER CONTROL STRATEGY WITHOUT VISUAL FEEDBACK VSL-12R2500-1 REV 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

KRUGER AA; JOSPEH I; MATLACK KS; CALLOW RA; ABRAMOWITZ H; PEGG IL; BRANDYS M; KOT WK

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

DOE Hosts German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information DOE Hosts German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information September 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - A high-ranking energy official from Germany formalized a partnership between her country and the United States during a recent visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Dr. Dorothee Műhl, Deputy Director General Manager of Germany's Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), and other German officials visited WIPP, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) underground repository for disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste, on September 14 and signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreeing to an

218

Speakers: Adam Sieminski, Deutsche Bank Stephen P. A. Brown, Resources for the Future  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: "Energy and the Economy" 5: "Energy and the Economy" Speakers: Adam Sieminski, Deutsche Bank Stephen P. A. Brown, Resources for the Future Donald L. Paul, University of Southern California Energy Institute David Sandalow, DOE Christof Rühl, Group Chief Economist, BP [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Adam: Microphone. So, we've lost a little bit of time because of all of the sessions running a bit over, but here is how we're going to make that up. I had about 12 minutes worth of slides that we're going to abandon. Isn't that great? We get to hear from the panelists rather than me. Now, my name is Adam Sieminski. I'm the Chief Energy Economist for Deutsche Bank. Don't let that intimidate you. I'm really a civil

219

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIJNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERlIIJNATION DETERlIIJNATION RECIPIENT:Nebraska Energy Office PROJECT TITLE : Herd Co. Feedlot Renewable Biomass Waste to Energy Production Facility Page I of2 STATE: NE Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrumcnt Number NEPA Control Numbu CID Number DE·FOA'()()(x)()S2 DE-FG-09EEOO134 GFO-09-20Hl03 0 Based on my review ofthe information concuning the proposed aclion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A). I have made tbe (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER Descriplion: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

220

Ayuda:Buscadores externos | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ayuda:Buscadores externos Ayuda:Buscadores externos Jump to: navigation, search 50px Move proposal : It has been suggested that this page be moved to a new name : '(new name to be decided)'. Use the talk page to discuss this action. Es posible crear búsquedas externas sobre un tema utilizando palabras claves o una plantilla. A continuación un ejemplo que puede funcionar en Google: [[Image:GoogleIcon.PNG]] [http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q={{{1|Wiki}}}&btnG=Search&meta= {{{1|Google}}}] ==Uso== Permite establecer un enlace a una consulta de búsqueda en el motor de búsqueda de Google: {{Google|Term1+Term2+Term3}}

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221

DOE/EA-0845 Environmental Assessment Expansion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45 45 Environmental Assessment Expansion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Research Center March 1994 U.S. Department of Energy MASTER DOE Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho _.OJ Oi_lll_lHl:lUTION OF TFII$O_r, UM_._T _ U_LJ_!_3'_ [6450-01] U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDINGOF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT . FOR EXPANSION OF THE IDAHONATIONALENGINEERING LABORATORY RESEARCH CENTER AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Findingof No Significant Impact(FONSI) SUMMARY: The Department of Energy(DOE)has prepared an environmental assessment (EA),DOE/EA-0845, for expansion and upgrade of facilities at the IdahoNationalEngineering Laboratory (INEL)Research Center(IRC)in Idaho Falls,Idaho. Construction and operation of proposed facilities wouldnot causesignificant environmental impacts. Basedon the analysesin the EA, DOE has determined that the proposedactionis

222

Memorandum for Improving DOE HQ Recruitment and Hiring Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~ ~ e ~ u t ~ ~ l o ~ f @ i j Washington, DC 20585 hlEMORANDUM TO DEPARTMENTAL ELEh@NT& FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. P O N W Improving the Headquarters' Hiring Processes Secretary Chu has set forth an athbitious agenda for the D of Energy i f l - a f d a to build a clean, secure, and prosperous energy future for our Nation. Fulfilling that agenda requires that we act with urgency and purpose. Success will depend largely on ow ability to recruit and retain a dedicated, high-performing workforce. To accomplish our expanded mission, the Department will hire hundreds of new employees during the next year. At Headquarters, we must make certain that we have the capacity to hire staff quickly yet wisely. We have already begun to strengthen the Headquarters' hiring process by launching such initiatives as accelerated procedures for

223

Fertilization Increases Below-Ground Carbon Sequestration of Loblolly Pine Plantations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF LOBLOLLY PINE PLANTATIONS K.H. Johnsen 1,2 , J.R. Butnor 1 , C. Maier 1 , R. Oren 3 , R. Pangle 4 , L. Samuelson 5 , J. Seiler 4 , S.E. McKeand 6 , and H.L Allen 6 1 Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 3041 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA 2 email: kjohnsen@fs.fed.us, ph: 919-549-4012, fax: 919-549-4047 3 School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 4 Dept. of Forestry, Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA 24061 5 School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 6 College of Natural Resources, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 Abstract The extent of fertilization of southern pine forests is increasing rapidly; industrial

224

ymna125.tmp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-. MANAGED BY MARTINMARIEllA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FORTHEUNITEDSTATES DEPARTMENT OFENERGY ORNUCON-381 The Economic, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of the Energy-Related Inventions Program Marilyn A. Brown C. Robert Wilson Charlotte A. Franchuk Steve M. Cohn Donald Jones tM&!%WTIOR 9F THIS ftOCUMENT K+LIN1.hlIT~ *--- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "--- - .-.>-.* This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copY. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Techni- cal Information, P.O. Sox 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; Prices available from (615) 576-6401, ITS 626-6401. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United

225

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2012 0, 2012 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Aug. 20 THERE WILL BE NO PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINAR THIS WEEK 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ALL EXPERIMENTERS' MEETING THIS WEEK Tuesday, Aug. 21 10:30 a.m. Research Techniques Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Roger Rusack, University of Minnesota Title: What Type of Forward Detector for CMS at the HL-LHC? 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Vitaly Pronskikh, Fermilab Title: Radiation Studies for Mu2e Experiment Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns

226

USDOE/DAO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c-12-19' c-12-19' % 16:37 Ff?ON USDOE/DAO . A....- ------ -- _ _ .__-- ---- r- \ ~cwd~ TO 83014271534 P.002 HIZTORY THE PHYTOII PROJECT ' EC-12-1994 16: 37 FROM usDoEaRo TO : e3014271534 P.003 w HlSfORY OF THE DAYTON PROJECT Keith V. Gilbert I ! June 1969 llonsanco Research Corporation ' A Subsidiary of Monsanro COmPanY MOUND LABORATORY Miamisburg, Ohio Operated for United States Atomic Energy Commission U.S. Government Contract No. AT-33- I-GEN-S3 1 The dwolopunt al the )60-million Atomic Energy Commission production and resoorch facility in Miomirburg con be traced to m wigin in 1926 when the Thomas and Hochwolt Cobnrmtories wcr. rrtoblislrrd in Doytsn. This firm was ocquirod by f&xrsanto Chemical Company in 1936 to CMI~ on long-tang= and fundmental

227

Mr. Richard T. Thomas General Counsel for Petroleum Operations  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

j&,J"[Di-' JAQ--- j&,J"[Di-' JAQ--- hl 3. ) :j .I Y ' ! <' Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20545 NOV 1 1984 Mr. Richard T. Thomas General Counsel for Petroleum Operations P.O. Box 391 Ashland, Kentucky 41114 Dear Mr. Thomas: I am enclosing a copy of the radiological survey report for the Ashland Oil Company (former Haist property), Tonawanda, New York (Enclosure l), which was conducted in July 1976 (copies were sent to your Buffalo, New York, office on August 17, 1978). The results of the survey indicate levels of radioactive contamination above current guidelines. As noted in the report, the radioactive residues on the site do not pose a health hazard provided they (the residues) were not disturbed in the past or will not be disturbed in the future; i.e.,

228

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMIl'fATlON  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EER EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMIl'fATlON Page I of I RECIPIENT:Elevance Renewable Sciences, Inc. STATE: tl PROJECT TITLE: Elevance Integrated Biorefinery Fundlnl: Opportunity Announcem('nt Number Procurement (mlTument Number NEPA Control Number CI D Numbl.'r OE-fOA.()()()()(}96 GFO-1D-362-oot EE2872 Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (aulhoru.cd under DOE Order 451.1A), I hl\'(' made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: De$(;ription: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10. literature surveys. inventories, audits), data analysis (including compoter modeling ). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

229

Most Viewed Documents - Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Materials Most Viewed Documents - Materials Phase diagrams of the elements Young, D.A. (1975) Use of instrumented charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; et al. (1975) Thermal and electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of unirradiated and irradiated graphites from 300 to 1000 K Moore, J.P.; Graves, R.S.; McElroy, D.L. (1973) LITERATURE SURVEY ON DILUTE URANIUM ALLOYS FOR SANDIA BOOSTER CONCEPT TO SANDIA CORPORATION. Fackelmann, J.M.; Bauer, A.A.; Moak, D.P. (1969) Properties of chemical explosives and explosive simulants Dobratz, B.M. (1972) Review of x-ray diffraction studies in uranium alloys Yakel, H.L. (1973) Elevated-temperature true stress-tube strain tensile behavior of AISI Type 304 stainless steel

230

Publications from Research Conducted at VULCAN | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at VULCAN Publications from Research Conducted at VULCAN 2013 Publications Benafan O., Noebe R. D., II S. A.Padula, Gaydosh D. J., Lerch B. A., Garg A., Bigelow G. S., An K., Vaidyanathan R., "Temperature dependent behavior of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy around the transformation regime", Scripta Materialia 68, 571-574 (2013). Bowman Jr. R. C., Payzant E. A., Wilson P. R., Pearson D. P., Ledovskikh A., Danilov D., Notten P. H.L., An K., Skorpenske H. D., Wood D. L., "Characterization and analyses of degradation and recovery of LaNi4.78Sn0.22 hydrides following thermal aging", Journal of Alloys and Compounds 580, S207-S210 (2013). Brice C. A., Hofmeister W. H., "Determination of bulk residual stresses in electron beam additivemManufactured aluminum", Metallurgical

231

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 FINAL Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the

232

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEC 1 9 2012 DEC 1 9 2012 CBFO:OOB:DMG:HL:12-2118:UFC 2300.00 Office of Business Management Assessment MA-12-08 To: Jose R. Franco, Manager Management Assessment (MA-12-08) was conducted from October 1-31, 2012, to evaluate the following area as it relates to the Carlsbad Field Office: * Carlsbad Field Office Technical Qualification Program The Management Assessment Plan and Report are attached for your review. There were no areas of concern resulting from this assessment. Please contact me at (575) 234-7315 if you have any questions or comments regarding this assessment. Attachments cc: w/attachments G. Basabilvazo, CBFO *ED A. Cooper, CBFO ED J. Waters, CBFO ED R. Unger, CBFO ED M. Mager, CTAC ED CBFO M&RC *ED denotes electronic distribution David . Garcia, Director

233

Aquafuel Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquafuel Research Aquafuel Research Jump to: navigation, search Name Aquafuel Research Place Kent, England, United Kingdom Zip ME9 8HL Sector Renewable Energy Product England-based renewable energy company. Coordinates 41.150928°, -81.358223° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.150928,"lon":-81.358223,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

235

Page I of I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAGE M  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAGE M ENT CENTER Nl!PA DETnu.llNATION RECIPIENT:Virent Energy Systems, tnc. STATE: WI PROJECT TITLE: Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel: Catalytic Conversion of Com Stover to Energy Dense. low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes Funding Opportunity Announccment Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-fOA'()()()()337 DE·EEOOO5006 GFO.()()()5OO6-OQ1 EE5006 Sastd on my rniew of the information conccrning the' proposed . ('tk)D.,s NEPA Compliance omen (I utboriud under DOE Order 451.IA), I hl \'C' made the folJowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPEN DIX AND NUMB ER: Descri ption: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (induding

236

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Program Overview Richard Farmer Richard Farmer Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (7 June 2010) (7 June 2010) The Administration's Clean Energy Goals 9 9 Double Renewable Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 9 Invest $150 billion over ten years i in energy R&D to transition to a clean energy economy clean energy economy 9 Reduce GHG emissions 83% by 2050 2 t t Æ Æ F l ll ff hi hl ffi i di f l d Fuel Cells Address Our Key Energy Challenges Increasing Energy Increasing Energy Ef ficiency and Resource Diversity Efficiency and Resource Diversity Æ Æ Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources.

237

FACE Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven FACE Publications Brookhaven FACE Publications Homepage This listing includes publications by authors during their affiliation with the Brookhaven National Laboratory FACE Team. Only peer reviewed published articles are listed. 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007| 2008 | 2009 2009 Lewin KF, Nagy J, Nettles WR, Cooley DM, Rogers A (2009) Comparison of gas use efficiency and treatment uniformity in a forest ecosystem exposed to elevated [CO2] using pure and pre-diluted Free Air CO2 Enrichment technology. Global Change Biology. 15, 388-395. Cseke LJ, Tsai C-J, Rogers A, Nelson MP, White HL, Karnosky DF, Podila GK (2009) Transcriptomic comparison in the leaves of two aspen genotypes having similar carbon assimilation rates but different allocation patterns under elevated CO2. New Phytologist. 182, 891-911.

238

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating the NCEP Global Forecast Model Clouds Evaluating the NCEP Global Forecast Model Clouds Lazarus, S.M. (a), Krueger, S.K. (a), Jenkins, M.A. (a), and Pan, H.-L. (b), University of Utah (a), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting As part of a collaborative effort with the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the University of Utah is now archiving (daily) column data from the NCEP Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model. Data are collected for 8 sites, 4 of which directly coincide with ARM facilities at Manus, Nauru, Barrow, and the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). The bevy of observational data at these locations offers a unique opportunity to evaluate model performance. Because cloud feedback

239

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPMZT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the PEA is in assess potential enJ?ronmental impacts of the implementation of a comprehek-e management program for potentiaIly reusable ICW enriched uranium (LEU). norr,:al uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). --l?prosimately 14,200 MTU (h?etric Tons of Uranium) of potentially reusable uranium is located at 15s

240

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mckenzie hl wyman" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Copper(II) bis [2-((E)-2-(pyrid-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenolate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new complex CuL{sub 2} [HL = 2-((E)-(2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol] was synthesized, and its structure (C{sub 28}H{sub 22}Br{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}CuN{sub 4}O{sub 2}, Mr = 740.76) was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystal belongs to the triclinic system, space group P1{sup -}, with a = 5.157(6), b = 12.090(1), c =12.310(1) A, {alpha} = 113.962(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 96.7910(10) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 90.0300(10) Degree-Sign , V = 695.4(8) A{sup 3}, Z = 1, R = 0.0481. The complex molecules are linked via the weak C-H...N hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of one dimension (1D) chains along the a axis.

Zhang, X. L., E-mail: zhangxinli6008@163.com [Baoji University of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Novel Silicon n-on-p Edgeless Planar Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC, the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We report on the development of novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel sensors fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), making use of the "active edge" concept for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology and fabrication process, we present device simulations (pre- and post-irradiation) performed for different sensor configurations. First preliminary results obtained with the test-structures of the production are shown.

M. Bomben; A. Bagolini; M. Boscardin; L. Bosisio; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; G. Giacomini; A. La Rosa; G. Marchori; N. Zorzi

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Selected results from the static characterization of edgeless n-on-p planar pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In view of the LHC upgrade for the High Luminosity Phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the Inner Detector with an all-Silicon system. The n-on-p technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. There is also the demand to reduce the inactive areas to a minimum. The ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento started a collaboration for the development on a novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process which can cope with all these demands. This paper reports selected results from the electrical characterization, both before and after irradiation, of test structures from the first production batch.

Gabriele Giacomini; Alvise Bagolini; Marco Bomben; Maurizio Boscardin; Luciano Bosisio; Giovanni Calderini; Jacques Chauveau; Alessandro La Rosa; Giovanni Marchiori; Nicola Zorzi

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

Expression and role of DJ-1 in leukemia  

SciTech Connect

DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in pathogenesis of some solid tumors. In this study, we found that DJ-1 was overexpressed in acute leukemia (AL) patient samples and leukemia cell lines, which gave the first clue that DJ-1 overexpression might be involved in leukemogenesis and/or disease progression of AL. Inactivation of DJ-1 by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60 resulted in inhibition of the proliferation potential and enhancement of the sensitivity of leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic drug etoposide. Further investigation of DJ-1 activity revealed that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), as well as some proliferation and apoptosis-related genes, was regulated by DJ-1. Thus, DJ-1 might be involved in leukemogesis through regulating cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. It could be a potential therapeutic target for leukemia.

Liu Hang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang Min [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)], E-mail: wangjxm@ihcams.ac.cn; Li Min [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang Donghai; Rao Qing; Wang Yang; Xu Zhifang; Wang Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Macro Economic Instability and Business Exit: Determinants of Failures and Acquisitions of Large UK Firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@}?#16;|#3;_it Lu ?h4 uLh4@|#16;L?t @?_ _#16;ttL*#3;|#16;L?t#21; #25;@#15;it EbbH#28;c uL#19; U#3;tt#16;?} L? i #16;|t Lu ?i#22; i?|h@?|tc TL#16;?|t L#3;|G R#21;#21;#21; |#4;iti t|#3;_#16;it #21;#21;#21; UL?|hL* uLh 4@UhLiUL?L4#16;U UL?_#16;|#16;L?t #16;? #15;@h... bbS#28; @?_ +LMtL? EbbS#28; #4;@#15;i t|#3;_#16;i_ |#4;i #16;4T@U| Lu 4@UhL i?#15;#16;hL?4i?| L? ?h4 ttL*#3;|#16;L?t #16...

Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Higson, Chris; Holly, Sean; Kattuman, Paul

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification has been a technological reality for over a half century, being first used in great detail in Europe as an alternative to petroleum. Several projects in the US in the last decade have led to the commercial demonstration and verification of the coal gasification process. This paper reports that, in an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant, the Electric Power Research Institute embarked in a program to research, evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facility, and release an RFP in mid 1990 as Phase I of that program. Houston Lighting and Power Company responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL and P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel.

Baumann, P.D. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (US)); Epstein, M. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Kern, E.E. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Higgs Working Group Report of the Snowmass 2013 Community Planning Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

S. Dawson; A. Gritsan; H. Logan; J. Qian; C. Tully; R. Van Kooten; A. Ajaib; A. Anastassov; I. Anderson; D. Asner; O. Bake; V. Barger; T. Barklow; B. Batell; M. Battaglia; S. Berge; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; J. Brau; E. Brownson; M. Cahill-Rowley; C. Calancha-Paredes; C. -Y. Chen; W. Chou; R. Clare; D. Cline; N. Craig; K. Cranmer; M. de Gruttola; A. Elagin; R. Essig; L. Everett; E. Feng; K. Fujii; J. Gainer; Y. Gao; I. Gogoladze; S. Gori; R. Goncalo; N. Graf; C. Grojean; S. Guindon; H. Haber; T. Han; G. Hanson; R. Harnik; S. Heinemeyer; U. Heintz; J. Hewett; Y. Ilchenko; A. Ishikawa; A. Ismail; V. Jain; P. Janot; S. Kanemura; S. Kawada; R. Kehoe; M. Klute; A. Kotwal; K. Krueger; G. Kukartsev; K. Kumar; J. Kunkle; M. Kurata; I. Lewis; Y. Li; L. Linssen; E. Lipeles; R. Lipton; T. Liss; J. List; T. Liu; Z. Liu; I. Low; T. Ma; P. Mackenzie; B. Mellado; K. Melnikov; A. Miyamoto; G. Moortgat-Pick; G. Mourou; M. Narain; H. Neal; J. Nielsen; N. Okada; H. Okawa; J. Olsen; H. Ono; P. Onyisi; N. Parashar; M. Peskin; F. Petriello; T. Plehn; C. Pollard; C. Potter; K. Prokofiev; M. Rauch; T. Rizzo; T. Robens; V. Rodriguez; P. Roloff; R. Ruiz; V. Sanz; J. Sayre; Q. Shafi; G. Shaughnessy; M. Sher; F. Simon; N. Solyak; J. Strube; J. Stupak; S. Su; T. Suehara; T. Tanabe; T. Tajima; V. Telnov; J. Tian; S. Thomas; M. Thomson; K. Tsumura; C. Un; M. Velasco; C. Wagner; S. Wang; S. Watanuki; G. Weiglein; A. Whitbeck; K. Yagyu; W. Yao; H. Yokoya; S. Zenz; D. Zerwas; Y. Zhang; Y. Zhou

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mr. W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * , AP)J2 p" H-l2 &,q qp@- Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 DEC. 20 1984 Mr. W. Librirzi Regional Superfund Office EPA Region II 4th Floor 26 Federal Plaza New York, New York 10278 Dear Mr. Librizzi: The Department of Energy (DOE) has completed two radiological surveys at the former Simonds Saw & Steel Company site (presently owned by the Guterl Steel Corporation), Lockport, New York (Enclosures 1 and 2). These surveys indicated that the levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the site are in excess of those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial action. However, the data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. On February 21, 1980, the State of New

249

Accessibility of pores in coal to methane and carbon dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accessibility Accessibility of pores in coal to methane and carbon dioxide 3 Yuri B. Melnichenko a,b,⇑ , Lilin He a , Richard Sakurovs c,⇑ , Arkady L. Kholodenko d , Tomasz Blach e , 4 Maria Mastalerz f , Andrzej P. Radlin ´ ski e,f , Gang Cheng g,h , David F.R. Mildner i 5 a Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 6 b Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA 7 c CSIRO Energy Technology, 11 Julius Avenue, North Ryde, 2113 NSW, Australia 8 d 375 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973, USA 9 e Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Australia 10 f Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208, USA 11 g Sandia National Laboratories, Q1 Livermore, CA 94551, USA 12 h Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque,

250

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 FR 3 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 277' 1U HL-Un-U r. .* * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Class Waiver of the Government's U.S. and Foreign Patent Rights in Inventions Arising under Work for Others Activities Conducted with Advance Payments provided by the Laboratory using funds under Clauses H 21 (k)(3) and I 96(h) under Management and Operating Contract No, W-31-109-ENG-38 Between the Department of Energy and The University of Chicago, as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory, W(C)-99-003, CH-1009 The University of Chicago (University), a nonprofit educational organization, manages and operates the Government-owned facilities of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois under Prime Contract W-31-109-ENG-38 (the Contract). The University

251

Stochastic sensing through covalent interactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for stochastic sensing in which the analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element or an adaptor element. If such bonding is irreversible, the bond may be broken by a chemical reagent. The sensor element may be a protein, such as the engineered P.sub.SH type or .alpha.HL protein pore. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current, change in force, and change in fluorescence. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may be detected.

Bayley, Hagan; Shin, Seong-Ho; Luchian, Tudor; Cheley, Stephen

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling the Geometric Electronic and Redox Properties of Iron(lll)-Containing Amphiphiles with Asymmetric [NNO] Headgroups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two iron(III)-containing amphiphiles 1 and 2 have been synthesized with the [NN'O] ligands HL{sup tBu-ODA} (2-((octadecyl(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol) and HL{sup I-ODA} (2-((octadecyl(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)-4,6-diiodophenol), respectively. Compound 1 is monometallic, whereas EXAFS data suggest that 2 is a mixture of mono- and bimetallic species. The archetypical [Fe{sup III}(L{sup NN'O}){sub 2}]{sup +} complexes 3-9 have been isolated and characterized in order to understand the geometric, electronic, and redox properties of the amphiphiles. Preference for a monometallic or bimetallic nuclearity is dependent on (i) the nature of the solvent used for synthesis and (ii) the type of the substituent in the phenol moiety. In methanol, the tert-butyl-, methoxy-, and chloro-substituted 3, 4, and 5 are monometallic species, whereas the bromo- and iodo-substituted 6 and 7 form bimetallic complexes taking advantage of stabilizing methoxo bridges generated by solvent deprotonation. In dichloromethane, the bromo- and iodo-substituted 8 and 9 are monometallic species; however, these species favor meridional coordination in opposition to the facial coordination observed for the tert-butyl- and methoxy-substituted compounds. Molecular structures for species 5, 7, 8, and 9 have been solved by X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the electronic spectrum of the amphiphile 1 was expected to be similar to those of facial/cis archetypes with similar substituents, but close resemblance was observed with the profile for those meridional/cis species, suggesting a similar coordination mode. This trend is discussed based on DFT calculations, where preference for the meridional/cis coordination mode appears related to the presence of tertiary amine nitrogen on the ligand, as when a long alkyl chain is attached to the [NN'O] headgroup.

R Shakya; M Allard; M Johann; M Heeg; E Rentschler; J Shearer; B McGarvey; C Verani

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

The methylation of benzoic and n-butyric acids by chloromethane in Phellinus pomaceus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetics of carboxylic acid methylation by chloromethane (CH3Cl) in myceliaaf the fungus Phellinus pomaceus were examined. Substantial incorporation of C2H3- into ester was observed within 5 min of addition of C2H3Cl to washed mycelia in the presence of the non-physiological acceptor butyric acid, rendering it unlikely that CH3Cl was converted to a diffusible intermediate before acting as methyl donor. The rate of methyl butyrate biosynthesis attained a maximum of 0.14 pmol g-l h-l at 1-5 mM-butyric acid, with higher concentrations causing increasing inhibition. Exogenous CH3Cl did not affect methyl butyrate production implying that the rate of CH3Cl biosynthesis did not limit methylation. However, C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl into methyl butyrate rose sharply from 20 to 60 % between 1.5 and 4 mM-butyric acid, suggesting inhibition of CH3Cl biosynthesis by the acid, an interpretation supported by the rapid decline in gaseous CH3Cl release by mycelia between 1.5 and 2 mM-butyric acid. With the natural acceptor benzoic acid as substrate a significant increase in the rate of ester biosynthesis was obtained in the presence of exogenous CH3Cl. Ester biosynthesis was maximal (0.18 pmol g-l h-l) at 0.5 mM-benZOiC acid but fell extremely rapidly with increasing concentration. As with butyric acid supraoptimal concentrations halted CH3Cl release and increased C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl. Studies on C2H3-incorporation from exogenous C2H3Cl into ester revealed a linear relationship between the logarithm of the percentage C2H3-incorporation and the logarithm of C2H3Cl

Kieran J. Mcnally; David B. Harper. *t

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

POSITION STATEMENT DOCUMENTING IONIZING RADIATION EXPOSURE IN THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE-USA believes that maintaining an accurate record of a patients cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation can be of substantial value for clinical, health services management and research purposes. Excessive radiation can cause cancer, skin and bone marrow disease and a variety of other diseases. Radiation exposure can come from a number of sources, both natural and manmade. Over the lifetime of the individual, medical procedures, such as X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT) scans, and isotope radiation therapy, contribute significant radiation dosages. Monitoring the use of radiological procedures, measuring the radiation dose directly, and recording the dose in the Electronic Health Record (EHR) can help assess and reduce the risk posed by excessive radiation while optimizing the diagnostic value of these procedures. With these risks and benefits in mind, IEEE-USA recommends the following: 1. Health Level Seven International (HL7), the global authority responsible for standards for interoperability of health information technology, should add the appropriate "dose object " radiation parameters, as defined in the IHE Radiology Technical Framework Supplement, Radiation Exposure Monitoring (REM), to HL7/CDA format longitudinal electronic health records (EHRs), to create a longitudinal record of a patient's exposure to radiation resulting from medical procedures. These records should note both the procedure and estimated radiation dose from each procedure. 2. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT) should make radiation dose monitoring a part of meaningful use criteria for EHRs. 3. Healthcare accreditation organizations (JCAHO, NCQA and URAC), in collaboration with the American College of Radiologists (ACR), should continue

Adopted The Ieee-usa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Stage I-IIA Non-Bulky Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Is Further Distinction Based on Prognostic Factors Useful? The Stanford Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the United States, early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is defined as asymptomatic stage I/II non-bulky disease. European groups stratify patients to more intense treatment by considering additional unfavorable factors, such as age, number of nodal sites, sedimentation rate, extranodal disease, and elements of the international prognostic score for advanced HL. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of these factors in patients with early-stage disease treated at Stanford University Medical Center. Methods and Materials: This study was a retrospective analysis of 101 patients treated with abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy (8 weeks) and 30-Gy (n = 84 patients) or 20-Gy (n = 17 patients) radiotherapy to involved sites. Outcomes were assessed after applying European risk factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 8.5 years, freedom from progression (FFP) and overall survival (OS) rates were 94% and 97%, respectively. From 33% to 60% of our patients were unfavorable per European criteria (i.e., German Hodgkin Study Group [GHSG], n = 55%; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, n = 33%; and Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte, n = 61%). Differences in FFP rates between favorable and unfavorable patients were significant only for GHSG criteria (p = 0.02) with there were no differences in OS rates for any criteria. Five of 6 patients who relapsed were successfully salvaged. Conclusions: The majority of our patients deemed unfavorable had an excellent outcome despite undergoing a significantly abbreviated regimen. Application of factors used by the GHSG defined a less favorable subset for FFP but with no impact on OS. As therapy for early-stage disease moves to further reductions in therapy, these factors take on added importance in the interpretation of current trial results and design of future studies.

Advani, Ranjana H., E-mail: radvani@stanford.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Maeda, Lauren S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Baer, David M. [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (United States); Mason, Joseph [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, California (United States); Rosenberg, Saul A.; Horning, Sandra J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (Pfish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Arachidonic Acid Accumulation and Delta-5 Desaturation in Felines After Feeding a Gamma-Linolenic Acid Enriched Diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feline lipid metabolism is a topic for greater exploration due to this specie?s unique characteristics. Cats express limited Delta 6-desaturase activity necessary for conversion of linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) to arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). The possibility exists that Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) may serve as a precursor of AA in reproductive tissues especially if coupled with chain elongation and a functionally active Delta 5-desaturase. In addition no research has been conducted regarding feline reproductive Delta 8-desaturase activity as an alternate to the production of AA. To investigate desaturation activities, a group of 26 adult female cats were randomly assigned into 1 of 3 groups based on the diet fed: High Linoleic Acid (HL, n=7), Low Linoleic Acid (LL, n=9), and High Gamma-Linolenic Acid (GLA, n=10).The diets were fed for 300 days prior to ovariohysterectomy at which time EDTA plasma and ovarian, uterine, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were collected. Homogenates of each tissue were prepared and frozen in aliquots at -80 degrees C. Total lipids were extracted from the plasma and tissue homogenates followed by phospholipid (PL) fractionation via thin layer chromatography and fatty acid (FA) analyses by gas chromatography. The Shapiro-Wilks test was used to determine normal distribution of FA data followed by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Plasma PLs were significantly increased in both GLA and dihomo-Gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6Delta8,11,14) in the GLA group and statistically increased in 20:2n-6 and 20:3n-6(Delta5,11,14) in the HL group. Uterine tissue homogenates had significantly increased amounts of DGLA and AA, however ovarian tissue showed an increase of only DGLA. Adipose tissue FAs showed significantly high amounts of DGLA in the GLA group. It is concluded that a high GLA diet results in increased AA in uterine, but not ovarian, tissues and thus may supply eicosanoid precursors in support of reproduction. The presence of increased amounts of 20:3n-6(Delta5,11,14) and not AA in the plasma and uterine tissues in the HL group suggests that Delta6-desaturase cannot be induced and that Delta8-desaturase is not active when feeding high dietary LA. Furthermore, the increase in DGLA may provide an adipose storage reservoir for additional conversion under times of metabolic need. These data support the presence of a functionally active Delta5-desaturase in uterine, but not ovarian, tissues. The findings also suggest that increased dietary GLA may be used to meet the AA requirements for reproduction in cats in the absence of an animal based pre-formed source of AA.

Chamberlin, Amy Jo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

Ng, Angela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Joanne L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.Hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiotherapy for Early Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma According to the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG): The Roles of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Involved-Node Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cure rates of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are high, and avoidance of late complications and second malignancies have become increasingly important. This comparative treatment planning study analyzes to what extent target volume reduction to involved-node (IN) and intensity-modulated (IM) radiotherapy (RT), compared with involved-field (IF) and three-dimensional (3D) RT, can reduce doses to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Based on 20 computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with early unfavorable mediastinal HL, we created treatment plans for 3D-RT and IMRT for both the IF and IN according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). As OAR, we defined heart, lung, breasts, and spinal cord. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were evaluated for planning target volumes (PTVs) and OAR. Results: Average IF-PTV and IN-PTV were 1705 cm{sup 3} and 1015 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean doses to the PTVs were almost identical for all plans. For IF-PTV/IN-PTV, conformity was better with IMRT and homogeneity was better with 3D-RT. Mean doses to the heart (17.94/9.19 Gy for 3D-RT and 13.76/7.42 Gy for IMRT) and spinal cord (23.93/13.78 Gy for 3D-RT and 19.16/11.55 Gy for IMRT) were reduced by IMRT, whereas mean doses to lung (10.62/8.57 Gy for 3D-RT and 12.77/9.64 Gy for IMRT) and breasts (left 4.37/3.42 Gy for 3D-RT and 6.04/4.59 Gy for IMRT, and right 2.30/1.63 Gy for 3D-RT and 5.37/3.53 Gy for IMRT) were increased. Volume exposed to high doses was smaller for IMRT, whereas volume exposed to low doses was smaller for 3D-RT. Pronounced benefits of IMRT were observed for patients with lymph nodes anterior to the heart. IN-RT achieved substantially better values than IF-RT for almost all OAR parameters, i.e., dose reduction of 20% to 50%, regardless of radiation technique. Conclusions: Reduction of target volume to IN most effectively improves OAR sparing, but is still considered investigational. For the time being, IMRT should be considered for large PTVs especially when the anterior mediastinum is involved.

Koeck, Julia, E-mail: Julia_Koeck@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Abo-Madyan, Yasser [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Lohr, Frank; Stieler, Florian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Kriz, Jan; Mueller, Rolf-Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Latif, Naeem [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microsoft PowerPoint - 04-10 DC_Ruhl.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Markets: The Long And The Markets: The Long And The Short Term Christof Rühl, Group Chief Economist, BP plc. Washington, April 2010 Outline Long term context Long term context Structural change in oil markets Natural gas: a new game   How does it matter? Conclusion © BP 2010 The Long Term: Real Commodity Prices 400 Oil Wheat Iron & Steel Index: average 1970-2008 = 100 300 350 200 250 100 150 0 50 © BP 2010 1972 1975 1978 1981 1984 1987 1990 1993 1996 1999 2002 2005 2009 The Long Term: Contributions to Growth 5-year moving average GDP Primary energy 4% OECD Non-OECD OECD Non-OECD 2% 3% 1% 2% 0% © BP 2010 1993 1996 1999 2002 2005 2008 1993 1996 1999 2002 2005 2008 Energy Demand Growth Mboe/d Gas Oil Mboe/d Coal Mboe/d 70 80 90 OECD Non-OECD 70 80 90 OECD Non-OECD 70 80 90 OECD Non-OECD 50 60 70 50 60 70 50 60 70 2016 20 30 40 30 40 20 30 40 2008 1988 0 10 20 0 10 20 0 10

263

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

264

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Amounts and Photosynthesis Carbon Dioxide Amounts and Photosynthesis Name: Alex Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Tanzania Date: Spring 2012 Question: Do plants produce more oxygen when they take in more carbon dioxide? Replies: Alex Yes, plants produce more oxygen when they take in more carbon dioxide Because that indicates a greater rate of photosynthesis is occurring. Here are some online articles that might help you understand more about photosynthesis. http://www.biology4kids.com/files/plants_photosynthesis.html http://www.google.com/search?q=photosynthesis+for+kids&hl=en&prmd =imvns&tbm=isch&tbo= u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=yD JvT5vANKTw0gHTq5n4Bg&ved=0CDsQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=653 Sincere regards, Mike Stewart Remember that in photosynthesis, the source of O2 is H2O. The following should be helpful to you:

265

Data:A88c3d04-2b72-4a3c-95cf-f0585b8dc547 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-2b72-4a3c-95cf-f0585b8dc547 4-2b72-4a3c-95cf-f0585b8dc547 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE HL: Highway Lighting (69-116W) Sector: Lighting Description: 1. AVAILABILITY Available to the Indiana State Highway Commission for highway lighting and flasher light service. This schedule is not available for new installations. Under this schedule, the Indiana State Highway Commission will own and install the complete lighting system. Tipmont Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) will provide maintenance on the lighting equipment at 110% of its cost. The Indiana State Highway Commission and the REMC have entered lighting agreement and maintenance contract regarding lighting installations covered under this Schedule.

266

Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W HLW W DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Facility to iden the HL to be i norma The as along w Level ( * H * H * H Sy * Pu D The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Waste T Why DOE Waste Vitrificatio s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a H y (HLW). The ntify the critical LW and determ ncorporated in ally requires a T What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the H LW Melter Fee LW Melter Pro LW Melter Offg ystem/Process ulse Jet Mixer isposal System To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen Treatmen W E-EM Did This n Facility a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com High-Level Wa purpose of this technology ele mine if these are to the final WT Technology Re he TRA Team m identified the

267

ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) (Redirected from Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Name Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Address Achada Santo Antonio Electra Building, 2nd floor Praia, Cape Verde Place Cape Verde Year founded 2009 Phone number +238 2604630 Website http://ecreee.vs120081.hl-user Coordinates 14.930464°, -23.512669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":14.930464,"lon":-23.512669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

March 11-12, 2013 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

March 11-12, 2013 March 11-12, 2013 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Meetings March 11-12, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Agenda High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center 9751 Washingtonion Blvd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878 March 11-12, 2013 Monday, March 11, 2013 9:00 a.m. European Strategy .pdf file (436KB) T. Nakada 9:20 a.m. Discussion 9:30 a.m. HL-LHC Accelerator Upgrades .pdf file (3.0MB) E. Prebys 9:50 a.m. Discussion 10:00 a.m. Planning to host the ILC In Japan .pdf file (7.2MB) H. Yamamoto 10:20 a.m. Discussion 10:30 a.m. BREAK 11:00 a.m. Update on Snowmass .pdf file (38KB) J. Rosner

269

BY SILICON CRYSTALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c October 29, 1942 a 1 1 _MIGH aECTgFXCATIOH - BY SILICON CRYSTALS . . c .. I n. The excellent pesformmce of Brftieh "red dot" c r y s t a l s f e explained R R due t o the kgife edge contact i n a t A polfehod ~ X ' f l i C B o H i g h frequency m c t l f f c n t f o n 8ependre c r i t i c a l l y on the ape%e;y of the rectifytnc boundary layer o f the crystal, C, For hl#$ comvere~on e f f i c i e n c y , the product c d t h i ~ capacity m a o f ' t h e @forward" (bulk) re-. sistance Rb o f the crystnl must b@ sm%P, depende primarily on the breadth of tha b f f e edge i t s lbngth. The contact am &harefore ~ E L V Q a rather large area wMQh prevents burn-out, thh3 t h e breadth of &h@ knife edge should be bdt8~1 than E~$O$B% % f I - ' amo For a knife edge, this produet very 14ttle upom For a wavsIL~n+3tih of PO emo the eowp,o%a%8sne 4

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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271

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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U. S. DEPAR TM ENT OF ENERGY OFFI CE OF SCIE"GE·· e  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

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Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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275

UCRL-CR--10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-10 -10 4934 DE91 000814 PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY OF ACTIVATED CARBONFIBERS ' Ko Kuriyama Mo S. ,Dresselhaus MIT ...... ' Cambridge, Massachusetts ' MASTEB ,_ ' _Yii:i" ' £31STRIBUTION OFIT_"IIS DoCUMEt"JT IS L I?',_'-:'_ , I)IS('I,AIMI,',R Work pt`rforlnt`(I iiil(|t`r lilt' llll._illl'_-'_Of lilt' I J,,H, I)t, pllrl- mt`ni of i,_nt`r_)' I),_' l,=lwrt`n_'t` I,Ivi.,rmort` Ntllhrn=ll l,ld_or=_- Ior,_'mldc,r _'onlrzlct mlml}t`r W-74(15-1,1N(;.4X, 'l'hi,_ doc'mm..||l t_'=l.,_ prt`p=lrt`d =Is ==_l=lt'v,,,|ml o1' work _ptm._(!rvd I_)' IIn =lp, t`|lC')' 01' lht` (ll|ilt`(l ,_tiHl's (;|_vt`rnn|t`nt. Nvilht, r lht` I Inilt`d ,Sl=dL, s (;o_'t`rl|u|el|l mir Iht` t ll|i_'t`r_lt.,,'of ('lllifl)r,fl_l mrr lilLY o1"II,.,Ir v|lll_l_|)'t`t`_, I|mkt`_ _lll)' ,_'_mrr_lnl); exprt`_ or i|npllt`d, or _l_sl|i|lt`_ _|,ly lel_=lllhd)lilly i_r r¢'sl)(m- _ihilll)'

276

T D  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D D - 4 5 0 0 . UC-35, Nuclear Explosions - Peaceful .Applications UC-48, Biology and Medicine RUL 4 - 8 - 3 L a w m o n o o R a d i a f l o n Laborafory U N l V E R S l T V O F C A L I F O R N I A L I V E R M O R E Bio-hl edicol Division UCRL- 50791 ! ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS FROM PROJECT R ULISON ! W. L. Robison L. R. Anspaugh Preface This analysis of the radiological hazards of Project Rulison was undertaken a t the informal request of members of the Nevada Operations Office of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. supplied by the Environmental Sciences Service Administration, A i r Resources Laboratory, L a s Vegas. was taken f r o m References 2 and 3. possible routes of entry of radionuclides to man.' Other groups have been requested to perform analyses of other possible routes in addi-

277

PROCEDUREPORTiEPRECIPI¶!ATIONOPl!RORIUE~~~ I/  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PROCEDUREPORTiEPRECIPI¶!ATIONOPl!RORIUE~~~ I/ PROCEDUREPORTiEPRECIPI¶!ATIONOPl!RORIUE~~~ I/ .I FNoHl?oaoammoussoImIw I: J I: C.R:. stlm awl r&ale aorden 1. !&waotlw cnlverel~ - February 3, 1953 I A oompleta repcwt of thle work will be mndo avnllable aa an ABC-NY0 report ia the near ,fut-* Ru, solution nreJl oontain 2 to 150 mg. of thorium 0-e:. Thus far, the wxlmblm llmite of oontamhants studled have bed 1200111~. o?mlxad trivalent rare earth oxidea (lanthanum, QO; I' prcmeoUymlu81, neodymium and yttrium) ,and S50 tug. of phosphoi~ I pentoxlde (aa.phoaphorla aoid). In a single proalpltatloni~ total weight ot rare earth and phoephorlc,ox~r aontaminat~ I.. i~&ti poipitate ~POZB 80 w. or th~mm odds IS OS tlse on 5w. A double preoipltatlon will quantlt<blP somaw $I Conoentrate the solution 0-m therltm to about 50

278

Recent progress of the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The foreseen luminosity upgrade for the LHC (a factor of 5-10 more in peak luminosity by 2021) poses serious constraints on the technology for the ATLAS tracker in this High Luminosity era (HL-LHC). In fact, such luminosity increase leads to increased occupancy and radiation damage of the tracking detectors. To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project was established comprising 17 institutes and more than 80 scientists. Main areas of research are the performance of planar pixel sensors at highest fluences, the exploration of possibilities for cost reduction to enable the instrumentation of large areas, the achievement of slim or active edge designs to provide low geometric inefficiencies without the need for shingling of modules and the investigation of the operation of highly irradiated sensors at low thresholds to increase the efficiency. In the following I will present results from the group, concerning mainly irradiated-devices performance, together with studies for new sensors, including detailed simulations.

The ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project; :; M. Bomben

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

Routing SCADA data through an enterprise WAN  

SciTech Connect

Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) and many other large utilities have investigated substantial resources in developing integrated enterprise wide area networks (WANs). The WAN provides unprecedented opportunities for integrating information throughout the corporation, resulting in improved efficiency and reduced costs of operation. In contrast, present dedicated point-to-point SCADA data circuits from the energy management system (EMS) to remote terminal units (RTUs) are not currently integrated with the network, nor replicated in any offsite backup system. An integrated approach might integrate communications from selected RTUs over the WAN to a backup system or the EMS. Such an approach would potentially provide improved disaster recovery, more efficient use of communications, reduced maintenance costs, and improved availability of operational data. RTU data, however, is fundamentally different from most other WAN traffic in that it is critical to the moment-to-moment operation of the utility and consists of a large number of messages repeated frequently and continuously. There are valid concerns as to whether the stability, availability, and inherent latency of the WAN would be adequate to support operations of a backup or primary SCADA system. There are also concerns about the adverse effects that SCADA traffic might have on the WAN. These concerns led to the project featured in this article, which tested the operational suitability and effectiveness of routing SCADA data between selected RTUs and a central site on the WAN.

Flowers, T.; Houle, B. [Houston Lighting and Power, TX (United States); Retzer, J.; Ramanathan, R. [National Systems and Research, Camas, WA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Human p53 oncogene contains one promoter upstream of exon 1 and a second, stronger promoter within intron 1  

SciTech Connect

To gain insight into how transcription of the human p53 oncogene is controlled, the authors characterized the regulatory regions of the gene. A 3.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) EcoRI restriction fragment encompassing the 5{prime} end of the human p53 gene, as well as subfragments generated by restriction digests, was cloned upstream of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and CAT activity was assayed in extracts of transfected cells. Two types of CAT vectors were used: Epstein-Barr virus oriP-derived constructs that were stably introduced into the human cell lines K562, Raji, and HL-60, and pSVO-CAT-derived constructs that were transiently introduced into the monkey cell line COS. By this approach they have identified two promoters for the human p53 gene. One promoter, p53P1, is located 100-250 bp upstream of the 218-bp noncoding first exon; a second, stronger promoter, p53P2, maps within the first intron. CAT activity and expression of CAT RNA indicate that p53P2 functions up to 50-fold more efficiently than p53P1. They conclude that the expression of the human p53 gene may be controlled by two promoters and that differential regulation of these promoters may play an important role in the altered expression of the gene in both normal and transformed cells.

Reisman, D.; Greenberg, M.; Rotter, V. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is proposed, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio theory and adjusted to obtain agreement with a higher level (HL) ab initio theory. This approach is explored by training such a model on data for ethane and testing the resulting model on methane, propane and butane. The electronic distribution of the molecules is varied by placing them in strong electrostatic environments consisting of random charges placed on the corners of a cube. The results find that parameters embedded in HF/STO-3G theory can be adjusted to obtain agreement, to within about 2 kcal/mol, with results of HF/6-31G theory. Obtaining this level of agreement requires the use of parameters that are functions of the bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders within the molecules. The argument is made that this approach provides a well-controlled means to take advantage of molecular similarity in...

Tanha, Matteus; Cappiello, Alex; Gordon, Geoffrey J; Yaron, David J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is proposed, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio theory and adjusted to obtain agreement with a higher level (HL) ab initio theory. This approach is explored by training such a model on data for ethane and testing the resulting model on methane, propane and butane. The electronic distribution of the molecules is varied by placing them in strong electrostatic environments consisting of random charges placed on the corners of a cube. The results find that parameters embedded in HF/STO-3G theory can be adjusted to obtain agreement, to within about 2 kcal/mol, with results of HF/6-31G theory. Obtaining this level of agreement requires the use of parameters that are functions of the bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders within the molecules. The argument is made that this approach provides a well-controlled means to take advantage of molecular similarity in quantum chemistry.

Matteus Tanha; Shiva Kaul; Alex Cappiello; Geoffrey J. Gordon; David J. Yaron

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

ProPortal: A Database for Prochlorococcus  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans, and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL) adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL) adapted group. They are closely related to, but distinct from, marine Synechococcus. The genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced and they range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 Mbp. They represent diverse lineages, spanning the rRNA diversity (97 to 99.93% similarity) of cultured representatives of this group. Our analyses of these genomes inform our understanding of how adaptation occurs in the oceans along gradients of light, nutrients, and other environmental factors, providing essential context for interpreting rapidly expanding metagenomic datasets. [Copied from http://proportal.mit.edu/project/prochlorococcus/] ProPortal allows users to browse and search genome date for not only Prochlorococcus, but Cyanophage and Synechococcus. Microarray data, environmental cell concentration data, and metagenome information are also available.

Huang, Katherine [Chisholm lab, MIT

284

Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance. Full and partial 3D pixel detectors have been tested, with and without a 1.6T magnetic field, in high energy pion beams at the CERN SPS North Area in 2009. Sensors characteristics have been measured as a function of the beam incident angle and compared to a regular planar pixel device. Overall full and partial 3D devices have similar behavior. Magnetic field has no sizeable effect on 3D performances. Due to electrode inefficiency 3D devices exhibit some loss of tracking efficiency for normal incident tracks but recover full efficiency with tilted tracks. As expected due to the electric field configuration 3D sensors have little charge sharing between cells.

Grenier, P.; /SLAC; Alimonti, G.; /INFN, Milan; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Bates, R.; /Glasgow U.; Bolle, E.; /Oslo U.; Borri, M.; /Manchester U.; Boscardin, M.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Buttar, C.; /Glasgow U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Cobal, M.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Cristofoli, A.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Dalla Betta, G.F.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Darbo, G.; /INFN, Genoa; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Devetak, E.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; DeWilde, B.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; Einsweiler, K.; /LBL, Berkeley; Esseni, D.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Manchester U. /CERN /LBL, Berkeley /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Oslo U. /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SLAC /SLAC /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /SLAC /SINTEF, Oslo /Manchester U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Bonn U. /Bonn U. /CERN /Manchester U. /SINTEF, Oslo /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Manchester U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Glasgow U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Hawaii U. /Freiburg U. /Manchester U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /CERN /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /Prague, Tech. U. /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /CERN /Oslo U. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /SLAC /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /SLAC /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-,qy4 I _ -,qy4 I _ . I .__. ..-.- -....k ~&cTIAL USE UNL-T 0 L; : A I ,; ,' MN- I?%-(83 aj 0.3 ' f4lttaIIurgicaI lafioratorph k+ A- - p 111~ uu-mnt consists of _____. 5 ___-- .^_. F%es and.--m_m - No...---:- ---.- -.---_ Q- -15 ____ of b ,,;-+~----c------ __-_ figures - --------=-.LupieS, &je3me-&vw-y wu Readers File. - UT, h 5 lDcnLats* P&r W% l290 ma - , (1k.h kas tl61t6d xb&eeTTiul~onf aQ At the pmumat * guwxwlm on Pun* PM thracr htiheu 'ba% &+#8' end one en tiho flnl6hlBaiq 0 hb &um8 &6k4:4 t?Lo aKr0 ar eseallOZVb* ua lfo na@ifibUs A v6atiZatici~1, aycptu ha Q63&u#eoat~e~ln~ilLiua8~d#~~m~i0 pwtt;:3.tQtorr, ltio8aspLw~~~OQa-~lllCI)brrL# tmhIp sum wh6 I)&, mrdraTl6g frw droar vm6 84 cflaplpl+ktaa6xt~moma*~(~}ww

286

Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing - 14194  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok?'s accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

Kelly, Steven E.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Source: Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol Blends.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

A2: Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends (Other Equipment). September 2013. A2: Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends (Other Equipment). September 2013. Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends (Other Equipment) Manufacturer Product Model Ethanol Compatibility Bravo Systems Fiberglass Fittings Series F, FF, FPE, FR, F Retrofit- S, RPE Retrofit-Si, F BLR, F D-BLR-S, TBF E0-E100 Bravo Systems Spill Buckets B3XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Tank Sumps & Covers B4XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Transition Sumps (planter, walkover, H-20 rated) B5XX, B6XX, B7XX, B8XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Transition Sumps B8XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Under Dispenser Contain- ment Sumps B7XXX, B8XXX, B9XXX E0-E100 Brugg Pipes FLEXWELL-HL, SECON-X, NIROFLEX, LPG E0-E100 KPS Petrol Pipe Systems Pipes and Associated Products All single- and double-wall plastic pipes, flexible

288

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Dietary Fiber/Carnitine, Diacylglycerol, and Low Glycemic Index Starch Effects on Obesity and Triglyceride Rich Lipoprotein Metabolsim in Dogs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obesity is the most common clinical disorder and is associated with various medical conditions in dogs. Appropriate dietary management potentially provides weight loss in a safe, healthy, and efficacious manner. In order to elucidate whether dietary fiber, carnitine, diacylglycerol (DAG), and low glycemic index (LGI) act on such dietary components, a series of studies was conducted: 1) the combination of dietary fiber/carnitine effect on short term (3 and 7 h) satiety and long term (6 weeks) canine weight loss, 2) the combination of dietary LGI/high glycemic index (HGI) starches and DAG/triacylglycerol (TAG) effect during a 9 week canine weight loss period, and 3) the DAG effect on triglyceride rich lipoprotein (TRL) metabolism isolated from canine plasma 3-4 h postprandially. The combination of dietary fiber/carnitine supplementation decreased both food and energy intake at 3 h post-feeding, suggesting that this combination diet provided 3 h post-meal satiety. This combination supplement also increased postprandial plasma B- hydroxybutyrate (BHB) at d 42 and body fat and weight loss at d 42 from baseline. This combination supplement did not alter plasma vitamin A distributions or concentrations although it contained high vitamin A as B-carotene. In the second study, the LGI diets resulted in a more pronounced body weight loss than the HGI diets due to lower diet digestibilities. These data are consistent with LGI diets decreasing metabolizable energy and consequently consuming less energy compared to the HGI diets. The DAG diets lowered postprandial plasma TAG at weeks 1 and 8 in and increased plasma BHB at week 8, suggesting an increase in fat oxidation. The combination of DAG/LGI decreased postprandial total cholesterol at week 8. Lipoprotein concentrations were not altered by diet types. Fasting lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) activities were not affected by diets. In the final study, DAG ingestion decreased TRL and plasma TAG concentrations vs. TAG ingestion. The DAG enriched meal increased non-esterified fatty acid, monoacylglycerol, and 1,3-DAG and decreased TAG in TRLs which may be attributed to larger TRL particle size compared to the TAG meal. Consequently, the DAG derived TRLs showed increased affinity of core TAG for LPL and HL in vitro. Moreover, the intravenous injection of the DAG derived canine TRLs into mice underwent more rapid blood clearance associated with the greater hepatic uptake compared to the TAG derived TRL injection. In conclusion, the combination of dietary fiber/carnitine and DAG/LGI preferably reduced body weight and stimulated fat oxidation, which promotes overall weight loss. The postprandial plasma TAG lowering effect of DAG is the result, at least partially, from the efficient clearance of TRLs from blood circulation and their ability to act as a more efficient substrate for plasma lipolytic enzymes.

Mitsuhashi, Yuka

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Seagate Crystal Reports - sum6.  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Shipping and Shipping and Receiving Activity (Sum-6) Current Year: 2000 Receiving Site: Hanford Shipping Site HLW HL W -V i trified TRU M L L W LLW OTHER* SNF** Quantity (m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity ( m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity (m 3) Quantity ( m 3) Quantity (M THM ) Ames Lab 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 5.460 0.000 0.0000 Argonne-E 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1,049.800 0.000 0.0000 Bettis 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 11.680 0.000 0.0000 Brookhaven 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 55.070 0.000 0.0000 Columbus 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 156.070 0.000 0.0000 EnergyTech 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 41.780 0.000 0.0000 Fermi 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 42.840 0.000 0.0000 GenAtomics 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 164.030 0.000 0.0000 Lawr-Berk 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 12.220 0.000 0.0000 NavRctrFac 0.000 0.000 0.000 16.000 0.000 0.000 0.0000

291

Experimental Challenges of the European Strategy for Particle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In planning for the Phase II upgrades of CMS and ATLAS major considerations are: 1)being able to deal with degradation of tracking and calorimetry up to the radiation doses to be expected with an integrated luminosity of 3000 $fb^{-1}$ and 2)maintaining physics performance at a pileup level of ~140. Here I report on work started within the context of the CMS Forward Calorimetry Task Force and continuing in an expanded CERN RD52 R$&$D program integrating timing (i.e. measuring the time-of-arrival of physics objects) as a potential tool for pileup mitigation and ideas for Forward Calorimetry. For the past 4 years our group has focused on precision timing at the level of 10-20 picoseconds in an environment with rates of $~10^6-10^7$ Hz/$cm^2 $ as is appropriate for the future running of the LHC (HL-LHC era). A time resolution of 10-20 picoseconds is one of the few clear criteria for pileup mitigation at the LHC, since the interaction time of a bunch crossing has an rms of 170 picosec. While work on charged particle timing in other contexts (i.e. ALICE R$&$D) is starting to approach this precision, there have been essentially no technologies that can sustain performance at these rates. I will present results on a tracker we developed within the DOE Advanced Detector R$&$D program which is now meeting these requirements. I will also review some results from Calorimeter Projects developed within our group (PHENIX EMCAL and ATLAS ZDC) which achieved calorimeter timing precision< 100 picoseconds.

Sebastian White

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effect of stoichiometry in the HfCo2 C15 laves phase  

SciTech Connect

In binary Laves phases (AB2) that do exhibit a homogeneity range, the ability to accommodate nonstoichiometry is related to the atomic size requirements for the topologically close-packed structure. Experimentally, based upon a hard sphere model, Laves phases with a metallic atom size ratio RA/RB close to the ideal value of -1.225 exhibit homogeneity ranges. Interestingly, the enthalpy of formation for Laves phases also display the largest values at the ideal ratio. For example, Campbell plots are empirical investigations of enthalpy of formation as a function of atom size ratio. Within an elemental class of AB2 Laves phases (Le,, systematic variation of the A element), a maximum value in enthalpy is observed. To interpret this result, Embedded Atom Methods (EAM) using Lennard-Jones potentials have been used to correlatc atomic size to enthalpy of formation (and therefore homogeneity range), thus providing insight into geometric trends that define Laves phases. In addition, constitutional defect types (mostly anti-site substitution) can be interpreted. With this information, a model system can be explored. The C15 phase, Hl'Coz, has a radius ratio of RA{approx}/R=c {approx}1. 26 and a reported range of solubility of 9 at.%. The solubility limits and constitutional defects have been investigated, and with this information, the elastic and mechanical properties as a function composition were defined. The results indicate that anti-site substitution is the governing defect mechanism on both sides of stoichiometry. The elastic and mechanical properties show a maximum at stoichiometry (unlike most intermetallics), with the brittle behavior decreasing with increasing Co content. The properties are effectively described in terms of the geometric/electronic structure models developed for Laves phase intermetallics. Support from DOE-OBES is gratefully acknowledged.

Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Chen, K. Ch; Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.); Peterson, Edwin Lowell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment  

SciTech Connect

Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY{sup {minus}} anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY {yields} XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, determining the electron affinity of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}, gaining insight on the bonding of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} ground state and observing the {sup 2}A{sub 2} excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

Metz, R.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Data:6171736f-7861-4e7d-8c32-35557c16c203 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36f-7861-4e7d-8c32-35557c16c203 36f-7861-4e7d-8c32-35557c16c203 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indianapolis Power & Light Co Effective date: 2010/03/30 End date if known: Rate name: HL - High Load Factor - Primary Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY: Available for power and lighting service at standard primary distribution, sub-transmission or transmission line voltages. Delivery voltage to be determined by the Company. Minimum contract two thousand (2,000) kilowatts of demand. Not for resale. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: Standard Characteristics: Three phase, sixty cycle alternating current, delivered and metered at one point on Customer's premises, at primary distribution voltage (approximately 4160 or 13,200 volts), sub-transmission voltage (approximately 34,500 volts), or transmission voltage (approximately 138,000 or 345,000 volts). All distribution transformers, lines and other equipment on the Customer's side of the point of delivery shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer. Non-Standard Characteristics: If the Customer desires service necessitating transformers (including circuit breakers, supporting structure and supplementary equipment) which do not conform to the standards of the Company as to design, voltage ratio or capacity, or if the Customer desires the exclusive use and/or control of the transformers (whether standard or non-standard), such transformers shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer, and the point of delivery in either case shall be at the high voltage side of the transformers. RATE: The Customer Charge; plus the sum of the Demand Charge and the Energy Charge adjusted according to the "Power Factor" clause shown hereafter; plus the Demand Side Management Adjustment, the Fuel Cost Adjustment, the Environmental Compliance Cost Recovery Adjustment and the Core and Core Plus Demand-Side Management Adjustment calculated in accordance with Rider No. 3, Rider No. 6, Rider No. 20 and Rider No. 22, respectively.

295

Data:1a3cf042-dd01-4d12-ba84-56882c614e9b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cf042-dd01-4d12-ba84-56882c614e9b cf042-dd01-4d12-ba84-56882c614e9b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indianapolis Power & Light Co Effective date: 2010/03/30 End date if known: Rate name: HL - High Load Factor - Transmission Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY: Available for power and lighting service at standard primary distribution, sub-transmission or transmission line voltages. Delivery voltage to be determined by the Company. Minimum contract two thousand (2,000) kilowatts of demand. Not for resale. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: Standard Characteristics: Three phase, sixty cycle alternating current, delivered and metered at one point on Customer's premises, at primary distribution voltage (approximately 4160 or 13,200 volts), sub-transmission voltage (approximately 34,500 volts), or transmission voltage (approximately 138,000 or 345,000 volts). All distribution transformers, lines and other equipment on the Customer's side of the point of delivery shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer. Non-Standard Characteristics: If the Customer desires service necessitating transformers (including circuit breakers, supporting structure and supplementary equipment) which do not conform to the standards of the Company as to design, voltage ratio or capacity, or if the Customer desires the exclusive use and/or control of the transformers (whether standard or non-standard), such transformers shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer, and the point of delivery in either case shall be at the high voltage side of the transformers. RATE: The Customer Charge; plus the sum of the Demand Charge and the Energy Charge adjusted according to the "Power Factor" clause shown hereafter; plus the Demand Side Management Adjustment, the Fuel Cost Adjustment, the Environmental Compliance Cost Recovery Adjustment and the Core and Core Plus Demand-Side Management Adjustment calculated in accordance with Rider No. 3, Rider No. 6, Rider No. 20 and Rider No. 22, respectively.

296

Data:46ea95a1-3e8e-4d61-a403-3247f3d273c7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5a1-3e8e-4d61-a403-3247f3d273c7 5a1-3e8e-4d61-a403-3247f3d273c7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indianapolis Power & Light Co Effective date: 2010/03/30 End date if known: Rate name: HL - High Load Factor - Sub-transmission Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY: Available for power and lighting service at standard primary distribution, sub-transmission or transmission line voltages. Delivery voltage to be determined by the Company. Minimum contract two thousand (2,000) kilowatts of demand. Not for resale. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: Standard Characteristics: Three phase, sixty cycle alternating current, delivered and metered at one point on Customer's premises, at primary distribution voltage (approximately 4160 or 13,200 volts), sub-transmission voltage (approximately 34,500 volts), or transmission voltage (approximately 138,000 or 345,000 volts). All distribution transformers, lines and other equipment on the Customer's side of the point of delivery shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer. Non-Standard Characteristics: If the Customer desires service necessitating transformers (including circuit breakers, supporting structure and supplementary equipment) which do not conform to the standards of the Company as to design, voltage ratio or capacity, or if the Customer desires the exclusive use and/or control of the transformers (whether standard or non-standard), such transformers shall be installed, owned, operated and maintained by the Customer, and the point of delivery in either case shall be at the high voltage side of the transformers. RATE: The Customer Charge; plus the sum of the Demand Charge and the Energy Charge adjusted according to the "Power Factor" clause shown hereafter; plus the Demand Side Management Adjustment, the Fuel Cost Adjustment, the Environmental Compliance Cost Recovery Adjustment and the Core and Core Plus Demand-Side Management Adjustment calculated in accordance with Rider No. 3, Rider No. 6, Rider No. 20 and Rider No. 22, respectively.

297

FINAL REPORT SUMMARY OF DM 1200 OPERATION AT VSL VSL-06R6710-2 REV 0 9/7/06  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this report was to summarize the testing experience on the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200), which is the High Level Waste (HLW) Pilot Melter located at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Further objectives were to provide descriptions of the history of all modifications and maintenance, methods of operation, problems and unit failures, and melter emissions and performance while processing a variety of simulated HL W and low activity waste (LAW) feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and employing a variety of operating methods. All of these objectives were met. The River Protection Project - Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) Project has undertaken a 'tiered' approach to vitrification development testing involving computer-based glass formulation, glass property-composition models, crucible melts, and continuous melter tests of increasing, more realistic scales. Melter systems ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 m{sup 2} installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) have been used for this purpose, which, in combination with the 3.3 m{sup 2} low activity waste (LAW) Pilot Melter at Duratek, Inc., span more than two orders of magnitude in melt surface area. In this way, less-costly small-scale tests can be used to define the most appropriate tests to be conducted at the larger scales in order to extract maximum benefit from the large-scale tests. For high level waste (HLW) vitrification development, a key component in this approach is the one-third scale DuraMelter 1200 (DM 1200), which is the HLW Pilot Melter that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. In particular, the DM1200 provides for testing on a vitrification system with the specific train of unit operations that has been selected for both HLW and LAW RPP-WTP off-gas treatment.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; DIENER G; BARDAKCI T; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Preparation and discharge characteristics of solid redox polymerization electrodes employing disulfide polymers and copolymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work in our laboratory on polymeric organodisulfides has shown these materials to perform well as positive electrodes in solid-state batteries. The polymeric materials have been named solid redox polymerization electrodes (SRPE's) due to the reversible polymerization/depolymerization reaction that occurs on charge/discharge of the electrode. The cell radiation for SRPE-based cells can be described for a simple case as, 2n M + (SRS){sub n} = n M{sub 2}SRS, where M is an alkali metal (Li, Na, K) and R is an organic group. In the broader sense SRPE's can have more than two S groups per monomer R unit, and are reversible to other monovalent and divalent metals. In the fully charged state SRPE's consist of polydisulfide polymers and are depolymerized on discharge by scission of sulfur-sulfur bonds, leading to the formation of dithiolate salts in the fully discharged cell. SRPE's are easy to synthesize, are air stable, and should be very inexpensive in bulk quantities. Depending on the redox potential of the polydisulfide and reaction condition, many disulfides can be copolymerized by oxidizing a mixture of dithiols, x HSRSH + y HSR'SH + (x+y)l{sub 2} = (SRS){sub x}(Sr'S){sub y} + 2(x+y) Hl, allowing modification of the physical and/or redox properties of the SRPE's. A series of simple aliphatic dithiols including (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH), (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH), and (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH) have been oxidized to polydisulfides and mixtures of the dithiols have been copolymerized. All of the resulting polymers and copolymers were evaluated in solid-state lithium cells, with some of the new materials demonstrating high levels of performance. The utilization of available capacity in the positive electrode was observed to be independent of electrode thickness for a number of SRPE's of loading levels up to 45% by weight. 8 refs., 5 figs. 2 tabs.

Lerner, M.M. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Visco, S.J.; Doeff, M.M.; Dejonghe, L.C. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Ue, M. (Mitsubishi Petrochemical Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newtons Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a pressure-drop residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Nonlinear forces on a vertical truncated cylinder in Stokes 5th order waves-model test and validation of prediction model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic analysis, which centers on the wave height and wave steepness, was done for the wave and wave effects on the forces. Wave elevation time series was measured in the absence of the model, at the site of the model. Horizontal and vertical forces on the model were measured using a dynamometer. Horizontal particle velocity was measured under a typical wave to find the difference between the theory and experiment. Forces on the model were calculated also using Universal Linear System Model by Kim and Wang (1999a & 199b). The measured forces (Fx, Fz) increased almost linearly with the wave steepness and with the wave period (wave height) at the given steepness. The horizontal and vertical force transfer functions Fx/(H/2) and Fz/(H/2) due to a 2.0 s period wave at H/L = 0.049 amount to 1.35 and 1.05 times the corresponding theoretical linear transfer function (LTF). The theoretical LTF was compared with the measured LTF. The theoretical LTF underestimates the measured horizontal force LTF, while it overestimates the measured vertical force LTF. The theoretical vertical linear force consistently over-predicts the nonlinear measured vertical force, whereas the theoretical linear horizontal force consistently under-predicts the nonlinear measured horizontal force. The theoretical prediction due to ULSM/L+Q (Universal Linear System Model/Linear + Quadratic) was compared with the measured horizontal and vertical forces for two typical wave forces due to low and high waves. The five harmonics of the measured and theoretical wave were the inputs. The use of the measured wave gave a more favorable comparison than the theoretical wave. However, the difference was small. Breaking of the waves at the cylinder was observed using photographs for some high waves. This trend worsened with the increasing wave height. The corresponding force time series behaves differently from the force time series due to waves that were not breaking at the cylinder.

Alex, Hitha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. Phytoplankton distribution data were assessed in relation to the hydrography and physical processes on the shelf, which were studied as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX A). Phytoplankton group distributions from 1992 , which was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude. Samples were collected at the surface and the chlorophyll maximum from Niskin bottles attached to a Sea-Bird SBE911plus CTD, preserved in 1% glutaraldehyde, and analyzed using the Uterm6hl method and the inverted-microscope technique. Unique phytoplankton distributions and regionspecific hydrography and physical processes were found on the inner, middle, and outer shelf during both flow regimes. Some differences were found in May 1993 due to the record river discharge. In 1992 and 1993, the inner shelf was diatom dominated, and was characterized by the highest nutrient and lowest safety values. River discharge and associated nutrients were focused by the localized downcoast flow predominant on the inner shelf area during the month of May. Water column stability decreased moving from the eastern part of the shelf to the western part in May 1992. The opposite regime was present in May 1993. Inner shelf nutrient concentrations in May 1993 were approximately double those in May 1992. The increased river discharge in 1993 caused a dramatic shift in dominant diatom species to Skeletonema costatum (Grevifle) Grunow, which is found in a range of salinities, temperatures, and depths. Chain-forming diatom and others were predominant in both years. On the middle shelf, the presence of tychopelagic diatoms reflected the possibility of benthic regeneration of nutrients and resuspension into the upper water column. This flux from the benthos supported the phytoplankton community on the middle shelf, where a near-bottom chlorophyll maximum was found. Lower concentrations of phytoplankton were present on the middle shelf than the inner shelf during both years. The upper 30-70 m of the water column on the middle shelf were found to be oligotrophic, so smaller or more motile cers such as dinoflagenates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids became more dominant. The outer shelf upper water column was nutrient-poor as well during both years, and dinoflageuates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids were even more dominant than on the middle shelf. The diatom population decreased more moving from the middle to the outer shelf. Effects of a warm core Loop Current eddy were evident on the outer shelf area. Upwelling processes shallower than 100 m may provide a means of supporting the phytoplankton population at the chlorophyll maximum on the outer shelf. The location of the increased volume of river water across the shelf in May 1993 was identified based on the increase in overall phytoplankton abundance in May 1993.

Bontempi, Paula Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Extraction of actinide (III, IV, V, VI) ions and TcO4- byN,N,N',N'- tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), Am(III), and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} with N, N, N', N'-tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TiBOGA) were investigated. An organic phase of 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% (V/V) 1-octanol/kerosene showed good extractability for actinides (III, IV, V VI) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}from aqueous solutions of HNO{sub 3} (0.1 to 4 mol/L). At 25 C, the distribution ratio of the actinide ions (D{sub An}) generally increased as the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the aqueous phase was increased from 0.1 to 4 mol/L, while the D{sub Tc} at first increased, then decreased, with a maximum of 3.0 at 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Based on the slope analysis of the dependence of D{sub M} (M = An or Tc) on the concentrations of reagents, the formula of extracted complexes were assumed to be UO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NpO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}), PuL(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, AmL{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, and HL{sub 2}(TcO{sub 4}) where L = TiBOGA. The enthalpy and entropy of the corresponding extraction reactions, {Delta}{sub r}H and {Delta}{sub r}S, were calculated from the dependence of D on temperature in the range of 15-55 C. For U(VI), Np(V), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, the extraction reactions are enthalpy driven and disfavored by entropy ({Delta}{sub r}H < 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S < 0). In contrast, the extraction reaction of Pu(IV) is entropy driven and disfavored by enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H > 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S > 0). A test run with 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% 1-octanol/kerosene was performed to separate actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from a simulated acidic high-level liquid waste (HLLW), using tracer amounts of {sup 238}U(VI), {sup 237}Np(V), {sup 239}Pu(VI), {sup 241}Am(III) and {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. The distribution ratios of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(VI), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} were 12.4, 3.9, 87, > 1000 and 1.5, respectively, confirming that TiBOGA is a promising extractant for the separation of all actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from acidic HLLW. It is noteworthy that the extractability of TiBOGA for Np(V) from acidic HLLW (D{sub Np(V)} = 3.9) is much higher than that of many other extractants that have been studies for the separation of actinides from HLLW.

Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Jianchen; Rao, Linfeng

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Final Technical Report for the Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO)  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO) is a DOE Plasma Science Center formed in late 2009 to focus on the general principles underlying momentum transport in magnetic fusion and astrophysical systems. It is composed of funded researchers from UCSD, UW Madison, U. Colorado, PPPL. As of 2011, UCSD supported postdocs are collaborating at MIT/Columbia and UC Santa Cruz and beginning in 2012, will also be based at PPPL. In the initial startup period, the Center supported the construction of two basic experiments at PPPL and UW Madison to focus on accretion disk hydrodynamic instabilities and solar physics issues. We now have computational efforts underway focused on understanding recent experimental tests of dynamos, solar tachocline physics, intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas and L-H transition physics in tokamak devices. In addition, we have the basic experiments discussed above complemented by work on a basic linear plasma device at UCSD and a collaboration at the LAPD located at UCLA. We are also performing experiments on intrinsic rotation and L-H transition physics in the DIII-D, NSTX, C-Mod, HBT EP, HL-2A, and EAST tokamaks in the US and China, and expect to begin collaborations on K-STAR in the coming year. Center funds provide support to over 10 postdocs and graduate students each year, who work with 8 senior faculty and researchers at their respective institutions. The Center has sponsored a mini-conference at the APS DPP 2010 meeting, and co-sponsored the recent Festival de Theorie (2011) with the CEA in Cadarache, and will co-sponsor a Winter School in January 2012 in collaboration with the CMSO-UW Madison. Center researchers have published over 50 papers in the peer reviewed literature, and given over 10 talks at major international meetings. In addition, the Center co-PI, Professor Patrick Diamond, shared the 2011 Alfven Prize at the EPS meeting. Key scientific results from this startup period include initial simulations of the effects of boundary conditions on turbulent dynamo experiments; simulations of intrinsic rotation showing the strong link between toroidal rotation and temperature gradients and elucidation of the turbulence symmetry breaking mechanisms that lead to this macroscopic behavior; first experiments in a large tokamak testing the roll of turbulent momentum transport in driving intrinsic rotation; experiments in tokamaks showing strong evidence that zonal flows, together with the more widely recognized mean sheared ExB flow, act to trigger the L-H transition in tokamak devices and the first experimental measurement of collisional viscosity in an unmagnetized plasma. In the coming three year period, we will continue these efforts by a combination of basic hydrodynamic, liquid metal and plasma experiments combined with experiments on numerous tokamak devices around the world. In addition, we will use MHD, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic codes combined with theory to address the problems of interest to the Center.

TYNAN, GEORGE R. [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data, analyses, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic of America (VSL) to determine the processing rates that are achievable with AZ-101 HLW simulants and corresponding melter feeds on a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) vitrification system. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. Tests conducted during Part B1 (VSL-00R2590-2) on the DM1000 vitrification system installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America showed that, without the use of bubblers, glass production rates with AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 simulants were significantly lower than the Project design basis rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d. Conversely, three-fold increases over the design basis rate were demonstrated with the use of bubblers. Furthermore, an un-bubbled control test using a replica of the melter feed used in cold commissioning tests at West Valley reproduced the rates that were observed with that feed on the WVDP production melter. More recent tests conducted on the DM1200 system, which more closely represents the present RPP-WTP design, are in general agreement with these earlier results. Screening tests conducted on the DM10 system have provided good indications of the larger-scale processing rates with bubblers (for both HL W and LAW feeds) but significantly overestimated the DM1000 un-bubbled rate observed for C-106/AY-102 melter feeds. This behavior is believed to be a consequence of the role of heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted, however, that the RPP-WTP Project directed a series of changes to the Test Plan as the result

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z