National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mckeesport cor aopolis-moon

  1. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  2. CAPTAIN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  3. COR Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The COR Toolkit cited in the attachments to Policy Flash 2012-25 and posted to/linked from various DOE Internet pages has been withdrawn until further notice.

  4. Accessing Online COR Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) training is now be available in an online format. "Accessing Online COR Training" provides a step-by-step guide to access the online COR course. 

  5. Application for COR Certification-Recertification

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solicitation number 1. Previous certification (attached): Date last issued or renewed: 2. Experience: (Attach COR Summary of Experience...

  6. VBH-0079- In the Matter of William Cor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by William Cor under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From August 1998 to September 2001, Mr. Cor was...

  7. TBU-0045- In the Matter of William Cor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    William Cor (the complainant or the employee), appeals the dismissal of his complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection...

  8. LOCALIZED PLASMA DENSITY ENHANCEMENTS OBSERVED IN STEREO COR1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2009-08-20

    Measurements of solar wind speed in the solar corona, where it is primarily accelerated, have proven elusive. One of the more successful attempts has been the tracking of outward-moving density inhomogeneities in white-light coronagraph images. These inhomogeneities, or 'blobs', have been treated as passive tracers of the ambient solar wind. Here we report on the extension of these observations to lower altitudes using the STEREO COR1 coronagraph, and discuss the implications of these measurements for theories about the origin of these features.

  9. Structural and functional characterization of the hazelnut allergen Cor a 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offermann, Lesa R.; Bublin, Merima; Perdue, Makenzie L.; Pfeifer, Sabine; Dubiela, Pawel; Borowski, Tomasz; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2015-09-28

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are basic proteins, stabilized by four disulfide bonds, and are expressed throughout the plant kingdom. These proteins are also known as important allergens in fruits and tree nuts. In this study, the nsLTP from hazelnuts, Cor a 8, was purified and its crystal structure determined. The protein is stable at low pH and refolds after thermal denaturation. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to provide an insight into conformational changes of Cor a 8 upon ligand binding. When known epitope areas from Pru p 3 were compared to those of Cor a 8, differences were obvious, which may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs from other plant sources. The structure of Cor a 8 represents the first resolved structure of a hazelnut allergen.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of the hazelnut allergen Cor a 8

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Offermann, Lesa R.; Bublin, Merima; Perdue, Makenzie L.; Pfeifer, Sabine; Dubiela, Pawel; Borowski, Tomasz; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2015-09-28

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are basic proteins, stabilized by four disulfide bonds, and are expressed throughout the plant kingdom. These proteins are also known as important allergens in fruits and tree nuts. In this study, the nsLTP from hazelnuts, Cor a 8, was purified and its crystal structure determined. The protein is stable at low pH and refolds after thermal denaturation. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to provide an insight into conformational changes of Cor a 8 upon ligand binding. When known epitope areas from Pru p 3 were compared to those of Cor a 8, differences were obvious,more » which may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs from other plant sources. The structure of Cor a 8 represents the first resolved structure of a hazelnut allergen.« less

  11. Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change – Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although the ACMP Handbook revisions are underway, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) issued OFPP Memorandum, “Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer’s Representatives (FAC-COR),” dated September 6, 2011. This OFPP Memorandum requires that agencies implement the revised FAC-COR certifications effective January 1, 2012.

  12. A novel cold-regulated gene from Camellia sinensis, CsCOR1, enhances salt- and dehydration-tolerance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xian-Wen; College of Life Science, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000; Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Feng, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Hui-Min; Zhu, Xiao-Pei; Liu, Jun; Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Yuan, Hong-Yu

    2010-04-02

    In present research, the full-length cDNA and the genomic sequence of a novel cold-regulated gene, CsCOR1, were isolated from Camellia sinensis L. The deduced protein CsCOR1 contains a hydrophobic N-terminus as a signal peptide and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain that is rich in glycine, arginine and proline. Two internal repetitive tridecapeptide fragments (HSVTAGRGGYNRG) exist in the middle of the C-terminal domain and the two nucleotide sequences encoding them are identical. CsCOR1 was localized in the cell walls of transgenic-tobaccos via CsCOR1::GFP fusion approach. The expression of CsCOR1 in tea leaves was enhanced dramatically by both cold- and dehydration-stress. And overexpression of CsCOR1 in transgenic-tobaccos improved obviously the tolerance to salinity and dehydration.

  13. COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form (04/1991) U.S. Department of Energy Requirements Change Notice No.: NNSA-49 Page 1 of 36 Pages PROJECT: Baseline List of Required Compliance Documents LOCATION: Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTRACTOR: Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC CONTRACT NO.: DE-AC05-00OR22800, I.85, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives (December 2000), DEAR 970.5204-2 DATE OF CONTRACT: August 31, 2000 This Requirements Change Notice (RCN) No. NNSA-49

  14. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Chae, Jongchul; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma ? are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma ? falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma ? are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  15. The three-dimensional analysis of hinode polar jets using images from LASCO C2, the STEREO COR2 coronagraphs, and SMEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Shimojo, M.; Sako, N.

    2014-04-01

    Images recorded by the X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode spacecraft are used to provide high-cadence observations of solar jetting activity. A selection of the brightest of these polar jets shows a positive correlation with high-speed responses traced into the interplanetary medium. LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraph images measure the coronal response to some of the largest jets, and also the nearby background solar wind velocity, thereby giving a determination of their speeds that we compare with Hinode observations. When using the full Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) data set, we track these same high-speed solar jet responses into the inner heliosphere and from these analyses determine their mass, flow energies, and the extent to which they retain their identity at large solar distances.

  16. ESTIMATING THE ARRIVAL TIME OF EARTH-DIRECTED CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AT IN SITU SPACECRAFT USING COR AND HI OBSERVATIONS FROM STEREO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2013-07-20

    Predicting the arrival time and transit speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Earth is critical to understanding the solar-terrestrial relationship. Even though STEREO observations now provide multiple views of CMEs in the heliosphere, the true speeds derived from stereoscopic reconstruction of SECCHI coronagraph data are not quite sufficient for accurate forecasting of the arrival time at Earth of a majority of CMEs. This uncertainty is due to many factors that change CME kinematics, such as the interaction of two or more CMEs or the interaction of CMEs with the pervading solar wind. In order to understand the propagation of CMEs, we have used the three-dimensional triangulation method on SECCHI coronagraph (COR2) images and geometric triangulation on the J-maps constructed from Heliospheric Imagers HI1 and HI2 data for eight Earth-directed CMEs observed during 2008-2010. Based on the reconstruction, and implementing the drag-based model for the distance where the CMEs could not be tracked unambiguously in the interplanetary (IP) medium, the arrival time of these CMEs have been estimated. These arrival times have also been compared with the actual arrival times as observed by in situ instruments. The analysis reveals the importance of heliospheric imaging for improved forecasting of the arrival time and direction of propagation of CMEs in the IP medium.

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale associated with chronic domestic woodsmoke inhalation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, J.; Salas, J.; Martinez-Guerra, M.L.; Gomez, A.; Martinez, C.; Portales, A.; Palomar, A.; Villegas, M.; Barrios, R. )

    1993-01-01

    We describe the clinical, radiologic, functional, and pulmonary hemodynamic characteristics of a group of 30 nonsmoking patients with a lung disease that may be related to intense, long-standing indoor wood-smoke exposure. The endoscopic and some of the pathologic findings are also presented. Intense and prolonged wood-smoke inhalation may produce a chronic pulmonary disease that is similar in many aspects to other forms of inorganic dust-exposure interstitial lung disease. It affects mostly country women in their 60s, and severe dyspnea and cough are the outstanding complaints. The chest roentgenograms show a diffuse, bilateral, reticulonodular pattern, combined with normalized or hyperinflated lungs, as well as indirect signs of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). On the pulmonary function test the patients show a mixed restrictive-obstructive pattern with severe hypoxemia and variable degrees of hypercapnia. Endoscopic findings are those of acute and chronic bronchitis and intense anthracotic staining of the airways appears to be quite characteristic. Fibrous and inflammatory focal thickening of the alveolar septa as well as diffuse parenchymal anthracotic deposits are the most prominent pathologic findings, although inflammatory changes of the bronchial epithelium are also present. The patients had severe PAH in which, as in other chronic lung diseases, chronic alveolar hypoxia may play the main pathogenetic role. However, PAH in wood-smoke inhalation-associated lung disease (WSIALD) appears to be more severe than in other forms of interstitial lung disease and tobacco-related COPD. The patients we studied are a selected group and they may represent one end of the spectrum of the WSIALD.

  18. SpyroCor(tm) Radiant Tube Heater Inserts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    leg releases 30% more energy than the exhaust leg because of convection and radiation heat transfer in the burner leg. With the help of a grant from DOE's Inventions and...

  19. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  20. COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... CODE COUNCIL (ICC) CP NAP 70.2 07022010 PHYSICAL PROTECTION TR, TQ NFPA CODES AND STANDARDS 04231998 CODES AND STANDARDS FP, EG, CP ORR PCB FFCA OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Steel Co National Tube Div Christy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Park Works - PA 35 Steel Co National Tube Div Christy Park Works - PA 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. STEEL CO., NATIONAL TUBE DIV., CHRISTY PARK WORKS (PA.35) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: National Tube Division PA.35-1 Location: McKeesport , Pennsylvania PA.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 PA.35-2 Site Operations: Metal fabrication operations. Pierced normal uranium billets by the three roll Assel Mill process. PA.35-1

  2. J,'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J,' .- .' \ I Department of Jhrgy ' , Wa.shingtori,DC 2p5 ,. " The Honorable Louts' Washowich ', :' ,' I.' .' 201 Lysle, Boulevard '~1. Mckeesport, Pennsylvania 15132 '- #. , : Dear, Mayor'Washowich: ,,, '_, Secretary ,of .Energy Haze.1 OlLeary'has announced a~ new,approacl the Oepartment,of Energy (DOE) and its communicationswith the support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enc' related to the former U.S. Steel Co.~.site in your jurisdiction work for DOE or its predecessor

  3. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING CONTRACT AND...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives Contracting Officers (COs) and Contracting Officer Representatives (CORs) have distinct roles, responsibilities,...

  4. Acquisition Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Officer's Representative Certification (COR) | Department of Energy Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although the ACMP Handbook revisions

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pending approval, Other EE, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roofs, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EE, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Tankless Water Heater City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EE, Food Service Equipment, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation, Windows, Doors, Roofs, Other EE, Reflective Roofs City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct-Use, Other Distributed Generation Technologies City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reflective Roofs, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Other EE, LED Lighting City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermostats, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Other EE City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CustomOthers pending approval, Tankless Water Heater City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MeasuresWhole Building, Wind (Small), Reflective Roofs City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  19. DOE F 473.2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OMB Control No.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... COR overseeing the contract. The printed namesignature and date of the HSO (or Federal employee delegated in writing to sign for the HSO) supporting the DOE Federal Sponsor. ...

  20. livermore field office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    donation to those in need.

    Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process http:nnsa.energy.govbloglivermore-field-office-sets-cor...

  1. RR-883-CC_book.indb

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Acknowledgments e authors wish to thank Debra Knopman (RAND Corporation), Keith Crane (RAND Cor- poration), Eric Vugrin (Sandia National Laboratory), and Ross Guttromson (Sandia ...

  2. DE-SOL-0008449 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    employee personnel, identified by the Contracting Officer's Representative (COR), who require access to the system on behalf of the U.S. Government. 1.4 DOE Laboratory Personnel- Employees of DOE Laboratory M&O contractors, identified by the COR, who require access to the system in support of Federal Personnel. 1.5 Administrative Contractor Personnel- Employees of non-M&O DOE contractors, identified by the COR, and approved by the Contractor, who require access to the system in support

  3. DE-SOL-0008449 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    employee personnel, identified by the Contracting Officer's Representative (COR), who require access to the system on behalf of the U.S. Government. 1.4 DOE Laboratory Personnel- Employees of DOE Laboratory M&O contractors, identified by the COR, who require access to the system in support of Federal Personnel. 1.5 Administrative Contractor Personnel- Employees of non-M&O DOE contractors, identified by the COR, and approved by the Contractor, who require access to the system in support

  4. Yosemite: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-32015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Northern Central Distributing, Inc. d/b/a Yosemite Home Décor failed to certify a variety of ceiling fans as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs ...

  6. SECTION G

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... COR, and the DOE Richland Occupational Medicine Program Manager the name or names of the responsible person or persons authorized to act for the Contractor, and in what capacity. ...

  7. Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (43.19 KB) PF2012-16a.pdf (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Personal Property Management Certification Brochure Accessing Online COR Training

  8. Policy Flash 2012-61 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Policy Flash 2012-61 Attached is Policy Flash 2012-61 COR Tool Kit Rescission. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Lorri Wilkins of the Professional...

  9. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Not Yet Assigned NETLSOD FE SOD 2012 Oct. 2012 - June 2013 Ben Smith (COR) Morgantown, WV B-22A Renovation Renovation will provide new HVAC, roofing, insulation, level concrete...

  10. Code of Record Standard Review Plan (SRP) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Code of Record Standard Review Plan (SRP) Code of Record Standard Review Plan (SRP) The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Code of Record (COR) is to provide guidance ...

  11. Microsoft Word - Acquisition Guide 32 1 - Reviewing and Approving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ACMP), which is defined in DOE O 361.1B. The Order prescribes training requirements for COs, CSs, and CORs, and includes a requirement for refresher training every two years....

  12. DOE TRANSCOM Technical Support Services DE-EM0002903 SECTION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... DOE O 205.1B Per occurrence DOE Information COR Workplace Substance Abuse Program DOE O 350.1, Chg. 4 Within 60 days of assuming full responsibility of DOE Approval DOE- EMCBC ...

  13. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management Post Competitio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... LM provided tailored COR training in Morgantown, WV, from August 19-21, 2014 and in Grand Junction, CO, on August 26-28, 2014. Forty-two (42) LM employees attended this training: ...

  14. OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    528.37 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2006-07.doc Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Personal Property Management Certification Brochure

  15. Supplemental Record of Decision for Interim Management of Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; SeliCor, Inc. AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DOD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of the Navy ...

  16. City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund for the City of Chicago. The fund utilizes revenue from Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and supports commercial and industrial...

  17. Standard Review Plan - Code of Record | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard Review Plan - Code of Record Standard Review Plan - Code of Record The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Code of Record (COR) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the COR for DOE nuclear projects. Standard Review Plan - Code of Record (472.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Code of Record Standard Review Plan (SRP) Preparation for Facility Operations RM DOE O 413.3B Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets

  18. Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook, Partial Revision of Chapter 11, Contracting Officer's Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to provide interim guidance for certifying and appointing Contracting Officer's Representatives. This guidance complies with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy memorandum, Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer's Representatives (FAC-COR), dated September 6, 2011 with an effective date of January 1, 2012.

  19. Personal Property Management Certification Brochure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Certification Brochure Personal Property Management Certification Brochure Personal Property Management Certification Brochure (404.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Personal Property Briefings Initial Application for FAC-C, Purchasing, Financial Assistance and Property Management Certification Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR)

  20. M O U N D E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... follor8: TABF - Tork Orders for the Dlmwtl.lng of Units III and IV TAB G - Tentative ... SE co-r *A* Balding, m cara)r l AaBuil&lng,141cosasr 12,ooo 24,ooo 50,m 25,000 a00 ...

  1. DOE Federal and Eligible Contractor Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal and Eligible Contractor Use DOE Federal and Eligible Contractor Use DOE Federal and Eligible Contractor Use 071615.docx (28.88 KB) More Documents & Publications List of Enterprise-Wide Agreements Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR)

  2. The dynamic character of the polar solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H.-S.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P. E-mail: hsyu@ucsd.edu E-mail: pphick@ucsd.edu

    2014-09-20

    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR2A coronagraph images, when analyzed using correlation tracking techniques, show a surprising result in places ordinarily thought of as 'quiet' solar wind above the poles in coronal hole regions. Instead of the static well-ordered flow and gradual acceleration normally expected, coronagraph images show outflow in polar coronal holes consisting of a mixture of intermittent slow and fast patches of material. We compare measurements of this highly variable solar wind from C2 and COR2A images and show that both coronagraphs measure essentially the same structures. Measurements of the mean velocity as a function of height of these structures are compared with mass flux determinations of the solar wind outflow in the large polar coronal hole regions and give similar results.

  3. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 PF2008-51.pdf (2.93 MB) PF2008-51a - Attachment - Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 - Implementation Guidance for the Government-wide Research Terms and Conditions (495 KB) More Documents & Publications Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Acquisition Letter/ Financial Assistance Letter (AL/FAL 2010-05) - Contract Periods of

  5. DOE TRANSCOM Technical Support Services DE-EM0002903 SECTION J - LIST OF ATTACHMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ACRONYM LIST Acronym Description TRANSCOM Transportation Tracking and Communications System 8(a) Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act ADR Alternative Dispute Resolution CBFO Carlsbad Field Office CCR Central Contractor Registration CFR Code of Federal Regulations CLIN Contract Line Item Number CO Contracting Officer COR Contracting Officer Representative CPARS Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System DEAR Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation DOE Department of Energy DPLH

  6. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    16 DATE: December 22, 2011 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) SUMMARY: A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although

  7. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2-16 DATE: December 22, 2011 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) SUMMARY: A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although

  8. Microsoft Word - Attachment B - Reporting Requirements.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-SOL-0003339 J.1 ATTACHMENT B - REPORTING REQUIREMENTS REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST 1. AWARDEE: 2. IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: REPORT SUBMISSION: Reports shall be submitted to the electronic addresses indicated in the NETL-identified distribution list provided in the post award debriefing. Electronic copies of each report must be submitted to the Contract Specialist (CS) and Contracting Officer's Representative (COR). 4. PLANNING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FORM NO. FREQ. NO. OF COPIES FORM NO.

  9. Morphological and kinematic evolution of three interacting coronal mass ejections of 2011 February 13-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2014-10-10

    During 2011 February 13-15, three Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in succession were recorded as limb CMEs by STEREO/SECCHI coronagraphs (COR). These CMEs provided an opportunity to study their geometrical and kinematic evolution from multiple vantage points. In this paper, we examine the differences in geometrical evolution of slow and fast CMEs during their propagation in the heliosphere. We also study their interaction and collision using STEREO/SECCHI COR and Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. We have found evidence of interaction and collision between the CMEs of February 15 and 14 in the COR2 and HI1 field of view (FOV), respectively, while the CME of February 14 caught up with the CME of February 13 in the HI2 FOV. By estimating the true mass of these CMEs and using their pre- and post-collision dynamics, the momentum and energy exchange between them during the collision phase are studied. We classify the nature of the observed collision between the CMEs of February 14 and 15 as inelastic, reaching close to the elastic regime. Relating imaging observations with in situ WIND measurements at L1, we find that the CMEs move adjacent to each other after their collision in the heliosphere and are recognized as distinct structures in in situ observations. Our results highlight the significance of HI observations in studying CME-CME collision for the purpose of improved space weather forecasting.

  10. ODU Researcher Visits JLab to Talk About Living in the Arctic (Daily Press)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  11. Popular Science Recognizes Innovative Solar Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  12. li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo SinaL report, pattisulerly dfh, raqmot b dto evaluation. 8. A eixdtoirth~atension primarily to inauro havlrg Chealeo &&able . fbroowultationonWtj0 ~itoevaluation~rkforthet&wto Bsddw Timoveoy ?lant, but 980 to keep Chemioo avsilable for dmelopm~t ark on the alternate oatbanatie mtoolaw leaoh proosa80 DIECDBfiIOH Be are requesting anamndcmntto o&end CoatmotAT(W&-1489 with the Chmaloal Qonstruobloon Cor;orhlon.

  13. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shadi$Dayeh Integrated$Electronics$and$Biointerfaces$Laboratory Department$of$Electrical$and$Computer$Engineering University$of$California$San$Diego Integrated$Flexible$Technologies for$Wearables$and$CorJcal$Implants Thursday,$August$11,$2016 2:00$p.m.$O$3:00$p.m. Sig$Hecker$Conference$Room$(TA3$O$0032$room$134) Abstract: Muta%ng high technologies with portable and flexible features that can be worn by or implanted into a user can lead to unprecedented applica%ons, connect objects together and

  14. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Acquisition Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3. ACQUISITION PLANNING 3.1 Define the roles and responsibilities of every ESPC acquisition team member and identify gaps that need to be filled. The rule of thumb is to include on the team all parties who could affect or be affected by the project, at least for periodic consultation. At a minimum, the team should include an agency CO with sufficient warrant, the COR, officials whose approval is required, a budget officer, and legal counsel. 3.2 To avoid miscommunication and maintain

  15. DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11991) PROJECT: U.S. Department of Energy Requirements Change Notice Baseline List of Required Compliance Documents CONTRACTOR: Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC CONTRACT NO. : DE-AC05-000R22800, 1.85, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives (December 2 000), DEAR 970.5204-2 COR-NP0-60 ESH-6.6.2013-515290 No.: NNSA-51 Page 1 of 34 Pages LOCATION : Oak Ridge, Tennessee DATE OF CONTRACT: August 31, 2000 This Requirements Change Notice (RCN) No. NNSA-51 incorporates, into Section J,

  16. NETL F 510.1-5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    510.1-5 (02/2002) OPI=CC01 (Previous Editions Obsolete) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR PATENT CLEARANCE FOR RELEASE OF CONTRACTED RESEARCH DOCUMENTS - Award No. Name & Phone No. of DOE COR TO: ~ For Technical Reports AAD Document Control MS 921-143 U.S. Department of Energy - NETL P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 ~ For Technical Papers/Journal Articles/Presentations Mark P. Dvorscak U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 FAX: (630) 252-2779 A. AWARDEE

  17. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract Modification No. 133 i PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. G.1- DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER G-1 G.2 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR) G-1 G.3 - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION G-1 G.4 - COST REPORTING PROCEDURES G-2 G.5 - INDIRECT CHARGES G-2 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section G Contract Modification No. 133 G-1 PART I SECTION G - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA G.1 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER For the definition of Contracting Officer see Federal

  18. II V It.. "/.::::JIJtCl.4 National Nuclear Security Admfnistratlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    /IA * . W r"A ~l II V It.. "/.::::JIJtCl.4 National Nuclear Security Admfnistratlon U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office PO Box 808, L-293 7000 East Avenue Livermore, Califor~.i.a 94551-0808 JAN 14 2014 3250 COR-M0-1/14/2014-556065 MEMORANDUM FOR KAREN.L. BOARDMAN CHAIR FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAP#I/B TY PANEL FROM: '~KIMBERLY DA VIS LEBAK -" - . ?~ //;' l~* Jl MANAGER f"t~L( .' SUBJECT: REFRENCE: Annual Workforce Analysis and

  19. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  20. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  1. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  2. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  3. Microsoft Word - Contract Sections B-H.DOC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Page G-1 Section G Contract Administration Data Table of Contents Section Page G.1 Billing Instructions G-2 G.2 RL Property Administration G-3 G.3 Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) Technical Direction - Notification of Changes G-3 G.4 Modification Authority G-5 Occupational Health Services Part I Contract No. DE-AC06-04RL14383 Section G Page G-2 G.1 Billing Instructions a. Public Voucher The Contractor shall submit to the Government a monthly Public Voucher (SF-1034). Vouchers are to

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  5. LARGE-SCALE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH A LIMB CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Y.; Auchere, F.; Vial, J.-C.; Tang, Y. H.; Zong, W. G.

    2010-01-10

    We present composite observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the associated large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) disturbances on 2007 December 31 by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) and COR1 coronagraph on board the recent Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory mission. For this limb event, the EUV disturbances exhibit some typical characteristics of EUV Imaging Telescope waves: (1) in the 195 A bandpass, diffuse brightenings are observed propagating oppositely away from the flare site with a velocity of approx260 km s{sup -1}, leaving dimmings behind; (2) when the brightenings encounter the boundary of a polar coronal hole, they stop there to form a stationary front. Multi-temperature analysis of the propagating EUV disturbances favors a heating process over a density enhancement in the disturbance region. Furthermore, the EUVI-COR1 composite display shows unambiguously that the propagation of the diffuse brightenings coincides with a large lateral expansion of the CME, which consequently results in a double-loop-structured CME leading edge. Based on these observational facts, we suggest that the wave-like EUV disturbances are a result of magnetic reconfiguration related to the CME liftoff rather than true waves in the corona. Reconnections between the expanding CME magnetic field lines and surrounding quiet-Sun magnetic loops account for the propagating diffuse brightenings; dimmings appear behind them as a consequence of volume expansion. X-ray and radio data provide us with complementary evidence.

  6. Mechanisms and observations of coronal dimming for the 201 August 7 event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Hock, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Coronal dimming of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission has the potential to be a useful forecaster of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As emitting material leaves the corona, a temporary void is left behind which can be observed in spectral images and irradiance measurements. The velocity and mass of the CMEs should impact the character of those observations. However, other physical processes can confuse the observations. We describe these processes and the expected observational signature, with special emphasis placed on the differences. We then apply this understanding to a coronal dimming event with an associated CME that occurred on 2010 August 7. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, while the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity and mass estimates for the associated CME. We develop a technique for mitigating temperature effects in coronal dimming from full-disk irradiance measurements taken by EVE. We find that for this event, nearly 100% of the dimming is due to mass loss in the corona.

  7. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  8. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  9. Eddy-Covariance and auxiliary measurements, NGEE-Barrow, 2012-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, Margaret; Billesbach, Dave; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2014-03-24

    The EC tower is operated as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment-Arctic (NGEE) at Barrow, Alaska. The tower is collecting flux data from the beginning of the thaw season, early June, and until conditions are completely frozen, early November. The tower is equipped with a Gill R3-50 Sonic Anemometer, LI-7700 (CH4) sensor, a LI-7500A (CO2/H2O) sensor, and radiation sensors (Kipp and Zonen CNR-4 (four component radiometer), two LiCor LI-190 quantum sensors (PAR upwelling and downwelling), and a down-looking Apogee SI-111 infrared radiometer (surface temperature)). The sensors are remotely controlled, and communication with the tower allows us to retrieve information in real time.

  10. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  11. Evaluation of various interpolants available in DICE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Daniel Z.; Reu, Phillip L.; Crozier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    This report evaluates several interpolants implemented in the Digital Image Correlation Engine (DICe), an ima ge cor relation software package developed by Sandia. By interpolants we refer to the basis functions used to represent discrete pixel inten sity data as a continuous signal. Inte rpolation is used to determine intensity values in an image at non - pixel locations. It is also used, in some cases, to evaluate the x and y gradients of the image intensities. Intensity gradients subsequently guid e the optimization process. The goal of this report is to inform analysts as to the characteristics of each interpolant and provide guidance towards the best interpolant for a given dataset. This work also serves as an initial verification of each of the i nterpolants implemented.

  12. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  13. A.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;;;. plf. t& -b ,,::";:,I. , P- ^' ' I- $ : / 7 ! I T,f , - . -.. .._...__ _ ___. ___ yL." j";;e,.i.--ey- g-- .._ ___...._ fi' B res ~...: j w CWies, Series-, __.__ CtASlfKATION MAi%- TO: NOT ClAsUFlED huCsuso u 1944 -1, ,- ,ciiT 7 t-ff hi .A a To: c. I?. Daniel8 T-7 In m3: <&dit y n&u-d\mre CorIpeqly Aftax ounmroation xlth Dr. Stona, it %Z3S d85Li0d t!lUt WX!TJdQtO tar;~inul phyolaul sx~?~inations x-ill not be IIeOasaWX'y On la:tirldtiti who had wrked less tha E

  15. The magnetic field of active region 11158 during the 2011 February 12-17 flares: Differences between photospheric extrapolation and coronal forward-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang E-mail: xudongs@stanford.edu

    2014-04-10

    We developed a coronal nonlinear force-free field (COR-NLFFF) forward-fitting code that fits an approximate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution to the observed geometry of automatically traced coronal loops. In contrast to photospheric NLFFF codes, which calculate a magnetic field solution from the constraints of the transverse photospheric field, this new code uses coronal constraints instead, and this way provides important information on systematic errors of each magnetic field calculation method, as well as on the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. In this study we applied the COR-NLFFF code to NOAA Active Region 11158, during the time interval of 2011 February 12-17, which includes an X2.2 GOES-class flare plus 35 M- and C-class flares. We calculated the free magnetic energy with a 6 minute cadence over 5 days. We find good agreement between the two types of codes for the total nonpotential E{sub N} and potential energy E{sub P} but find up to a factor of 4 discrepancy in the free energy E {sub free} = E{sub N} – E{sub P} and up to a factor of 10 discrepancy in the decrease of the free energy ΔE {sub free} during flares. The coronal NLFFF code exhibits a larger time variability and yields a decrease of free energy during the flare that is sufficient to satisfy the flare energy budget, while the photospheric NLFFF code shows much less time variability and an order of magnitude less free-energy decrease during flares. The discrepancy may partly be due to the preprocessing of photospheric vector data but more likely is due to the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. We conclude that the coronal field cannot be correctly calculated on the basis of photospheric data alone and requires additional information on coronal loop geometries.

  16. Molecular and Electronic Structure of Cyclic Trinuclear Gold(I) Carbeniate Complexes: Insights for Structure/Luminescence/Conductivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDougaldJr, Roy N; Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Jia, Huiping; Perez, Michael R; Rabaa, Hassan; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Cundari, Thomas R.; Gnade, Bruce E; Omary, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study of correlations between solid-state structure and optical/electronic properties of cyclotrimeric gold(I) carbeniates, [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] (R, R' = H, Me, Bu-n, or (c)Pe), is reported. Synthesis and structural and photophysical characterization of novel complexes [Au-3(MeN=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=COMe)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], and [Au-3((c)PeN=COMe)(3)] are presented. Changes in R and R' lead to distinctive variations in solid-state stacking, luminescence spectra, and conductive properties. Solid-state emission and excitation spectra for each complex display a remarkable dependence on the solid-state packing of the cyclotrimers. The electronic structure of [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] was investigated via molecular and solid-state simulations. Calculations on [Au-3(HN=COH)(3)] models indicate that the infinitely extended chain of eclipsed structures with equidistant Au-Au intertrimer aurophilic bonding can have lower band gaps, smaller Stokes shifts, and reduced reorganization energies (lambda). The action of one cyclotrimer as a molecular nanowire is demonstrated via fabrication of an organic field effect transistor and shown to produce a p-type field effect. Hole transport for the same cyclotrimer-doped within a poly(9-vinylcarbazole) host-produced a colossal increase in current density from similar to 1 to similar to 1000 mA/cm(2). Computations and experiments thus delineate the complex relationships between solid-state morphologies, electronic structures, and optoelectronic properties of gold(I) carbeniates.

  17. CKow -- A More Transparent and Reliable Model for Chemical Transfer to Meat and Milk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to increase the understanding and transparency of chemical biotransfer modeling into meat and milk and explicitly confront the uncertainties in exposure assessments of chemicals that require such estimates. In cumulative exposure assessments that include food pathways, much of the overall uncertainty is attributable to the estimation of transfer into biota and through food webs. Currently, the most commonly used meat and milk-biotransfer models date back two decades and, in spite of their widespread use in multimedia exposure models few attempts have been made to advance or improve the outdated and highly uncertain Kow regressions used in these models. Furthermore, in the range of Kow where meat and milk become the dominant human exposure pathways, these models often provide unrealistic rates and do not reflect properly the transfer dynamics. To address these issues, we developed a dynamic three-compartment cow model (called CKow), distinguishing lactating and non-lactating cows. For chemicals without available overall removal rates in the cow, a correlation is derived from measured values reported in the literature to predict this parameter from Kow. Results on carry over rates (COR) and biotransfer factors (BTF) demonstrate that a steady-state ratio between animal intake and meat concentrations is almost never reached. For meat, empirical data collected on short term experiments need to be adjusted to provide estimates of average longer term behaviors. The performance of the new model in matching measurements is improved relative to existing models--thus reducing uncertainty. The CKow model is straight forward to apply at steady state for milk and dynamically for realistic exposure durations for meat COR.

  18. TRANSFORMING THE SRS ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS: COMMUNICATION AND APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldivar, E.

    2010-01-20

    A process for communicating information relating to core business functions that also encourages improving internal communications has been established at SRS. This process continues to grow and strengthen as the multiple Contractors, Regulators and DOE-SR relationships mature. A number of management communication tools have been initiated, retooled, rebooted or continued with enhancements to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. The types of information that are the focus of this improved process are feedback from the customer and from informational exchange forums (i.e., Challenge Opportunity and Resolution (COR), SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT), Environmental Quality Management Division (EQMD), Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC), etc.). These forums, SRS environmental functions centralization, and the creation of a Regulatory Integration process allows for cross-functional decision making, problem solving and information sharing that involves the field organizations, Environmental Compliance Authorities (ECA), Subject Matter Experts (SME), DOE and the Regulators. Numerous examples of effective decision-making and problem solving will be shared. Lessons Learned involving inadequate communications and the resulting impacts on the environment, customer satisfaction, and relationships will also be discussed. Additionally, the focus on improved communications also includes maintaining awareness of business activities. The tools being utilized to facilitate the continuing improvement of internal communications include weekly staff meetings for all individuals within the organization, quarterly ECA and SME meeting, quarterly Regulatory Integration & Environmental Services (RI&ES) All-Hands meetings hosted by the Director, bi-weekly EQMD and EQMD Lite meetings with the customer, bi-annual SRIT meetings, and COR meetings on an as need basis. In addition, an existing Required Reading Program

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  20. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SHAPE AND EVOLUTION OF TWO ERUPTIVE FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong; Zhao Hui E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.c E-mail: v00975@phys.nthu.edu.t

    2010-09-01

    On 2009 September 26, a dramatic and large filament (LF) eruption and a small filament (SF) eruption were observed in the He II 304 A line by the two EUVI telescopes aboard the STEREO A and B spacecraft. The LF heads out into space and becomes the bright core of a gradual coronal mass ejection (CME), while the eruption of the SF is characterized by motions of the filament materials. Using stereoscopic analysis of EUVI data, we reconstruct the three-dimensional shape and evolution of two eruptive filaments. For the first time, we investigate the true velocities and accelerations of 12 points along the axis of the LF, and find that the velocity and acceleration vary with the measured location. The highest points among the 12 points are the fastest in the first half hour, and then the points at the low-latitude leg of the LF become the fastest. For the SF, it is an asymmetric whip-like filament eruption, and the downward motions of the material lead to the disappearance of the former high-latitude endpoint and the formation of a new low-latitude endpoint. Based on the temporal evolution of the two filaments, we infer that the two filaments lie in the same filament channel. By combining the EUVI, COR1, and COR2 data of STEREO A together, we find that there is no impulsive or fast acceleration in this event. It displays a weak and persistent acceleration for more than 17 hr. The average velocity and acceleration of the LF are 101.8 km s{sup -1} and 2.9 m s{sup -2}, respectively. The filament eruptions are associated with a slow CME with an average velocity of 177.4 km s{sup -1}. The velocity of the CME is nearly 1.6 times as large as that of the filament material. This event is one example of a gradual filament eruption associated with a gradual CME. In addition, the moving direction of the LF changes from a non-radial to a nearly radial direction with a variation of inclination angle of nearly 38.{sup 0}2.

  2. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10{sup -1} down to 10{sup -7}. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  3. CONFRRM Solar Energy Resource Data: Data from the Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM) is a cooperative effort between NREL and other agencies to conduct long-term solar radiation and wind measurements at selected locations in the United States. CONFRRM expands the geographic coverage of measurement locations and provides high quality data for determining site-specific resources, as well as data for the validation and testing of models to predict available resources based on meteorological or satellite data. Twelve sites are currently active in the CONFRRM network. CONFRRM complements and provides additional geographic coverage to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS) network. Solar data elements measured and reported by the CONFRRM sites include global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal irradiance (DNI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and global horizontal irradiance measured with a LI-COR pyranometer. Meteorological data include air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed, wind direction and peak wind speed. Data logger temperature and battery voltage may also be reported. Prior to January 1, 1996, five CONFRRM sites together with South Caroline State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina, made up the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network, located in the Southeastern United States. In January 1997 the HBCU sites became part of CONFRRM.

  4. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  5. Chemical stability of melt-cast refractories in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abanin, V.I.; Federov, A.A.; Malyavin, A.G.; Ketov, A.N.

    1983-02-20

    Melts based on V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ are promising as catalysts for conversion of sulfur dioxide and thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid. The high chemical activity of such media with respect to metallic materials necessitates development of new materials of construction not based on metals. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence the composition and structure of melt-cast refractories on their chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melts. The chemical stability of refractories based on SiO/sub 2/ in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt is raised by the presence of chain calcium silicates with pyroxene and pyroxenoid chains, and lowered in presence of the oxides of zirconium, zinc, and cobalt in the materials. Fused quartz, cor-93, cast stone of diopside composition, and basalt-dolomite cast stone have high chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt and can be recommended as construction materials for equipment used for thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid.

  6. Overexpression of Late Embryogenesis Abundant 14 enhances Arabidopsis salt stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Fengjuan Qi, Shengdong Li, Hui Liu, Pu Li, Pengcheng Wu, Changai Zheng, Chengchao Huang, Jinguang

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: It is the first time to investigate the biological function of AtLEA14 in salt stress response. AtLEA14 enhances the salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and yeast. AtLEA14 responses to salt stress by stabilizing AtPP2-B11, an E3 ligase, under normal or salt stress conditions. - Abstract: Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are implicated in various abiotic stresses in higher plants. In this study, we identified a LEA protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtLEA14, which was ubiquitously expressed in different tissues and remarkably induced with increased duration of salt treatment. Subcellular distribution analysis demonstrated that AtLEA14 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Transgenic Arabidopsis and yeast overexpressing AtLEA14 all exhibited enhanced tolerance to high salinity. The transcripts of salt stress-responsive marker genes (COR15a, KIN1, RD29B and ERD10) were overactivated in AtLEA14 overexpressing lines compared with those in wild type plants under normal or salt stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis showed that AtLEA14 could effectively stabilize AtPP2-B11, an important E3 ligase. These results suggested that AtLEA14 had important protective functions under salt stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

  7. Beryllium Related Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, R F

    2008-12-23

    In recent months, LLNL has identified, commenced, and implemented a series of interim controls, compensatory measures, and initiatives to ensure worker safety, and improve safety processes with regards to potential worker exposure to beryllium. Many of these actions have been undertaken in response to the NNSA Independent Review (COR-TS-5/15/2008-8550) received by LLNL in November of 2008. Others are the result of recent discoveries, events or incidents, and lessons learned, or were scheduled corrective actions from earlier commitments. Many of these actions are very recent in nature, or are still in progress, and vary in the formality of implementation. Actions are being reviewed for effectiveness as they progress. The documentation of implementation, and review of effectiveness, when appropriate, of these actions will be addressed as part of the formal Corrective Action Plan addressing the Independent Review. The mitigating actions taken fall into the following categories: (1) Responses to specific events/concerns; (2) Development of interim controls; (3) Review of ongoing activities; and (4) Performance improvement measures.

  8. Catalysts For Hydrogenation And Hydrosilylation Methods Of Making And Using The Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2004-05-18

    A compound is provided including an organometallic complex represented by the formula I: wherein M is an atom of molybdenum or tangsten, Cp is substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl radical represented by the formula [C.sub.5 Q.sup.1 Q.sup.2 Q.sup.3 Q.sup.4 Q.sup.5 ], wherein Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, --OR, --C(O)R', --CO.sub.2 R', --SiR'.sub.3 and --NR'R", wherein R' and R" are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, and halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, wherein said Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 radicals are optionally linked to each other to form a stable bridging group, NHC is any N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, L is either any neutral electron donor ligand, wherein k is a number from 0 to 1 or L is an anionic ligand wherein k is 2, and A.sup.- is an anion. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones are provided. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, ketones and esters are also provided.

  9. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  10. GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT IN THE 2014 JANUARY 6 SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Mkel, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-07-20

    We present a study of the 2014 January 6 solar energetic particle event which produced a small ground level enhancement (GLE), making it the second GLE of this unusual solar cycle 24. This event was primarily observed by the South Pole neutron monitors (increase of ?2.5%) while a few other neutron monitors recorded smaller increases. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME) originated behind the western limb and had a speed of 1960kms{sup 1}. The height of the CME at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst, which indicates the formation of a strong shock, was measured to be 1.61 Rs using a direct image from STEREO-A/EUVI. The CME height at the time of the GLE particle release (determined using the South Pole neutron monitor data) was directly measured as 2.96 Rs based on STEREO-A/COR1 white-light observations. These CME heights are consistent with those obtained for GLE71, the only other GLE of the current cycle, as well as cycle-23 GLEs derived using back-extrapolation. GLE72 is of special interest because it is one of only two GLEs of cycle 24, one of two behind-the-limb GLEs, and one of the two smallest GLEs of cycles 23 and 24.

  11. Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

  12. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low ?- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (?x?100mm ? ?y? 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (?p/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  13. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  14. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  15. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, Karol; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Shelton, William A.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Greens function that renders a highly scalable computational accurate method for producing an analytic coupled-cluster Greens function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N?1 and N +1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N ?1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the cor- responding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Greens function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Greens function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating prop- erties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but it also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Greens function defined by the CCSD (CC with singles and doubles) representation of the ground-state wave function.

  16. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  17. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqu, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  18. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zehr, Robert T.; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-04-01

    Using a variety of organic carbonyl molecules (R1C(O)R2) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that ejection of organic radicals from TiO2 surfaces is likely a prevalent reaction process occurring during heterogeneous photooxidationof organic molecules. Organic carbonyls react with coadsorbed oxygen species to form organic diolates which are more strongly bound to TiO2 than are the parent carbonyls. The parent carbonyls, when bound to TiO2(110) in an ?1 configuration, are photo-inactive. However, the diolates are shown to photodecompose by ejection one of the two R substituents from the surface into the gas phase, leaving behind the carboxylate of the other R group. Theoretical calculations using DFT show that in most cases the choice of which R group is ejected can be predicted based on the C-R bond energies and, to a lesser extent, the stability of the ejected R group.

  19. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  20. THE DEFLECTION OF THE TWO INTERACTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OF 2010 MAY 23-24 AS REVEALED BY COMBINED IN SITU MEASUREMENTS AND HELIOSPHERIC IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Davies, J. A.; Davis, C. J.; Moestl, C.; Roussev, I. I.; Temmer, M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010 May 23-24, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the launch of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were subsequently tracked by the SECCHI suite on board STEREO. Using the COR2 coronagraphs and the heliospheric imagers (HIs), the initial direction of both CMEs is determined to be slightly west of the Sun-Earth line. We derive the CME kinematics, including the evolution of the CME expansion until 0.4 AU. We find that, during the interaction, the second CME decelerates from a speed above 500 km s{sup -1} to 380 km s{sup -1}, the speed of the leading edge of the first CME. STEREO observes a complex structure composed of two different bright tracks in HI2-A but only one bright track in HI2-B. In situ measurements from Wind show an 'isolated' interplanetary CME, with the geometry of a flux rope preceded by a shock. Measurements in the sheath are consistent with draping around the transient. By combining remote-sensing and in situ measurements, we determine that this event shows a clear instance of deflection of two CMEs after their collision, and we estimate the deflection of the first CME to be about 10 Degree-Sign toward the Sun-Earth line. The arrival time, arrival speed, and radius at Earth of the first CME are best predicted from remote-sensing observations taken before the collision of the CMEs. Due to the over-expansion of the CME after the collision, there are few, if any, signs of interaction in in situ measurements. This study illustrates that complex interactions during the Sun-to-Earth propagation may not be revealed by in situ measurements alone.

  1. TH-A-18C-03: Noise Correlation in CBCT Projection Data and Its Application for Noise Reduction in Low-Dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, H; Huang, J; Ma, J; Chen, W; Ouyang, L; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, we systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam on-board CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 mAs to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are non-zero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second- order neighbors are about 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. Conclusion: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring detector bins of CBCT projection data. An accurate noise model of CBCT projection data can improve the performance of the statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for low

  2. AUTOMATICALLY DETECTING AND TRACKING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. SEPARATION OF DYNAMIC AND QUIESCENT COMPONENTS IN CORONAGRAPH IMAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-20

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach-notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  3. Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing solar resource variability of MW-scale PV system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Johnson, Lars; Ellis, Abraham; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2012-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and SunPower Corporation (SunPower) have completed design and deployment of an autonomous irradiance monitoring system based on wireless mesh communications and a battery operated data acquisition system. The Lanai High-Density Irradiance Sensor Network is comprised of 24 LI-COR{reg_sign} irradiance sensors (silicon pyranometers) polled by 19 RF Radios. The system was implemented with commercially available hardware and custom developed LabVIEW applications. The network of solar irradiance sensors was installed in January 2010 around the periphery and within the 1.2 MW ac La Ola PV plant on the island of Lanai, Hawaii. Data acquired at 1 second intervals is transmitted over wireless links to be time-stamped and recorded on SunPower data servers at the site for later analysis. The intent is to study power and solar resource data sets to correlate the movement of cloud shadows across the PV array and its effect on power output of the PV plant. The irradiance data sets recorded will be used to study the shape, size and velocity of cloud shadows. This data, along with time-correlated PV array output data, will support the development and validation of a PV performance model that can predict the short-term output characteristics (ramp rates) of PV systems of different sizes and designs. This analysis could also be used by the La Ola system operator to predict power ramp events and support the function of the future battery system. This experience could be used to validate short-term output forecasting methodologies.

  4. AmeriFlux US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    by seasonal litterfall collection, and 4.5 as measured by the optically based Li-Cor LAI-2000 instrument. Further site information: http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/durham/4155/bartlett.htm

  5. Global energetics of solar flares. I. Magnetic energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju E-mail: yan.xu@njit.edu

    2014-12-10

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We calculate the potential (E{sub p} ), the nonpotential (E {sub np}) or free energies (E {sub free} = E {sub np} – E{sub p} ), and the flare-dissipated magnetic energies (E {sub diss}). We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: the COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub z} from HMI to define the potential field, and the two-dimensional (2D) coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in six coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric three-dimensional (3D) vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of ≲ 3. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The magnetic parameters exhibit scaling laws for the nonpotential energy, E{sub np}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.02}, for the free energy, E{sub free}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.7} and E{sub free}∝B{sub φ}{sup 1.0}L{sup 1.5}, for the dissipated energy, E{sub diss}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.6} and E{sub diss}∝E{sub free}{sup 0.9}, and the energy dissipation volume, V∝E{sub diss}{sup 1.2}. The potential energies vary in the range of E{sub p} = 1 × 10{sup 31}-4 × 10{sup 33} erg, while the free energy has a ratio of E {sub free}/E{sub p} ≈ 1%-25%. The Poynting flux amounts to F {sub flare} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during flares, which averages to F {sub AR} ≈ 6 × 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during the entire observation

  6. Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoel, David; Griffith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large federal installation hosting diverse missions and multiple organizations with competing regulatory needs. Accordingly, there was a need to integrate environmental compliance strategies to ensure the consistent flow of information between Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR), the regulatory agencies and other interested parties. In order to meet this objective, DOE and major SRS contractors and tenants have committed to a strategy of collaboratively working together to ensure that a consistent, integrated, and fully coordinated approach to environmental compliance and regulator relationships is maintained. DOE-SR and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the SRS management and operations contractor, have established an environmental compliance integration process that provides for the consistent flow down of requirements to projects, facilities, SRS contractors, and subcontractors as well as the upward flow of information to assist in the early identification and resolution of environmental regulatory issues and enhancement of compliance opportunities. In addition, this process strongly fosters teamwork to collaboratively resolve complex regulatory challenges, promote pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities to advance site missions in a manner that balances near-term actions with the long-term site vision, while being protective of human health and the environment. Communication tools are being utilized, some with enhancements, to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. SRS internal regulatory integration is accomplished through a variety of informational exchange forums (e.g., Challenges, Opportunities and Resolution (COR) Team, DOE's Joint Site Regulatory Integration Team, and the Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC)). SRS communications and problem-solving with the regulatory agencies have been enhanced through formation of an

  7. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. In this article, we provide evidence that ERF96 ismore » a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  8. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96more » is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  9. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that

  10. Recyclable catalysts methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2006-02-28

    Organometallic complexes are provided, which include a catalyst containing a transition metal, a ligand and a component having the formula GAr.sup.F. Ar.sup.F is an aromatic ring system selected from phenyl, naphthalenyl, anthracenyl, fluorenyl, or indenyl. The aromatic ring system has at least a substituent selected from fluorine, hydrogen, hydrocarbyl or fluorinated hydrocarbyl, G is substituted or unsubstituted (CH.sub.2).sub.n or (CF.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n is from 1 to 30, wherein further one or more CH.sub.2 or CF.sub.2 groups are optionally replaced by NR, PR, SiR.sub.2, BR, O or S, or R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, GAr.sup.F being covalently bonded to either said transition metal or said ligand of said catalyst, thereby rendering said cationic organometallic complex liquid. The catalyst of the organometallic complex can be [CpM(CO).sub.2(NHC)L.sub.k].sup.+A.sup.-, wherein M is an atom of molybdenum or tungsten, Cp is substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl radical represented by the formula [C.sub.5Q.sup.1Q.sup.2Q.sup.3Q.sup.4Q.sup.5], wherein Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, GAr.sup.F C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical substituted by GAr.sup.F, halogen radical, halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, --OR, --C(O)R', --CO.sub.2R', --SiR'.sub.3 and --NR'R'', wherein R' and R'' are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, and halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, wherein said Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 radicals are optionally linked to each other to form a stable bridging group, NHC is any N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, L is either any neutral electron donor ligand, wherein k is a number from 0 to 1 or L is an anionic ligand wherein k is 2, and A.sup.- is an anion. Processes using the organometallic complexes as catalysts in catalytic reactions, such as for

  11. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Liukang; McDermitt, Dayle; Anderson, Tyler; Riensche, Brad; Komissarov, Anatoly; Howe, Julie

    2012-02-01

    utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR's Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument's robustness in a real-world situation.

  12. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a

  13. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-06-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide