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1

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The first and only Seabee drilling project was the installation of five TGHs at the Camp Wilson region of the MCAGCC Marine base near Twenty-Nine Palms, CA. While the program was a success and GPO identified an anomaly where a deep, slim hole is to be drilled in June, 2010, the Seabee rig was sent oversees soon after drilling was completed. If/when another rig

2

LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes As previously mentioned, a deep slim hole is scheduled to be drilled in the Camp Wilson area of MCAGCC in June, 2010. The location of this hole is entirely driven by favorable structures as interpreted from LiDAR data and results of the Seabee TGH drilling program completed in early 2009. Details of the MCAGCC work are available in another section of this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

3

LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Primary LiDAR application to this project was Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM). This particular application was used to gather data over a specific land area then used to create a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with a resolution of approximately 1m in the horizontal direction and 10cm in the vertical direction. The LiDAR data gathered for MCAGCC was analyzed in conjunction with other data, such as aerial photography and field

4

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

5

Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A full comparison of these analyses with those of other groundwater from the Twenty-Nine Palms/Joshua/Johnson Valley/Yucca Valley areas may indicate an enhanced mixing component, or it may show that these waters are simply consistent with most other groundwater in the region. Given the apparent gross immaturity of the waters sampled here, it is difficult to even estimate an order of magnitude of a geothermal component to these fluids,

6

Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Final SP reports indicate there may be low-amplitude anomalies in the Deadman Lake area. These low-amplitude anomalies, however, are not indicative of a production-size resource. The amplitudes of the anomalies are somewhat smaller than those reported for moderate and high-temperature geothermal areas identified in the Great Basin and elsewhere

7

City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Twenty-Nine Palms Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Twenty-Nine Palms, California Coordinates 34.1355582°, -116.0541689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

8

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes From November 2008 to March 2009, Seabees from the Naval Construction Division (NCD) successfully completed fivetemperature gradient holes for the GPO. Samples taken from each hole were similar in nature; mixtures of sand and conglomerates with the occasional granite sections were typically encountered. Each hole varied slightly in depth, ranging from 600ft to 1,000ft; however, each hole has been completed to acceptable standards of the GPO. Upon completion of drilling, 3" metal tubing was inserted to

9

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal exploration activities in the Camp Wilson area of Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twenty-nine Palms, CA, for almost two years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For several decades the GPO has worked

10

Palm oil pundit speaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry, director of Godrej International Ltd. in Mumbai, India, spoke about palm oil on March 15, 2010, during the 2010 Annual Convention of the National Institute of Oilseed Products in Palm Springs, California, USA. Palm oil pundit speaks ...

11

Tughuan Hurin-Shzin (Tughuan Twenty-Nine) Festival  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 Notes and context (include reference to any related documentation, such as photographs) The Location of Huzhu County Downloaded From: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2 7/Location...

Limusishiden; Jugui

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

book review: The palm book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

newsandupdate ISSN1948?6596 bookreviewThepalmbookTheBookofPalms,byCarlFriedrichPhillipvonMartius[a

Balslev, Henrik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health

14

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 9 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 9 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Brazil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutri

15

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 10 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 10 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Nigeria Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nut

16

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 11 Oil Recovery from Palm Fruits and Palm Kernel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 11 Oil Recovery from Palm Fruits and Palm Kernel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochem

17

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Leather Palm Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leather Palm Gloves Leather Palm Gloves Description Color Finish Uses FNAL Stock Number Cow leather palm Cotton back 2.5 white knit wrist Grey palm, pink and green striped back...

18

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Characterization, and Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book serves as a rich source of information on the production, processing, characterization and utilization of palm oil and its components. It also includes several topics related to oil palm genomics, tissue culture and genetic engineering of oil pal

19

Malaysia: economic transformation advances oil palm industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malaysia is currently the worlds largest exporter of palm oil although it is the second-largest producer of the oil after neighboring Indonesia. Malaysia: economic transformation advances oil palm industry Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Bi

20

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 17 Enzymatic and Chemical Modification of Palm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Its Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 17 Enzymatic and Chemical Modification of Palm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Its Fractions Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Te

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 8 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Malaysia and Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 8 Palm and Palm Kernel Oil Production and Processing in Malaysia and Indonesia Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology

22

Palm fatty acid distillate biodiesel: Next-generation palm biodiesel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The promise of alternative low-cost non-food feedstocks such as jatropha has yet to materialize, and there seems to be, at the current moment, no light at the end of the tunnel in the search for low-cost feedstock alternatives. Palm fatty acid distillate b

23

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 22 Oil Palm as Bioenergy Feedstock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 22 Oil Palm as Bioenergy Feedstock Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Process

24

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 3 Oil Palm Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 3 Oil Palm Genomics Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing 0641F6393F

25

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 25 Sustainable Development of Palm Oil Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 25 Sustainable Development of Palm Oil Industry Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

26

FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH 35 FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF OIL PALM GENES USING AN AUTOMATED BIOINFORMATICS APPROACH LAURA B WILLIS*; PHILIP A LESSARDBank, and duplicate entries were eliminated by pairwise BLAST searches, resulting in a collection of unique oil palm

Sinskey, Anthony J.

27

Palm oil - towards a sustainable future?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The food industry faces problems relating to the sustainability of palm oil as a food commodity. These problem areas include social, environmental, economic and (more)

Nilsson, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Palm Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Palm Oil determinations via P4.3 PORIM, P4.1 PORIM, P2.5 PORIM, Cd 1d-92, P4.2 PORIM, Cd 96b-93,

29

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 24 Traceability of RSPO Certified Sustainable Palm Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 24 Traceability of RSPO Certified Sustainable Palm Oil Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - B

30

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 16 Minor Constituents of Palm Oil: Characterization, Processing, and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 16 Minor Constituents of Palm Oil: Characterization, Processing, and Application Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Methods and Analyses eChapters Food Science

31

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 7 The Economics of Malaysian Palm Oil Production, Marketing and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology H

32

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 13 The Physicochemical Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 13 The Physicochemical Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nut

33

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

34

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 18 Health and Nutritional Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 18 Health and Nutritional Properties of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

35

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemis

36

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 4 Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering of Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 4 Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering of Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bio

37

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 2 Breeding and Genetics of the Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 2 Breeding and Genetics of the Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

38

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 14 Polymorphic Properties of Palm Oil and Its Major Component Triacyglycerols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 14 Polymorphic Properties of Palm Oil and Its Major Component Triacyglycerols Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology

39

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield Food Science Health Nutrition Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Process

40

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 21 Oil Palm Biomass for Various Wood-based Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 21 Oil Palm Biomass for Various Wood-based Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 1 A Brief History of the Oil Palm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 1 A Brief History of the Oil Palm Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processi

42

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 15 Measurement and Maintenance of Palm Oil Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 15 Measurement and Maintenance of Palm Oil Quality Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioch

43

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 23 Waste and Environmental Management in the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 23 Waste and Environmental Management in the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Heal

44

City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing Provider Palm Desert '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a statement in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. After temporarily suspending their program, Palm Desert reinstated it in August 2010, but

45

She, With a Warm Palm, the Skin Over My Spine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??She, with a Warm Palm, the Skin over My Spine is a collection of sixnonfiction essays and three vignettes divided into two parts. The first (more)

Cambardella, Cara Maria Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Eliassen-Palm Cross Sections for the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eliassen-Palm (EP) cross sections are meridional cross sections showing the Eliassen-Palm flux F by arrows and its divergence by contours. For large-scale, quasi-geostrophic motion F is defined to have ? and ? components r0 cos?[?u?v?, fv???/?p] where ? is ...

H. J. Edmon Jr.; B. J. Hoskins; M. E. McIntyre

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 -OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

56 JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 - OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008) Keyword: polyhydroxyalkanoate, PHB, PHBV, metabolic@mit.edu ** Malaysian Palm Oil Board, P. O. Box 10620, 50720 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. INTRODUCTION Polyhydroxyalkanoates

Sinskey, Anthony J.

48

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

Sambandan, T. G.

49

Blue fan palm distribution and seed removal patterns in three desert oases of northern Baja California, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOI 10.1007/s11258-009-9682-4 Blue fan palm distribution anddistribution patterns of the blue fan palm, Brahea armata,i) the levels of blue fan palm seed removal by vertebrates

Wehncke, Elisabet V.; Lpez-Medelln, Xavier; Ezcurra, Exequiel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Healthful LipidsChapter 30 Palm Oil, Its Fractions, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 30 Palm Oil, Its Fractions, and Components Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 30 Palm Oil, Its Fractions, an

51

Oil Palm Research in Context: Identifying the Need for Biodiversity Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Palm Research in Context: Identifying the Need for Biodiversity Assessment Edgar C. Turner, Cambridge, United Kingdom Abstract Oil palm cultivation is frequently cited as a major threat to tropical was used to find papers on oil palm published since 1970, which were assigned to different subject

Foster, William A.

52

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang Selangor, Malaysia 2 Malaysian Palm Oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

53

ICCBT 2008 -F -(07) pp79-94 Palm Biodiesel an Alternative Green Renewable Energy for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-chemical properties of palm biodiesel are compared to that of petroleum diesel. This survey reveals a conclusion fromICCBT 2008 - F - (07) ­ pp79-94 ICCBT2008 Palm Biodiesel an Alternative Green Renewable Energy to focus interest on biofuels, namely, palm biodiesel. Since palm oil has a high fossil energy balance

Ducatelle, Frederick

54

Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth February 7, 2013 - 1:20pm Addthis Smart for Life received a loan from Palm Beach County’s revolving loan fund program to expand its production facility and boost its overall energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of Craig Stephens, Palm Beach County. Smart for Life received a loan from Palm Beach County's revolving loan fund program to expand its production facility and boost its overall energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of Craig Stephens, Palm Beach County. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What are the key facts? After making energy efficiency upgrades, Smart for Life expects to

55

Character segmentation from ancient palm leaf manuscripts in Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a character segmentation system from ancient palm leaf manuscripts written in ancient Thai language. This aims to develop an automated system for the digitization and processing of ancient manuscripts. In this paper, the preprocessing ... Keywords: binarization, character segmentation, document image analysis, image segmentation, text segmentation

Rapeeporn Chamchong; Chun Che Fung

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 -OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 JOURNAL OF OIL PALM RESEARCH SPECIAL ISSUE ON MALAYSIA-MIT BIOTECHNOLOGY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME: VOLUME 2 - OIL PALM METABOLIC ENGINEERING (JULY 2008) NON-RADIOACTIVE ASSAY FOR ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE 2007. ABSTRACT Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a key enzyme in oil biosynthesis and is critical for the oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

57

Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin,...

58

An Investigation into the Derived Demand for Land in Palm Oil Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the years, the world industry of oil palm has been rapidly increasing in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America. One of the (more)

Lau, Jia Li

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Twentynine Palms, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twentynine Palms, California: Energy Resources Twentynine Palms, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1355582°, -116.0541689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1355582,"lon":-116.0541689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Palm Beach County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palm Beach County, Florida: Energy Resources Palm Beach County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Palm Harbor, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palm Harbor, Florida: Energy Resources Palm Harbor, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.0780718°, -82.7637127° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.0780718,"lon":-82.7637127,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm 2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County (HabitatPBC) in completing three high-performance prototype houses that achieved HERS index scores of less than 60, which is about 30% better than typical HabitatPBC construction, at a payback of less than 4 years. The HabitatPBC is planning to implement these strategies in future homes they build. This has the potential for significant and affordable energy savings as HabitatPBC has built more than 111 affordable houses and served an additional 125 families worldwide through their affiliation with HFH International (today serving >20 families a year). Building America (through the Florida Solar Energy Center, a member of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team) achieved

63

ISOLATION AND UTILIZATION OF ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE FROM OIL PALM (Elaeis guineensis) MESOCARP Keywords: acetyl-CoA carboxylase, gene isolation, biotin carboxylase, biodegradable plastics, oil palm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISOLATION AND UTILIZATION OF ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE FROM OIL PALM (Elaeis guineensis) MESOCARP 97 Keywords: acetyl-CoA carboxylase, gene isolation, biotin carboxylase, biodegradable plastics, oil palm; Accepted: 7 November 2007. ISOLATION AND UTILIZATION OF ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE FROM OIL PALM (Elaeis

Sinskey, Anthony J.

64

Short- and long-term price forecasting for palm and lauric oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry presents excerpts from a talk he delivered at the 6th Indonesian Palm Oil Conference (IPOC) & 2011 Price Outlook, organized by the Indonesian Palm Oil Association (GAPKI) and held December 13, 2010, at the Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali. Sho

65

The effect of palm oil supplementation on growth and carcass composition of growing lambs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of palm oil supplementation on growth and carcass composition of growing lambs M Hilmi Selangor, Malaysia Palm oil is considered as a cheap source of energy supplementation in a commercial feed for sheep. However there is a scarcity of report on the effect of oil supplementation on the growth

Recanati, Catherine

66

The Navy seeks to identify responsible sources and obtain information in regard to purchasing renewable power for Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, located in Fallon, NV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation Opportunities at NAWS China Lake, NAS Fallon, MCAGCC 29 Palms, and MCAS Yuma The Department of Navy (DoN) intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) in early 2009 for renewable energy generation opportunities at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, California; Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada; Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) Twentynine Palms, California, and Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, Arizona. The DoN will consider opportunities for the purchase of renewable power, developer wholesale generation, distributed generation, and the combination of those opportunities. Specifically, the Navy will provide Government land on these installations for large

67

Lipid Metabolism in Bovine Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Steers Fed Supplementary Palm Oil or Soybean Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesized that supplementing finishing diets with palm oil would elevate Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity in muscle and subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue, promoting adipocyte differentiation and increase monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in beef, particularly oleic acid. Soybean oil supplementation was used as a negative control. Eighteen Angus steers were assigned randomly to three groups of 6 steers and fed a basal diet without additional fat, with 3% palm oil (rich in palmitic acid), or with 3% soybean oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids), top dressed daily. There were no significant differences across treatment in quality grade, REA, 12th rib fat thickness, or yield grade. Palm oil tended to increase marbling score (P = 0.33). Palm oil supplementation decreased the concentration of myristic acid (P = 0.04), and tended to decrease the concentration of t10, c12 CLA (P = 0.07) and 18:3n-3 (P = 0.06) in s.c. adipose tissue while soybean supplementation increased c9, t11 CLA (P = 0.02) and 18:3n-3 (P = 0.03) in muscle. Palm oil supplementation increased both glucose and acetate incorporation into total lipids of s.c. adipose tissue (both P = 0.03). Volume of s.c. adipocytes was greater in cattle supplemented with palm oil than in soybean- supplemented cattle (P = 0.004). Enzyme activity of G-6-PDH tended to be greater in steers consuming palm oil supplement (P = 0.10). We conclude that there was a partial interaction between palm oil supplementation and adipocyte differentiation. Palm oil supplementation increased s.c. adipocyte content without deteriorating meat quality traits and tended to increase marbling.

Gang, Gyoung Ok

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Overcoming the challenges of certification for independent smallholders in the palm oil industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independent smallholders' certification in the palm oil industry has been recognized as a significant challenge both in the academic literature and in the interviews conducted with experts prior to writing this thesis. ...

Vergez, Coralie (Coralie Sandrine Elsa)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Eliassen-Palm Cross Sections for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eliassen-Palm cross sections and residual meridional circulations are presented for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for summer and winter based on the data of Newell et al. (1972, 1974). The cross sections are similar to those presented by ...

David J. Karoly

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Some Geotechnical Properties of Palm Biodiesel Contaminated Mining Sand and Weathered Granite Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-pollution due to accidental during transportation or leakage from storage not only brings large damage to the environments, but it also affects the geotechnical properties of soil. Hence, an extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to investigate the geotechnical properties on palm biodiesel contaminated weathered granite soil and mining sand. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out by using a direct simple shear device on clean and contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were mixed with palm biodiesel in the amount 5%, 10 % and 15 % by dry weight. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of palm biodiesel contamination on the mining sand and weathered granite soil samples. The overall results indicated decrease of shear strength with increasing palm biodiesel contents.

Yue Ling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Positive outcomes of oil palm phenolics on degenerative diseases in animal models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well established that plant phenolics elicit various biological activities, with positive effects on health. Palm oil production results in large volumes of aqueous by-products containing phenolics. In the present ...

Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi

72

RESEARCH SARS-CoV Infection in a Restaurant from Palm Civet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiologic investigations showed that 2 of 4 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) identified in the winter of 20032004 were a waitress at a restaurant in Guangzhou, China, that served palm civets as food and a customer who ate in the restaurant a short distance from animal cages. All 6 palm civets at the restaurant were positive for SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Partial spike (S) gene sequences of SARS-CoV from the 2 patients were identical to 4 of 5 S gene viral sequences from palm civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SARS-CoV from palm civets in the restaurant was most closely related to animal isolates. SARS cases at the restaurant were the result of recent interspecies transfer from the putative palm civet reservoir, and not the result of continued circulation of SARS-CoV in the human population. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic emerged in 2003 in 6 municipalities in the Pearl River delta region in Guangdong, China. Early casepatients were more likely to be persons with occupational exposure to animals, such as animal sellers or restaurant cooks (1,2). Tracing the source of infection has been complicated, given the sporadic nature of index cases without a clear history of contact with animals. After the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the end of the SARS epidemic, 4 new cases of SARS were reported from

Ming Wang; Meiying Yan; Huifang Xu; Weili Liang; Biao Kan; Bojian Zheng; Honglin Chen; Han Zheng; Yanmei Xu; Enmin Zhang; Hongxia Wang; Jingrong Ye; Guichang Li; Machao Li; Zhigang Cui; Yu-fei Liu; Rong-tong Guo; Xiao-ning Liu; Duan-hua Zhou; Ailan Zhao; Rong Hai; Dongzhen Yu; Yi Guan; Jianguo Xu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Palm Springs Spa Resort Casino Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Spa Resort Casino Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Springs Spa Resort Casino Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Palm Springs Spa Resort Casino Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Palm Springs Spa Resort Casino Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Palm Springs, California Coordinates 33.8302961°, -116.5452921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

74

Improved Power Control in the Palm of Your Hand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved Power Control in the Palm of Your Hand Improved Power Control in the Palm of Your Hand Improved Power Control in the Palm of Your Hand November 7, 2011 - 2:11pm Addthis Silicon carbide thyristors, developed through a partnership between the Energy Department's Sandia National Lab and GeneSiC Semiconductor, are key to utility-scale power conversion. Learn more about this technology, which won a 2011 R&D 100 award. Dr. Imre Gyuk Dr. Imre Gyuk Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability How does it work? The GeneSic thyristor -- an electronic switch -- is based on on silicon carbide (SiC), which can operate at much higher temperatures than silicon. This allows the device to handle 10 times the voltage, and switch 100 times faster, than its silicon-based competition.

75

City of Palm Desert This page outlines solar PV incentives, financing mechanisms, permitting process, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/csi-latest-news/2167-why-pay-to-install-solar o Southern California Edison Solar Rooftop Program · This commercial energy grid. www.sce.com/solarleadership/solar-rooftop-program/ Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACECity of Palm Desert This page outlines solar PV incentives, financing mechanisms, permitting

76

Text Line Extraction Using Adaptive Partial Projection for Palm Leaf Manuscripts from Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Text line extraction is one of the critical steps in document analysis and optical character recognition (OCR) systems. The purpose of this study is to address the problem of text line extraction of ancient Thai manuscripts written on palm leaves, using ... Keywords: line extraction, line segmentation, historical document, document analysis system

Rapeeporn Chamchong, Chun Che Fung

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

THE HISTORY OF OLIVE OIL1 "The whole Mediterranean, the sculpture, the palm, the gold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE HISTORY OF OLIVE OIL1 "The whole Mediterranean, the sculpture, the palm, the gold beads ANNA LINDH FOUNDATION POLICY ANALYSIS 1:1. THE HISTORY OF OLIVE OIL February 20, 2008 EUROMED Sustainable Connections: 1.1 The History of Olive oil 1 #12;contend that the Mesopotamian Fertile Crescent

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

78

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of LipidsChapter 9 Crystallization of Palm Oil Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of Lipids Chapter 9 Crystallization of Palm Oil Products Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 0B466411CD87C680D99B2D98B90D36F7 AOCS Press 

79

Scenario analysis for reverse logistics implementation case study of the Palm Oil supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work shows the potential reverse logistic flows that can be implemented in the Palm Oil supply chain, based in the waste management and the recovery flows that are obtained trough the agents that made part in the chain. In this context, the study ...

Edgar Alfonso; Diego Ferrucho; Angel Roldn; Mario Vargas; Freddy Gonzlez

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Using a Wireless Sensors Network in the Sustainable Management of African Palm Oil Solid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All human activities have an impact in the environment in which we live. Nowadays, the industrial gases emission is considered as one of the main causes for worsening greenhouse effect. The African Palm agro industry in Ecuador is no stranger to this ... Keywords: compost, production science, solid waste, wireless sensors network, wireless communication technologies

Mauro Jimenez, Alejandra Jimenez, Pablo Lozada, Santiago Jimenez, Cristhy Jimenez

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2009 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Special Session, paper AIAA-2009-2411, Palm Springs, May, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2009 AIAA SDM Wind Energy Special Session, paper AIAA-2009-2411, Palm Springs, May, 2009 Fatigue to evaluate the static and fatigue performance of infused wind turbine blade laminates containing various-scale wind turbine blades are very large composite structures with relatively thick plies, commonly

82

Using Different Formulations of the Transformed Eulerian Mean Equations and EliassenPalm Diagnostics in General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equations and EliassenPalm (EP) flux diagnostics are presented for the general nonhydrostatic, fully compressible, deep atmosphere formulation of the primitive equations in spherical geometric coordinates. The TEM ...

Steven C. Hardiman; David G. Andrews; Andy A. White; Neal Butchart; Ian Edmond

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Trade as a Driver of Oil Palm Expansion: The Implica;ons for Peatlands in Indonesia and Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;ons for Peatlands in Indonesia and Malaysia Alexandra C. Morel, Ph.D. Earth Ins) of peatland, with an esIndonesia and Malaysia currently planted with industrial oil palm plantaIndonesia

Columbia University

84

Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production from Steam Gasification of Palm Oil Wastes Using the Supported Nano-NiO/?-Al2O3 Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic steam gasification of palm oil wastes for hydrogen-rich gas production was experimentally investigated in a combined fixed bed reactor using the newly developed nano-NiO/?-Al2O3 catalyst. The results indicated that the nano-NiO/?-Al2O3 ... Keywords: Biomass gasification, palm oil waste, catalyst, hydrogen production

Jianfen Li; Yanfang Yin; Jianjun Liu; Rong Yan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Research Article HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy) and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller). The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. 2013

Achmad Roesyadi; Danawati Hariprajitno; N. Nurjannah; Santi Dyah Savitri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Properties of Amorphous Carbon Microspheres Synthesised by Palm Oil-CVD Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon microspheres were synthesized using a dual-furnace chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000 deg. C. Palm oil-based cooking oil (PO) and zinc nitrate solution was used as a carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively with PO to zinc nitrate ratio of 30:20 (v/v) and a silicon wafer as the sample target. Regular microsphere shape of the amorphous carbons was obtained and a uniform microsphere structure improved as the carbonization temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. At 800 deg. C, no regular microspheres were formed but more uniform structure is observed at 900 deg. C. Generally the microspheres size is uniform when the heating temperature was increased to 1000 deg. C, but the presence of mixed sizes can still be observed. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of oxide of carbon, ZnO phase together with Zn oxalate phase. Raman spectra show two broad peaks characteristic to amorphous carbon at 1344 and 1582 cm{sup -1} for the D and G bands, respectively. These bands become more prominent as the preparation temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. This is in agreement with the formation of amorphous carbon microspheres as shown by the FESEM study and other Zn-based phases as a result of the oxidation process of the palm oil as the carbon source and the zinc nitrate as the catalyst precursor, respectively.

Zobir, S. A. M. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Nano-SciTech Centre, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zainal, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarijo, S. H. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M. [Nano-SciTech Centre, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Raman spectroscopic study of carbon nanotubes prepared using Fe/ZnO-palm olein-chemical vapour deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at 800-1000C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein ...

Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir; Suriani Abu Bakar; Saifollah Abdullah; Zulkarnain Zainal; Siti Halimah Sarijo; Mohamad Rusop

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Energy Estimation Tools for the PalmTM Todd L. Cignetti, Kirill Komarov, and Carla Schlatter Ellis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its devices by tracking device power states and transitions. The current PalmOS does not provide are made, and thereby keep track of device state transitions. These power states and energy transitions can. In order to be useful, the device state must account for the bit rate. When the power consumption falls

Ellis, Carla

89

Eliassen-Palm Diagnostics of Wave-Mean Flow Interaction in the GFDL "SKYHI" General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eliassen-Palm flux is important in analytical studies of small-amplitude waves where it provides a powerful and elegant tool for the description of wave propagation in mean zonal shear flows, as well as for analysis of the effective mean ...

D. G. Andrews; J. D. Mahlman; R. W. Sinclair

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evaluation of MODIS gross primary productivity and land cover products for the humid tropics using oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia and Google Earth imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conducting quantitative studies on the carbon balance or productivity of oil palm is important in understanding the role of this ecosystem in global climate change. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of MODIS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ...

Arthur Philip Cracknell, Kasturi Devi Kanniah, Kian Pang Tan, Lei Wang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Crystallization and Solidification Properties Chapter 4 Effects of Tempering on Physical Properties of Shortenings Based on BinaryBlends of Palm Oil & Anhydrous Milk Fat During Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystallization and Solidification Properties Chapter 4 Effects of Tempering on Physical Properties of Shortenings Based on BinaryBlends of Palm Oil & Anhydrous Milk Fat During Storage Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nu

92

Use of UK-DMC 2 and ALOS PALSAR for studying the age of oil palm trees in southern peninsular Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article demonstrates some techniques for studying the age of oil palm trees Elaeis guineensis Jacq. using the Disaster Monitoring Constellation 2 from the UK UK-DMC 2 and Advanced Land Observing Satellite phased array ...

KianPang Tan, KasturiDevi Kanniah, ArthurPhilip Cracknell

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The 1986 North Palm Springs Earthquake: Effects on power facilities: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The North Palm Springs Earthquake of July 8, 1986, was centered near a large electrical substation. Strong motion records were taken on the substation site and at several other locations in the epicentral area. The recorded peak ground accelerations of 0.97g (north-south), 0.48g (vertical), and 0.72g (east-west) are the highest ever measured at a major electric power facilty. Earthquake damage in the ceramic components of switchyard equipment ranged from moderate to extensive, depending on the design of the equipment. Anchorage of heavy switchyard equipment such as transformers and reactors deformed, and in one instance failed in bolt shearing. Control and instrumentation systems at the substation, and at nearby power generation facilities, were undamaged by the earthquake. 5 refs., 42 figs., 12 tabs.

Swan, S.; Hadjian, A.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Note: Development of target changeable palm-top pyroelectric x-ray tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A target changeable palm-top size x-ray tube was realized using pyroelectric crystal and detachable vacuum flanges. The target metals can be exchanged easily by attaching them on the brass stage with carbon tape. When silver and titanium palates (area: 10 mm{sup 2}) were used as targets, silver L{alpha} and titanium K lines were clearly observed by bombarding electrons on the targets for 90 s. The intensities were the same or higher than those of previously reported pyroelectric x-ray tubes. Chromium, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc K lines in the x-ray tube (stainless steel and brass) disappeared by replacing the brass stage and the stainless steel vacuum flange with a carbon stage and a glass tube, respectively.

Imashuku, Susumu; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development and characterization of acrylated palm oil nanoparticles using ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the utilization of radiation crosslinking methods which are known as intermolecular and intramolecular crosslinking for the formation of nanoparticles of Acrylated Palm Oil (APO) in the microemulsion system that also consists of Pluronic F-127 (PF-127) surfactant was demonstrated. This microemulsion system was subjected to the ionizing radiation i.e. gamma irradiation at different doses to form the crosslinked APO nanoparticles. The effects of radiation doses on the size of APO nanoparticles were investigated using the Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method and their images were viewed using the Transmission Electron Microcrospy (TEM). The Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure and the crosslinking conversion of carbon-carbon double bond (-C = C-) of the APO nanoparticles after irradiation. As a result, the size of the APO nanoparticle decreased when the irradiation dose increased. Reduce in size might be due to the effect of intramolecular crosslinking reaction of the APO nanoparticles during irradiation process. Meanwhile, the intramolecular -C C- crosslinking conversion percentage was increased at doses below 1kGy before decreasing at the higher dose that might due to the intermolecular crosslinking of the macromolecules. This study showed that radiation crosslinking methods of polymerization and crosslinking in the microemulsion were found to be promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

Tajau, Rida; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Hashim, Kamaruddin [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Radiation Processing Technology Division (BTS), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Lake Worth, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, working with Building America researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Florida Solar Energy Center, upgraded this previously unoccupied 1996 home in Lake Worth, Florida to achieve an estimated 39% improvement in energy efficiency. The 1,573-ft 2 slab-on-grade, single- family home received extensive energy upgrades during its conversion to affordable and efficient housing for low-income families. By replacing the home's water heater, using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), reducing air infiltration, adding more ceiling insulation, and installing a central air conditioner, the home's annual energy bills are

97

Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse into 4{pi} steradians with a pulse width of 15 {+-} 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 {mu}F capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 {mu}F, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of {sup 3}He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

Rout, R. K.; Niranjan, Ram; Srivastava, R.; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geothermal utilization plan, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. Final report, March 1-September 1, 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary engineering feasibility study of geothermal utilization was completed for the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The study incorporated previous studies of the geology, geophysics, and environment performed for the Center. In addition, information about fuel consumption and current heating methodology was provided by the Center's personnel. This information was integrated with design assumptions based on the best estimates available for geothermal resource temperature and flow rate. The result of the study is a recommended pipeline alignment and suggested geothermal service area. The estimated costs for construction of the system range from $4.5 to $5 million. The estimated savings in offset natural gas consumption after capital recovery is $3.8 million over a twenty year period. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghusn, G. Jr.; Flynn, T.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ARM - Campaign Instrument - palms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Download Data McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA, 2010.06.02 - 2010.06.28 Primary Measurements Taken The following...

100

,"Canola Oil",,"Corn Oil",,"Cottonseed Oil",,"Palm Oil",,"Soybean Oil",,"Other",,"Poultry",,"Tallow"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Inputs to Biodiesel Production" U.S. Inputs to Biodiesel Production" "(million pounds)" "Period","Feedstock Inputs" ,"Vegetable Oils",,,,,,,,,,,,"Animal Fats" ,"Canola Oil",,"Corn Oil",,"Cottonseed Oil",,"Palm Oil",,"Soybean Oil",,"Other",,"Poultry",,"Tallow" 2011 "January",8,,17,,0,,"W",,150,,"W",,14,,11 "February",26,,13,,0,,"W",,150,,"W",,14,,11 "March",68,,14,,0,,"W",,190,,"W",,19,,27 "April",88,,20,,0,,"W",,236,,"W",,15,,47 "May",113,,21,,0,,"W",,264,,"W",,16,,36 "June",75,,34,,0,,"W",,311,,"W",,23,,49

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Factors Influencing the Stability and Marketability of a Novel, Phytochemical-Rich Oil from the Aai Palm Fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aai palm fruit has recently become the focus of numerous research endeavors due to its extraordinary antioxidant content. However, little is known about the fruits phytochemical rich oil, which is a by-product of the aai pulp. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phytochemical content of aai oil and its relation to oxidative stability. A total of 206 mg/kg of chlorophylls, which included chlorophyll a as well as four chlorophyll derivatives were tentatively identified by HPLC in crude aai oil (CAO). Two predominant carotenoids (216 mg/kg ?-carotene and 177 mg/kg lutein) were also characterized in addition to ?-tocopherol (645 mg/kg). Initial investigations into oil stability focused upon the photooxidation of aai oil due to its significant chlorophyll content and findings demonstrated that the increases of nonanal were observed when phospholipids and polyphenolics were reduced. Subsequently, investigations into the interactions between phospholipids and lipophilic antioxidants and their contributions to the stability of aai oil were also assessed by isolating phytochemicals and selectively reconstituting the oil. Findings demonstrated a potential relationship between phospholipids and lipophilic antioxidants, but this was not conclusive. Advances in the processing of the aai pulp by-product created from the clarification process yielded a partially refined aai oil (RAO). The stability of both RAO and CAO as a result of autoxidation were compared to other common food oils (olive, canola, and soybean) and primary and secondary oxidation data suggested CAO was most stable. The difference in the stability of the two aai oils was also investigated by blending these oils and assessing oxidation. An increased stability was demonstrated in the blended RAO, which suggested a significant antioxidant contribution from the CAO. With such similar lipophilic compositions in CAO and RAO, it is theorized that the driving factor behind the stability of CAO can be attributed to its water soluble antioxidant content. While further investigations are required to fully comprehend the interactions of aai oil phytochemicals, these experiments provide insight into the phytochemical content and stability of aai oil. The understanding and information obtained in these studies is geared at increasing the marketability of aai oil as a food ingredient.

Duncan, Christopher Edward

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

CryptoPalm: a cryptographic library for PalmOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PDAs and other handheld devices are commonly used for processing private or otherwise secret information. Their increased usage along with their networking capabilities raises security considerations for the protection of the sensitive information they ...

Georgios C. Alexandridis; Artemios G. Voyiatzis; Dimitrios N. Serpanos

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PALM DESERT ENERGY INDEPENDENCE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mails, or visits the Office of Energy Management to request an EIP application form (the "Application"). The OEM

Kammen, Daniel M.

104

Towards Palm-Size Autonomous Helicopters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

muFly EU project started in 2006 with the idea to build an autonomous micro helicopter, comparable in size and weight to a small bird. Several scientific and technological objectives were identified. This spanned from system-level integration, high efficiency ... Keywords: Graph based SLAM, Micro actuators, Micro helicopter, Multi-directional triangulation

Samir Bouabdallah; Christian Bermes; Slawomir Grzonka; Christiane Gimkiewicz; Alain Brenzikofer; Robert Hahn; Dario Schafroth; Giorgio Grisetti; Wolfram Burgard; Roland Siegwart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

IEEE Power Engineering Society. Papers from the joint power generation conference  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-nine papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for 22 papers. Seven papers have been previously entered in the data base. (LCL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CHC (Geo-Heated Center) staff provided assistance to 103 requests from 26 states, and from Canada, Egypt, Mexico, China, Poland and Greece. A breakdown of the requests according to application include: space and district heating (19), geothermal heat pumps (24), greenhouses (10), aquaculture (4), industrial (4), equipment (3), resources (27), electric power (2) and other (20). Progress is reported on: (1) evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, (2) pilot fruit drier and (3) geothermal district heating marketing tools and equipment investigation. Four presentations and two tours were conducted during the quarter, GHC Quarterly Bulletin Vol. 14, No. 4 was prepared, 14 volumes were added to the library and information was disseminated to 45 requests. Progress reports are on: (1) GHP Teleconference 93, (2) California Energy Buys Glass Mountain Prospect from Unocal and Makes Deal for Newberry Caldera, (3) New Power Plant Planned, (4) Vale to Get Power Plant, (5) BPA Approves Geothermal Project, (6) Update: San Bernardino Reservoir Study, (7) Twenty-nine Palms Geothermal Resources, (8) Geo-Ag Heat Center, Lake County, and (9) Update: Geothermal Wells at Alturas.

Lienau, P.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

North Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beach, Florida: Energy Resources Beach, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.8192°, -80.056669° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.8192,"lon":-80.056669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

West Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

24°, -80.0533746° 24°, -80.0533746° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7153424,"lon":-80.0533746,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

Palm Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9009°, -80.0961538° 9009°, -80.0961538° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6359009,"lon":-80.0961538,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

110

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8233946°, -80.1386547° 8233946°, -80.1386547° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.8233946,"lon":-80.1386547,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Royal Palm Estates, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7326°, -80.1250434° 7326°, -80.1250434° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6817326,"lon":-80.1250434,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

06°, -80.0364297° 06°, -80.0364297° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7056206,"lon":-80.0364297,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Palm Springs North, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North, Florida: Energy Resources North, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.9309271°, -80.3283845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.9309271,"lon":-80.3283845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Palm City, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7.1678268°, -80.2661591° 7.1678268°, -80.2661591° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.1678268,"lon":-80.2661591,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

Palm Desert, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert, California: Energy Resources Desert, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7222445°, -116.3744556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7222445,"lon":-116.3744556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

South Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

588958°, -80.0386522° 588958°, -80.0386522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.588958,"lon":-80.0386522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Palm Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

302961°, -116.5452921° 302961°, -116.5452921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.8302961,"lon":-116.5452921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including installing new electrical wiring, lighting, insulation, a solar hot water heater and an air-conditioning system. Additionally, the company installed a new...

119

City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program (California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the interest rate initially will not exceed 10%. Loans are primarily intended to fund solar installations and a wide range of efficiency projects in existing buildings, but are...

120

DOD End User Perspective and DARPA Palm Power Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen * 50 W 2 kW-hr; 3.4 kg 2001 - DMFC - System * 60 W; 6.8 kg; 30% efficiency SOFC -Hydrocarbon - System * 20 W; 0.72 kg; 28% efficiency (Goals) "It's the fuel stupid"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy in the Palm of Your Hand  

nuclear incidents. International safeguards personnel can use the detection device to inspect nuclear facilities, and homeland security personnel can ...

122

Characterization of a Natural Biofoam from the Buriti Palm Tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... insulation, packing, lifebuoy, automobile cushion, furniture and many others. ... Characterization of Mechanochemically Synthesized ZrO2-B2O3-Mg System by ... Effect of Cold Working on the Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties...

123

Palm Beach Shores, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7781183°, -80.0355962° 7781183°, -80.0355962° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7781183,"lon":-80.0355962,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

124

Royal Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4°, -80.2306019° 4°, -80.2306019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7083984,"lon":-80.2306019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

An Objective Method for Forecasting Tropical Cyclone Intensity Using Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical analysis program, based on finding an optimal representation of the data, has been applied to 120 observations of twenty nine 1973 and 1974 North Pacific tropical cyclones. Each observation consists of a field of Nimbus-5 ...

Herbert E. Hunter; Edward B. Rodgers; William E. Shenk

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Future energy horizons of the Pacific Coast. Paleogene symposium and selected technical papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-eight of the twenty-nine papers were abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. One paper was included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (JGB)

Weaver, D.W.; Hornaday, G.R.; Tipton, A. (eds.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Proceedings of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Technology Workshop, Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 18--20, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts are included for twenty-nine of the thirty papers presented concerning vertical axis wind turbines. One paper has previously been abstracted and included in the ERDA Energy Data Base and Energy Research Abstracts journal.

Not Available

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Methylome reorganization during in vitro dedifferentiation and regeneration of Populus trichocarpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the in vitro-regenerated oil palm Elaeis guineensis. AnnJL: Somaclonal variation in oil palm (Elaeis guineensischaracterisation of two oil palm markers showing somaclonal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Jetlet Formation from Diabatic Forcing with Applications to the 1994 Palm Sunday Tornado Outbreak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional responses of simple stably stratified barotropic and baroclinic flows to prescribed diabatic forcing are investigated using a dry, hydrostatic, primitive equation numerical model (the North Carolina State University ...

David W. Hamilton; Yuh-Lang Lin; Ronald P. Weglarz; Michael L. Kaplan

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

DoD End User Perspective and DARPA Palm Power Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; distribution is unlimited. 7 #12;Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Tactical Power Low Sulfur JP8 Fuel Towable Power SOFC 10 100 1,000 10,000 Automotive Locomotive SOFC MCFC POWER (kWe) PEM/HT PEMFC SOFC Multiple Modules C Methane rich reformate Solid Oxide (SOFC) (Tubular, planar) Solid Zirconium Oxide Ceramic (Solid

131

Big business works with small farmers : the case of the Buabin Oil Palm Outgrower Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, there are about 500 million small farms from which two billion people derive their livelihoods. These farmers face a host of challenges to access both domestic and international markets. This thesis examines the ...

Santini, Christina PioCosta-Lahue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Characterization of Fibers from Different Parts of the Buriti Palm Tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... uses as automobile interior components and civil construction panels. .... through the SnO2/CdS and CdS/CdTe interfaces in SnO2/CdS/CdTe Solar Cells.

133

Letter to the editor The bio-fuel debate and fossil energy use in palm oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and industrial processing facilities, and for production of fertilizers and pesticides. Greenhouse gas emissions of uncertainty in these estimates, is essential to provide solid arguments on which to base policies relating

134

The Feasibility study of using Palm oil as the lubricant of Automative Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In general,the lubricants were composed by basestock and additive,and the basestock is usual use mineral oil. This paper examines the viscosity,viscosity index and antiwear properties (more)

tzeng, jason

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Complex Games and Palm Computers Pieter Spronck and Jaap van den Herik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with the introduction of home computers games became a major application. The first games were produced by solitary home-based

Spronck, Pieter

136

Spearing High Net Wealth Individuals: The Case of Online Fraud and Mature Age Internet Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every day dangerous criminals are targeting high net wealth members of our community as they venture onto the internet. Statements from twenty-nine community organizations and mature age internet users were analyzed using structured coding techniques ... Keywords: Criminal, Fraud, Internet, Mature, Phishing, Spear

Nigel Martin, John Rice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2007 Data  

SciTech Connect

The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2006 and August 31, 2007. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2007. Twenty-nine academic programs were included in the survey universe, and 28 of the 29 responded. The report includes data by degree level including citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity plus enrollments of junior and senior undergraduate students and graduate students.

Analysis and Evaluation, Science Education Programs

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Project #: 13916 ASBESTOS ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insulation was observed in select locations within the building. Material in the hallways was sampled containing materials throughout the building. It was determined that: Sixteen (16) of the twenty-nine (29 APPENDIX III ----- Asbestos Building Survey Report APPENDIX IV ----- Floor Plans Showing Sampling Locations

deYoung, Brad

142

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind belt states include Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma,Oklahoma all with more than 2,000 MW. Twenty-nine states had more than 100 MW of windWind Power Rankings: The Top 20 States Capacity (MW) Percentage of In-State Generation Annual (2011) California Illinois Iowa Minnesota Oklahoma

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Florida PNNL and FSEC helped Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County build three <60 HERS...

144

Journal of Coastal Research 22 5 13001304 West Palm Beach, Florida September 2006 Fractal Analysis of Maine's Glaciated Shoreline Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ostrina, respectively. The range for M. californianus extends westward (not pictured) across the Aleutian

Hren, Michael

145

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Population genetics of the understory fishtail palm Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti in Belize: high genetic connectivity with local differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacon2,9, Nancy C Garwood3, Richard M Bateman4, Meredith M Thomas5, Steve Russell6, C Donovan Bailey2, William J Hahn7, Samuel GM Bridgewater6 and Rob DeSalle8 Address: 1Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University... , Bronx, NY 10458-5126, USA Email: Anglica Cibrin-Jaramillo* - acibrian@amnh.org; Christine D Bacon - cbacon@simla.colostate.edu; Nancy C Garwood - ngarwood@plant.siu.edu; Richard M Bateman - r.bateman@rbgkew.org.uk; Meredith M Thomas - mmt29@cam...

Cibrian-Jaramillo, Angelica; Bacon, Christine D; Garwood, Nancy C; Bateman, Richard M; Thomas, Meredith M; Russell, Steven R; Bailey, Donovan C; Hahn, William J; Bridgewater, Samuel G M; DeSalle, Rob

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Health assessment for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Palm Beach County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD001447952. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Pratt and Whitney Government Engine Business Division has been in operation as a division of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) plant since 1958. In the past, materials disposed of in the landfill/incineration trenches at the plant included construction debris, discarded equipment, unknown solid waste from Air Force Plant Number 74, solvents and solvent sludges, asbestos, fuels, paints, pesticide and herbicide container residues, benzonitrite and solvent-contaminated soils, mercury (from bulbs and thermometers), discarded equipment from metal finishing operations, commercial and laboratory chemicals, garbage, and sewage sludge. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via chemicals in the groundwater and air (wind-blown) and possibly through ingestion of contaminated wildlife.

1989-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

148

Network Aware Image Shaping for Low-Latency and Energy-Efficient Data Services over the Palm Wireless Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the introduction of next-generation wireless data services and increasing user demands for ubiquitous Internet access, there will be a growing demand for wireless handheld devices with multimedia communication capability. However, wireless multimedia communication has several bottlenecks, including limited bandwidth of cellular networks, dynamically varying wireless channel conditions, and processor/battery constrained handheld device.

Dong-Gi Lee; Debashis Panigrahi; Sujit Dey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) by Ralstonia eutropha in high cell density palm oil fermentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved production costs will accelerate commercialization of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymer and PHA-based products. Plant oils are considered favorable feedstocks, due to their high carbon content and relatively low ...

Yusof, Zainal Abidin Mohd

150

The Hesitant Boom: Indonesia's Oil Palm Sub-Sector in an Era of Economic Crisis and Political Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared with assistance from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). I am grateful for the guidance and support I have received there. I would especially like to thank Dr William Sunderlin who has provided endless academic support and constructive advice. The following people from CIFOR have also offered a great deal of assistance: Grahame Applegate, Chris Barr, Brian Belcher, Emily Boyd, Unna Chokkalingam, Carol Colfer, Rona Dennis, David Edmunds, Carmen Garcia, Wil De Jong, David Kaimowitz, Ken MacDicken, Cynthia McDougall, Michael Spilsbury, and Rachel Wrangham. Outside of CIFOR I have also received a great deal of support and assistance from: Peter Dauvergne, Chip Fey, Peter Kanowski, Togu Manurang, Stephen Midgley, Lesley Potter, Ben Santoso, Martua Sirait and Eric Wakker. Timothy Brown deserves special credit for providing very detailed and constructive comments on a final draft. Finally, I would like to thank all of the people interviewed who have given their time to help me put this paper together. Despite all the assistance I have received from the above people, any errors are my own

Anne Casson; Emily Boyd; Unna Chokkalingam; Carol Colfer; Rona Dennis; David Edmunds; Carmen Garcia; Wil De Jong; David Kaimowitz; Ken Macdicken; Peter Kanowski; Togu Manurang; Stephen Midgley; Lesley Potter; Ben Santoso; Martua Sirait; Eric Wakker; Timothy Brown

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Syfy Online Network TOP STORIES OCT 19 2010 TRENDING TOPICS: ELECTRIC VEHICLES PALM PRE 2 STEVE JOBS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Refresh Enter both words below: International Reporter: Adario Strange FAQ Feedback Terms Privacy Search DVICE Chevy Volt returns 127 MPG in an extended real world test Lamborghini now makes tractors Advertising Newsletter Signup About DVICE Search DVICE GO ©2010, DVICE. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 2New

Suslick, Kenneth S.

152

PalmSpace: Continuous Around-Device Gestures vs. Multitouch for 3D Rotation Tasks on Mobile Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current graphics hardware for mobile devices now allows for rendering sophisticated 3D scenes on mobile on touchscreens caused by the fat finger problem, i.e. occlusion and accu- racy [17], but 3D content itself

153

Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Lake Worth, Florida PNNL and Florida Solar Energy Center worked with Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County...

154

820 Gessner Rd. -Ste. 920 Houston, TX 77024 www.energytribune.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, so let us concen- trate on Indonesia and the oil palm. The oil palm (Elaeis) is the most productive oil crop in the world, with an average annual yield of 3 to 4 tons of crude palm oil per hectare production, moving into Brazilian sugarcane for ethanol and In- donesian palm oil for biodiesel. Woertz

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

155

Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including soybeans, canola oil, palm oil, and restaurantsmall quantities from canola and sunflower oils and

Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Numerical Simulation of an Unbalanced Jetlet and Its Role in the Palm Sunday 1994 Tornado Outbreak in Alabama and Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meso-beta-scale numerical model simulations and observational data are synthesized in an effort to develop a multistage paradigm for use in forecasting tornadic convection in the southeastern United States. The case study to be utilized as an ...

Michael L. Kaplan; Yuh-Lang Lin; David W. Hamilton; Robert A. Rozumalski

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Characterization of exhaust emissions from palm oil-based and soybean oil-based biodiesel fueled heavy-duty transit buses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel blends offer a renewable energy fueling option for compression-ignition internal combustion engines. Typically, biodiesel blended at or less than 20% (B20), by volume, will (more)

Efaw, Trampas J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Comparative hydraulic and anatomic properties in palm trees (Washingtonia robusta) of varying heights: implications for hydraulic limitation to increased height growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies that suggest that hydraulic limitation may not onlyand Dawson 2007). The hydraulic limitation hypothesis isevidence that the hydraulic cost of increased frictional

Renninger, Heidi J.; Phillips, Nathan; Hodel, Donald R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

THE FINAL DEMISE OF EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK BUILDING K-33 Health Physics Society Annual Meeting West Palm Beach, Florida June 27, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building K-33 was constructed in 1954 as the final section of the five-stage uranium enrichment cascade at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). The two original building (K-25 and K-27) were used to produce weapons grade highly enriched uranium (HEU). Building K-29, K-31, and K-33 were added to produce low enriched uranium (LEU) for nuclear power plant fuel. During ORGDP operations K-33 produced a peak enrichment of 2.5%. Thousands of tons of reactor tails fed into gaseous diffusion plants in the 1950s and early 1960s introducing some fission products and transuranics. Building K-33 was a two-story, 25-meters (82-feet) tall structure with approximately 30 hectare (64 acres) of floor space. The Operations (first) Floor contained offices, change houses, feed vaporization rooms, and auxiliary equipment to support enrichment operations. The Cell (second) Floor contained the enrichment process equipment and was divided into eight process units (designated K-902-1 through K-902-8). Each unit contained ten cells, and each cell contained eight process stages (diffusers) for a total of 640 enrichment stages. 1985: LEU buildings were taken off-line after the anticipated demand for uranium enrichment failed to materialize. 1987: LEU buildings were placed in permanent shutdown. Process equipment were maintained in a shutdown state. 1997: DOE signed an Action Memorandum for equipment removal and decontamination of Buildings K-29, K-31, K-33; BNFL awarded contract to reindustrialize the buildings under the Three Buildings D&D and Recycle Project. 2002: Equipment removal complete and effort shifts to vacuuming, chemical cleaning, scabbling, etc. 2005: Decontamination efforts in K-33 cease. Building left with significant {sup 99}Tc contamination on metal structures and PCB contamination in concrete. Uranium, transuranics, and fission products also present on building shell. 2009: DOE targets Building K-33 for demolition. 2010: ORAU contracted to characterize Building K-33 for final disposition at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) in Oak Ridge. ORAU collected 439 samples from May and June. LATA Sharp started removing transite panels in September. 2011: LATA Sharp began demolition in January and expects the last waste shipment to EMWMF in September. Approximately 237,000 m{sup 3} (310,000 yd{sup 3}, bulked) of waste taken to EMWMF in 23,000 truckloads expected by project completion.

David A. King

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Diagnostic Analysis of Tidal Winds and the EliassenPalm Flux Divergence in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere from TIMED/SABER Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For migrating tides or fast-moving planetary waves, polarization relations derived from the linear wave equations are required to accurately derive the wind components from the temperature field. A common problem in diagnosing winds from the ...

Xun Zhu; Jeng-Hwa Yee; E. R. Talaat; M. Mlynczak; J. M. Russell III

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 -Tropical forests in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 - Tropical forests if carbon credits were priced between $10 and $33 per tonne, a study has found. Forests soak up vast amounts of planet-warming carbon dioxide each year and are crucial in the fight to curb climate change. Many

162

Use of a Novel Two Color PALM Method to Examine Structural Properties of Drp1 Helical Rings during Mammalian Mitochondrial Fission In Situ.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells 24-36 hours. 4. Add doxycycline and caspase inhibitorsdynamin-related GTPase doxycycline dynamin related protein 1with the addition of doxycycline (Dox), a tetracycline

Rosenbloom, Alyssa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). II. A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO THE YOUNG M DWARF GJ 3629 SEPARATED BY 0.''2  

SciTech Connect

We present the discovery of a 0.''2 companion to the young M dwarf GJ 3629 as part of our high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets around low-mass stars with the Keck-II and Subaru telescopes. Two epochs of imaging confirm that the pair is comoving and reveal signs of orbital motion. The primary exhibits saturated X-ray emission which, together with its UV photometry from GALEX, points to an age younger than {approx}300 Myr. At these ages the companion lies below the hydrogen burning limit with a model-dependent mass of 46 {+-} 16 M{sub Jup} based on the system's photometric distance of 22 {+-} 3 pc. Resolved YJHK photometry of the pair indicates a spectral type of M7 {+-} 2 for GJ 3629 B. With a projected separation of 4.4 {+-} 0.6 AU and an estimated orbital period of 21 {+-} 5 yr, GJ 3629 AB is likely to yield a dynamical mass in the next several years, making it one of only a handful of brown dwarfs to have a measured mass and an age constrained from the stellar primary.

Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: bpbowler@ifa.hawaii.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

PROCESS KNOWLEDGE DATA GATHERING AND REPORTING IN SUPPORT OF DECOMMISSIONING Health Physics Society Annual Meeting West Palm Beach, Florida June 27, 2011  

SciTech Connect

Summary of recent ORAU decommissioning activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Project objective was to generate approved Waste Lot Profiles for legacy facilities scheduled for demolition and shipment to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) or appropriate alternate facility. The form and content of process knowledge (PK) reports were developed with input from the EMWMF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Attainment Team and regulators. PK may be defined as the knowledge of the design and the history of operations that occurs during the life cycle of a facility (paraphrased from SRNL guidance) - similar to the MARSSIM historical site assessment. Some types of PK data used to decommission ORNL and ETTP facilities include: (1) Design drawings; (2) Historical documents [e.g., History of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Thomas (1963) and A Brief History of the Chemical Technical Division (ORNL/M-2733)]; (3) Historical photographs; (4) Radiological survey reports; (5) Facility-specific databases - (a) Spill history, (b) Waste Information Tracking System (WITS), and (c) Hazardous Materials Management Information System (HMMIS); (6) Facility walkdown summary reports; and (7) Living memory data. Facility walkdowns are critical for worker safety planning and to assure on-the-ground-conditions match historical descriptions. For Oak Ridge operations, investigators also document the nature and number of items requiring special handling or disposition planning, such as the following: (1) Items containing polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos, lead, or refrigerants; (2) Items with physical WAC restriction (e.g., large items, pipes, and concrete); and (3) Too 'hot' for EMWMF. Special emphasis was made to interview facility managers, scientists, technicians, or anyone with direct knowledge of process-related activities. Interviews often led to more contact names and reports but also offered anecdotal accounts of releases, process-related operations, maintenance activities, and other relevant information not addressed in the written record. 'Fun' part of PK data gathering. Often got not-so-useful information such as, 'The operations manager was a jerk and we all hated him.' PK data are used to indicate the presence or absence of contaminants. Multiple lines of investigation are necessary for characterization planning and to help determine which disposal facility is best suited for targeted wastes. The model used by ORAU assisted remediation contractors and EMWMF managers by identifying anomalous waste and items requiring special handling.

David A. King

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

166

Microsoft PowerPoint - Grndwater&WastWtrRemediation_TechBriefp1...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, safflower oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, beef oil, cod-liver oil, tallow, candelilla oil, carnawba wax, beeswax, and palm tree wax. This...

167

Engineering Solution for Minimising Adverse Health Impact of Deep-fat Fried Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Azmil Haizam Ahmad Tarmizi and Razali Ismail Malaysian Palm Oil Board Lembaga Minyak Sawit Malaysia Simulation of industrial frying of potato chips using a pilot plant continuous fryer: Physico-chemical changes in palm olein binary

168

Slide 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CRYSTALLISATION BEHAVIOUR OF PALM OIL: Crystal Size Distribution of Palm Oil and the Ternary Blends during Isothermal Crystallization using Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM) system Zaliha Omar, Elina Hishamuddin and Nori

169

AB 811 enables you to tailor a program that makes sense for your community and constituents. You determine the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information please contact: City of Palm Desert Office of Energy Management 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite

Kammen, Daniel M.

170

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

The relationship of serum tocopherol and tocotrienol concentrations to the serum concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins in normocholesterolemic middle-aged men after consuming crude palm oil-rich diets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vitamin E consists of two homologous series, the tocopherols and tocotrienols. Each of the four homologues in both series was quantitated in serum samples from (more)

Peterson, Jeffery Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03222011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida...

173

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plantation, forest-to-acacia plantation, forest-to-rubber plantation, and forest-to-oil palm plantation. We determined annual equivalent values for each option, and the...

174

Integrated Renewable Energy and Energy Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.6 ................................................................................................................ 20Oil Palm 4.0 .................................................................. 22BIOMASS.1.2 ................................................................................................................ 23Pyrolysis 4Direct Combustion of Biomass 4

175

SYNTHESIS OF LIGHT-WEIGHT METALLIC MATERIALS II: V ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Das, Pratt and Whitney, P O Box 109600, West Palm Beach, FL-33410-9600 ... discussed with respect to the composition dependence of the glass transition...

176

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oils (soybean, palm oil, canola, mustard), algae, Starch;properties differ from canola biodiesel, which in turncrops, including soybeans, canola and mustard seeds, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Can feedstock production for biofuels be sustainable in California?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and oil palm, soybean and canola or rapeseed for biodiesel.for biodiesel, followed by canola. Soybeans have never beenother alternative crops. Canola grows well in California but

Kaffka, Stephen R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oils (soybean, palm oil, canola, mustard), algae, Starch;properties differ from canola biodiesel, which in turncrops, including soybeans, canola and mustard seeds, and

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sky Train Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Train Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Train Corp. Place Palm Harbor, Florida Zip 34684 Sector Services Product Sky Train Corporation is a consultant company...

180

EBL Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Windows, Mac OS (may need pdf plugin), and Palm OS devices Not available for Linux operating systems If you have installation problems, see Adobe's troubleshooting page...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nationwide Solar Funding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Funding Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationwide Solar Funding Place Palm Desert, California Zip 92211 Sector Solar Product Provides funding for small (residential and...

182

Policies, Political-Economy, and Swidden in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. C. (1976). The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellionand the Political Economy of Ignorance. Agroforestryof Small-holder Oil Palm Economies of Sabah and Sarawak.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Department of Energy Awards Nearly $7.5 Million to Help Develop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Magnet Lab (Palm Bay, Florida) will develop an innovative superconducting direct-drive generator for large wind turbines. The project will employ a new technology for the...

184

Can feedstock production for biofuels be sustainable in California?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gallons annually of corn ethanol, 1 bil- lion gallons oflocations) and corn for ethanol, and oil palm, soybean andinvestment in corn-grain-based ethanol manufactur- ing in

Kaffka, Stephen R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CX-005389: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03222011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida...

186

CHP in federal sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility Texas DG Guidelines U of Md Test Bed Malden Mills Heatmap CHP Analysis Tool Microturbine tests Interconnection Standards 29 Palms USMC CHP Ft. Bragg CHP NYSERDAPark...

187

DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Agenda | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Agenda DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Agenda Agenda - Solar Forum (Palm Springs) 1128110.pdf More Documents & Publications Agenda - DOE...

188

DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet DOE Tribal Leader Solar Energy Forum - Travel Fact Sheet Travel Fact Sheet Palm Springs Dec 2011.pdf More Documents &...

189

Biomass Resources Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Resources Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass Resources Corporation Place West Palm Beach, Florida Zip 33401 Product The Company has established a unique...

190

Energy Insurance Brokers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Palm Springs, California . References "Energy Insurance Brokers" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnergyInsuranceBrokers&oldid344864" Categories:...

191

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

192

Breakthrough_Science_NERSC-CTW.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough Science at NERSC Richard Gerber NERSC User Services Group Cray Technical Workshop, Isle of Palms, SC February 25, 2009 Outline * Overview of NERSC * NERSC's Cray XT4 -...

193

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03222011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida...

194

Southern Illinois University Carbondale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--- PUFA 750-850 Coconut Oil --- SFA 675-700 Palm Oil --- SFA, MUFA 525-550 Rendered Fats ~0.15-0.6% SFA

195

Outline for MOU Writing Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by others arising out of the terms of this ... not to exceed [insert #] days ? Process search result verifications in ... Enter cases into the UL and UL palm ...

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

196

U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

o-Sanford,Orleans,Oroville,Oswego,Otay,outlying,Owensboro-Evansville,PA,Pablo,Pacific,Pakistan,Palau,Palm,Pal-Waukee,Panama," Paper",Papua,parachutes,Paraguay,Parts,Pascagoula,Paso...

197

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Anti-Vibration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vibration Gloves Anti-Vibration Gloves Description Color Finish USes FNAL Stock Number Pigskin leather palm and fingers Low-profile closure with woven elastic cuff Neoprene knuckle...

198

Overview of An Analysis Project for Renewable Biogas / Fuel Cell Technologies (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on renewable biogas: as an opportunity for commercialization of fuel cells presented as part of a panel discussion at the 2009 Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Centre for the Study of African Economies Department of Economics . University of Oxford . Manor Road Building . Oxford OX1 3UQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the adoption of com- munal palm harvesting (imachi nkwu) in response to commercialization of palm oil among Graduate Student Workshop, the NEUDC, the University of Massachusetts Economic History and Development Workshop, the SITE summer workshop, and the World Economic History Congress for their comments and advice

Oxford, University of

200

Touch Light Through the Leaves: a tactile display for light and shadow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

You can feel something good and comfortable when you turn your palms up and the light falling onto your palms through the trees. "Touch Light Through the Leaves" begins from an imagination which we can touch the light through the leaves. We propose "Touch ... Keywords: interaction, light and shadow detection, sensor, tactile display

Kunihiro Nishimura; Yasuhiro Suzuki; Michitaka Hirose

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 20360 of 28,560 results. 51 - 20360 of 28,560 results. Article DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that disposal operations in Panel 5 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground repository are complete. Last month, the final contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste shipment was emplaced in the panel, which took just over two years to fill. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-completes-disposal-operations-panel-5-wipp-underground Page Uranium Leasing Program LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts... http://energy.gov/lm/services/property-management/uranium-leasing-program

202

Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Uranium Leasing Program » Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts are actively held under lease and two lease tracts have been placed in inactive status indefinitely. Administrative duties include the ongoing monitoring and oversight of leaseholders' activities and the annual inspection of these lease tracts to identify and correct safety hazards or other environmental compliance issues. Program Summary Current Status The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has extended the public comment

203

HEAVY-WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTORS ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS. VOLUME II. ENGINEERING STUDIES AND TECHNICAL DATA  

SciTech Connect

The results of preliminary design and evaluation studies of various concepts of a power reactor that is moderated by heavy water and fueled with natural uranium are presented. Twenty-nine conceptal designs were developed for reactors ranging in capacity from 100 Mwe to 460 Mwe. Resigns were prepared for hot- and cold-moderator reac tors of the pressure vessel type, with liquid D/sub 2/O, boiling D/sub 2/O, E/sub 2/O steam, and helium as coolants. Also studied were cold-moderator pressure tube reactors cooled with liquid D/sub 2/O and boiling D/sub 2/O. The repont includes the results of engineering studies of the reactor systems, electrical generation facilities, and auxiliary equipment. (auth)

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Task analysis for solar installers  

SciTech Connect

The process focused on the sequential identification and field validation of the tasks actually performed. This method provides an accurate picture of what happens on the roof. Forty-six solar firms were identified as the population; 29 (63%) participated in the validation project. We identified 8 duty areas and 46 tasks. The overall response rate for the occupational task list is 100% except for tasks under the duty of constructing solar collectors. Only eight of the twenty-nine respondents (28%) indicated that solar installers fabricate collectors. This shows that solar installers do not manufacture collectors and only perform tasks directly related to installation. Additional findings from our study indicate that instructional materials designed for solar installers need to be standardized and made task-specific. The tasks identified in this research should form the foundation for a competency-based curriculum for solar water heater installers.

Harrison, J.; LaHart, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the second year of this project. Adult (n = 24), metamorphosed (n = 247), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 387) stages from both species were examined in 2001. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. Twenty-nine spawning ground surveys were conducted. Nine strategic point-specific habitat surveys were performed to assess habitat requirements of juvenile lamprey.

Stone, Jennifer; Pirtle, Jody; Barndt, Scott A.

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Summary report of a workshop on research opportunities in plant biochemistry, December 11--13, 1992, Kona, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A DOE-sponsored workshop was held December 11--13, 1992 in Kona, Hawaii to discuss those aspects of fundamental research in plant biochemistry deemed essential to provide the basic information base necessary for exploiting plant biotechnology to meet future societal needs. Twenty nine scientists, with interests representing many of the various areas of plant biochemistry, participated. The workshop was intended to define in both broad and specific terms the current state of knowledge in the general area of metabolic biochemistry, and to identify those areas that afford unusual opportunity or that are relatively underdeveloped in comparison with other areas of plant biology. Participants provided critiques of the state of knowledge of the major areas of metabolic biochemistry in relation to a series of questions that are presented herein.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Phase I report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California's geographic and end-use markets which could directly use low and moderate temperature geothermal resources are ranked and described, as well as those which have the highest potential for near-term commercial development of these resources. Building on previous market surveys, the assessment determined that out of 38 geothermal resource areas with characteristics for direct use development, five areas have no perceived impediments to near-term development: Susanville, Litchfield, Ontario Hot Springs, Lake Elsinore, and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Twenty-nine applications were compared with previously selected criteria to determine their near-term potential for direct use of geothermal fluids. Seven categories were found to have the least impediments to development; agriculture and district heating applications are considered the highest. Ten-year projections were conducted for fossil fuel displacement from the higher rated applications. It is concluded that greenhouses have the greatest displacement of 18 x 10/sup 6/ therms per year.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Alexis Herman | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alexis Herman Alexis Herman About Us Alexis Herman - Former Secretary of Labor Photo of Alexis Herman Alexis M. Herman was born in Mobile, Alabama, and began her career working for Catholic Charities helping young out-of-school men and women find work in the Pascagoula, Mississippi shipyard. At the age of twenty-nine, President Jimmy Carter's appointment made her the youngest director of the Women's Bureau in the history of the Labor Department. And on May 1, 1997, Alexis M. Herman was sworn in as America's 23rd Secretary of Labor and the first African American ever to lead the United States Department of Labor. She also served as a valued member of the National Economic Council. As Secretary, she focused on a prepared workforce, a secure workforce, and quality workplaces. With that mandate in mind, she consolidated the

212

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Physical Properties of Normal Grade Biodiesel and Winter Grade Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this study, optical and thermal properties of normal grade and winter grade palm oil biodiesel were investigated. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Photopyroelectric technique were used to evaluate the samples. The dispersion curve and thermal diffusivity were obtained. Consequently, the variation of refractive index, as a function of wavelength in normal grade biodiesel is faster than winter grade palm oil biodiesel, and the thermal diffusivity of winter grade biodiesel is higher than the thermal diffusivity of normal grade biodiesel. This is attributed to the higher palmitic acid C16:0 content in normal grade than in winter grade palm oil biodiesel.

Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Mohd Maarof Moksin; Harrison Lau; Lik Nang; Monir Norozi; W. Mahmood; Mat Yunus; Azmi Zakaria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Enagra Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Enagra Inc Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94304 Product Palo Alto-based palm oil and biodiesel trading company. References Enagra Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

214

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships | BSA 03-12 ...  

Modulating seed beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase II level converts the composition of a temperate seed oil to that of a palm-like tropical oil. (.pdf)

215

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulent Flow and Dispersion in and above a Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow and dispersion in and above an idealized street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1 are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Each of upwind building wall, street ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Siegfried Raasch; Marcus Oliver Letzel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Microsoft Word - 2009 Australasian Section_ April 2009_final.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Australasian Section, American Oil Chemist Society April 2009, Newsletter In this issue: From the President Industry Updates ? Monola 77T: Nuseeds High Yielding Specialty Canola ? Certified Sustainable Palm Oil Available ? Oilseed Indu

217

Palmera : an information augmented museum visit device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis tries to develop a new museum guide device with the combination functions of digital cameras and palms as a tool that maps information onto digital images to support a real-time contextualized learning that ...

Wang, Xingchen, 1976-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

External Influences on Hurricane Intensity. Part III: Potential Vorticity Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of Hurricane Elena (1985) with a baroclinic wave was reexamined using both potential vorticity (PV) and a formulation for Eliassen-Palm fluxes in cylindrical coordinates. The hurricane began to deepen rapidly as a narrow upper-...

John Molinari; Steven Skubis; David Vollaro

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Employee Profiles | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chvala Meet Ondrej Chvala When many of us think of a vacation, we dream of white sandy beaches and palm trees. But when Ondrej Chvala, a postdoc on the PHENIX experiment, thinks...

220

Characterization and Validation Studies of PowerPlex 2.1, a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Palm Beach County Sheriff's ... The following substrates were used: 5 pieces of broken glass 8 1 mm each, 1 cm2 of oily rag, 1 cm2 of dirty tire, 2 cm2 ...

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Social Memory and the Politics of Place-making in Northeastern Amazonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one about a huge snake, an anaconda, that was killed in 1993invaders and poachers. The anaconda, the most hostile, theheart-of-palm. 20. The anaconda (sucuriju) grows to fabulous

Raffles, Hugh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Social Memory and the Politics of Place-Making in Northeastern Amazonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one about a huge snake, an anaconda, that was killed in 1993invaders and poachers. The anaconda, the most hostile, theheart-of-palm. 20. The anaconda (sucuriju) grows to fabulous

Raffles, Hugh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Stratospheric Warmings Diagnosed Using the Transformed Eulerian-Mean Equations and the Effect of the Mean State on Wave Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terms in the transformed Eulerian mean equations are computed for the stratospheric warmings of December and January, 197677, together with cross sections showing the directions of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) fluxes and residual mean meridional ...

A. O'Neill; C. E. Youngblut

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the pollution source while the oil content was 54.22oil contents was observed in palms near the pollution source.oil content the effect was only upto 1500m from the source

Rani, B Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09152010 Location(s): West Palm Beach, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 15, 2010 CX-003911:...

226

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Bottom-Heating Effects on Scalar Dispersion in and above a Cubical Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on scalar dispersion in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated, and scalar dispersion ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Young-Hee Ryu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulence Coherent Structures in and above a Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated and are compared with each ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Oilseeds of the future: Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

inform's examination of some of the trait-modified oilseeds currently in research and development pipelines around the world continues with this month's look at work in cottonseed, flax, and oil palm. Oilseeds of the future: Part 2 Oil

229

SunPeak Solar LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunPeak Solar LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name SunPeak Solar LLC Place Palm Desert, California Zip 92260 Product US project developer and asset manager, focussing on PV...

230

NIOP-AOCS Fats and Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for NIOP-AOCS Fats & Oils, samples in this series include crude coconut oil, RB Palm Oil, Crude Safflower Oil, Crude sunflower Oil. NIOP-AOCS Fats and Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Progr

231

2014 Joint Action Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 Joint Action Workshop 2014 Joint Action Workshop January 12, 2014 8:00AM EST to January 14, 2014 5:00PM EST Palm Desert, California The Joint Action Workshop is an annual...

232

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1.1: White Water Wind Farm located near Palm Springs,testing at their active wind farm near Mojave, California.It is imperative that wind farms remain in operation

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

From kiosks to megastores: The evolving carbon market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recently a New Zealand wind farm was implemented jointly.Above, a Palm Springs wind farm. Offset Standard and thebuild wind energy in- frastructure on farms (NativeEnergy

Niemeier, Debbie A.; Rowan, Dana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Bottom Heating Effects on Scalar Dispersion in and above a Cubical Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on scalar dispersion in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated, and scalar dispersion ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Young-Hee Ryu

235

Marketing Research Design and Analysis University of Michigan Business School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Section 3: Specific Research Questions The AWARE research team will present this project in Washington DC. The prototype software will be made available and will run on any Windows or PalmOS machine. Additionally

Michalek, Jeremy J.

236

Frictional lichenified dermatosis from prolonged use of a computer mouse: Case report and review of the literature of computer-related dermatoses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dermatitis possible caused by computer wrist rest. ContactS, Phillips RM, et al. Computer palms. J Am Acad DermatolGoksugur N, Cakici H. A new computer-associated occupational

Ghasri, Pedram; Feldman, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator Awards 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator awards winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The recipients will receive their awards at the Clean Cities Conference in Palm Springs, CA.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chapter 2: Sustainable and Unsustainable Developments in the U.S. Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable cultivation are detrimental to sustainable energy production.production, particularly from palm oil, corn, and sugarcane, further demonstrates that renewable energyenergy requirements for ethanol production all undermine the sustainability of existing renewable

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a fuel in solid oxide fuel cells, J. Power Sources 118:L. and Bloomfield, D.P. , Ammonia Cracker for Fuel Cells,1998 Fuel Cell Seminar Abstracts, November 16-19, Palm

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be a hot point of discussion at next week's climate meeting in Nairobi, Kenya. Already a coalition of 15 conservation Earth Day Poverty alleviation Cell phones in Africa Seniors helping Africa Oil palm in rainforests

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Beach, FL Autonomous Underwater Inspection Using 3D Laser Perform offshore testing of 3D laser over targets of opportunity including a sunken barge and various ship wrecks in...

242

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Cut-Resistant Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lbs) 3500 grams (7.7 lbs) Cut-Resistant Gloves Description Color Finish Uses FNAL Stock Number Flat dipped natural rubber palms Seamless cut and abrasion resistant Kevlar...

243

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Nitrile Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrile Gloves Nitrile Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number 5.5 mil thick fingers 5.1 mil at palm 10 long 100% nitrile (non-latex) Powder...

244

Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea & the Solomon Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] assess the extent of any fraud in the volumes and export values declared by enterprises which supply logs) correlates closely with loss of carbon capture. (The prospective market for palm oil as a fuel is contracting

245

Biofuel Co-Firing - Field Demonstration Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofuel is a renewable fuel that is derived from biomass. A broad category of biofuels was investigated to identify candidate fuels that would reduce the local dependence on fossil fuels, particularly low-sulfur fuel oil (LSFO). The biofuel selected for evaluation was crude palm oil grown in Malaysia under rigorous sustainability standards established by the Roundtable for Sustainability of Palm Oil. The evaluation culminated in a full-scale demonstration conducted by Hawaiian Electric Company and the El...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Anti-friction additives for lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

A lubricating oil composition is described comprising (i) a major portion of lubricant oil; and (ii) from about 0.05 to about 10.0 wt.% of, as an additive, a product prepared by reacting a natural oil selected from the group consisting of coconut, babassu, palm, palm kernel, olive, castor, peanut, beef tallow and lard, with a (C/sub 2/-C/sub 10/) hydroxy acid and a polyamine.

Karol, T.J.; Magaha, H.S.; Schlicht, R.C.

1987-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

Public attitudes and solar policy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public attitude surveys are examined regarding support for government action on solar energy in general and for information dissemination and economic incentive programs in particular. Twenty-nine public attitude surveys with data relevant to solar energy policy were collected. Their findings were separated and recorded under major subject categories for analysis. There is significant support expressed in surveys for government action on solar energy, but nearly half of the respondents do not feel it should replace private effort. Over 70% of respondents say they like solar, but these positive attitudes do not translate directly into willingness to purchase. Information programs and economic incentives elicit approval from well over half of respondents. General knowledge of the existence of solar energy is high, yet about 40% of sampled respondents still have not seen a solar collector. Over 80% do not know details necessary to a purchase decision. Perception of cost seems to be related to purchase intent. Information programs and economic incentives can operate to affect that perception.

Weis, P. R.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Localization of malignant melanoma using monoclonal antibodies  

SciTech Connect

Finding a screening test to evaluate patients with cancer for occult metastatic disease, as well as imaging all known disease, is a goal of research efforts. Twenty-nine evaluable patients with deeply invasive (stage I), regional nodal (stage II), or systemic (stage III) melanoma underwent imaging by administration of a preparation of the antimelanoma antibody labeled with technetium 99m. Scan results indicated that 28 of 32 confirmed metastatic sites were imaged with this technique (88% sensitivity). Analysis of the individual positive sites revealed that nodal basins and visceral metastases accounted for the highest percentage of metastatic sites imaged, with 14 (88%) of 16 nodal basin metastases and all four visceral metastases being detected through imaging. Occult nodal disease was detected in the iliac nodal chain in two of the 29 patients. The imaging of benign tumors and nodal basins not containing disease accounted for a confirmed false-positive rate of 21%. Three (10%) of the 29 scan results were confirmed to be false-negative. In vivo tumor localization with monoclonal antibodies showed a sensitivity similar to that of other roentgenographic procedures for identifying metastatic disease and was useful in two of three patients in identifying occult iliac nodal disease, a region that is difficult to evaluate with physical examination and other imaging modalities.

Wasselle, J.; Becker, J.; Cruse, W.; Espinosa, C.; Cox, C.; Reintgen, D. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Consequences of Growth-Oriented Policies and the World Banks Research Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes Chinas experience with the pollution levy, an emissions charge system which covers 300,000 factories. Operation of the system has been well-documented since the mid-1980s, affording a unique opportunity to assess the implementation and impact of incentive-based regulation in a developing country. Although a uniform levy is established by Chinas National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA), strictness of enforcement varies greatly across provinces. In addition, provinces can legally augment (but not undercut) the national rate with NEPAs permission. The result is wide dispersion in the effective levy, or rate at which excess emissions are actually charged by provincial regulators. Using panel data for twenty-nine provinces during 1987-1993, we investigate the sources of variation in the effective levy with a model of equilibrium pollution. In this model, effective provincial levy rates and industrial emissions intensities are jointly determined at the intersection of environmental demand (ED) and supply (ES) functions. The ED function, which reflects differential abatement costs, relates industrial emissions intensity to the price of pollution and structural characteristics such as sector, scale and ownership. The ES function relates the provincial levy rate to two sets of variables which reflect differences in economic

Hua Wang; David Wheeler; Richard Newfarmer; Suggestions This

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Saving energy in occupied buildings: results from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory residential data bases  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes results to date from the residential portion of the Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) project, comprising findings from several hundred studies of new and retrofitted buildings. The following are discussed for both new and retrofitted homes: (1) energy savings and the range of savings for given types of measures; (2) cost and cost-effectiveness of various measures; and (3) methodology. In existing residences, data compiled from roughly 70 retrofit projects, with sample sizes that range from 1 to 33,000 homes, strongly indicate that retrofits often significantly reduce annual space heating energy consumption. But, results are highly variable. The maximum energy savings from individual measures installed in different households are 3 to 7 times greater than the median value. Nineteen conservation programs sponsored by utilities achieved annual space heat savings of 38.5 million Btu at an average investment level of $1050. Twenty-nine of 215 new homes in our BECA-A database have detailed sub-metered data that permits normalization of space heat loads for both indoor temperature and internal gains. In these homes, the standardized heating energy requirement ranges from 10 to 25 kBtu/ft/sup 2/ over various climatic regions, a value that is roughly 50% less than current building practice.

Goldman, C.A.; Wagner, B.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

A group of 40 hvb coals, mostly from western Kentucky fields, has been examined with regard to ASTM Gieseler plastometric properties. Twenty-nine of these coals have also been studied over a range of temperatures by isothermal Gieseler plastometry. Raw Gieseler data provide melting and coking slopes and readily calculable fluidity spans. Maximum fluidity by slope intersection is a more consistent measure than observed maximum fluidity. Isothermal slopes and maximum fluidities follow Arrhenius temperature dependencies, with activation energies related systematically to fluid properties. These freshly sampled coals are also characterized by chemical, physical and petrographic criteria, by quantitative solvent extractions, by pyrolysis gas chromatography, by Fourier Transform infrared analysis of coals and extraction residues, by the HPLC analysis of coal extracts, and by optical microscopy of coals and Gieseler semi-coke residues. Multiple linear regression analysis yields three-term expressions which estimate maximum fluidities (both ASTM and isothermal) with R values of .90 to .92. Slopes and critical temperatures are similarly predictable. Plastometer experiments with selected coals under superatmospheric pressures show both melting slopes and maximum fluidities to be sharply increased, the latter by one to three orders of magnitude. Some suggestions are offered to accommodate this new information into the general body of knowledge concerning the phenomenon of plasticity in mid-ranked coals. 81 references, 28 figures, 40 tables.

Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Irefin, A.; Jiminez, A.; Jones, T. M.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Phase I report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential geothermal direct-use energy market and its application to projects in California are assessed. Project identification effort is to be focused on those that have the highest probability for near-term successful commercial operations. Near-term herein means 2 to 5 years for project implementation. Phase I has been focused on defining and assessing: (1) the geothermal direct-use resources that are suitable for near-term utilization; and (2) the generic applications (municipal heating districts, horticultural greenhouse firms, laundries, etc.) that are suitable for near-term projects. Five economic development regions in the state, containing recognized geothermal direct-use resources, have been defined. Thirty-eight direct use resources have been evaluated in these regions. After assessment against pre-selected criteria, twenty-seven have been rated with a priority of I, II or III, thereby qualifying them for further marketing effort. The five areas with a priority of I are summarized. These areas have no perceived impediments to near-term development. Twenty-nine generic categories of applications were assessed against previously selected criteria to determine their near term potential for direct use of geothermal fluids. Some twenty industry, commercial and institutional application categories were rated with a priority of I, II or III and warrant further marketing efforts. The seven categories with a priority of I are listed. These categories were found to have the least impediments to near-term application projects.

Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Kitson Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kitson Partners Kitson Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Kitson & Partners Place Palm Beach Gardens, Florida Zip 33418 Product Private residential and commercial real estate investment and development company based in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. In April 2009, the company chose Florida Power & Light to develop a 75MW PV project at its new development property in Babcock Ranch. References Kitson & Partners[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kitson & Partners is a company located in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida . References ↑ "Kitson & Partners" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kitson_Partners&oldid=34811

258

CX-005389: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Categorical Exclusion Determination 89: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005389: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/22/2011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Palm Beach County, Florida proposes to use $1.2 million dollars of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to help offset a portion of the cost associated with installation of a Digester Biogas Combined Heat and Power Renewable Energy Project at the Palm Beach County Water Utilities Department (PBCWUD) Southern Region Water Reclamation Facility (SRWRF). The energy saved as a result of this project will be approximately 200 kilowatts per hour and the greenhouse gas emissions reduced (carbon dioxide

259

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Bay Palm Bay Location: City Palm Bay FL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a sustainability and energy master plan (completed); 2) energy efficiency audits at seven municipal facilities; 5) energy efficient retrofits at six municipal buildings; 3) community-wide greenhouse gas inventory; 4) review and upgrade existing building codes; 5) municipal building retrofits to include interior lighting retrofits, upgrade appliances, building management system design proposal and retrofits, solar water heaters, and parking lot LED conversions; 6) installation of electric car charging stations at strategic locations in city; 7) residential light bulb exchange program; and 8) technical consultant services for energy efficiency website

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS ASSOCIATION OF ARIZONA R.D. JUSTICE SUITE 140 WILLIAM H. STACY PRESIDENT 340 E. PALM LANE SECRETARY-TREASURER PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85004-4603 ELSTON GRUBAUGH (602) 254-5908 ROBERT S. LYNCH VICE-PRESIDENT Fax (602) 257-9542 COUNSEL AND

262

Dates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dates Dates Nature Bulletin No. 511-A December 15, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DATES When the wise men from the east, guided by a mysterious new star, traveled to Jerusalem and thence to Bethlehem where they worshipped the infant Jesus and presented Him with gifts, you can be sure that, in addition to gold and frankincense and myrrh, they carried dates as food to sustain them on their long journey. The Date Palm had been cultivated along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers since the time of the Sumerians, 3000 years before the birth of Christ. This tree, like the coconut palm, is unknown today in its wild state but is believed to have originated in Ethiopia. In early times it was abundant in Palestine and the scientific name, Phoenix, given to the date palm by the Greeks, may be due to the fact that they first saw it in Phoenicia. The "tree of life, " variously referred to in the Bible, was probably this palm.

263

Processing Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryProcessing Division2013 Members438 Members as of October 1, 2013, Process Plus LLCCincinnati, OH, USAAbdurahman, SadegWashington State UniversityPullman, WA, USAAbigor, RolandNIFOR, Nigerian Institute for Oil PalmEdo Sta

264

The Shape, Propagation and Mean-Flow Interaction of Large-Scale Weather Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a zonal average operator the Eliassen-Palm flux provides a diagnostic of both eddy behavior and the feedback of the eddies onto the mean flow. This paper addresses the diagnosis problem for other averaging operators and, in particular, for ...

Brian J. Hoskins; Ian N. James; Glenn H. White

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

Werner, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Goodwin, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM); Shreve, Andrew P. (Santa Fe, NM)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Visitor Guide to Smart Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visitor Guide to Smart Security The following articles are prohibited on LANL property, including and are not allowed in Limited Security Areas or above: · personal computers and associated media (including palm- top capabilities, unless disabled). Note 1: Government cell phones are allowed into Security Areas as long

267

Rhythmic perception and entrainment in 5-year-old children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numb pull come mud peel dark nap cool 3 cut beak chip neck nut pool lot palm tell park cod dip chill dad bean curl pork loop 4 turn pen bill dart mood lunch chart bed lid teach duck barn tick chop led ban pet...

Verney, John Parker

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture: Tendencies & Deficiencies Tad Patzek, Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering, UT Austin of Conclusions, cntd. The main energy crops I have looked at are maize, sugarcane, soybeans, and oil palms are witnessing a global move away from food to energy crops. Diverting more land to pure energy crops

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

269

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

270

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Fatty Acid Profile of Sunshine Bass: II. Profile Change Differs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, employing a variety of alternative lipid sources, such as corn, canola, soybean, linseed, and palm oils [1 affecting growth performance of the livestock. We previously demonstrated canola, coconut, corn, grapeseed-PUFA-rich FO with MC-PUFA-rich canola oil, for example, increases fillet 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 content

271

Text Entry Systems: Mobility, Accessibility, Universality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Text entry has never been so important as it is today. This is in large part due to the phenomenal, relatively recent success of mobile computing, text messaging on mobile phones, and the proliferation of small devices like the Blackberry and Palm Pilot. ... Keywords: Human-Computer Interaction, User Interfaces

I. Scott MacKenzie; Kumiko Tanaka-Ishii

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or hydrotreating or hydrocracking of agronomic, natural plant oils (e.g., soybeans, palm, coconut, safflower such as algae, seaweed, water hyacinths, etc., are NOT acceptable feedstocks under this FOA. Appendix E contains of ethanol, biogas #12;7 and biodiesel produced from transesterification or hydrotreating or hydrocracking

Reuter, Martin

273

Letter Report Describing the Analyses and Reports that were Forecast to be Completed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for both sugar and fiber, and algae for oil or other intermediate products. The objective of this report oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and arboreal Leucaenas found on Oahu, Maui, Hawai`i and Moloka is an increasingly important component of biofuel production since many of the feedstocks must be hydrotreated

274

10/7/12 The Pow er of Seaw eed -India Real Time -WSJ October 1, 2012, 10:00 AM IST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needs from green energy. Today, biofuels account for only 3% of total fuel use. India's biofuels target material for biofuel. Green fuels have typically been made from palm oil or corn. But now there's growing evidence that seaweed might fit the bill as a raw material for biofuel, and one Indian entrepreneur

Bhalla, Upinder S.

275

World Conference on Oilseed Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Industry Professionals Gather in Izmir, Turkey Industry professionals will review and discuss the day-to-day concerns and critical issues related to soyabean, sunflower, corn, canola, olive and palm, and other tropical oils at the World Con

276

Commodity Price Volatility and the Sources of Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, hides, soybeans, natural rubber, hardlog, cotton, wool, iron ore, copper, nickel, aluminum, lead, zinc, tin, soy oil, sun?ower oil, palm oil, coconut oil, gold, and crude oil. 4 This index can be seen to measure the bene?ts of diversifying the economy...

Cavalcanti, Tiago V. de V.; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Diagnostic Study of Eddy-Mean Flow Interactions during FGGE SOP-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eliassen-Palm (EP) diagrams have been shown to be very useful diagnostics in both the troposphere and the stratosphere. However, the idea that the EP flux divergence is the sole forcing of the mean wind by the eddies can be misleading. A time ...

Mark P. Baldwin; H. J. Edmon Jr.; James R. Holton

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Opportunities and barriers for sustainable international bioenergy trade and strategies to overcome them -A report prepared by IEA Bioenergy Task 40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residue of the palm oil production process) from Malaysia to the Netherlands, and wood pellets from Canada households (who were replacing their expensive fossil fuels with wood pellets), higher demand from power can be immature and unstable, e.g. as in the case of the wood pellet market. During the winter of 2005

279

4 DECEMBER 2009 VOL 326 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1344 CREDIT:WIKIMEDIACOMMONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viable green fuel is a long shot. Until now, the green algae has not been used for biofuels because few material for biofuel. Green fuels have typically been made from palm oil or corn. But now there's growing evidence that seaweed might fit the bill as a raw material for biofuel, and one Indian entrepreneur

280

Biocommodity Engineering Lee R. Lynd,* Charles E. Wyman, and Tillman U. Gerngross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as grains and sugar beet for bioethanol and oil seed crops (e.g. oil palm) for biodiesel. Second generation (Saccharum spp.), sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), cassava (Manihot esculenta) and maize (Zea mays) for bioethanol comprises three modules which describe (i) socioe- conomics and consumption, (ii) conversion and trade

California at Riverside, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Changes in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, p. 25). Bioethanol and biodiesel are the dominant types of biofuel for transport (UNEP 2009, p) savings of biofuels compared to fossil fuels. This mainly depends on the feedstock and conversion 6 Crop Environmental Impacts Palm Oil · Forest conversion and species loss · Fire damage to natural

California at Riverside, University of

282

Oregon State University General Catalog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, p. 25). Bioethanol and biodiesel are the dominant types of biofuel for transport (UNEP 2009, p) savings of biofuels compared to fossil fuels. This mainly depends on the feedstock and conversion 6 Crop Environmental Impacts Palm Oil · Forest conversion and species loss · Fire damage to natural

Escher, Christine

283

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria 1 Version: 20070606 Frontotemporal syndromes in amyotrophic, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA (5) Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center, San Francisco Kingdom (8) Science Director & Vice President, The ALS Association, Palm Harbor, Florida, U.S.A. (9

Dickerson, Brad

284

Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

A guide to writing articles in energy science Martin Weiss a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV Kingbird Solar Lower West Wind Energy Project Catalina Renewable Energy High Desert Solar Alta Solar Meadows Field Solar Project US Topco Energy Horn PV Manzana Wind Project Lake Hughes Wind AV Solar Palms PV Project GWF Tracy Amendment Gray Butte Solar PV Golden Hills (Altamont Repower II) North

286

A contactless biometric system using multiple hand features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of modern computing technology, there is increased reliance on biometrics to provide stronger personal authentication. Among the variety of biometric solutions in the market, hand-based system is the oldest, and perhaps the most successful ... Keywords: Contactless biometrics, Hand geometry recognition, Hand vein recognition, Image processing, Image quality assessment scheme, Knuckle print recognition, Multimodal biometrics, Palm print recognition

Goh Kah Ong Michael; Tee Connie; Andrew Beng Jin Teoh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Helmut Dersch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have ported PTViewer, a Java-based spherical panorama viewer, to J2ME, Suns microedition runtime for the Java language. A prepackaged version for PalmOS 5 is distributed together with a generic jar-version suitable for any CLDC-1.1/MIDP-2.0 compliant Java runtime. 1

Smartphone; Fh Furtwangen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Using PDA and CBR for the Control of Motors in a Table Displacement (or milimaquinado) XYZ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When combining different technicals types, a completes application is obtained in comparison of using only one of this, and it is that what is described in this work. It develops a tool for a Personal Digital Assistent (PDA) Palm OS m100 model, this ... Keywords: PDA, dsPIC, CBR, UART, potocol, port, step motor

J. Morales Valladares; M. A. Basurto Pensado; C. A. Ochoa Ortiz

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

GEORDI: A Handheld Tool for Remote System Administration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and implementation of a tool for allowing technical staff to perform diagnosis, triage and remediation of system problems from a commodity handheld device (e.g., a PalmOS PDA) with a wireless network connection using industry ...

Stephen J. Okay; Gale E. Pedowitz

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cooking with Healthier Fats and Oils When you do use fats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Margarine (stick) Cottonseed Oil Chicken Fat Lard Beef Tallow Bacon Grease Palm Oil Butter CoconutCooking with Healthier Fats and Oils When you do use fats and oils, choose those with less saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. parent tips Percent of Saturated Fat Choose

Bandettini, Peter A.

291

Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid, Fish Oil and Soybean Oil on PPARs (? & ?) mRNA Expression in Broiler Chickens and Their Relation to Body Fat Deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An experiment was conducted on broiler chickens to study the effects of different dietary fats (Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), fish oil, soybean oil, or their mixtures, as well as palm oil, as a more saturated fat), with a as fed dose of 7 % for single fat and 3.5 + 3.5 % for the mixtures, on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) gene expression and its relation with body fat deposits. The CLA used in this experiment was CLA LUTA60 which contained 60 % CLA, so 7 % and 3.5 % dietary inclusions of CLA LUTA60 were equal to 4.2 % and 2.1 % CLA, respectively. Higher abdominal fat pad was found in broiler chickens fed with a diet containing palm oil compared to chickens in the other experimental groups (P ? 0.05). The diets containing CLA resulted in an increased fat deposition in the liver of broiler chickens (P ? 0.05). The only exception was related to the birds fed with diets containing palm oil or fish oil + soybeanInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12 8582 oil, where contents of liver fat were compared to the CLA + fish oil treatment. PPAR? gene in adipose tissue of chickens fed with palm oil diet was up-regulated compared to other

Maryam Royan; Goh Yong Meng; Fauziah Othman; Awis Qurni Sazili; Bahman Navidshad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS ASSOCIATION OF ARIZONA R. GALE PEARCE SUITE 140 ELSTON GRUBAUGH PRESIDENT 340 E. PALM LANE SECRETARY-TREASURER PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85004-4603 R.D. JUSTICE (602) 254-5908 ROBERT S. LYNCH VICE-PRESIDENT Fax (602) 257-9542 ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER

293

SFI Bulletin2011, vol. 25 transcience: shared patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emergency power, and to help shave the base's 20-MW summer peak (DOE/EERE, 2003). As with Naval Base Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EERE), 2003. CHP and PV Increase Power Reliability at Twentynine Palms Reinstatement of ESPC Authority. Accessible on the worldwide web at: www.eere.energy.gov/femp. Federal Energy

294

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

295

Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Clinical and Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Series of Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report clinical and dosimetric factors predictive of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) from a series of 240 patients. Methods and Materials: Of the 297 isocenters treating 263 patients, 240 patients (n=263 isocenters) had evaluable information regarding RP. Age, gender, current smoking status and pack-years, O{sub 2} use, Charlson Comorbidity Index, prior lung radiation therapy (yes/no), dose/fractionation, V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, V{sub prescription}, mean lung dose, planning target volume (PTV), total lung volume, and PTV/lung volume ratio were recorded. Results: Twenty-nine patients (11.0%) developed symptomatic pneumonitis (26 grade 2, 3 grade 3). The mean V{sub 20} was 6.5% (range, 0.4%-20.2%), and the average mean lung dose was 5.03 Gy (0.547-12.2 Gy). In univariable analysis female gender (P=.0257) and Charlson Comorbidity index (P=.0366) were significantly predictive of RP. Among dosimetric parameters, V{sub 5} (P=.0186), V{sub 13} (P=.0438), and V{sub prescription} (where dose = 60 Gy) (P=.0128) were significant. There was only a trend toward significance for V{sub 20} (P=.0610). Planning target volume/normal lung volume ratio was highly significant (P=.0024). In multivariable analysis the clinical factors of female gender, pack-years smoking, and larger gross internal tumor volume and PTV were predictive (P=.0094, .0312, .0364, and .052, respectively), but no dosimetric factors were significant. Conclusions: Rate of symptomatic RP was 11%. Our mean lung dose was <600 cGy in most cases and V20 <10%. In univariable analysis, dosimetric factors were predictive, while tumor size (or tumor/lung volume ratio) played a role in multivariable and univariable and analysis, respectively.

Baker, Ryan [University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, Florida (United States); Han Gang [Department of Biostatistics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Sarangkasiri, Siriporn; DeMarco, MaryLou; Turke, Carolyn; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@Moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Overview of reduced-enrichment fuels - development  

SciTech Connect

The US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 to provide the technical means to operate research and test reactors with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuels without significant penalty in experiment performance, operation costs, component modifications, or safety characteristics. A large increase in /sup 238/U is required to reduce the enrichment, and a 10 to 15% increase in /sup 235/U is required to compensate for the extra absorption in /sup 238/U. The additional uranium can be accommodated by redesigning the fuel element to increase the fuel volume fraction in the reactor core and/or by increasing the uranium density in the fuel meat. Since fuel element redesign coupled with the highest density fuel available in 1978 is sufficient for only a few reactors, a fuel development and testing effort was begun to qualify much higher density fuels. The greatest emphasis has been on plate-type fuels, since plate-type reactors are the largest users of highly enriched uranium (HEU). In addition to the RERTR program's work with plate-type dispersion fuels, the CEA developed and tested the caramel fuel, consisting of sintered UO/sub 2/ wafers in Zircaloy-clad plates; GA Technologies developed highly loaded UZrH/sub x/ fuel for TRIGA reactors and tested it in cooperation with the RERTR Program; and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. developed and tested rod-type uranium silicide-Al dispersion fuel. The dispersion fuels were irradiated to high burnups to establish their limits of usability. A whole-core demonstration has been conducted in the ORR using 4.8 Mg U/m/sup 3/ U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersion fuel. Twenty-nine elements have achieved average burnups in excess of 40%.

Snelgrove, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary second quarter 1996 100, 200, 300 and 600 areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1996 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized below: All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1996 were completed. One Hundred twenty- five environmental radiological surveys were performed during the second quarter of 1996, twenty nine at the active waste sites and ninety six at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels Wag found at three of the active waste sites and fifteen of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as 65,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys seven were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and one was in an unposted area. The contamination found within three of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining four sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. At the site where there was no posting, the contamination was below action levels, however, Site Support Services was notified. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR`s) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. During the second quarter 1996, 0. 7 hectares (1.7 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Surface Contamination (SC) to URM. No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARS) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. No Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIR) were closed during the Second Quarter of 1996. Five open SCIRB had not been resolved.

Dorian, J.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Matched-Pair Comparison of Radioembolization Plus Best Supportive Care Versus Best Supportive Care Alone for Chemotherapy Refractory Liver-Dominant Colorectal Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate overall survival after radioembolization or best supportive care (BSC) in patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: This was a matched-pair comparison of patients who received radioembolization plus BSC or BSC alone for extensive liver disease. Twenty-nine patients who received radioembolization were retrospectively matched with a contemporary cohort of >500 patients who received BSC from 3 centers in Germany. Using clinical databases, patients were initially matched for prior treatments and tumor burden and then 29 patients were consecutively identified with two or more of four matching criteria: synchronous/metachronous metastases, tumor burden, increased ALP, and/or CEA >200 U/ml. Survival was calculated from date of progression before radioembolization or BSC by using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 29 patients in each study arm, 16 pairs (55.2%) matched for all four criteria, and 11 pairs (37.9%) matched three criteria. Patients in both groups had a similar performance status (Karnofsky index, median 80% [range, 60-100%]). Compared with BSC alone, radioembolization prolonged survival (median, 8.3 vs. 3.5 months; P < 0.001) with a hazard ratio of 0.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.55; P < 0.001) in a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Treatment-related adverse events following radioembolization included: grade 1-2 fatigue (n = 20, 69%), grade 1 abdominal pain/nausea (n = 14, 48.3%), and grade 2 gastrointestinal ulceration (n = 3, 10.3%). Three cases of grade 3 radiation-induced liver disease were symptomatically managed. Conclusions: Radioembolization offers a promising addition to BSC in treatment-refractory patients for whom there are limited options. Survival was prolonged and adverse events were generally mild-to-moderate in nature and manageable.

Seidensticker, Ricarda, E-mail: ricarda.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie and Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Kraus, Patrick; Seidensticker, Max; Mohnike, Konrad [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie and Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Fahlke, Joerg [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefaesschirurgie (Germany); Kettner, Erika [Klinik fuer Haematologie/Onkologie, Klinikum Magdeburg (Germany); Hildebrandt, Bert [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Dudeck, Oliver; Pech, Maciej; Amthauer, Holger; Ricke, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie and Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Polar Bear Aerial Survey in the Eastern Chukchi Sea: A Pilot Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bering Seas population, shared with Russia. Currently a reliable population estimate for the Chukchi/Bering Seas population does not exist. Land-based aerial and mark-recapture population surveys may not be possible in the Chukchi Sea because variable ice conditions, the limited range of helicopters, extremely large polar bear home ranges, and severe weather conditions may limit access to remote areas. Thus line-transect aerial surveys from icebreakers may be the best available tool to monitor this polar bear stock. In August 2000, a line-transect survey was conducted in the eastern Chukchi Sea and western Beaufort Sea from helicopters based on a U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker under the Ship of Opportunity program. The objectives of this pilot study were to estimate polar bear density in the eastern Chukchi and western Beaufort Seas and to assess the logistical feasibility of using shipbased aerial surveys to develop polar bear population estimates. Twenty-nine polar bears in 25 groups were sighted on 94 transects (8257 km). The density of bears was estimated as 1 bear per 147 km 2 (CV = 38%). Additional aerial surveys in late fall, using dedicated icebreakers, would be required to achieve the number of sightings, survey effort, coverage, and precision needed for more effective monitoring of population trends in the Chukchi Sea. Key words: aerial survey, Ursus maritimus, polar bear, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi Sea, line transect, icebreaker RSUM. LAlaska a deux populations dours polaires: celle du sud de la mer de Beaufort, commune avec le Canada, et celle de la mer des Tchouktches / mer de Bring, commune avec la Russie. lheure actuelle, on ne possde pas destimation fiable de la population de la mer des Tchouktches / mer de Bring. En raison des conditions variables de la glace, de la porte limite

Susanne Kalxdorff; Geoff York

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

Xiang-Dong Peng

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Collection Rule and an Integrated Cell Culture-Nested PCR Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluated the use of an integrated cell culture-reverse transcription-PCR (ICC-RT-PCR) procedure coupled with nested PCR to detect human astroviruses, enteroviruses, and adenovirus types 40 and 41 in surface water samples that were collected and evaluated by using the Information Collection Rule (ICR) method. The results obtained with the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR method were compared to the results obtained with the total culturable virus assaymost-probable-number (TCVA-MPN) method, the method recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for monitoring viruses in surface and finished waters. Twenty-nine ICR surface water samples were analyzed. Viruses were concentrated by using filter adsorption-beef extract elution and organic flocculation techniques, and then the preparations were evaluated for viruses by visualizing cytopathic effects in the Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cell line. In the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR technique we used Caco-2 cells to propagate astroviruses and enteroviruses (ICC step), and we used BGMK cells to propagate adenovirus types 40 and 41, as well as enteroviruses. Fifteen of the 29 samples (51.7%) were positive for astrovirus as determined by the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR method, and eight of these samples (27.5%) contained infectious astrovirus. Seventeen of the 29 samples (58.6%) were positive for enteroviruses when the BGMK cell line was used, and six (27.6%) of these samples were determined to be infectious. Fourteen of the 29 samples (48.3%) were positive for adenovirus types 40 and 41, and 11

Christopher D. Chapron; Nicola A. Ballester; Justin H. Fontaine; Christine N. Frades; Aaron; B. Margolin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE„it gets into DOEs system and becomes a budget line item as well  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1/28/2011 1/28/2011 TRIBAL LEADER FORUM: SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST December 19-20, 2011 SPA RESORT CASINO HOTEL IN PALM SPRINGS, CA 100 North Indian Canyon Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262 (888) 999-1995 The first of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this Forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders and executives to get real-time, regional market snapshots of: solar power purchasing, project financing options and structures which are getting closed, and related emerging issues or trends which are facilitating or obstructing projects from financial closing. This Forum will also provide a venue to Tribal leaders and executives to hear directly from each other regarding best practices in tribal

305

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRIBAL LEADER SOLAR ENERGY FORUM TRIBAL LEADER SOLAR ENERGY FORUM TRAVEL FACT SHEET December 19-20, 2011 Spa Resort Casino Hotel 100 North Indian Canyon Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262 MEETING DETAILS The Department of Energy's Office of Indian Energy's (IE) will host a Solar Energy Forum for Tribal Leaders in Palm Springs, CA, to provide an in depth overview of renewable energy development with a focus on solar technologies and development activities in the Southwest. The Forum will take place on Monday, December 19 and Tuesday, December 20. The first day will focus on commercial and community scale project development and financing. On the second day, a facilitated forum will provide tribal leaders the opportunity to discuss their experiences.

306

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 15910 of 31,917 results. 01 - 15910 of 31,917 results. Download Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting, September 25, 2008: Transcript http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/electricity-advisory-committee-meeting-september-25-2008-transcript Article Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth A Florida community focuses on energy efficiency to encourage economic growth. http://energy.gov/articles/palm-beach-county-sees-energy-smart-economic-growth Article Making the Most of the Small Business Conference Veteran participant explains the benefits his company gets out of the Department of energy Annual Small Business Conference. http://energy.gov/articles/making-most-small-business-conference Article Outdoor Outfitter Gets Greener With Solar Water Heater Using Recovery Act funding, L.L. Bean, the popular outdoor apparel company,

307

Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Renewable Hydrogen Delivering Renewable Hydrogen A Focus on Near-Term Applications A One-Day Workshop Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Fuel Cell Partnership Palm Springs, California, November 16, 2009 Palm Springs Convention Center, Wyndham Hotel - Catalina Room, 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM With Modeling Show-and-Tell at 5:15 PM and Reception Presentation at 6:15 PM (Mesquite Room G) AGENDA 8:30 am Registration 9:00 am Welcome and Opening Remarks: Robert Remick, NREL 9:10 am Session 1: Renewable Hydrogen Policy and Markets Moderator: Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy 1. Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition Paul Leiby, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2. California Regulations on Renewable Hydrogen and Low Carbon Technologies

308

TEMPLATE FOR EES DIRECTORATE QUARTERLY HIGHLIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2012 November 2012 Biodiesel Solubility to Common Elastomers Determined Using Hansen Solubility Parameters A solubility analysis evaluating biodiesel fuels and blends to common elastomers and plastic materials was performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researcher Mike Kass. Hansen solubility parameters for soybean, rapeseed, palm, canola, beef tallow, and coconut biodiesels were determined from the literature and used to calculate the solubility distance for each biodiesel type and elastomer material as a function of blend level with diesel fuel. The results show that biodiesels derived from soybean, rapeseed, palm, canola, and beef tallow (SRPCB) oils all exhibited nearly identical compatibility behavior to polymers and generally show increased solubility (swell) with increasing bio-oil content.

309

Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002-September 30, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Development and Demonstration Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado F. Lynch Hydrogen Components Inc. Littleton, Colorado S. Munshi Westport Innovations Inc. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada S. Wayne West Virginia University Morgantown, West Virginia Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38707 November 2005 Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado

310

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Florida | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 25, 2011 August 25, 2011 CX-006568: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-West Palm Beach CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): West Palm Beach, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy August 23, 2011 CX-006530: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate 75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 08/23/2011 Location(s): North Miami, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 11, 2011 CX-006449: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Lightweight, Direct Drive, Fully Superconducting Generator for Large Wind Turbines CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/11/2011 Location(s): Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

311

China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuvo Solar Energy Inc formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc Nuvo Solar Energy Inc formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc (formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc) Place West Palm Beach, Florida Zip 33401 Product US-based start-up which has acquired a license to manufacturer "PV cell with integral light transmitting waveguide in a ceramic sleeve". References China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc (formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc (formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc) is a company located in West Palm Beach, Florida . References ↑ "China Nuvo Solar Energy Inc (formerly Nuvo Solar Energy Inc)" Retrieved from

312

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2011 6, 2011 CX-005698: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Alhambra CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/06/2011 Location(s): Alhambra, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 6, 2011 CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Support for Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Projects CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/06/2011 Location(s): New Hampshire Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 5, 2011 CX-005709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Palm Bay CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/05/2011 Location(s): Palm Bay, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 5, 2011 CX-005567: Categorical Exclusion Determination

313

CX-005709: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Categorical Exclusion Determination 09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Palm Bay CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/05/2011 Location(s): Palm Bay, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a sustainability and energy master plan (completed); 2) Energy efficiency audits at seven municipal facilities; 3) Energy efficient retrofits at six municipal buildings; 4) Community-wide greenhouse gas inventory; 5) Review and upgrade existing building codes; 6) Municipal building retrofits to include interior lighting retrofits, upgrade appliances, building management system design proposal and retrofits, solar water heaters, and

314

CX-006568: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

68: Categorical Exclusion Determination 68: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006568: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-West Palm Beach CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): West Palm Beach, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Install low emissivity glass, exterior sunshade system, energy monitoring station, and thermal comfort balance system; 2) purchase electric vehicles and install electric vehicle charging stations; 3) retrofit existing streetlights with light emitting diode and retrofit existing lighting systems at city's parking garages; 4) install solar photovoltaic system; and 5) develop a financial incentive program including inter-local agreements, developing

315

Solar Energy Development in the Southwest | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Development in the Southwest Solar Energy Development in the Southwest Solar Energy Development in the Southwest December 19-20, 2011 Palm Springs, California Spa Resort Casino Hotel The Office of Indian Energy hosted a Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Solar Development in the Southwest" December 19-20, 2011, in Palm Springs, California. The forum focused on commercial- and community-scale project development and financing and provided an opportunity for tribal leaders to discuss their experiences and get real-time, regional market snapshots of: Solar power purchasing Project finance options and structures Emerging issues or trends that are facilitating or obstructing projects from financial closings This is one in a series of Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development and investment Tribal Leader Energy Forums. The DOE

316

AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.) Place West Palm Beach, Florida Zip 33414 Sector Biofuels Product Marwich II, Ltd. (OTC.BB: MWII.OB) merged in December 2007 with AE Biofuels, Inc., formerly American Ethanol. Subsequently Marwich II, Ltd. has changed its name to AE Biofuels (OTC: AEBF). References AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.) is a company located in West Palm Beach, Florida . References ↑ "[ AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AE_Biofuels_Inc_formerly_Marwich_II_Ltd&oldid=341812"

317

Energy 5 0 LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy 5.0 LLC Energy 5.0 LLC Place West Palm Beach, Florida Zip FL 33401 Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Energy 5.0 deve ... ven technology." is too long. References Energy 5.0 LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Energy 5.0 LLC is a company located in West Palm Beach, Florida . References ↑ "Energy 5.0 LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energy_5_0_LLC&oldid=344825" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

318

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described. U.S. Patent No.: 7,675,045 (DOE S-112,966) Patent Application Filing Date: October 9, 2008

319

Nondestructive Evaluation: 27th Annual EPRI Steam Generator NDE Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This years Steam Generator Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Workshop took place in Palm Desert, California, on July 2123, 2008, and included one full day and two half days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and international nuclear utilities, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, NDE service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generato...

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART I: THE EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE FROM A VYGOTSKIAN PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of exible exchange rates. These countries produce and rely on a variety of commodity products (Australia, Canada, and New Zealand) with well developed asset markets and a su¢ ciently long history of #12.2%, Australian Wool 6.8%, New Zealand Wool 6.8%, Palm Oil 3.8%, Coconut oil 2.2% and soyaoil 0.6%. Again

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

sets, and the associated case histories provide an excellent reference for researchers and managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of exible exchange rates. These countries produce and rely on a variety of commodity products (Australia, Canada, and New Zealand) with well developed asset markets and a su¢ ciently long history of #12.2%, Australian Wool 6.8%, New Zealand Wool 6.8%, Palm Oil 3.8%, Coconut oil 2.2% and soyaoil 0.6%. Again

Wake, Marvalee H.

322

Spider BeetleS American spider beetle, Mezium americanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of exible exchange rates. These countries produce and rely on a variety of commodity products (Australia, Canada, and New Zealand) with well developed asset markets and a su¢ ciently long history of #12.2%, Australian Wool 6.8%, New Zealand Wool 6.8%, Palm Oil 3.8%, Coconut oil 2.2% and soyaoil 0.6%. Again

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

323

Distributed Generation Biofuel Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update report documents testing performed to assess aspects of using biofuel as an energy source for distributed generation. Specifically, the tests involved running Caterpillar Power Module compression ignition engines on palm methyl ester (PME) biofuel and comparing the emissions to those of the same engines running on ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel. Fuel consumption and energy efficiency were also assessed, and some relevant storage and handling properties of the PME were noted. The tests...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Bottom heating system using geothermal power for propagation. Final report, Phases 1 and 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and study a bottom-heating system in a greenhouse utilizing geothermal energy to aid germination and speed growth of palms. Source of heat was geothermal brine from HGP-A well. The project was successful; the heat made a dramatic difference with certain varieties, such as Areca catechu (betelnut) with 82% germination with heat, zero without. For other varieties, germination rates were much closer. Quality of seed is important. Tabs, figs.

Downing, J.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Investigation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in the Sonoma Valley Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sonoma Valley area contains low-temperature geothermal resources (20 C {le} T {le} 90 C) having the potential for useful development. Sonoma Valley residents, local governments and institutions, private developers, and manufacturers may be able to utilize the geothermal resources as an alternate energy source. Historically, there have been at least six geothermal spring areas developed in the Sonoma Valley. Four of these (Boyes Hot Springs, Fetter's Hot Springs, Agua Caliente Springs, and the Sonoma State Hospital warm spring) lie on a linear trend extending northwestward from the City of Sonoma. Detailed geophysical surveys delineated a major fault trace along the east side of the Sonoma Valley in association with the historic geothermal areas. Other fault traces were also delineated revealing a general northwest-trending structural faulting fabric underlying the valley. Water wells located near the ''east side'' fault have relatively high boron concentrations. Geochemical evidence may suggest the ''east side'' fault presents a barrier to lateral fluid migration but is a conduit for ascending fluids. Fifteen of the twenty-nine geothermal wells or springs located from literature research or field surveys are located along or east of this major fault in a 10 km (6.2 miles) long, narrow zone. The highest recorded water temperature in the valley appears to be 62.7 C (145 F) at 137.2 meters (450 feet) in a well at Boyes Hot Springs. This is consistent with the geothermal reservoir temperature range of 52-77 C (126-171 F) indicated by geothermometry calculations performed on data from wells in the area. Interpretation of data indicates a low-temperature geothermal fluid upwelling or ''plume'', along the ''east side'' fault with subsequent migration into permeable aquifers predominantly within volcanic strata. It is quite likely other geothermal fluid ''plumes'' in association with faulting are present within the Sonoma Valley area. A 5.8 km{sup 2} geothermal zone, that parallels the fault trace, is delineated and is perhaps the most favorable area for further investigation and possible geothermal production.

Youngs, Leslie G.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Bezore, Stephen P.; Majmundar, Hasu H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and NNSA sources. This tool continues to be of considerable value in aligning the SDRD program with mission priorities, and was expanded in FY 2007 to include technology development needs from the DHS and other agencies with missions closely aligned to that of the NTS.

Wil Lewis, editor

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Phase I Trial of Samarium-153-Lexidronam Complex for Treatment of Clinically Nonmetastatic High-Risk Prostate Cancer: First Report of a Completed Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of samarium-153 EDTMP ({sup 153}Sm) with hormonal therapy (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in high-risk clinically nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk M0 prostate cancer patients (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >7, or >T3) were eligible for this prospective trial of dose-escalated radioactive {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25-2.0 mCi/kg) as primary or postoperative therapy. After 1 month of HT, we administered {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP followed by 4 more months of HT, 46.8 Gy to the pelvic region and 23.4 Gy to the prostate target (TD = 70.2 Gy). The primary endpoint was Grade III toxicity or higher by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Twenty-nine patients enrolled (median prostate-specific antigen = 8.2 ng/mL, 27/29 (93%) T stage {>=}T2b, 24/29 (83%) had Gleason >7) and received {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (.25 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.5 mCi/kg, 4 patients; 0.75 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.0 mCi/kg, 6 patients; 1.5 mCi/kg, 5 patients; 2.0mCi/kg, 4 patients). Twenty-eight patients underwent all planned therapy without delays (1 patient required surgery before the start of RT). With a median follow-up time of 23 months, there were 2 patients (7 %) experiencing Grade III hematologic toxicity. There were no other Grade III or IV side effects. Conclusions: Our trial demonstrates that 2 mCi/kg {sup 153}Sm -EDTMP with HT and RT was safe and feasible in men with high-risk M0 prostate cancer. A Phase II study to test this treatment is currently underway by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.

Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard [Department of Urology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Intenzo, Charles [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lavarino, Jorosali [Department Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Xu Yihuan; Chervoneva, Inna [Department of Pharmacology, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is responsible for two out of the three leading causes of death in the United States. Oxidatively modified apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein (apoB-LPs) are known to contribute to atherosclerotic lesion formation. Based on separate studies, small, dense LDL (apoB-LPs) with longer half-lives have proven to be more susceptible to oxidative modification. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine: 1) whether the yolk-specific very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDLy) have smaller diameters in Restricted Ovulator (R/O) hens where apoB-LP clearance is delayed by apoB-LP receptor dysfunction compared to sister hens with normal ovarian function 2) whether, in this same model, changes in the relative amounts of lipoprotein density classes of VLDL, LDL, and high density lipoproteins (HDL) occur in accordance with effects observed in mammalian models of delayed LDL clearance such as the LDL-receptor knockout mouse that is also known to experience prolonged circulation and continued intravascular metabolism and, 3) whether delayed apoB-LP clearance results in increased particle susceptibility to oxidation under conditions of relatively high plasma estrogen. No significant difference was found between the VLDLy diameters collected from twenty-three sexually mature R/O and twenty-nine normal (NOR) laying sister hens. The composition of VLDL and LDL fractions significantly differed in total plasma C and triacylglyceride between R/O and NOR hens, indicating continued intravascular metabolism for VLDLy in R/O hens. Oxidative susceptibility of VLDLy was measured by conjugated diene and hexanal formation under copper ion exposure. The initiation and propagation of conjugated diene formation was significantly faster (P < 0.05) for VLDLy isolated from the R/O hens when compared to VLDLy isolated from the NOR hens. The R/O VLDLy particles produced significantly (P < 0.05) greater amounts of hexanal than the NOR particles for the first five hours of incubation with copper. These findings demonstrate that lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation is highly dependent on particle age. Thus, any treatment to reduce apo B-LP concentration, an indirect measure of apoB-LP clearance rate, would also reduce apo B-LP age and ASCVD risk.

Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Construction of a stationary FIFO queue with impatient customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the stability of queues with impatient customers. Under general stationary ergodic assumptions, we first provide some conditions for such a queue to be regenerative (i.e. to empty a.s. an infinite number of times). In the particular case of a single server operating in First in, First out, we prove the existence (in some cases, on an enlarged probability space) of a stationary workload. This is done by studying stochastic recursions under the Palm settings, and by stochastic comparison of stochastic recursions.

Moyal, Pascal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Construction of a stationary queue with impatient customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the stability of queues with impatient customers. Under general stationary ergodic assumptions, we first provide some conditions for such a queue to be regenerative (i.e. to empty a.s. an infinite number of times). In the particular case of a single server operating in First in, First out, we prove the existence (in some cases, on an enlarged probability space) of a stationary workload. This is done by studying a non-monotonic stochastic recursion under the Palm settings, and by stochastic comparison of stochastic recursions.

Moyal, Pascal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ogmios 36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- palms - Dogani, an unknown, little-visited green haven, with its two pools and resident crocodiles (the Damaa of Dogani, meaning that they are protected or sacred). Later that evening, we held what was to be our first informal meeting with the mayor... of the Edison phonograph and more than 500 old wax discs. In addition, an extensive fund of gramophone records and one of the largest collections of tape- recordings of Russian folklore represent the history of Russian ethnogra- phy and contain a wide range...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

Michael W. Smith, Kevin Jordan, Cheol Park, Jae-Woo Kim, Peter Lillehei, Roy Crooks, Joycelyn Harrison

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 25920 of 28,560 results. 11 - 25920 of 28,560 results. Download CX-006568: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-West Palm Beach CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): West Palm Beach, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006568-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rhode Island-City-Pawtucket CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2011 Location(s): Pawtucket, Rhode Island Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006571-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006569: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-County-Macomb CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 08/24/2011

335

PULSE: Palomar Ultraviolet Laser for the Study of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PULSE is a new concept to augment the currently operating 5.1-m Hale PALM-3000 exoplanet adaptive optics system with an ultraviolet Rayleigh laser and associated wavefront sensor. By using an ultraviolet laser to measure the high spatial and temporal order turbulence near the telescope aperture, where it dominates, one can extend the faintness limit of natural guide stars needed by PALM-3000. Initial simulations indicate that very-high infrared contrast ratios and good visible-light adaptive optics performance will be achieved by such an upgraded system on stars as faint as mV = 16-17 using an optimized low-order NGS sensor. This will enable direct imaging searches for, and subsequent characterization of, companions around cool, low-mass stars for the first time, as well as routine visible-light imaging twice as sharp as HST for fainter targets. PULSE will reuse the laser and wavefront sensor technologies developed for the automated Robo-AO laser system currently operating at the Palomar 60-inch telescope, as...

Baranec, Christoph; van Dam, Marcos; Burruss, Rick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 2960 of 28,905 results. 51 - 2960 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connecticut-City-Hamden, Town of CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.16, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1, B6.1 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Hamden, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005703-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Palm Bay CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/05/2011 Location(s): Palm Bay, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005709-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001698: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act, County of Monterey, California Energy Efficiency and

337

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS  

SciTech Connect

Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula ? Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA(20) and GA(8), in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations. We modified gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling in transgenic poplars using dominant transgenes and studied their effects for 3 years under field conditions. The transgenes that we employed either reduced the bioactive GAs, or attenuated their signaling. The majority of transgenic trees had significant and in many cases dramatic changes in height, crown architecture, foliage morphology, flowering onset, floral structure, and vegetative phenology. Most transgenes elicited various levels of height reduction consistent with the roles of GA in elongation growth. Several other growth traits were proportionally reduced, including branch length, internode distance, and leaf length. In contrast to elongation growth, stem diameter growth was much less affected, suggesting that semi-dwarf trees in dense stands might provide high levels of biomass production and carbon sequestration. The severity of phenotypic effects was strongly correlated with transgene expression among independent transgenic events, but often in a non-linear manner, the form of which varied widely among constructs. The majority of semi-dwarfed, transgenic plants showed delayed bud flush and early bud set, and expression of a native GAI transgene accelerated first time flowering in the field. All of the phenotypic changes observed in multiple years were stable over the 3 years of field study. Our results suggest that transgenic modification of GA action may be useful for producing semi-dwarf trees with modified growth and morphology for horticulture and other uses. We studied the poplar C(19) gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) gene subfamily. We show that a set of paralogous gene pairs differentially regulate shoot and root development. ? PtGA2ox4 and its paralogous gene PtGA2ox5 are primarily expressed in aerial organs, and overexpression of PtGA2ox5 produced a strong dwarfing phenotype characteristic of GA deficiency. Suppression of PtGA2ox4 and PtGA2ox5 led to increased biomass growth, but had no effect on root development. By contrast, the PtGA2ox2 and PtGA2ox7 paralogous pair was predominantly expressed in roots, and when these two genes were RNAi-suppressed it led to a decrease of root biomass. ? The morphological changes in the transgenic plants were underpinned by tissue-specific increases in bioactive GAs that corresponded to the predominant native expression of the targeted paralogous gene pair. Although RNAi suppression of both paralogous pairs led to changes in wood developmen

Busov, Victor

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

Whole Building Design Approach | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Approach Design Approach Whole Building Design Approach October 16, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis Picture of a Spanish-style building with xeriscape, including palm trees. Camp Pendleton's temporary lodging facility was constructed from 20% recycled materials and will be 100% recyclable upon its distant demolition. The four-story South Mesa Lodge also received one of the U.S. Green Building Council's highest energy efficiency ratings, saving more than 30% percent of water, lighting, and overall utility usage. As defined by the Whole Building Design Guide, the goal of whole building design is to create a successful high-performance building by applying an integrated design and team approach to the project during the planning and programming phases. Whole building design has proven to help:

340

Bryant Sugar House Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bryant Sugar House Biomass Facility Bryant Sugar House Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bryant Sugar House Biomass Facility Facility Bryant Sugar House Sector Biomass Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Pathway and Resource Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway and Resource Overview Pathway and Resource Overview Delivering Renewable Hydrogen Workshop - A Focus on Near-Term Applications Mark F. Ruth November 16, 2009 Palm Springs, CA NREL/PR-6A1-47108 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Definition and Presentation Outline Hydrogen pathway analysis is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment), well-to- wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. This presentation focuses on * Pathway analyses using the Macro-System Model (MSM) * Resource and pathway analysis using the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA) * Status of water-electrolysis technology

342

1 Energy Information Administratlor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 1 9 2) 1 9 1 Energy Information Administratlor ^1982 Washington D ANNUAL April 1983 ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK With Projections to 1990 Ird __ PALm JA A_ .^ ^^^^^^^aaaaaayMN - C s 1s|! l4 1iw_ - _ ~ 1~ __ ~I. EN - i*' This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Ordering information and purchase of this and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the EIA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC. Addresses and telephone numbers appear below. An order form is enclosed for your convenience. National Energy Information Center, EI-20 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building Room 1F-048 Washington, D.C. 20585

343

North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Resource Biomass Facility Regional Resource Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name North County Regional Resource Biomass Facility Facility North County Regional Resource Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

boro biofuel boro biofuel maiden lane New York New York Biofuels Multi boro biofuel boro biofuel maiden lane New York New York Biofuels Multi feed stock http borobiofuel com Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area A2BE Carbon Capture LLC A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Panorama Ave Boulder Colorado Biofuels Developing technology for producing valuable fuel and food from CO2 using algal photosynthesis and bio harvesting http www algaeatwork com Rockies Area AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd West Palm Beach Florida Biofuels Marwich II Ltd OTC BB MWII OB merged in December with AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Subsequently Marwich II Ltd has changed its name to AE Biofuels OTC AEBF AHL TECH AHL TECH PO Box Cincinnati Ohio Biofuels Manufacturing Research and development Other Efficient Utilization http www AHL TECH com

345

Sol Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sol Inc Sol Inc Address 3210 SW 42nd Ave Place Palm City, Florida Zip 34990 Sector Solar Product Solar outdoor LED lighting Year founded 1990 Phone number +1 (772) 286-9461 Website http://www.solarlightingusa.co Coordinates 27.16516°, -80.3107° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.16516,"lon":-80.3107,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Genesis Solar Energy Project PA/FEIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GENESIS SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT GENESIS SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT Volume 1 of 3 August 2010 DOI Control #: FES 10-42 Publication Index #: BLM/CA/ES-2010-016+1793 NEPA Tracking # DOI-BLM-CA-060-0010-0015-EIS ,,..--......- _...._--- United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management 1201 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262 Phone (760) 833·7100 IFax (760) 833-7199 http://www.blm.gov/calpalmsprings/ In reply refer to: CACA 048880 August 27, 20 I0 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the Proposed Resource Management Plan-Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement (PAIFEIS) for the California Desert Conservation Area (COCA) Plan and Genesis Solar Energy Project (GSEP). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the PAiFEIS in consultation with cooperating agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National

347

DOE Awards Contracts to Seven Small Businesses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contracts to Seven Small Businesses Contracts to Seven Small Businesses DOE Awards Contracts to Seven Small Businesses June 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced contract awards to seven small-disadvantaged businesses. Each contract will have a maximum value of approximately $4 million. The contracts will have terms of a one-year base period, with three one-year option periods. The small-businesses receiving the contracts are: Trinity Engineering Associates; Cincinnati, Ohio Terranear PMC; Irving, Texas Aspen Resources Limited; Boulder, Colorado DLE Technical Services; Palm City, Florida Boston Government Services; Lenoir City, Tennessee JG Management Systems; Grand Junction, Colorado

348

Dillon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dillon Wind Farm Dillon Wind Farm Facility Dillon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Palm Springs CA Coordinates 33.939323°, -116.589503° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.939323,"lon":-116.589503,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

Garnet Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Garnet Wind Garnet Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Garnet Wind Facility Garnet Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Azusa Light & Water Developer Azusa Light & Water Energy Purchaser Azusa Light & Water Location Palm Springs CA Coordinates 33.918267°, -116.701076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.918267,"lon":-116.701076,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

fit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Institute of Technology Florida Institute of Technology M. O'Donnell L. Baksay (Florida Institute of Technology) J. Laub (Palm Bay High School) The purpose of this experiment is to determine the mean lifetime of a muon through the two-paddle collection process. A muon's lifetime is approximately 2.2 microseconds. It was hypothesized that the longer the trial, the closer the average of a muon's lifetime would be to 2.2 microseconds. One- and two-hour long sessions were performed; one hour being the minimum requirement for data collection and two hours being doubled that time. Using the QuarkNet site averages for the muon lifetimes were collected and analyzed. The average for one hour was 3.582023938 and the two- hour average was 2.704854922. It supported the hypothesis that the longer the trial, the closer it

351

MFCF in Europe and Elsewhere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFCF in Europe MFCF in Europe MFCF in Europe MFCF in Europe (and elsewhere (and elsewhere ... ... ) ) J. Robert Selman Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, IL Work MCFC-PAFC R&D Palm Springs, CA Nov, 2009 Outline 1. Status of technology, players 2. Life time, performance decay, failure 3. R&D priorities 4. Fundamental research 5. Concluding remarks 1. Status of technology, players Developer Operating pressure (atm) Reforming Manifolding Module Plant size/target (kW) FCE (USA) 1.0 Internal External Single or multistacks 300-3,000 GenCell (USA) 1.0 Internal (indirect) Internal Single stack 40-120 CFC Solutions/MT U (Germany) 1.0 Internal External Hotmodule (horizontal stack) 250-1,000 AFCo (Italy) 3.5 External External Twin-stack (two 125-cell stack integrated with reformer in a can) 125-1,000 KEPRI (Korea)

352

MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop Summary Report Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Dr. Robert J. Remick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mr. Douglas Wheeler DJW Technology Dr. Prabhakar Singh Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center January 13, 2010 Executive Summary A two-session workshop on molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) was held November 16 prior to the 2009 Fuel Cell Seminar in the Palm Springs Convention Center. The MCFC session was held in the morning and the PAFC session, which also included discussions of fuel cells using polybenzimidazole (PBI) electrolyte supports, was held in the afternoon at the same location. Both sessions brought together technical experts from industry, academia, and the national laboratories to address future development of advanced

353

Trees of the Bible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Bible of the Bible Nature Bulletin No. 676-A April 21, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation TREES OF THE BIBLE The King James Version of the Bible mentions seven flowers, seven vegetables, several spices, and thirty-seven differently named trees. Some -- such as cypress, shittah, ash, and teil -- appear only once. Others -- notably the palm, olive, fig, and cedar -- occur many times. This version was completed in 1611, long before botany became an exact science. Like several others, it was a translation by scholars who were not botanists, had never visited the Holy Land, did not realize that the native plants in that region were far different from plants in northern Europe, and made the mistake of identifying some of those mentioned in the Scriptures with familiar plants in England.

354

U.S. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG p.GI.G!) EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Palm Beach County STATE: FL PROJECT TITLE: EECBG Activity 1: Digester Biogas Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE00013 DE-EE0000793 GFO-0000793-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.1A), 1 have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

355

Green Earth Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Fuels Earth Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Earth Fuels Place Houston, Texas Zip 77057 Product A producer and distributor of soy and palm based biodiesel Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Okeelanta Cogeneration Biomass Facility Facility Okeelanta Cogeneration Sector Biomass Location Palm Beach County, Florida Coordinates 26.6514503°, -80.2767327° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6514503,"lon":-80.2767327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-005389: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/22/2011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 17, 2011 CX-005934: Categorical Exclusion Determination Noranda CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/17/2011 Location(s): New Madrid, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 17, 2011 CX-005558: Categorical Exclusion Determination Noranda CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/17/2011 Location(s): New Madrid, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 17, 2011 CX-005518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota-City-Rochester

358

Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Renewable Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Energy Station Edward C. Heydorn - Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Pinakin Patel - FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fred Jahnke - FuelCell Energy, Inc. "Delivering Renewable Hydrogen - A Focus on Near-Term Applications" Palm Springs, CA 16 November 2009 Presentation Outline * Hydrogen Energy Station Technology Overview * Process Description * Performance and Economic Parameters * Proposed Demonstration on Renewable Feedstock * Status of Shop Validation Test * Conclusion 2 Objectives * Determine the economic and technical viability of a hydrogen energy station designed to co-produce power and hydrogen Utilize technology development roadmap to provide deliverables and go/no-go decision

359

Point Of Contact Contractor Name and Address Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15/2011 15/2011 Run Date: DE-SOL-0002014 Vendor List for Solicitation: Page 1 of 6 018572938 NETGAIN CORPORATION ERIN JONES Phone: 8656905811 Fax: 8656905814 ejones@netgain-corp.com 2095 LAKESIDE CENTRE WAY, SUITE 115 KNOXVILLE TN 379226592 040773264 PROTECTION STRATEGIES INCORPORATED KEITH P. HEDMAN Phone: 7035530561 Fax: 7035530562 khedman@protectionsi.com 2300 9TH STREET SOUTH SUITE 400 ARLINGTON VA 222042387 045509338 SECURIGUARD, INC. CHARLIE BORING Phone: 7038216777 Fax: 7037901696 charlie.boring@securiguardinc.com 6858 OLD DOMINION DR # 307 MC LEAN VA 221011383 073891921 WACKENHUT SERVICES, INCORPORATED MICHAEL GOLDEN Phone: 5614723645 Fax: 5614723679 mgolden@wsihq.com 7121 FAIRWAY DRIVE, SUITE 301 PALM BEACH GARDENS FL 334183766 085925480 BRANDAN ENTERPRISES INC GEORGES H. BRANDAN

360

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beets and Bacteria Beets and Bacteria Name: Arlene Status: other Grade: 6-8 Location: IL Country: USA Date: Fall 2011 Question: I found an experiment at the pbs.org/teachers website that evaluates different handwashing techniques by swabbing palms, nails, and in between fingers after different types of handwashing. These swabs are then "plated" on canned beets placed inside of a petri dish. Does this sound like a realistic and safe experiment for middle school students? NEWTON BBS does not recommend growing/culturing bacteria without the supervision of a microbiologist, and a properly equipped microbiology laboratory. Safety is our main concern! Growing dangerous bacteria species unknowingly is a real possibility and serious illness may occur without proper handling techniques. Furthermore, without proper bacterial disposal procedures such as an autoclave can guarantee, there is a danger to anyone who comes in contact after disposal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

CX-003702: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003702: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida Hydrogen Initiative - Enerfuel (Advanced HiFoil Bipolar Plates) CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/15/2010 Location(s): West Palm Beach, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Under the 2004 Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), the University of Central Florida (UCF - formerly Florida Hydrogen Initiative) was awarded funding that would then be used to fund various research projects chosen by the university. The scope of the CDP has been expanded to include five new sub-award projects. This project would provide durable, low cost bipolar plates for use in advanced high temperature proton exchange membrane (HT PEM) fuel cells for stationary, vehicle auxiliary power units (APU), and

362

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Modular/3D Housing Units (1) Company Champion Enterprises, Inc. 27% CMH Manufacturing 14% All American Homes, LLC 10% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Excel Homes LLC 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1,200 110.6 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the Modular/3D home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007, surveyed Modular/3D home sales were estimated at $1.6 billion and 20,601 units. HousingZone.com, 2007 Factory Built Housing Results, http://www.housingzone.com/factory.html. 3,200 228.8 1,689 165.4 1,614 162.9 Gross Sales Market Share of Top Units Produced Volume ($million) 25 Company Sales (2)

363

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Built Housing Units (1) Company CMH Manufacturing 20% Champion Enterprises, Inc. 19% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Fleetwood Enterprises, Inc. 9% Skyline Corporation 6% Note(s): Source(s): 8,207 376.4 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the factory-built home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007, surveyed factory-built home sales were estimated at $6.6 billion and 133,361 units. HousingZone.com, 2007 Factory Built Housing Results. 21,126 1,286.6 8,911 679.1 15,137 600.0 Gross Sales Market Share of Top Units Produced Volume ($million) 25 Company Sales (2) 31,100 1,327.8

364

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of HUD-Code (Mobile) Homes (1) Company CMH Manufacturing 23% Champion Enterprises, Inc. 18% Fleetwood Enterprises, Inc. 12% Palm Harbor Homes 11% Skyline Corporation 8% Note(s): Source(s): 8,207 376 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the HUD-Code home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007, surveyed HUD-Code home sales were estimated at $4.83 billion and 109,320 units. HousingZone.com, 2007 Factory Built Housing Results, http://www.housingzone.com/factory.html. 16,473 848 15,137 600 7,297 516 Gross Sales Market Share of Top Units Produced Volume ($million) 25 Company Sales (2)

365

arch layout 11.21.98  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.jpg 1.jpg Demonstration A full-scale demonstration of a light-redirecting skylight was conducted in the Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce. Because cooling loads area major problem in this climate and sunlight is almost always available, we designed a solution around a small skylight that admits and redirects direct sunlight to the ceiling of two separate interior rooms. The geometry of the internal skylight reflector was designed to provide daylight under all seasonal solar conditions, without allowing direct sunlight penetration to the task areas. The optical materials (reflectors and diffusers) were selected to provide good optical efficiency throughout the year. Initial surveys of the occupants indicated that they enjoyed the variability intrinsic in such a system and that it met their lighting needs well even during the winter.

366

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 3100 of 31,917 results. 91 - 3100 of 31,917 results. Article Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy At an event this morning at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, the Energy Department released a strategy on critical materials. The report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials used in four clean energy technologies: wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-releases-new-critical-materials-strategy Download EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Tuba City Uranium Mill Tailings Site http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1268-final-environmental-assessment Download Solar Energy Development in the Southwest Presentations from the Tribal Leader Energy Forum on solar in Palm Springs,

367

Wagner | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wagner Wagner Jump to: navigation, search Name Wagner Facility Wagner Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner WKN USA LLC Developer WKN USA LLC Energy Purchaser Undisclosed PPA Location Palm Springs CA Coordinates 33.908089°, -116.555558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.908089,"lon":-116.555558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

901 - 11910 of 31,917 results. 901 - 11910 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005389: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Activity 1: Digester Biogas CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/22/2011 Location(s): Palm Beach County, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005389-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005444: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant: Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Incremental Cost Recovery CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/22/2011 Location(s): Fairfax County, Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005444-categorical-exclusion-determination

369

Blythe Solar Power Project PA/FEIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BLYTHE SOLAR POWER PROJECT BLYTHE SOLAR POWER PROJECT Volume 1 of 2 August 2010 DOI Control #: FES 10-41 Publication Index #: BLM/CA/ES-2010-015+1793 NEPA Tracking # DOI-BLM-CA-060-0010-0013-EIS United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management 120 1 Bird Center Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262 Phone (760) 833-7100 IFax (760) 833-7199 http://www.blm.gov/ca/palmsprings/ In reply refer to: CACA 048811 August 20, 20 I0 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the Proposed Resource Management Plan-AmendmentlFinal Environmental Impact Statement (PAlFEIS) for the California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan and Blythe Solar Power Project (BSPP). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the PAIFEIS in consultation with cooperating agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National Environmental

370

Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Continental Biofuels Corporation Continental Biofuels Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Continental Biofuels Corporation Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75240 Sector Biofuels Product Dallas-based company devoted to agribusiness in Southeast Asia. The firms focus its agribusiness acquisitions on crops, especially palm oil plantations, that can be used as biofuels. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Block, Director Emeritus Florida Solar Energy Center/University of Central Florida 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Phone: (321) 638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Greg Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Greg.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-04GO14225 Subcontractors: * EnerFuels, Inc., West Palm Beach, FL * Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL * Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL * SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL * Electrolytic Technologies Corporation, Miami, FL

372

Bio-Based Resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Fatty-acid distribution in various plant oils...in various plant oils Fatty acid C:DB (a) Canola Corn Cottonseed Linseed Olive Palm Rapeseed Soybean High oleic (b) Myristic 14:0 0.1 0.1 0.7 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 Myristoleic 14:1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Palmitic 16:0 4.1 10.9 21.6 5.5 13.7 44.4 3.0 11.0 6.4 Palmitoleic 16:1 0.3...

373

Agua Caliente Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of facility- and commercial-scale solar energy projects on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation in Palm Springs, CA. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) conducted a feasibility and pre-development study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. As described below, this study as a logical and necessary next step for ACBCI. Support for solar project development in California, provided through the statewide California Solar Initiative (CSI), its Renewable Portfolio Standard and Feed-in Tariff Program, and recently announced Reverse Auction Mechanism, provide unprecedented support and incentives that can be utilized by customers of California's investor-owned utilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program funding allowed ACBCI to complete its next logical step to implement its Strategic Energy Plan, consistent with its energy and sustainability goals.

Carolyn T. Stewart, Managing Partner; Red Mountain Energy Partners

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Animal Hands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hands Hands Nature Bulletin No. 611 October 1, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMAL HANDS Muddy footprints shaped like babies' hands can be seen on almost every trash barrel in our forest preserve picnic areas. These are made by raccoons which come at night to eat discarded sandwiches, chicken bones and other food scraps. The hind feet as well as the front feet of the coon are built like hands and that its front foot, especially in mud or soft snow, leaves a print of the palm with four spread fingers and a thumb. The track of the hind foot is longer with a definite heal. The coon feels for fish, crawfish, frogs and snails along the water's edge, scrubbing each thoroughly before eating. Full of curiosity and mischief, a pet coon quickly learns to unlatch doors, play with small objects and pick people's pockets.

375

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio Standard Portfolio Standard & Utility Supplier Diversity Program Presented by: Rahmon O. Momoh Energy Advisor to Commissioner Timothy Simon TRIBAL LEADER FORUM: SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST December 19-20, 2011 SPA RESORT CASINO HOTEL IN PALM SPRINGS, CA 2 About the CPUC * The CPUC is the California state agency that regulates essential services including: o Electricity o Natural Gas o Telecommunications o Water o Rail and Transportation * Headquartered in San Francisco with offices in Los Angeles and Sacramento * Five Governor-appointed Commissioners serve staggered six-year terms * Meet publicly at least once a month to decide on important policies, such as energy rates and procurement, renewable energy goals, and improvements to infrastructure 3 Utility Regulation

376

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 7390 of 8,172 results. 81 - 7390 of 8,172 results. Download Solar Energy Development in the Southwest Presentations from the Tribal Leader Energy Forum on solar in Palm Springs, CA. http://energy.gov/indianenergy/downloads/solar-energy-development-southwest Download Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Presentations from the Tribal Leader Energy Forum on conventional energy in Las Vegas, NV. http://energy.gov/indianenergy/downloads/conventional-energy-forum-associated-vertical-business-development-best Download FTCP Face to Face Meeting- September 18, 2012 Meeting hosted by FTCP Chair and FTCP Deputy Chair with FTCP Agents and other FTCP personnel in attendance. Meetings consisted of FAQ Standards updates, FTCP Operational Goals discussion, NTC Activities and guest

377

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USC, Westinghouse Savannah River Company Sign Hydrogen Technology Agreement USC, Westinghouse Savannah River Company Sign Hydrogen Technology Agreement ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) COLUMBIA, S.C. (Jan. 23, 2002) - The Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the University of South Carolina have signed an agreement to make South Carolina the nation's leader in hydrogen and fuel-cell technology. The agreement, signed Wednesday, Jan. 23, by USC President John M. Palms and Dr. Susan Wood, WSRC vice president for the Savannah River Technology Center, calls for collaborative research and development in the area of hydrogen technology, including energy applications and development of hydrogen fuel-cell technology for transportation, electric power and portable power applications. The Savannah River Technology Center is the applied research and development laboratory for the Savannah River Site.

378

Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis of fats. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolysis of fats and oils produces fatty acid and glycerol. The catalyzed, liquid phase Colgate-Emry process, state-of-the-art, produces impure products that require extensive energy investment for their purification to commercial grade. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis may produce products more easily purified. A bench-scale hydrolyzer was designed and constructed to contact descending liquid fat or oil with rising superheated steam. Each of the five stages in the reactor was designed similar to a distillation column stage to promote intimate liquid-gas contact. Degree of hydrolysis achieved in continuous tests using tallow feed were 15% at 280C and 35% at 300C at a tallow-to-steam mass feed ratio of 4.2. At a feed ratio of 9.2, the degree of hydrolysis was 21% at 300C. Decomposition was strongly evident at 325C but not at lower temperatures. Soybean oil rapidly polymerized under reaction conditions. Batch tests at 320C produced degrees of hydrolyses of between 44% and 63% using tallow and palm oil feeds. Over 95% fatty acids were present in a clean, readily separated organic portion of the overhead product from most tests. The test reactor had serious hydraulic resistance to liquid down-flow which limited operation to very long liquid residence times. These times are in excess of those that tallow and palm oil are stable at the reaction temperature. Little glycerol and extensive light organics were produced indicating that unexplained competing reactions to hydrolysis occurred in the experimental system. Further tests using an improved reactor will be required.

Deibert, M.C.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis of fats  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolysis of fats and oils produces fatty acid and glycerol. The catalyzed, liquid phase Colgate-Emry process, state-of-the-art, produces impure products that require extensive energy investment for their purification to commercial grade. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis may produce products more easily purified. A bench-scale hydrolyzer was designed and constructed to contact descending liquid fat or oil with rising superheated steam. Each of the five stages in the reactor was designed similar to a distillation column stage to promote intimate liquid-gas contact. Degree of hydrolysis achieved in continuous tests using tallow feed were 15% at 280C and 35% at 300C at a tallow-to-steam mass feed ratio of 4.2. At a feed ratio of 9.2, the degree of hydrolysis was 21% at 300C. Decomposition was strongly evident at 325C but not at lower temperatures. Soybean oil rapidly polymerized under reaction conditions. Batch tests at 320C produced degrees of hydrolyses of between 44% and 63% using tallow and palm oil feeds. Over 95% fatty acids were present in a clean, readily separated organic portion of the overhead product from most tests. The test reactor had serious hydraulic resistance to liquid down-flow which limited operation to very long liquid residence times. These times are in excess of those that tallow and palm oil are stable at the reaction temperature. Little glycerol and extensive light organics were produced indicating that unexplained competing reactions to hydrolysis occurred in the experimental system. Further tests using an improved reactor will be required.

Deibert, M.C.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Case Studies of integrated hydrogen systems. International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Final report for Subtask A of task 11 - Integrated Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the framework of the International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Task 11 was undertaken to develop tools to assist in the design and evaluation of existing and potential hydrogen demonstration projects. Emphasis was placed on integrated systems, from input energy to hydrogen end use. Included in the PDF document are the Executive Summary of the final report and the various case studies. The activities of task 11 were focused on near- and mid-term applications, with consideration for the transition from fossil-based systems to sustainable hydrogen energy systems. The participating countries were Canada, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the United States. In order for hydrogen to become a competitive energy carrier, experience and operating data need to be generated and collected through demonstration projects. A framework of scientific principles, technical expertise, and analytical evaluation and assessment needed to be developed to aid in the design and optimization of hydrogen demonstration projects to promote implementation. The task participants undertook research within the framework of three highly coordinated subtasks that focused on the collection and critical evaluation of data from existing demonstration projects around the world, the development and testing of computer models of hydrogen components and integrated systems, and the evaluation and comparison of hydrogen systems. While the Executive Summary reflects work on all three subtasks, this collection of chapters refers only to the work performed under Subtask A. Ten projects were analyzed and evaluated in detail as part of Subtask A, Case Studies. The projects and the project partners were: Solar Hydrogen Demonstration Project, Solar-Wasserstoff-Bayern, Bayernwerk, BMW, Linde, Siemens (Germany); Solar Hydrogen Plant on Residential House, M. Friedli (Switzerland); A.T. Stuart Renewable Energy Test Site; Stuart Energy Systems (Canada); PHOEBUS Juelich Demonstration Plant Research Centre, Juelich (FZJ) (Germany); Schatz Solar Hydrogen Project, Schatz Energy Research Centre, Humboldt State University (USA); INTA Solar Hydrogen Facility, INTA (Spain); Solar Hydrogen Fueled Trucks, Clean Air Now, Xerox (USA), Electrolyser (Canada); SAPHYS: Stand-Alone Small Size Photovoltaic Hydrogen Energy System, ENEA (Italy), IET (Norway), FZJ (Germany); Hydrogen Generation from Stand-Alone Wind-Powered Electrolysis Systems, RAL (United Kingdom), ENEA (Italy), DLR (Germany); Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation Project; Schatz Energy Research Centre, City of Palm Desert (USA). Other demonstration projects are summarized in chapter 11.

Schucan, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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381

High Efficiency Integrated Space Conditioning, Water Heating and Air Distribution System for HUD-Code Manufactured Housing  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the need for new space conditioning and water heating systems for manufactured housing, DeLima Associates assembled a team to develop a space conditioning system that would enhance comfort conditions while also reducing energy usage at the systems level. The product, Comboflair® was defined as a result of a needs analysis of project sponsors and industry stakeholders. An integrated system would be developed that would combine a packaged airconditioning system with a small-duct, high-velocity air distribution system. In its basic configuration, the source for space heating would be a gas water heater. The complete system would be installed at the manufactured home factory and would require no site installation work at the homesite as is now required with conventional split-system air conditioners. Several prototypes were fabricated and tested before a field test unit was completed in October 2005. The Comboflair® system, complete with ductwork, was installed in a 1,984 square feet, double-wide manufactured home built by Palm Harbor Homes in Austin, TX. After the home was transported and installed at a Palm Harbor dealer lot in Austin, TX, a data acquisition system was installed for remote data collection. Over 60 parameters were continuously monitored and measurements were transmitted to a remote site every 15 minutes for performance analysis. The Comboflair® system was field tested from February 2006 until April 2007. The cooling system performed in accordance with the design specifications. The heating system initially could not provide the needed capacity at peak heating conditions until the water heater was replaced with a higher capacity standard water heater. All system comfort goals were then met. As a result of field testing, we have identified improvements to be made to specific components for incorporation into production models. The Comboflair® system will be manufactured by Unico, Inc. at their new production facility in St. Louis, MO. The product will be initially launched in the hot-humid climates of the southern U.S.

Henry DeLima; Joe Akin; Joseph Pietsch

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

SEPCO - Solar Electric Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEPCO - Solar Electric Power Company SEPCO - Solar Electric Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SEPCO - Solar Electric Power Company Name SEPCO - Solar Electric Power Company Address 1521 SE Palm Court Place Stuart, Florida Zip 34994 Sector Solar Product Commercial Solar Lighting & Off Grid Solar Power Systems Year founded 1994 Number of employees 11-50 Company Type For Profit Phone number 772-220-6615 Website http://www.sepco-solarlighting Coordinates 27.170937°, -80.232438° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.170937,"lon":-80.232438,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

General Biodiesel Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biodiesel Incorporated Biodiesel Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name General Biodiesel Incorporated Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98136 Product General BioDieselâ"¢, Inc. specializes in producing high-quality biodiesel by processing vegetable oils (primarily palm, canola, soy, linseed, coconut, mustard and cotton) and by cleaning and recycling cooking oils. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Bio-composite Nonwoven Media Based on Chitosan and Empty Fruit Bunches for Wastewater Application  

SciTech Connect

Fibrous filter media in the form of non-woven filters have been used extensively in water treatment as pre-filters or to support the medium that does the separation. Lignocellulosic such as empty fruit bunches have potential to be used as a low cost filter media as they represent unused resources, widely available and are environmentally friendly. Laboratory filtration tests were performed to investigate the potential application of empty fruit bunches that enriched with chitosan as a fiber filter media to remove suspended solids, oil and grease, and organics in terms of chemical oxygen demand from palm oil mill effluent. The present paper studies the effect of chitosan concentration on the filter media performance. Bench-scaled experiment results indicated that pre-treatment using the fiber filtration system removed up to 67.3% of total suspended solid, 65.1% of oil and grease and 46.1% of chemical oxygen demand. The results show that the lignocellulosic fiber filter could be a potential technology for primary wastewater treatment.

Sadikin, Aziatul Niza; Nawawi, Mohd Ghazali Mohd; Othman, Norasikin

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Using Show Homes (and Sponsorships) to Persuade Commissioning Relevancy and Factory Crafted High Performance Modular Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Builders' Show (IBS) sponsored by the National Association of Home Builders is a venue attracting over 100,000 builders and building related professionals every year. The increased attendances each year improves the educational sessions, vendor participation and "live" home construction demonstrations. The "live" home demonstrations are a great opportunity to integrate high performance construction and commissioning strategies into the marketplace to validate and distinguish products and the show home builders. At this past year's IBS show in February, Palm Harbor Homes build the GenX home that included an installed and operational 4.08kWp photovoltaic system with inverter and back up battery management system, a solar hot water heater, completed and passed the thermal bypass inspection checklist required for EnergyStar certification and obtained Florida Green Building Certification. The home also qualified for local utility rebate for meeting EnergyStar, father demonstrating that incentive programs encourage high performance building practices and are vital to integrating commissioning procedures into the marketplace. Blower door and duct leakage tests were conducted to quantify as built conditions validating modular manufacturing quality assurance. This paper aims to provide a case study of commissioned, performance measure that justify cost for these demonstration project and "live" show homes.

Thomas-Rees, S.; Chasar, D.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Science and Technology Review October/November 2009  

SciTech Connect

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Collaborations Provide Solutions--Commentary by Steven D. Liedle; (2) Light-Speed Spectral Analysis of a Laser Pulse--An optical device inspects and stops potentially damaging laser pulses; (3) Capturing Waveforms in a Quadrillionth of a Second--The femtoscope, a time microscope, improves the temporal resolution and dynamic range of conventional recording instruments; (4) Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy in the Palm of Your Hand--A miniature gamma-ray spectrometer provides increased resolution at a reduced cost; (5) Building Fusion Targets with Precision Robotics--A robotic system assembles tiny fusion targets with nanometer precision; (6) ROSE: Making Compiler Technology More Accessible--An open-source software infrastructure makes powerful compiler techniques available to all programmers; (7) Restoring Sight to the Blind with an Artificial Retina--A retinal prosthesis could restore vision to people suffering from eye diseases; (8) Eradicating the Aftermath of War--A remotely operated system precisely locates buried land mines; (9) Compact Alignment for Diagnostic Laser Beams--A smaller, less expensive device aligns diagnostic laser beams onto targets; and (10) Securing Radiological Sources in Africa--Livermore and other national laboratories are helping African countries secure their nuclear materials.

Bearinger, J P

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

International Journal of Computer Research ISSN 1535-6698 Volume 11, Number 1, pp. 1-12 2002 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. PROTOCOLS FOR SERVICE DISCOVERY IN DYNAMIC AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile and wireless computing is permeating the globe, affecting the way we live and conduct business using portable computers such as laptops, hand-held PCs, Palm computers, and even wearable computers. In becoming mobile, users innocently expect and demand the same computing luxury they used to (and still) enjoy in the fixed computing environment. Unfortunately, network resources (e.g. printers, fax machines, and file systems) and application software do not follow the mobile users when they leave their offices or homes, or when they relocate to another temporary office or home. Supporting true mobility of users and business task forces will therefore require changing the way application software is packaged and deployed. It will also require changing the mechanisms by which system resource are configured and managed. The lesson quickly learned by the mobile computing research community is that mobility and dynamism are synonymous. Service discovery protocols (SDP) are re-shaping the way software and network resources are configured, deployed, and advertised, all in favor of the mobile user. Furthermore, so called wireless local connectivity technologies (e.g. Infrared and Bluetooth) are fueling the importance of SDP by enabling the mobile user to discover and use proximity services seamlessly and effortlessly. In this paper we discuss the emerging technology of service discovery in the context of mobile and wireless computing, with emphasis on Jini, UpnP, and Salutation protocols.

Mobile Networks Choonhwa; Choonhwa Lee; Sumi Helal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP) is one of five competitively selected U.S. DOE Building America teams and began work on 9/1/99. BAIHP focuses on improving the energy efficiency, durability and indoor air quality in manufactured homes. Team members, Cavalier Homes, Fleetwood Homes, Palm Harbor Homes, Southern Energy Homes, and manufacturers in the Super Good Cents/Natural Choice program produce over 100,000 manufactured homes/yr currently. In addition, the BAIHP team provides technical assistance to about 30 site builders and modular home manufacturers including Habitat for Humanity affiliates throughout the nation. BAIHP is also charged with enhancing the energy efficiency and learning environment in portable classrooms in the northwestern states of WA, OR and ID. This paper summarizes the multifaceted work being performed by BAIHP and provides specific data on 310 homes constructed in the Gainesville FL area with technical assistance from Florida Home Energy and Resources Organization. The paper also summarizes typical causes and cures for moisture problems in manufactured homes.

Chandra, S.; McCloud, M.; Moyer, N.; Beal, D.; Chasar, D.; McIlvaine, J.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Martin, E.; Fonorow, K.; Mullens, M.; Lubliner, M.; McSorley, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

OmniTouch: wearable multitouch interaction everywhere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that allows everyday surfaces- including a wearers own body- to be appropriated for graphical multitouch interaction. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that enables interactive multitouch applications on everyday surfaces. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or environment. Foremost, the system allows the wearer to use their hands, arms and legs as graphical, interactive surfaces. Users can also transiently appropriate surfaces from the environment to expand the interactive area (e.g., books, walls, tables). On such surfaces- without any calibration- OmniTouch provides capabilities similar to that of a mouse or touchscreen: X and Y location in 2D interfaces and whether fingers are clicked or hovering, enabling a wide variety of interactions. Reliable operation on the hands, for example, requires buttons to be 2.3cm in diameter. Thus, it is now conceivable that anything one can do on todays mobile devices, they could do in the palm of their hand. ACM Classification: H.5.2 [Information interfaces and

Chris Harrison; Hrvoje Benko; Andrew D. Wilson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Green and High Performance Factory Crafted Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the U.S., factory-built housing greater than 400 square feet is built either to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) code for mobile homes or site-built codes for modular housing. During the last few years, as the production of HUD code housing has dwindled, many leading edge factory builders have started building modular homes to compete with site-built housing and stay in business. As part of the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP) we have assisted in the design and construction of several green and high performance modular homes that Palm Harbor Homes, Florida Division (PHH) has built for the International Builders Show (IBS) in 2006, 2007, and 2008. This paper will summarize the design features and the green and energy-efficient certification processes conducted for the 2008 show homes, one of which received the very first E-Scale produced by BAIHP for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Builders Challenge program.

Thomas-Rees, S.; Chasar, D.; Chandra, S.; Stroer, D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Dose Reconstruction Using Computational Modeling of Handling a Particular Arsenic-73/Arsenic-74 Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special work evolution was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with a particular 73As/74As source but the workers extremity dosimeter did not appear to provide appropriate dosimetric information for the tasks performed. This prompted a reconstruction of the dose to the workers hands. The computer code MCNP was chosen to model the tasks that the worker performed to evaluate the potential nonuniform hand dose distribution. A model was constructed similar to the workers hands to represent the performed handling tasks. The model included the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and the palm. The dose was calculated at the 7 mg cm-2 skin depth. To comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, the 100 cm2 area that received the highest dose must be calculated. It could be determined if the dose received by the worker exceeded any regulatory limit. The computer code VARSKIN was also used to provide results to compare with those from MCNP where applicable. The results from the MCNP calculations showed that the dose to the workers hands did not exceed the regulatory limit of 0.5 Sv (50 rem). The equivalent nonuniform dose was 0.126 Sv (12.6 rem) to the right hand and 0.082 Sv (8.2 rem) to the left hand.

Stallard, Alisha M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almuth Ernsting assesses the current social and environmental impacts of large-scale biofuel production and questions whether sustainability standards will be enough to prevent serious problems. Few people now doubt that some of the biofuels used in Europe are produced at the expense of rainforests and other biodiverse ecosystems and that those should not be promoted as green energy. Nobody would choose to buy biodiesel made from Colombian palm oil grown on illegal plantations owned by companies linked to paramilitaries which have killed, evicted and tortured local people to grab their land. Governments and international organisations are therefore keen to develop sustainability standards. In Europe, various countries including the UK are planning reporting requirements on environmental and social sustainability. The European Commission has proposed environmental standards, though they do not include human rights and food security. Can sustainability guarantees work and ensure that biofuels will contribute to climate change mitigation and socially just development? Scepticism has come from many grassroots organisations, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and even a report published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Europe report discloses biofuels' embarrassing secret  

SciTech Connect

According to a recently released European Union (EU) internal document, biofuels can produce up to four times more greenhouse gas emissions than the conventional diesel or gasoline they are intended to replace. Conventional gasoline and diesel emit around 85 kilograms of CO2-equivalent per gigajoule of energy. For biofuels to make any sense, they have to beat this by a margin, or else why bother given all the negative externalities associated with growing biofuels? The EU study suggests that the carbon footprint of typical European biofuels is in the range of 100--150 and North American soybeans score around 340 -- at least four times higher than conventional transportation fuels. By contrast, Latin American sugar cane and bioethanol from palm oil from Southeast Asia, is relatively better at 82 and 74 kilograms per gigajoule, respectively. But even in these cases, it is far from clear if biofuels are superior to conventional fuels due to the many externalities associated with biofuels, including clearing of virgin forests and loss of habitat and biodiversity. Moreover, biofuel production in many regions competes directly with food production, resulting in higher food costs.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the users palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the users fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hands characteristics just into the systems mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interfaces controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

Anthony L. Crawford

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of oilseed yields: a preliminary review  

SciTech Connect

It was assumed that for most oilseed crops, 90% of the oil yield might be considered as profit. To compare oil seeds, pertinent portions of the yield and energy paragraphs from a summary published by Dr. Duke for DOE Grant No. 59-2246-1-6-054-0 with Dr. Bagby as ADODR were reproduced. The seed yields ranged from 200 to 14,000 kg/ha, the low one too low to consider and the high one suspiciously high. The yield of 14,000 kg oil per hectare is equivalent to more than 30 barrels of oil per hectare. The energy species included ambrette, tung-oil tree, cashew, wood-oil tree, mu-oil tree, peanut, mustard greens; rape, colza; black mustard, turnip, safflower, colocynth, coconut, crambe, African oil palm, soybean, cotton, sunflower, Eastern black walnut, Engligh walnut, meadow foam, flax, macadamia nuts, opium poppy, perilla, almond, castorbean, Chinese tallow tree, sesame, jojoba, yellow mustard, stokes' aster, and Zanzibar oilvine. 1 table. (DP)

Duke, J.A. (Economic Botany Lab., Beltsville, MD); Bagby, M.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microsoft Word - TITLE.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Transportation for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION 1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K. Debe and Judith B. Hartmann (primary contact) 3M Company 3M Center, Building 201-1C-30 St. Paul, MN 55144-1000 (651) 736-1772, fax: (651) 575-1187, e-mail: jbhartmann@mmm.com DOE Program Manager: JoAnn Milliken (202) 586-2480, fax: (202) 586-9811, e-mail: JoAnn.Milliken@ee.doe.gov ANL Technical Advisor: James F. Miller (630) 252-4537, fax: (630) 972-4537, e-mail: millerj@cmt.anl.gov Contractor: 3M Company, St. Paul, Minnesota Prime Contract No. DE-FC02-99EE50582, September 1999-December 2001 Subcontractor: Energy Partners, Inc., West Palm Beach, Florida Objectives * Develop a set of high-performance, matching polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and

400

Intro2009printerversion.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expat's Expat's Guide to U.S. Taxes Hands-On Help for Americans Overseas by JANE A. BRUNO, J.D. Published by Jane A. Bruno, J.D. Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, U.S.A. N E W f o r 2 0 0 8 / 2 0 0 9 ! I n c l u d e s T h e L a t e s t T a x C h a n g e s ! Copyright 2009 Jane A. Bruno. Printed and bound in the United States of America. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by information storage and retrieval system - except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review to be printed in a magazine or newspaper - without permission in writing from the publisher. For information, please contact Jane Bruno at janebruno1@gmail.com. First printing, 1998. Publisher's Note: This book was written in an effort to clarify and simplify the federal tax rules

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401

Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications  

SciTech Connect

Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Doses to the hand during the administration of radiolabeled antibodies containing Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure of the hands of medical personnel administering radiolabeled antibodies (RABs) was evaluated on the basis of (a) observing and photo-documenting administration techniques, and (b) experimental data on doses to thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on fingers of phantom hands holding syringes, and on syringes, with radionuclides in the syringes in each case. Actual exposure data for I-131 and Lu-177 were obtained in field studies. Variations in handling and administration techniques were identified. Dose rates measured using TLDs on the surface of loaded syringes were adjusted for differences in electronic stopping power, absorption coefficients, and attenuation between dosimeters and tissue to estimate dose-to-skin averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 7 mg cm{sup {minus}2} depth for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177. Dose rate coefficients to the skin, if in contact with the syringe wall, were 89, 1.9, 3.8, and 0.41 {micro}Sv s{sup {minus}1} per 37 MBq (1 mCi) for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177, respectively. For dose reduction, when using Y-90 the importance was clearly indicated of (a) avoiding direct contact with syringes containing RABs, if practical, and (b) using a beta-particle shield on the syringe. In using a syringe for injection, doses can best be approximated for the geometry studied by (a) wearing a finger dosimeter on the middle finger, toward the outside of the hand, on the hand operating the plunger, and (b) wearing finger dosimeters on the inner (palm) side of the finger on the hand that supports the syringe for energetic beta-particle emitters, such as Y-90 and Re-188.

Barber, D.E. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Public Health; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nissan Hypermini Urban Electric Vehicle Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), which is part of DOEs FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, in partnership with the California cities of Vacaville and Palm Springs, collected mileage and maintenance and repairs data for a fleet of eleven Nissan Hypermini urban electric vehicles (UEVs). The eleven Hyperminis were deployed for various periods between January 2001 and June 2005. During the combined total of 439 months of use, the eleven Hyperminis were driven a total of 41,220 miles by staff from both cities. This equates to an average use of about 22 miles per week per vehicle. There were some early problems with the vehicles, including a charging problem and a need to upgrade the electrical system. In addition, six vehicles required drive system repairs. However, the repairs were all made under warranty. The Hyperminis were generally well-liked and provided drivers with the ability to travel any of the local roads. Full charging of the Hyperminis lithiumion battery pack required up to 4 hours, with about 810 miles of range available for each hour of battery charging. With its right-side steering wheel, some accommodation of the drivers customary driving methods was required to adapt for different blind spots and vehicle manipulation. For that reason, the drivers received orientation and training before using the vehicle. The Hypermini is instrumented in kilometers rather than in miles, which required an adjustment for the drivers to calculate speed and range. As the drivers gained familiarity with the vehicles, there was increased acceptance and a preference for using it over traditional city vehicles. In all cases, the Hyperminis attracted a great amount of attention and interest from the general public.

James Francfort; Robert Brayer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dietary lipid source and vitamin e influence on chicken meat quality and lipid oxidation stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the poultry industry, further processed meat products have the highest share in the market, and because there is a growing demand of food products with enriched amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, the objectives of this research were to assess lipid oxidation development and quality characteristics of chicken meat as affected by dietary fat and vitamin E levels. Broilers were fed during six weeks with diets containing animal/vegetable, lard, palm kernel, soybean, conjugated linoleic acid, flaxseed, or menhaden oil. Each lipid diet was supplemented with either a control (33 or 42 mg/kg) or a supranutritional level (200-400 or 200 mg/kg) of vitamin E. Breast and thigh meat, or skin, were processed, packaged, and refrigerated as raw meat, cooked patties, or cooked sous vide meat. The results showed that the chicken meat fatty acid composition reflected those from the dietary fats. In the meat or skin there was a higher lipid oxidation susceptibility as the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increased, shown as malonaldehyde values, particularly in the treatments with low supplemented level of vitamin E (P<0.05). The relative lipid oxidative stability of the meat decreased in consecutive order from raw, cooked sous vide, and cooked meat patties. Sous vide cooked meat developed lipid oxidation at a slow rate and showed not to be affected by nonheme iron values. Dietary fat and vitamin E level affected breast meat lightness (L* color space) values (P<0.05), but not muscle pH, Allo-Kramer shear force, or water holding capacity. In conclusion, the increment in the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increases the susceptibility to lipid oxidation in the meat. Supranutritional supplementation levels of vitamin E are more effective at inhibiting the lipid oxidation development in chicken meat than some current levels used by the poultry industry. Neither dietary fat nor vitamin E level seems to affect the development of pale, soft, and exudative meat condition in chicken meat.

Narciso-Gaytan, Carlos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Investigation on Nitric Oxide and Soot of Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel using a Medium Duty Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiesel has been suggested as an alternative fuel to the petroleum diesel fuel. It beneficially reduces regulated emission gases, but increases NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide) Thus, the increase in NOx is the barrier for potential growth of the biodiesel fuel. In general, NOx formation is dominated by flame temperature. Interestingly, soot can play a role as a heat sink as well as a heat transfer media to high temperature gases. Thus, the cooling effect of soot may change the flame temperature and therefore, NOx emissions. In this study, emphasis is placed on the relationship between soot and NO (Nitric oxide) formation. For the experimental study, a metallic fuel additive is used since barium is known to be effective to suppress soot formation during combustion. The barium additive is applied to #2D (Number 2 diesel fuel) by volume basis: 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 %-v, and to the palm olein oil by 0.25 %-v. All the tests are carried out in a four-cylinder medium duty diesel engine, 4045 DI diesel engine, manufactured by John Deere. For the analysis, an analytical model is used to estimate combustion temperature, NO concentration and soot emissivity. The results show that NO concentration does not have the expected trade-off relation with soot. Rather, NO concentration is found to be more strongly affected by ambient temperature and combustion characteristics than by soot. The results of the analytical model show the reasonable NO estimation and the improvement on temperature calculation. However, the model is not able to explain the detailed changes of soot emissivity by the different fuels since the emissivity correlation is developed empirically for diesel fuel.

Song, Hoseok

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries  

SciTech Connect

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment for Selected Countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as available for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, K.L.; Oladosu, G.A.; Wolfe, A.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Dale, V.H.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modular hydride beds for mobile applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

On the Path to Zero Energy Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just imagine living in Florida and your fantasies might turn to swaying palms, fresh orange juice and lots of air-conditioning. For most people, a summer spent in Florida's heat and humidity would be unbearable without it. So air-conditioning is a necessity. But it's also a big energy drain, accounting for about 35% of all electricity used in a typical Florida house. As the largest single source of energy consumption in Florida, a home's air-conditioning load represents the biggest energy challenge. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) designed a project to answer this challenge. Two homes were built with the same floor plan on near-by lots. The difference was that one (the ''control home'') conformed to local residential building practices, and the other (the ''Zero Energy home'') was designed with energy efficiency in mind and solar technology systems on the roof. The homes were then monitored carefully for energy use. The project's designers were looking to answer two important questions: Could a home in a climate such as central Florida's be engineered and built so efficiently that a relatively small PV system would serve the majority of its cooling needs--and even some of its daytime electrical needs? And, would that home be as comfortable and appealing as the conventional model built alongside it? The answer to both questions turned out to be a resounding yes. And the test was especially rigorous, because it was conducted in the summer of 1998--one of the hottest summers on record in Florida. This news is important for city planners, architects, builders, and homeowners not only in the Sunshine State, but elsewhere, too. The solar/energy efficiency combo worked so well in Florida that it can--and should--be tried in other parts of the country. This brochure describes the Zero Energy Homes concept using a case study.

Merrigan, T.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

LBNL Campus Map Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C A L IF O R N IA G O L D E N B E A R S ⌬⌲⌭ ⌺〈⌭ ⌺⌵ ⌮⌿ Sherman Davis A r d e n Faculty Glade P P H H H H H H P P H S P L L L L O O O O O O O O O O O O O S O S O O L L L L L Mather Redwood Grove Californian North American Meso- American Garden of Old Roses Mediterranean/ European Miocene Sequoia Forest Western Herbs Chinese Herbs Australian Asian New World Desert South American African Palms & Cycads LeRoy Ave La Loma Ave Highland Pl Bancroft Way G a y le y R d S t a d i u m R i m W a y C a n y o n R d M o s s w o o d R d C e n te nn ia l D r C e n t e n n ia l D r C y c l o t r o n R d Un ive rs ity S o u th D r Piedm on t Av e C a l v in R d G la s e r R d M c M il la n R d C h a m b e r l a i n R d A l v a r e z R d 88 65 50A 50 50B 70A 70 54 6 7 17 27 53 52 16 14 4 5 25 45 48 37 80 10 2 29 58 47 51 64 63 60 81 82 55 56 90 71 46 26 76 78 75 75A 75B 69 77 79 77A 31 72 Strawberry Entrance Grizzly Peak Entrance National Center for Electron Microscopy 66 62 73 83 85B 84 Human Genome Laboratory 85 74 Lawrence Berkeley

413

On the Path to Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

Just imagine living in Florida and your fantasies might turn to swaying palms, fresh orange juice and lots of air-conditioning. For most people, a summer spent in Florida's heat and humidity would be unbearable without it. So air-conditioning is a necessity. But it's also a big energy drain, accounting for about 35% of all electricity used in a typical Florida house. As the largest single source of energy consumption in Florida, a home's air-conditioning load represents the biggest energy challenge. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) designed a project to answer this challenge. Two homes were built with the same floor plan on near-by lots. The difference was that one (the ''control home'') conformed to local residential building practices, and the other (the ''Zero Energy home'') was designed with energy efficiency in mind and solar technology systems on the roof. The homes were then monitored carefully for energy use. The project's designers were looking to answer two important questions: Could a home in a climate such as central Florida's be engineered and built so efficiently that a relatively small PV system would serve the majority of its cooling needs--and even some of its daytime electrical needs? And, would that home be as comfortable and appealing as the conventional model built alongside it? The answer to both questions turned out to be a resounding yes. And the test was especially rigorous, because it was conducted in the summer of 1998--one of the hottest summers on record in Florida. This news is important for city planners, architects, builders, and homeowners not only in the Sunshine State, but elsewhere, too. The solar/energy efficiency combo worked so well in Florida that it can--and should--be tried in other parts of the country. This brochure describes the Zero Energy Homes concept using a case study.

Merrigan, T.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (www.baihp.org) for the period 9/1/99-6/30/06. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida and focuses on factory built housing. In partnership with over 50 factory and site builders, work was performed in two main areas--research and technical assistance. In the research area--through site visits in over 75 problem homes, we discovered the prime causes of moisture problems in some manufactured homes and our industry partners adopted our solutions to nearly eliminate this vexing problem. Through testing conducted in over two dozen housing factories of six factory builders we documented the value of leak free duct design and construction which was embraced by our industry partners and implemented in all the thousands of homes they built. Through laboratory test facilities and measurements in real homes we documented the merits of 'cool roof' technologies and developed an innovative night sky radiative cooling concept currently being tested. We patented an energy efficient condenser fan design, documented energy efficient home retrofit strategies after hurricane damage, developed improved specifications for federal procurement for future temporary housing, compared the Building America benchmark to HERS Index and IECC 2006, developed a toolkit for improving the accuracy and speed of benchmark calculations, monitored the field performance of over a dozen prototype homes and initiated research on the effectiveness of occupancy feedback in reducing household energy use. In the technical assistance area we provided systems engineering analysis, conducted training, testing and commissioning that have resulted in over 128,000 factory built and over 5,000 site built homes which are saving their owners over $17,000,000 annually in energy bills. These include homes built by Palm Harbor Homes, Fleetwood, Southern Energy Homes, Cavalier and the manufacturers participating in the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home program. We worked with over two dozen Habitat for Humanity affiliates and helped them build over 700 Energy Star or near Energy Star homes. We have provided technical assistance to several show homes constructed for the International builders show in Orlando, FL and assisted with other prototype homes in cold climates that save 40% over the benchmark reference. In the Gainesville Fl area we have several builders that are consistently producing 15 to 30 homes per month in several subdivisions that meet the 30% benchmark savings goal. We have contributed to the 2006 DOE Joule goals by providing two community case studies meeting the 30% benchmark goal in marine climates.

McIlvaine, Janet; Chandra, Subrato; Barkaszi, Stephen; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Fonorow, Ken; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Hutchinson, Stephanie; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McCluney, Ross; McGinley, Mark; McSorley, Mike; Moyer, Neil; Mullens, Mike; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Vieira, Rob; Wichers, Susan

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries  

SciTech Connect

Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg  

SciTech Connect

A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower concentrations can also be measured in the CRDS mode when a compact laser source is available to be integrated into the spectrometer in the future. This exploratory study demonstrates a new instrument platform using an OES-CRDS dual-mode technique for potential field applications.

Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi 39759 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?  

SciTech Connect

A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further investigations and focal mitigation measures for arsenic may be carried out alongside Indus River.

Fatmi, Zafar, E-mail: zafar.fatmi@aku.edu [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan); Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)] [Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Stadium Road, P.O. Box 3500, Karachi (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mhlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four thin-film damage competitions organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

Bolinger, Mark A

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

420

Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes evaporative spray roof cooling systems, their components, performance and applications in various climates and building types. The evolution of this indirect evaporative cooling technique is discussed. Psychrometric and sol-air principles are covered and a simplified method of evaluation presented. A life cycle energy savings example is discussed. Benefits of roof life and roof top equipment efficiency and maintenance are covered as well as water consumption and performance trade-offs with alternate methods of roof heat gain control. Testimonials and case studies are presented. The gradual migration of business, industry, and populace to the southern United States was largely brought on by the advent of the practical air-conditioner, cheap electricity, and the harshness of northern winters. But while "wintering at Palm Beach" has been replaced by "Sun Belt industries" ; the compression-refrigeration cooling cycle is about the only thing separating millions of southerners (native and adopted) from August heat stroke and the Detroit News employment ads. This migration has been spurred by economic recessions which hit harder at the competitively populated northern centers than at the still growing industries of the south. These trends are important illustrations of the concern for efficient cooling strategies. Not only are homes in hot climates vulnerable to the now not-so-low cost of electricity but large, compact. and heavily occupied buildings (offices, schools, hospitals, theaters, etc.) often must air-condition year-around. In 1968. air-conditioning was 3% of U.S. end energy consumption compared to 18% for space heating and 25% for transportation. By 1980, according to Electric Power Research Institute's Oliver Yu, air-conditioning use was 12.5% of all electricity generated and by the year 2000 is projected to reach 16.7% "as migration slows and the GNP reaches a stable 3% growth rate" (EPRI 1982 to 1986 Overview and Strategy). Of further significance is the effect of air-conditioning loads on the peak generating requirements of electrical utilities. Because utilities must build generating capacity to meet peak requirements, they normally charge a higher summer kWh rate (for residential) and levy a peak kW demand charge on a monthly or even annual "ratchet" rate (for larger service customers). The June '83 cover of Houston City Magazine, in reference to future electrical rates, promised: "Pay or Sweat". Typical of many cooling or heat gain prevention strategies being employed on "innovative" buildings in warm climates, evaporative spray roof cooling (ESRC) systems (not to be confused with roof ponds) are not new. Like ventilated structures, ice house roofs, enhanced ventilation, masonry walls, night sky radiation and ground contact cooling, evaporative cooling in many forms has been around for centuries. (See Solar Age, July '82 and February '81 for related articles). Even the development of roof spray systems is not as newly founded as one might suspect.

Bachman, L. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mcagcc twenty-nine palms" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

World Biofuels Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over the next two decades, provided policymakers stay the course with their policy goals. This project relied on a scenario-based analysis to study global biofuel markets. Scenarios were designed to evaluate the impact of different policy proposals and market conditions. World biofuel supply for selected scenarios is shown in Figure 1. The reference case total biofuel production increases from 12 billion gallons of ethanol equivalent in 2005 to 54 billion gallons in 2020 and 83 billion gallons in 2030. The scenarios analyzed show volumes ranging from 46 to 64 billion gallons in 2020, and from about 72 to about 100 billion gallons in 2030. The highest production worldwide occurs in the scenario with high feedstock availability combined with high oil prices and more rapid improvements in cellulosic biofuel conversion technologies. The lowest global production is found in the scenario with low feedstock availability, low oil prices and slower technology progress.

Alfstad,T.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Property Tax Assessments as a Finance Vehicle for Residential PV Installations: Opportunities and Potential Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy efficiency improvements, and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms, and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have met with mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including: (1) historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, (2) lack of program awareness, (3) reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and (4) a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy, and not in need of financing. Although some of these barriers have begun to fade--most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates--the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from several U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the City of Berkeley, California, these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. As discussed in more detail later, this seemingly innovative approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including: long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from Federal taxable income, as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program--which was first announced on October 23, 2007--has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica, and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. Berkeley's Proposed PV Program In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities (not just 'charter cities' like Berkeley) in California to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29, 2008 and passed on to the State Senate for consideration. That local governments from across California and the broader US are so genuinely excited about the prospect of supporting the installation of residential PV in their communities through this type of program is no doubt an interesting development. Given, however, the potential for such programs to negatively interact with the residential solar ITC, it is important to evaluate the financial attractiveness of this specific type of loan program, particularly in advance of any broader state- or nation-wide 'rollout'. This case study presents such an evaluation. Because Berkeley appears to have the most-well-developed proposa

Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z