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Sample records for mbta migratory bird

  1. Migratory Bird Treaty Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Migratory Bird Treaty Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) is the domestic law that affirms the United States' commitment to four international conventions (with Canada, Japan, Mexico, and Russia) for the protection of a shared migratory bird resource. Each of the conventions protect selected species of birds that are common to both countries. The MBTA protects migratory birds by governing the taking, killing, possession, transportation, and importation of such

  2. Migratory Bird Conservation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Migratory Bird Conservation Migratory Bird Conservation The Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in activities related to the protection and conservation of migratory birds at its laboratories and facilities nation-wide. These activities are carried out at the Department's facilities pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) and Executive Order (EO) 13186, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds, with support from the DOE Migratory Bird Workgroup. Headquarters

  3. Migratory Birds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Migratory Birds Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMigratoryBirds&oldid612154...

  4. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Migratory bird conventions impose substantive obligations on the United States for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats, and through the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Act), the...

  5. Migratory Bird Program Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Migratory Bird Program Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Migratory Bird Program WebsiteLegal Abstract Summary...

  6. Migratory Bird Treaty Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Migratory Bird Treaty Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Migratory Bird Treaty ActLegal Abstract The original...

  7. SUBCHAPTER II„MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... may be taken, killed, or possessed U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law ... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement 16 USC 703-712 Migratory Bird ...

  8. Executive Order 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Migratory bird conventions impose substantive obligations on the United States for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats, and through the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Act), the...

  9. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds (2001)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Migratory bird conventions impose substantive obligations on the United States for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats, and through the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Act), the...

  10. DOE and FWS Sign New MOU on Migratory Bird Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

  11. Title 16 USC 703 Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    703 Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 USC 703 Migratory Bird Treaty Act...

  12. File:DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels....

  13. Federal Migratory Bird Depredation Permit 3-200-13 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the problem. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Migratory Birds Organization US Fish and Wildlife Service Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not...

  14. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Migratory bird conventions impose substantive obligations on the United States for the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats, and through the Migratory Bird Treaty Act ...

  15. Migratory Birds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as: Installation of power poles and transmission lines Construction projects Invasive weed species eradication Waste treatment that utilizes retention and evaporation...

  16. Migratory Birds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    65 2.164 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.153 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.078 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.069 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.323 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.304 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434

  17. Fragmentation of habitats used by neotropical migratory birds in Southern Appalachians and the neotropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, S.M.; Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.L. |

    1993-12-31

    Recent declines in North American breeding populations have sparked great concern over the effects of habitat fragmentation. Neotropical migrant birds use and are influenced by two biomes during a single life span. Yet assessment of the relative importance of changes in tropical wintering areas versus temperate breeding areas is complicated by regional variation in rates and extent of habitat change. Landscape-level measurements of forest fragmentation derived from remotely-sensed data provide a means to compare the patterns of habitat modification on the wintering and breeding grounds of migrant birds. This study quantifies patterns of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and tropical Amazon and relates these patterns to the resource needs of neotropical migrant birds. Study sites were selected from remotely-sensed images to represent a range of forest fragmentation (highly fragmented landscape to continuous forest).

  18. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    incidental take of migratory birds is prohibited unless otherwise permitted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). However, neither the MBTA nor the current implementing...

  20. An implantable instrument for studying the long-term flight biology of migratory birds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivey, Robin J. E-mail: c.bishop@bangor.ac.uk; Bishop, Charles M. E-mail: c.bishop@bangor.ac.uk

    2014-01-15

    The design of an instrument deployed in a project studying the high altitude Himalayan migrations of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) is described. The electronics of this archival datalogger measured 22 14 6.5 mm, weighed 3 g, was powered by a AA-sized battery weighing 10 g and housed in a transparent biocompatible tube sealed with titanium electrodes for electrocardiography (ECG). The combined weight of 32 g represented less than 2% of the typical bodyweight of the geese. The primary tasks of the instrument were to continuously record a digitised ECG signal for heart-rate determination and store 12-bit triaxial accelerations sampled at 100 Hz with 15% coverage over each 2 min period. Measurement of atmospheric pressure provided an indication of altitude and rate of ascent or descent during flight. Geomagnetic field readings allowed for latitude estimation. These parameters were logged twice per minute along with body temperature. Data were stored to a memory card of 8 GB capacity. Instruments were implanted in geese captured on Mongolian lakes during the breeding season when the birds are temporarily flightless due to moulting. The goal was to collect data over a ten month period, covering both southward and northward migrations. This imposed extreme constraints on the design's power consumption. Raw ECG can be post-processed to obtain heart-rate, allowing improved rejection of signal interference due to strenuous activity of locomotory muscles during flight. Accelerometry can be used to monitor wing-beat frequency and body kinematics, and since the geese continued to flap their wings continuously even during rather steep descents, act as a proxy for biomechanical power. The instrument enables detailed investigation of the challenges faced by the geese during these arduous migrations which typically involve flying at extreme altitudes through cold, low density air where oxygen availability is significantly reduced compared to sea level.

  1. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the migratory bird conventions, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts (16 U.S.C. 668-668d), the Fish and Wildlife ...

  2. Oak Ridge recognized for bird protection practices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Oak Ridge’s efforts to protect migratory birds recently garnered honorable mention for the 2013 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award. The Energy Department championed the effort through partnerships with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, UT-Battelle, and URS | CH2M Oak Ridge.

  3. NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 12:02pm ... of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 ...

  4. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to monitor ecosystem health by investigating the health and condition of...

  5. Bird guard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Dana M.

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  6. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to monitor ecosystem health by investigating the health and condition of cavity-nesting birds on the Pajarito Plateau. February 2, 2015 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505)

  7. BLM-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Department of Interior and Bureau of Land Management; United States Fish and Wildlife Service Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect Not Provided Legal...

  8. DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department of Energy Organization United States Department of Energy; United States Fish and Wildlife Service Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect Not Provided Legal...

  9. Long-Term Studies of Radionuclide Contamination of Migratory Waterfowl at the Savannah River Site: Implications for Habitat Management and Nuclear Waste Site Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisbin, I.L.; Kennamer, R.A.

    2000-10-01

    Past nuclear activities at SRS have resulted in low level contamination in various wetlands. The wetlands and reservoirs serve a major wintering ground for migratory waterfowl. American coots have the highest level of cesium accumulation among the birds. The concentration has decreased exponentially with a four year half-life. The current levels pose no threat to human consumption.

  10. File:BLM-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    some details may not fully reflect the modified file. Author AliciaFKing Short title Microsoft Word - BLMEO13186MOUSigned 4.12.10.docx Date and time of digitizing 06:15, 13 April...

  11. Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania ...

  12. NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices As of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy ...

  13. Battling bird flu by the numbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  14. EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices March 31, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Two adult bald eagles sit atop a tree on the Hanford ...

  15. This research is for the birds-really, It Is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The saying "The early bird catches the worm," also applies to people if they're trying to ... The saying "The early bird catches the worm," also applies to people if they're trying to ...

  16. Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds | Community | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 17, 2016 A bald eagle named Spirit and a golden eagle named Nova recently helped a team of researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) collect terabytes of data for a project aimed at helping researchers make wind energy safer for birds. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with industry to gather data about bird flight patterns, which will help the companies develop technology to reduce bird collisions with

  17. GRASSLAND BIRD DISTRIBUTION AND RAPTOR FLIGHT PATTERNS IN THE COMPETITIVE RENEWABLE ENERGY ZONES OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Erik

    2013-08-10

    fewer detections (MacKenzie and Nichols 2004). I used occupancy models that allow for the possibility of imperfect detection and species abundance to improve estimates of occurrence probability (Royal 2004). I focused species-specific analyses on grassland birds with few detections: Cassin’s sparrow (Peucaea cassinii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda). Chapter III uses a multi-season dynamic site occupancy model that incorporates bird abundance to better estimate occurrence probability. 3) When I considered the topographic relief of the study sites, the proposed design of the wind facility and its location within the central U.S. migratory corridor, I expanded the study to investigate raptor abundance and flight behavior (Hoover 2002, Miller 2008). I developed a new survey technique that improved the accuracy of raptor flight height estimates and compared seasonal counts and flight heights at the plateau rim and areas further inland. I used counts and flight behaviors to calculate species-specific collision risk indices for raptors based on topographic features. I focused species-specific analyses on raptors with the highest counts: American kestrel (Falco sparverius), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni), and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura). Chapter IV describes patterns of seasonal raptor abundance and flight behavior and how topography modulates collision risk with proposed wind energy turbines. 4) Finally, for completeness, in Chapter V I summarize morning point count data for all species and provide estimates of relative composition and species diversity with the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index (Shannon and Weaver 1949).

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation Bird Records and Population Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W. K.; Giffen, N. R.; Wade, M. C.; Haines, A. M.; Evans, J. W.; Jett, R. T.

    2014-09-01

    Bird data have been collected through surveys, environmental assessments, and other observations for decades in the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park, located on the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. Birds were recorded in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, interior forests, grasslands, ponds, corridors, forest edges, and more. Most of the information was gathered from waterfowl surveys conducted from 1990 to 2008, from Partners in Flight (PIF) breeding bird surveys conducted from 1995 to 2013, and from past publications and research on Reservation birds. We have also included our own observations and, in a few instances, credible observations of ORR birds of which we have been made aware through eBird or discussions with area ornithologists and bird watchers. For the period 1950-2014, we were able to document 228 species of birds on the ORR. Several of these species are known from historic records only, while others were not known to have ever occurred on the Reservation until recently. This report does not include PIF breeding bird data from the 2014 season or any records after July 2014. Twenty-two species--approximately 10% of the total number of species observed--have state-listed status in Tennessee as endangered, threatened, or in need of management. Of the 228 species we documented, 120 are believed to be breeding birds on the ORR.

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Bird Records and Population Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W. Kelly; Giffen, Neil R.; Wade, Murray; Haines, Angelina; Evans, James W.; Jett, Robert Trent

    2014-11-01

    Bird data have been collected through surveys, environmental assessments, and other observations for decades in the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park, located on the US Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. Birds were recorded in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, interior forests, grasslands, ponds, corridors, forest edges, and more. Most of the information was gathered from waterfowl surveys conducted from 1990 to 2008, from Partners in Flight (PIF) breeding bird surveys conducted from 1995 to 2013, and from past publications and research on Reservation birds. We have also included our own observations and, in a few instances, credible observations of ORR birds of which we have been made aware through eBird or discussions with area ornithologists and bird watchers. For the period 1950 2014, we were able to document 228 species of birds on the ORR. Several of these species are known from historic records only, while others were not known to have ever occurred on the Reservation until recently. This report does not include PIF breeding bird data from the 2014 season or any records after July 2014. Twenty-two species approximately 10% of the total number of species observed have state-listed status in Tennessee as endangered, threatened, or in need of management. Of the 228 species we documented, 120 are believed to be breeding birds on the ORR.

  20. BLM - Western BLM Bird Species of Conservation Concern List ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BLM - Western BLM Bird Species of Conservation Concern List Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Checklist: BLM -...

  1. White Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7615508, -116.3006974 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  2. Executive Order 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds Migratory bird conventions impose substantive obligations on the United States for the conservation of...

  3. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in

  4. For the birds | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 19, 2013 - 1:23pm The birdhouses mark the 3-acre native grass area near the New Hope Center. It's not often a team can say they "killed two birds with one stone," but...

  5. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 2, 2015: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2013: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  7. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2014: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature,...

  8. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fact sheet summarizes what is known about bird and bat interactions with land-based wind power in North America, including habitat impacts, and what key questions and knowledge ...

  9. NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices As of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates 700 million downlight luminaires were installed in residential and commercial buildings; light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires represent less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have

  10. Proceedings of the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop: Understanding and Resolving Bird and Bat Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Susan Savitt

    2004-09-01

    Most conservation groups support the development of wind energy in the US as an alternative to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. However, concerns have surfaced over the potential threat to birds, bats, and other wildlife from the construction and operation of wind turbine facilities. Co-sponsored by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop was convened to examine current research on the impacts of wind energy development on avian and bat species and to discuss the most effective ways to mitigate such impacts. On 18-19 May 2004, 82 representatives from government, non-government organizations, private business, and academia met to (1) review the status of the wind industry and current project development practices, including pre-development risk assessment and post-construction monitoring; (2) learn what is known about direct, indirect (habitat), and cumulative impacts on birds and bats from existing wind projects; about relevant aspects of bat and bird migration ecology; about offshore wind development experience in Europe; and about preventing, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts; (3) review wind development guidelines developed by the USFWS and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife; and (4) identify topics needing further research and to discuss what can be done to ensure that research is both credible and accessible. These Workshop Proceedings include detailed summaries of the presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  11. X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One-hundred million years ago, what did birds look like? Scientists have taken a huge step towards finding the answer, leaving the creative imaginations behind such classics as Jurassic Park, The Land Before Time and Dinotopic to contend with science.

  12. Archaeopteryx: Bringing the Dino-Bird to Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2011-01-25

    Some 150 million years ago, a strange creature died in a tropical lagoon that today is located in Bavaria, Germany. In 1861, a single feather of this creature was discovered. Not long afterward, a complete fossil was found with the same bird-like feathers but dinosaur-like anatomical features. Darwin had just published 'On the Origin of Species'; could this be the missing link that Darwin's supporters hoped to find? Recently, two of the now eleven discovered Archaeopteryx fossils, and that first feather, were brought to SLAC, where, using the intense X-ray beam, researchers searched for the chemical remains of the original living creatures. Please join us for this lecture, which will explain how the studies attempt to bring the original dino-bird back to life.

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated

  14. conservation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    conservation NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for its excellence in conservation of migratory birds through research collaboration. The

  15. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Research Results and Priority Questions | Department of Energy Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions This fact sheet summarizes what is known about bird and bat interactions with land-based wind power in North America, including habitat impacts, and what key questions and knowledge gaps remain.

  16. Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 16, 2016 - 10:38am Addthis Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. | Footage courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RES Americas. Kelly Yaker National Renewable Energy Laboratory How does it work? Researchers at NREL teamed with industry to study the flight patterns of two eagles. The data will help the companies develop systems to detect birds and prevent collisions with

  17. Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania | Department of Energy Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy Center in Pennsylvania Curtailment_2008_Final_Report.pdf (3.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Featured Publications from the Bats and Wind Energy Cooperative EA-1782: Avian and Bat Assessment Annual Report

  18. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-377 Alston&Bird LLP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 77 Alston&Bird LLP Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-377 Alston&Bird LLP Application from Alston&Bird LLP to export electric energy to Mexico. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-377 Alston&Bird LLP (2.27 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-377 DC Energy Texas Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-382 Glacial Energy of Texas Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. 314-A BP En

  19. Classification of Birds and Bats Using Flight Tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; Matzner, Shari; Duberstein, Corey A.

    2015-05-01

    Classification of birds and bats that use areas targeted for offshore wind farm development and the inference of their behavior is essential to evaluating the potential effects of development. The current approach to assessing the number and distribution of birds at sea involves transect surveys using trained individuals in boats or airplanes or using high-resolution imagery. These approaches are costly and have safety concerns. Based on a limited annotated library extracted from a single-camera thermal video, we provide a framework for building models that classify birds and bats and their associated behaviors. As an example, we developed a discriminant model for theoretical flight paths and applied it to data (N = 64 tracks) extracted from 5-min video clips. The agreement between model- and observer-classified path types was initially only 41%, but it increased to 73% when small-scale jitter was censored and path types were combined. Classification of 46 tracks of bats, swallows, gulls, and terns on average was 82% accurate, based on a jackknife cross-validation. Model classification of bats and terns (N = 4 and 2, respectively) was 94% and 91% correct, respectively; however, the variance associated with the tracks from these targets is poorly estimated. Model classification of gulls and swallows (N ≥ 18) was on average 73% and 85% correct, respectively. The models developed here should be considered preliminary because they are based on a small data set both in terms of the numbers of species and the identified flight tracks. Future classification models would be greatly improved by including a measure of distance between the camera and the target.

  20. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturrock, Anna M.; Wikert, J. D.; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hinkelman, Travis M.; Weber, Peter K.; Whitman, George E.; Glessner, Justin J.; Johnson, Rachel C.

    2015-05-20

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith 87Sr/86Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning to the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate.

  1. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sturrock, Anna M.; Wikert, J. D.; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hinkelman, Travis M.; Weber, Peter K.; Whitman, George E.; Glessner, Justin J.; Johnson, Rachel C.

    2015-05-20

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith 87Sr/86Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning tomore » the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate.« less

  2. Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protect Migratory Birds | Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds September 12, 2013 DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. In order to enhance collaboration in promoting the conservation of

  3. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  4. Automated Thermal Image Processing for Detection and Classification of Birds and Bats - FY2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Virden, Daniel J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.

    2012-09-01

    Surveying wildlife at risk from offshore wind energy development is difficult and expensive. Infrared video can be used to record birds and bats that pass through the camera view, but it is also time consuming and expensive to review video and determine what was recorded. We proposed to conduct algorithm and software development to identify and to differentiate thermally detected targets of interest that would allow automated processing of thermal image data to enumerate birds, bats, and insects. During FY2012 we developed computer code within MATLAB to identify objects recorded in video and extract attribute information that describes the objects recorded. We tested the efficiency of track identification using observer-based counts of tracks within segments of sample video. We examined object attributes, modeled the effects of random variability on attributes, and produced data smoothing techniques to limit random variation within attribute data. We also began drafting and testing methodology to identify objects recorded on video. We also recorded approximately 10 hours of infrared video of various marine birds, passerine birds, and bats near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) at Sequim, Washington. A total of 6 hours of bird video was captured overlooking Sequim Bay over a series of weeks. An additional 2 hours of video of birds was also captured during two weeks overlooking Dungeness Bay within the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bats and passerine birds (swallows) were also recorded at dusk on the MSL campus during nine evenings. An observer noted the identity of objects viewed through the camera concurrently with recording. These video files will provide the information necessary to produce and test software developed during FY2013. The annotation will also form the basis for creation of a method to reliably identify recorded objects.

  5. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Skalski, John R.; Deters, Katherine A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Richard L.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.; Kim, Jin A.; Trott, Donna M.

    2011-09-01

    Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth

  6. Metal concentrations in feathers of birds from Papua New Guinea forests: Evidence of pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, J.; Laska, M. . Dept. of Biological Sciences Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ ); Gochfeld, M. UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ . Environmental and Community Medicine)

    1993-07-01

    The authors used the feathers of seven species of birds from New Guinea highland forests to examine concentrations of heavy metals and selenium. The authors tested the null hypotheses that there were no species, food type, or elevation differences in the concentrations of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese in the feathers of adults. All species had nondetectable levels of mercury. There were significant species differences in cadmium, lead, chromium, selenium, and manganese. Common smokey honeyeaters (Melipotes fumigatus, a fruit and flower feeder) had the lowest levels of all metals; blue-grey robin (Peneothello cyanus, mainly insectivorous) had the highest cadmium and manganese; and several species of birds of paradise had the highest lead levels. Lead levels were relatively high compared to those reported from feathers of other birds, attributable to the use of leaded gasoline.

  7. Surveys of forest bird populations found in the vicinity of proposed geothermal project subzones in the district of Puna, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, J.D.; Reynolds, M.; Ritchotte, G.; Nielsen, B.; Viggiano, A.; Dwyer, J.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents data on the distribution and status of forest bird species found within the vicinity of proposed geothermal resource development on the Island of Hawaii. Potential impacts of the proposed development on the native bird populations found in the project are are addressed.

  8. The Solid Waste Authority: {open_quotes}This place is for the birds{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalik, M.B.

    1995-12-01

    The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County (SWA) manages a waste-to-energy facility and landfill adjacent to a site which, during the 1985 Florida drought, served as the largest communal Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) roost documented in the United States. Listed as an endangered species, the Snail Kite initiated a Section 7 consulation process as a USCOAE Dredge & Fill permit was sought for construction in 1987. In response to environmental permit requirements, SWA developed and implemented a Wildlife Conservation & Management Program which evaluated the roost`s response to activities associated with site development. Specifically, a seven-year bird monitoring program was conducted on kite usage of this roost from 1987-1993. Impact assessment was expanded to include monitoring the mixed-species wading bird colony which inhabits the same roosting area. Monitoring at the community level serves as a better environmental indicator because Snail Kites are nomadic and respond to regional water level changes. This paper gives an overview of the environmental concerns and approach taken to monitor the roost, describes the different components of the bird monitoring program, and summarizes the findings of the 7-year data collection. An evaluation of the SWA project with regards to impacts on Snail Kite and wading bird usage of the area is also discussed.

  9. wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    wildlife NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for its excellence in conservation of migratory birds through research collaboration. The... A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant Approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, sits the United States Department of

  10. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Wind Coordinating Collaborative

    2010-05-01

    This fact sheet summarizes what is known about bird and bat interactions with land-based wind power in North America, including habitat impacts, and what key questions and knowledge gaps remain.

  11. A test of an expert-based bird-habitat relationship model in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Gartner, David, L.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Dunning, John, B., Jr.; Franzreb, Kathleen, E.; Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Miller, Karl, V.; Pearson, Scott, F.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships models are used widely by land managers to provide information on which species are likely to occur in an area of interest and may be impacted by a proposed management activity. Few such models have been tested. Recent Avian census data from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina was used to validate BIRDHAB, a geographic information system (GIS) model developed by United States Forest Service resource managers to predict relative habitat quality for birds at the stand level on national forests in the southeastern United States. BIRDHAB is based on the species-habitat matrices presented by Hamel (1992).

  12. Two-dimensional thermal video analysis of offshore bird and bat flight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Duberstein, Corey A.

    2015-09-11

    Thermal infrared video can provide essential information about bird and bat presence and activity for risk assessment studies, but the analysis of recorded video can be time-consuming and may not extract all of the available information. Automated processing makes continuous monitoring over extended periods of time feasible, and maximizes the information provided by video. This is especially important for collecting data in remote locations that are difficult for human observers to access, such as proposed offshore wind turbine sites. We present guidelines for selecting an appropriate thermal camera based on environmental conditions and the physical characteristics of the target animals.more » We developed new video image processing algorithms that automate the extraction of bird and bat flight tracks from thermal video, and that characterize the extracted tracks to support animal identification and behavior inference. The algorithms use a video peak store process followed by background masking and perceptual grouping to extract flight tracks. The extracted tracks are automatically quantified in terms that could then be used to infer animal type and possibly behavior. The developed automated processing generates results that are reproducible and verifiable, and reduces the total amount of video data that must be retained and reviewed by human experts. Finally, we suggest models for interpreting thermal imaging information.« less

  13. Two-dimensional thermal video analysis of offshore bird and bat flight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Duberstein, Corey A.

    2015-11-30

    Thermal infrared video can provide essential information about bird and bat presence and activity for risk assessment studies, but the analysis of recorded video can be time-consuming and may not extract all of the available information. Automated processing makes continuous monitoring over extended periods of time feasible, and maximizes the information provided by video. This is especially important for collecting data in remote locations that are difficult for human observers to access, such as proposed offshore wind turbine sites. We present guidelines for selecting an appropriate thermal camera based on environmental conditions and the physical characteristics of the target animals. We developed new video image processing algorithms that automate the extraction of bird and bat flight tracks from thermal video, and that characterize the extracted tracks to support animal identification and behavior inference. The algorithms use a video peak store process followed by background masking and perceptual grouping to extract flight tracks. The extracted tracks are automatically quantified in terms that could then be used to infer animal type and possibly behavior. The developed automated processing generates results that are reproducible and verifiable, and reduces the total amount of video data that must be retained and reviewed by human experts. Finally, we suggest models for interpreting thermal imaging information.

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/12 (1) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis. Typically developers consider migratory birds, bald and golden eagle habitat, fish habitat, protected marine mammals and endangered and threatened species. The candidate...

  15. Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Clean Water Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Endangered Species Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, the ...

  16. SREL Reprint #3308

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Stable isotope analysis is widely promoted as a practical method for tracing the geographic origins of migratory birds. However, the extent to which geospatial patterns ...

  17. Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... on migratory birds to enter into a memorandum of ... actions relating to the terms or conditions of ... Circular Area Earthquake Search, NEIC: Earthquake Search ...

  18. Title 50 CFR 10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Implementing regulations for wildlife and fisheries, including the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2010 Legal Citation 50 CFR 10...

  19. It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Super-ion Building Blocks | U.S. DOE Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science (SC) It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's Super-ion Building Blocks Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 07.25.16 It's a Bird,

  20. Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2009-06-15

    A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

  1. Assessment of the Impacts of Green Mountain Power Corporation's Wind Power Facility on Breeding and Migrating Birds in Searsburg, Vermont: July 1996--July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, P.

    2002-03-01

    A 6-megawatt, 11 turbine wind power development was constructed by Green Mountain Power Corporation in Searsburg, southern Vermont, in 1996. To determine whether birds were impacted, a series of modified BA (Before, After) studies was conducted before construction (1993-1996), during (1996), and after (1997) construction on the project site. The studies were designed to monitor changes in breeding bird community (species composition and abundance) on the site, examine the behavior and numbers of songbirds migrating at night over the site and hawks migrating over the site in daylight, and search for carcasses of birds that might have collided with the turbines.

  2. Session: What have studies of communications towers suggested regarding the impact of guy wires and lights on birds and bats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The paper ''Wind turbines and Avian Risk: Lessons from Communications Towers'' was given by Paul Kerlinger. The presenter outlined lessons that have been learned from research on communications (not cell) towers and about the impacts of guy wires and lights on birds and bats and how they could be useful to wind energy developers. The paper also provided specific information about a large 'fatality' event that occurred at the Mountaineer, WC wind energy site in May 2003, and a table of Night Migrant Carcass search findings for various wind sites in the US.

  3. From: Austin Bird To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Citizen Comment: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC"s)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Austin Bird To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Citizen Comment: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC"s) Date: Monday, October 06, 2014 10:00:01 AM To Whomever It May Concern; I am writing in support of the establishment of National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETCs). The establishment of these corridors would further the progress of the budding alternative energy sector in the Midwest, particularly in my state, Iowa. I am a resident of Davenport, Iowa, and

  4. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A.; Fox, Anthony D.; Furness, Robert W.; Bullman, Rhys; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2010-01-15

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  5. Stressor Management Video Slide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A video excerpt from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service webinar that explains the “Stressor Management Approach” to analyzing impacts to migratory birds.  The full length webinar can be viewed at...

  6. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan ... Division of Migratory Bird Management U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Daniel Martin I.M. ...

  7. Nicaragua Canal Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Russia. The MBTA prohibits the take, possession, import, export, transport, selling, ... floodplains and to avoid direct and indirect support of ...

  8. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authority Name: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Address: 10 Park Plaza, Suite 3910 Boston, MA 02116 Zip: 02116 Website: www.mbta.com Coordinates:...

  9. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; et al

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu andmore » Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.« less

  10. The mapping and differentiation of biological and environmental elemental signatures in the fossil remains of a 50 million year old bird

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerton, Victoria M.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Norell, Mark A.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Sellers, William I.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; van Dongen, Bart; Knoll, Fabien; Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-22

    The preservation of fossils reflects the interplay of inorganic and organic chemical processes, which should be clearly differentiated to make interpretations about the biology of extinct organisms. A new coliiformes bird (mouse bird) from the ~50 million year old Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) has here been analysed using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (ESEM-EDS). The concentration and distribution of 16 elements (Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mg, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Ba, Hg) has been mapped for individual points on the sample. S, Cu and Zn map distinctly within visibly preserved feathers and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) shows that S and Cu within the feathers are organically bound in a similar manner to modern feathers. The morphological preservation of the feathers, on both macro- and microscopic scales, is variable throughout the fossil and the differences in the lateral microfacies have resulted in a morphological preservation gradient. This study clearly differentiates endogenous organic remains from those representing exogenous overprinted geochemical precipitates and illustrates the chemical complexity of the overall taphonomic process.

  11. Relationship of coarse woody debris to arthropod Availability for Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers and other bark-foraging birds on loblolly pine boles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract This study determined if short-term removal of coarse woody debris would reduce prey available to red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis Vieillot) and other bark-foraging birds at the Savannah River Site in Aiken and Barnwell counties, SC. All coarse woody debris was removed from four 9-ha plots of mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in 1997 and again in 1998. We sampled arthropods in coarse woody debris removal and control stands using crawl traps that captured arthropods crawling up tree boles, burlap bands wrapped around trees, and cardboard panels placed on the ground. We captured 27 orders and 172 families of arthropods in crawl traps whereas 20 arthropod orders were observed under burlap bands and cardboard panels. The most abundant insects collected from crawl traps were aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae) and ants (Hymenoptera: Forrnicidae). The greatest biomass was in the wood cockroaches (Blattaria: Blattellidae), caterpillars (Lepidoptera) in the Family Noctuidae, and adult weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The most common group observed underneath cardboard panels was lsoptera (termites), and the most common taxon under burlap bands was wood cockroaches. Overall, arthropod abundance and biomass captured in crawl traps was similar in control and removal plots. In contrast, we observed more arthropods under burlap bands (mean & SE; 3,021.5 k 348.6, P= 0.03) and cardboard panels (3,537.25 k 432.4, P= 0.04) in plots with coarse woody debris compared with burlap bands (2325 + 171.3) and cardboard panels (2439.75 + 288.9) in plots where coarse woody debris was removed. Regression analyses showed that abundance beneath cardboard panels was positively correlated with abundance beneath burlap bands demonstrating the link between abundance on the ground with that on trees. Our results demonstrate that short-term removal of coarse woody debris from pine forests reduced overall arthropod availability to bark-foraging birds.

  12. NREL: Energy Analysis - Lori Bird

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market analysis Policy analysis Primary research interests Renewable energy and carbon markets Renewable energy policy Interplay of emissions and renewables policies Education and ...

  13. A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu and assessment of potential impacts to waterbirds from the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K.; Woodside, D.; Bruegmann, M.

    1994-08-01

    A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu was conducted during August and September 1993 to identify potential waterbird habitats within the general area of the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor and to assess the potential impacts to endangered waterbird of installing and operating a high voltage transmission line from the Island of Hawaii to the islands of Oahu and Maui. Annual waterbird survey information and other literature containing information on specific wetland sites were summarized. Literature describing impacts of overhead transmission lines on birds was used to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed project on endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. On Oahu, five wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within 2.5 miles of the proposed transmission line corridor. On Maui, three wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within the general area of the proposed transmission line corridor. Several of the wetlands identified on Oahu and Maui also supported resident wading birds and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory birds may collide with the proposed transmission lines wires. The frequency and numbers of bird collisions is expected to be greater on Oahu than on Maui because more wetland habitat exists and greater numbers of birds occur in the project area on Oahu. In addition, the endangered Hawaiian goose and the endangered Hawaiian petrel may be impacted by the proposed segment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission line on Maui.

  14. Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for the Federal power. The SWPA markets hydroelectric power from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers multipurpose dams. ... Energy facilities - power generation or energy transmission ...

  15. Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene radical pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Wedge, Christopher J.; Storey, Jonathan G.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Liddell, Paul A.; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the spin-selective kinetics of a carotenoidporphyrinfullerene triad that has previously been used to establish the principle that a photochemical reaction could form the basis of the magnetic compass sensor of migratory birds and show that its magnetic sensitivity can be understood without invoking quantum Zeno effects.

  16. EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (51.32 KB) More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection EA-2006: Draft Environmental Assessment Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds

  17. Microclimate Influence on Bird Arrival Behavior

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process ... developing mounts for micro-Secure Digital cards that can store data for later retrieval. ...

  18. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Encounters Report Wildlife Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email If you find an injured bird, contact the Santa Fe Raptor Center. Have a close encounter? Report the following Any wildlife incidents or encounters Migratory bird injury or

  19. DOE Issues Environmental Assessment on Road Project for Public Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues 88th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report DOE Issues 88th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report September 1, 2016 - 2:59pm Addthis The 88th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report highlights the Council on Environmental Quality final guidance on climate change, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service migratory bird training, an updated Environmental Protection Agency screening tool for environmental justice analysis, and contributions by our summer interns. Addthis Related Articles DOE Issues 86th Lessons Learned

  20. SREL Reprint #3344

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Recoveries of Ring-necked Ducks banded on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, South Carolina Robert A. Kennamer University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802 Introduction: Each year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Canadian Wildlife Service and state and provincial wildlife management agencies band about 300,000 migratory game birds (USFWS 2001). These management agencies, ornithological institutions, researchers,

  1. OSTIblog Articles in the carbon sequestration Topic | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information sequestration Topic Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World by Kathy Chambers 17 Apr, 2014 in 17081 Goose-BNL.jpg Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World Read more about 17081 Warmer winters are changing bird migratory patterns, warmer seawater is linked to coral reef bleaching in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems. According to the

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Hanford Advisory Board Health, Safety, and Environmental Protection Committee E.M. Bowers, RL J.M. Rodriguez, MSA April 19, 2012 2 Biological Control Services * Migratory Birds (Osprey) * Mosquito Control (West Nile Virus) * Animal Control (rad control / health & safety such as Hantavirus) * Vegetation Control - Industrial Weeds (Tumbleweeds) - Noxious Weeds (Rush skeletonweed) * Revegetation 3 Biological Control Staff * Manager / CPA (1) * Teamster / CPOs (8) * RCT (1) * Operator (0.1

  3. Climate Education Update_Jan07.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Editing and Layout: Andrea Maestas LALP-06-073 ACRF Climate Education Update  Climate Education Update by Dr. Hans Verlinde, ARM Scientist In the last year, the subject of climate change at the two poles has been in the news more than ever before. Ice cover in the Arctic is decreasing in extent and area; icebergs are breaking off Antarctica because of thinning ice shelves; permafrost is melting in Alaska, causing ground heaving and destroying roads and houses; bird migratory patterns are

  4. Session: Avian migration and implications for wind power development in the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mabey, Sarah; Cooper, Brian

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session was arranged to convey what is known about avian migration, particularly in the eastern US. The first presentation ''Migration Ecology: Issues of Scale and Behavior'' by Sarah Mabey frames the issue of migratory bird interactions with wind energy facilities from an ecological perspective: when, where, and why are migrant bird species vulnerable to wind turbine collision. The second presentation ''Radar Studies of Nocturnal Migration at Wind Sites in the Eastern US'' by Brian Cooper reported on radar studies conducted at wind sites in the eastern US, including Mount Storm, Clipper Wind, and others.

  5. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Carter, Jessica A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.

    2010-08-01

    The study reported herein was funded as part of the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program study code is EST P 02 01: A Study of Salmonid Survival and Behavior through the Columbia River Estuary Using Acoustic Tags. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries for the USACE Portland District. Estimated survival of acoustic-tagged juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead through the lower Columbia River and estuary in 2009 was lowest in the final 50 km of the estuary. Probability of survival was relatively high (>0.90) for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon from the Bonneville Dam forebay (rkm 236) to Three-tree Point (rkm 49.6). Survival of juvenile Chinook salmon declined sharply through the lower 50 km of the estuary. Acoustic-tagged steelhead smolts did not survive as well as juvenile Chinook salmon between Bonneville Dam and the mouth of the Columbia River. Steelhead survival began to decline farther upstream (at rkm 86) relative to that of the Chinook salmon stocks. Subyearling Chinook salmon survival decreased markedly as the season progressed. It remains to be determined whether later migrating subyearling Chinook salmon are suffering increasing mortality as the season progresses or whether some portion of the apparent loss is due to fish extending their freshwater residence. This study provided the first glimpse into what promises to be a very informative way to learn more about how juvenile salmonid passage experiences through the FCRPS may influence their subsequent survival after passing Bonneville Dam. New information regarding the influence of migration pathway through the lower 50 km of the Columbia River estuary on probability of survival of juvenile salmonids, combined with increased understanding regarding the foraging distances and time periods of avian predators should prove useful in developing or assessing management actions to reduce losses of juvenile salmonid smolts that attempt to pass through the estuary on their seaward migration.

  6. Microclimate Influence on Bird Arrival Behavior Field Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using our own prototype sensor arrays that were deployed to collect microclimate data, we were able to visualize distinct differences in temperature, wind speed, and humidity over ...

  7. RADIONUCLIDES IN MARINE FISHES AND BIRDS FROM AMCHITKA AND KISKA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... we studied are regularly eaten by native people of the Aleutians (Hamrick and Smith 2003). ... However, Hunt and Smith (1999) noted that actinides released from Sellafield constitute a ...

  8. Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tom Gray (AWEA), Alex Hoar (USFWS), Bob Thresher (NREL), and Merlin Tuttle (BCI) provided oversight for the BWEC the project. We wish to thank the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, ...

  9. Microsoft Word - NGL Downlight Report Alston Bird CBI FINAL 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Energy and Environmental Design LEED-CI Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-Commercial Interiors LPD lighting power density lmW lumens per watt LLP Limited...

  10. For the Birds: The Magic of Color in Feathers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    probability contrasts (PPC) analysis projected onto three dimensions for black, brown, grey, and peacock (green) feathers. Where relevant, red arrows indicate the pigment...

  11. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

  13. Surveys of the distribution of seabirds found in the vicinity of proposed geothermal project subzones in the District of Puna, Hawaii. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, M.; Ritchotte, G.; Viggiano, A.; Dwyer, J.; Nielsen, B.; Jacobi, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    In 1993, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) entered into an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct specific biological surveys to identify potential impacts of the proposed geothermal development on the natural resources of the East Rift Zone. This report presents information from published literature information and new field data on seabird populations on the island of Hawaii. These data are analyzed with regard to potential impacts of geothermal development on seabird populations in this area. Fifteen species of seabirds, waterbirds, and shorebirds are documented or suspected of being found using habitats within or immediately adjacent to the three geothermal subzones located in the Puna district on the island of Hawai`i. Of these species, two are on the federal Endangered Species List, three are on the State of Hawaii Endangered Species List, and all 15 are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Act.

  14. The clean water act -- (Federal Water Pollution Control Act), what it means to utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talt, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Departing from previous policy, in August 1993 the USEPA`s Water Office recommended that the agency regulate a proposed electric power plant`s cooling pond as a water of the US. At issue was a proposal by Florida Power corp. to build a new electric power plant in Polk County, Florida. A 2,600 acre cooling pond to collect heated and discharged water was included in the proposal. Region 4 USEPA staff asked USEPA Headquarters in Washington, DC to decide whether the pond was exempt from the CWA or a water of the US. The pond could be a habitat for migratory birds according to a memo prepared by Region 4 staff. The USEPA Water Office used the presence of migratory birds to claim a nexus to interstate commerce and therefore concluded that the pond should be regulated under the CWA. Electric power industry proponents have argued that an overly expansive definition of waters of the US may result in any new power plant being required to construct cooling towers. Cooling towers are said to be a more expensive and wasteful method to cool heated water. Region 4 ultimately recanted its earlier position after considerable discussions with various other Environmental Protection Agency offices and, no doubt industry pressure. Florida Power Corp. was not required to obtain an NPDES permit for the cooling pond. The lesson of Florida Power Corp. is that the regulatory environment for utilities can be uncertain under the Clean Water Act even in the face of a relatively straightforward exemption from regulation.

  15. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  16. Effects of Flow on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Fall and Summer Chinook Salmon in John Day Reservoir : Annual Report 1985. [Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    1985-12-01

    As part of a study to define the effects of instream flows on the passage time, migration behavior, and survival of phi age chinook salmon migrating through John Day Reservoir from June through August juvenile fish were tagged and released below McNary Dam in 1981. This report discusses adult returns through 1984. (ACR)

  17. Building-Grid Integration Research and Development Innovators Program (BIRD IP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) within the Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking graduate students interested in exploring building-grid integration and development (R&D) technology concepts that can improve the operating efficiency of buildings and increase penetration of distributed renewable energy generation, leading to more efficient buildings and cleaner generation of electricity.

  18. Is it a bird? Or a plane? It's a solar plane!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Impulse -- a solar-powered aircraft -- is pushing the boundaries of innovation. Learn how our SunShot Initiative takes a similar approach to advancing game-changing, clean energy breakthroughs.

  19. It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an intern! | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Is the Energy Race our new "Sputnik" Moment? Is the Energy Race our new "Sputnik" Moment? National Press Club Washington, D.C. 29 November, 2010 Chu_NationalPressClub112910.ppt (5.67 MB) More Documents & Publications Is the Energy Race our new "Sputnik" Moment? Chu_NationalPressClub112910.pdf US-China clean energy report

    Is the Perfect Wall Realistic? Is the Perfect Wall Realistic? June 16, 2016 - 3:18pm Addthis Is the Perfect Wall Realistic? Eric Werling

  20. EA-2032: Bird Track Springs Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; Union County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Forest Service (Wallowa-Whitman National Forest) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are jointly preparing an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to restore aquatic habitat on a 1.9 mile stretch of the Grande Ronde River to benefit Endangered Species Act-listed fish species. BPA is considering whether to fund the proposal and the Forest Service is deciding whether to issue a special use permit.

  1. From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: The Modern Science of Origami (BNL Women in Science Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Robert J

    2010-06-24

    During the 1990s, the development and application of mathematical techniques to origami revolutionized this centuries-old Japanese art of paper folding. In his talk, Lang will describe how geometric concepts led to the solution of a broad class of origami-folding problems. Conversely, algorithms and theorems of origami design have shed light on long-standing mathematical questions and have solved practical engineering problems. Lang will discuss how origami has led to huge space telescopes, safer airbags, and more.

  2. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Day, Robin; Strickland, M. Dale

    2012-11-01

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post

  3. 2014 annual site environmental report, Southwestern Power Administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    Southwestern Power Administration’s Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) serves as the chief reporting mechanism for site environmental performance information within the Department of Energy and as a valuable resource for shared and collaborative environmental protection and performance information to Agency stakeholders and members of the public living near Southwestern Power Administration’s (Southwestern) facilities and transmission line rights-of-ways. This ASER meets the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.B. Southwestern’s key environmental involvement includes an emphasis on the protection of ecological resources which is effectively accomplished through environmental program elements such as protecting water resources, generation of clean hydropower energy, oil spill prevention practices, elimination of green-house gas emissions, and comprehensive project reviews to ensure the protection of living organisms, migratory birds, Federally threatened or endangered species, and historic or cultural resources. Southwestern continues to actively minimize effects to natural resources and strive for continual improvement in the area of environmental compliance and sustainability while achieving the agency mission to market and deliver Federal hydroelectric power.

  4. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  6. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    (Chapters 7-12); Integrating data across survey platforms (Chapters 13-19); Individual movements and habitat use for focal bird species (Chapters 20-25); and Nocturnal avian migration monitoring (Chapters 26-27). Boat-based and digital video aerial surveys each had specific advantages and disadvantages, but were largely complementary (Chapters 1, 5, 13-14). Digital aerial surveys were particularly useful for covering offshore areas at broad scales, where general distributions of taxonomic groups were a priority; boat surveys could provide more detailed data on species identities and behaviors, but were more limited in geographic scope due to their slower survey pace. The mid-Atlantic study area was important for wintering and breeding taxa, and its location also made it a key migratory corridor. There was considerable variation in species composition and spatial patterns by season, largely driven by dynamic environmental conditions (Chapters 12, 15, and 20-22). Habitat gradients in nearshore waters, however, were reliable influences on productivity and patterns of species distributions and abundance. Areas within about 30-40 km of the coast offshore of the mouths of Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, as well as to the south of Delaware Bay along the coast, were consistent hotspots of abundance and species diversity, regardless of survey methodology or analytical approach (Chapters 2, 12, 17). Inter-annual variation was substantial, and the importance of certain environmental variables in predicting animal distributions indicates that these species may well respond to future environmental shifts brought about by anthropogenic effects and climatic change. This study is an important first step, however, towards understanding how bird, marine mammal, and sea turtle populations in the mid-Atlantic may be exposed to offshore wind energy development and other anthropogenic activities. The results of this study provide insight to help address environmental permitting requirements for

  7. Tracking the sources of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in birds: Foraging in waste management facilities results in higher DecaBDE exposure in males

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentes, Marie-Line; Mazerolle, Marc J.; Giroux, Jean-François; Patenaude-Monette, Martin; and others

    2015-04-15

    Differences in feeding ecology are now recognized as major determinants of inter-individual variations in contaminant profiles of free-ranging animals, but exceedingly little attention has been devoted to the role of habitat use. Marked inter-individual variations and high levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (e.g., DecaBDE) have previously been documented in ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) breeding in a colony near Montreal (QC, Canada). However, the environmental sources of these compounds, and thus the reasons causing these large inter-individual variations remain unidentified. In the present study, we used GPS-based telemetry (±5 to 10 m precision) to track ring-billed gulls from this colony to reconstruct their movements at the landscape level. We related habitat use of individual gulls (n=76) to plasma concentrations (ng/g ww) and relative contributions (percentages) to Σ{sub 38}PBDEs of major congeners in the internationally restricted PentaBDE and current-use DecaBDE mixtures. Male gulls that visited waste management facilities (WMFs; i.e., landfills, wastewater treatment plants and related facilities; 25% of all GPS-tracked males) exhibited greater DecaBDE (concentrations and percentages) and lower PentaBDE (percentages) relative to those that did not. In contrast, no such relationships were found in females. Moreover, in males, DecaBDE (concentrations and percentages) increased with percentages of time spent in WMFs (i.e., ~5% of total foraging time), while PentaBDE (percentages) decreased. No relationships between percentages of time spent in other habitats (i.e., urban areas, agriculture fields, and St. Lawrence River) were found in either sex. These findings suggest that animals breeding in the vicinity of WMFs as well as mobile species that only use these sites for short stopovers to forage, could be at risk of enhanced DecaBDE exposure. - Highlights: • The study was conducted on breeding gulls with high levels of flame retardants. • Ring-billed gulls were GPS-tracked to associate habitat use with plasma PBDEs. • Males that visited waste management facilities had greater DecaBDE. • DecaBDE also increased with time spent in waste management facilities in males. • No relationships between habitat use and PBDEs were found in females.

  8. Credit for Return Flows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Water Supply: Current water storage contracted amounts Fish and Wildlife Continue to manage fish spawning operations at Allatoona Lake Continue migratory fish ...

  9. United States Geological Survey, LSC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, LSC Address Leetown Science Center, Conte Anadromous Fish Laboratory, 1 Migratory Way Place Turners Falls,...

  10. RL-721 REV7 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applicable guidance documents and agreements. Caution shall be exercised during the bird nesting season (mid-March to mid-July . If nesting birds, pair of birds of the same...

  11. RL-721 REV7 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applicable guidance documents and agreements. Caution shall be exercised during the bird nesting season (mid-March to mid-July). If nesting birds, pair of birds of the same...

  12. RL-721 REV7 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applicable guidance documents and agreements. Caution shall be exercised during the bird nesting season (mid-March to mid-July) . If nesting birds, pair of birds of the same...

  13. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  14. EA-1782: Avian and Bat Assessment Annual Report | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that documents the number and identity of bird and bat species that fatally collide with ... Featured Publications from the Bats and Wind Energy Cooperative Monitoring bat and bird ...

  15. SREL Reprint #3278

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    migrants moving to and from their breeding and wintering sites (Cohrs and Cohrs 1994, Moore et al. 1995, Hunter et al. 2001, Brittain et al. 2010). Migratory species tend to...

  16. CX-000198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Active Acoustic Deterrence of Migratory WhalesCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3Date: 11/23/2009Location(s): ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-011385: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessment of Potential Impact of Electromagnetic Fields from Undersea Cable on Migratory Fish Behavior CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3 Date: 12/17/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. Bright Future for CPV (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-02-03

    Concentrator photovoltaics may play significant role in growth of solar electricity because of scalability. Need to take a bird?s eye view for the design and a worm?s eye view for diagnosis.

  19. Federal Technical Capability Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... melvin.boyd@emcbc.doe.gov Office of River Protection Semi Bird (509) 376- 1665 (509) 376-5335 misipati.bird@orp.doe.gov Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Russell McCallister ...

  20. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diversity, an indicator of healthy habitats, continue taking accurate data for Kasper's web diary, and enjoy birding for what it is - not to win. "Birding for me is not about the...

  1. Public Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Watching Effective January 24, 2005 There are several great bird watching spots in the public areas on Fermilab's site. Driving is restricted to the roads within the public...

  2. Small Business Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ...ie.bird@emcbc.doe.gov PortsmouthPaducah Project Office: Anne Marie Bird (513) 246-0569; ... DOE Acquisition Forecast: This web page contains future and ongoing contracting actions ...

  3. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hosted a Northern Saw-Whet Owl banding demonstration by master bander, Tim Tolford. Bird banding is a technique used to study wild birds by attaching a tag to their leg to...

  4. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar #3: Understanding Avian Collision Rate Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind farms can impact birds through collisions. Collision rate models have been developed to estimate the perceived risk to birds and the potential number of collisions within proposed wind farms....

  5. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Normandeau Associates is developing a tool to check the risk of wind turbine collisions for bird and bat species.

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Feeders Description: Create and design your own bird feeder to hang outside by using household supplies. Ingredients: 1 toilet paper roll 1 piece of string (8") Scissors Bird Seed Elmer's Glue or Peanut Butter Directions: Cut a piece of string, poke a couple of holes near one end of the toilet paper roll, and tie the ends of the strings through them. Smear peanut butter or glue on the empty toilet paper tube. Roll it in bird seed. Hang your toilet paper roll bird feeder in a tree and

  7. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EESAT 2009 October 4-7 Seattle Ali Nourai American Electric Power Chairman, Electricity Storage Association Energy Storage Projects in AEP - A Migratory Trend - 2 * 5.2 Million customers * 11 States * 39,000 MW Generation * 38,953 miles Transmission * 212,781 miles Distribution * $45.2 billion Assets (2008) * $14.4 billion revenue (2008) * 20,861 Employees AEP Overview 3 Migratory Path of Utility Energy Storage - in AEP Large Central Units Storage at Grid Edge Substation Batteries Graphics

  8. Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

  9. Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bird, Gregory H. ; Irimia, Adriana ; Ofek, Gilad ; Kwong, Peter D. ; Wilson, Ian A. ; Walensky , Loren D. 1 ; NIH) 2 ; Scripps) 2 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  10. File:EO 13186.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Birds Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from...

  11. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  12. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  13. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    including salamanders otters muskrats minks rabbits beavers frogs lizards snakes fish and birds The combination of macro and micro vertebrates invertebrates terrestrial and...

  14. Manhattan Project: Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In a 1933 interview, Rutherford called such expectations "moonshine." Einstein compared particle bombardment with shooting in the dark at scarce birds, while Bohr, the Danish Nobel ...

  15. Smart Phone Technologies Reduce Risks to Eagles from Wind Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential Mitigating Wind-Radar ...

  16. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the natural history and identification of vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals). The emphasis in ...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/12-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us State Biological Resource Considerations (12-ID-a) The Idaho Department of Fish & Game preserves wildlife against any direct take, including wild animals, birds, and...

  18. UCRL-JC- I250 M. Dreicer, USA; A. Aaricrog, Riso National Laboratory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... most sensitive to least): mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, crustaceans, ... Experiments in the Chernobyl power plant cooling pond have shown that fish continued to ...

  19. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distributi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high ... Valley Authority (TVA) National SCADA Test Bed Substation Automation Evaluation ...

  20. Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    time. (For a given velocity model, this two-way travel time is equivalent to several kilometers of depth penetration.) Subsequently, LDG used Bird's services to acquire new...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  2. The Nocturnal Avian Migration Experiment Final Campaign Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition, by taking multichannel recordings of these calls, the position of the calling bird can be calculated and linked to collocated radar measurements. Authors: Stepanian, ...

  3. November | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home ... of nanostructures that can be used in solar cell design. ... papers and posters, panels and birds-of-a-feather sessions. ...

  4. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Searchlight BBCS i October 2012 Searchlight Wind Energy Project Bird and Bat Conservation Strategy Prepared for: Duke Energy Renewables 550 South Tryon Street Charlotte, North ...

  5. SREL Reprint #3305

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through their diet, and thus may be exposed to two, generally sublethal, yet chronic, stressors. We analyzed nestling wading birds (n171) of varying size and trophic...

  6. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study bird bones. The fairly sunny and warm weather also allowed attendees to view the sun through telescopes with the help of Naperville Astronomical Association volunteers....

  7. Renville County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Falls Energy Minnesota Energy Sunrise Agri Fuels Places in Renville County, Minnesota Bird Island, Minnesota Buffalo Lake, Minnesota Danube, Minnesota Fairfax, Minnesota...

  8. Sunrise Agri Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agri Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunrise Agri Fuels Place: Bird Island, Minnesota Zip: 55310 Sector: Biomass Product: Manufacturer of Biomass Fuel Pellets for Pellet...

  9. Idaho County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grangeville, Idaho Kamiah, Idaho Kooskia, Idaho Riggins, Idaho Stites, Idaho White Bird, Idaho Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIdahoCounty,Idaho&oldid...

  10. Cheyenne County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Cheyenne County, Kansas Bird City, Kansas St. Francis, Kansas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  11. Community Connections: Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    businesses with expert assistance In other news Readers' survey, protecting Lab bird residents and major media mentions For your calendar Science talks for young and old...

  12. Status, Accomplishments, and Recent Developments at the ARM Climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OK Installed revised version of rotating bird deterrent device to prevent roosting turkey vultures from damaging equipment. * LICOR-7500 IRGA calibrations Trained SGP...

  13. Ecology Fact Sheets | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology Fact Sheets General Ecology: Mammals and Birds: An Amphibian's Eye View of Wetlands BioBarrierTm Carnivorous Plants Carolina Bays (HTML) Carolina Bays Deepwater Swamps PIT...

  14. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    visitor to the Fernald Preserve in Ohio, enjoying activities like trail walks and bird watching. July 10, 2014 DOE Partners with Other Federal Agencies Working on the Wind...

  15. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool...

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Styxosaurus and sea birds with teeth to the "T. rex of the Ocean," the 40-foot super-predator Tylosaurus. This National Geographic program playing at the Pajarito...

  17. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top Links Labwide calendar Fermilab at Work Wilson Hall Cafe menu Chez Leon menu Weather ... Well, hello there nature, bird, animal, pigeon, Wilson Hall, closeup This pigeon recently ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... sciences (2) birds (1) classical and quantum mechanics, general physics (1) communities (1) decision making (1) doped materials (1) ecosystems (1) electric potential (1) ...

  19. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Partnering with EERE, Normandeau Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions ...

  20. Testing the Effectiveness of an Avian Flight Diverter for Reducing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Abstract Distribution power lines are placed high overhead, safely out of human reach; however, for birds, these overhead wires are a potentially fatal obstacle....

  1. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distributi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint Bird, L.; Milligan, M. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components ...

  2. Sensitive Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bird habitats during the nesting season to information on where certain types of bats can be found, the document includes guidance to help LANL project managers conduct...

  3. ATTENDEES: Ashley Armstrong, Department of Energy Laura Barhydt...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing Company- Fort Smith, AR Ted Schroder, Alston & Bird, on Behalf of Rheem Manufacturing Company- Washington, D.C. Josh Greene, AO Smith- Milwaukee Wisconsin Greg ...

  4. Marbled murrelet abundance and breeding activity at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, and Kachemak Bay, Alaska, before and after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bird study number 6. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuletz, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The author compared pre- and post-spill abundance and breeding activity of murrelets near the Naked Island group in central Prince William Sound, and in Kachemak Bay in lower Cook Inlet. Murrelet numbers at Naked Island were lower in 1989 than in 1978-1980 but not in 1990-1992. At Kachemak Bay, where oiling was minimal, murrelet densities did not change between 1988 and 1989. The results suggest that the murrelet population at Kachemak Bay, further removed temporally and spatially from the spill epicenter, was not affected as the Naked Island populations in 1989. Murrelet numbers were negatively correlated to numbers of boats at both study sites, and cleanup activities likely contributed to disruption in 1989.

  5. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2013-06-01

    A primary issue of concern of regulatory and resource agencies is how the operation of hydrokinetic turbines will affect local and migratory fish populations. This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments.

  6. Comet Riders--Nuclear nomads to the stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr. ); Buden, D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the potential role of an evolutionary family of advanced space nuclear power systems (solid core reactor, gas core reactor, and thermonulcear fusion systems) in the detailed exploration of Solar System comets and in the use of interstellar comes to support migratory journeys to the stars by both human beings and their smart robot systems. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2014 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2015-05-12

    statewide database. No field surveys were conducted this year for sensitive plants on the NNSS due to poor growing conditions. Surveys of sensitive and protected/regulated animals during 2014 focused on winter raptors, bats, wild horses (Equus caballus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), desert bighorn sheep (Ovis Canadensis nelsoni), and mountain lions (Puma concolor). Two permanent, long-term winter raptor survey routes were established and sampled in January and February. A total of 27 raptors representing 4 species were observed. The wild horse population increased from 30 to 41, with several yearlings recruiting into the population, possibly due to the death of a mountain lion known to prey on horse foals. Mule deer abundance and density measured with standardized deer surveys was similar to 2013 and appears to be stable. Desert bighorn sheep, including rams, ewes, and lambs, were detected using motion-activated cameras at four water sources. There are plans to conduct helicopter surveys to census the population during September 2015 and then capture and radio-collar up to 20 sheep during November 2015. Over 150 sheep scat samples have been collected for genetic analysis to try to determine how sheep on the NNSS are related to surrounding sheep populations. Information is presented about bird mortalities, Migratory Bird Treaty Act compliance, and a summary of nuisance animals and their control on the NNSS. A total of 93 mountain lion images (i.e., photographs or video clips) were taken during 220,379 camera hours at 16 of 32 sites sampled and another 11,946 images of at least 29 species other than mountain lions were taken as well. A mountain lion telemetry study continued in 2014. NNSS7 was tracked from January 1 to November 15 using a global positioning system satellite transmitter. He consumed 21 mule deer, 17 desert bighorn sheep, 1 juvenile bobcat, and 3 coyotes. Mule deer were primarily taken in the summer and fall. No new mountain lions were captured. A minimum

  8. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  9. Tracing the HIV-1 subtype B mobility in Europe: a phylogeographic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, D; Pybus, O; Magiorkinis, G; Hatzakis, A

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and the origin of HIV-1 subtype B, the most prevalent circulating clade among the long-term residents in Europe, have been studied extensively. However the spatial diffusion of the epidemic from the perspective of the virus has not previously been traced. In the current study we inferred the migration history of HIV-1 subtype B by way of a phylogeography of viral sequences sampled from 16 European countries and Israel. Migration events were inferred from viral phylogenies by character reconstruction using parsimony. With regard to the spatial dispersal of the HIV subtype B sequences across viral phylogenies, in most of the countries in Europe the epidemic was introduced by multiple sources and subsequently spread within local networks. Poland provides an exception where most of the infections were the result of a single point introduction. According to the significant migratory pathways, we show that there are considerable differences across Europe. Specifically, Greece, Portugal, Serbia and Spain, provide sources shedding HIV-1; Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg, on the other hand, are migratory targets, while for Denmark, Germany, Italy, Israel, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK we inferred significant bidirectional migration. For Poland no significant migratory pathways were inferred. Subtype B phylogeographies provide a new insight about the geographical distribution of viral lineages, as well as the significant pathways of virus dispersal across Europe, suggesting that intervention strategies should also address tourists, travellers and migrants.

  10. CX-100475 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The EV charging station would be approximately 1'-4' by 2'-4' wide by 5' - 6' tall. The charging station would be located in the existing parking lot of the Lady Bird Park, a State ...

  11. How Bacteria Make Magnets | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Bacteria Make Magnets For a number of animals, including birds, fish and mammals, there is evidence that magnets are used for orientation. However, little is known about how...

  12. CX-012196: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structure and Debris Removal from Howes and Bird's Eye View Properties CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/30/2014 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. PHASE II REMEDIAL INVESTlGATlOE FORMER AMCHITKA ARMY AIR BASE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... oil was seeping into a wetland and the Bering Sea. The other area was at Bird Cape, where 17 drums had rusted away in a small area within a wetland, releasing most of the oil ...

  14. CX-008825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 07/26/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  15. Weldon Spring Site„Connecting lessons from the past with a vision...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... is home to insects, birds, and more than 200 species of plants native to Missouri. The paved walking path, lined with benches, features markers which identify many of the plants. ...

  16. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Report Targets Data on Avian Issues...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at Solar Energy Facilities May 4, 2015 Understanding how birds are affected by utility-scale solar facilities is the focus of a new NREL report...

  17. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Report Targets Data...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at Solar Energy Facilities May 4, 2015 Understanding how birds are affected by utility-scale solar facilities is the focus of a new NREL report ...

  18. Directory of Small Business Program Managers (SBPMs)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Consolidated Business Center 250 East 5th Street 500 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Anne Marie Bird EMCBC Small Business Program Manager W: (513) 246-0569 F: (513) 246-0529...

  19. New Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2011 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Photo of a bird. DOE's Argonne National Laboratory recently developed the prototype of a ...

  20. Workshop Explores Energy Project Financing Options for Southwest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early bird rates for the conference end March 26, so register soon to take advantage of reduced registration rates. Learn more about the Office of Indian Energy's work with Alaska ...

  1. Energy Department Awards $4.5 Million for Innovative Wind Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiversity Research Institute of Gorham, Maine, will receive 1.1 million to develop a stereo-optic camera system to detect and document bird and bat flight behavior in the ...

  2. CX-010098: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phoenix to Lone Butte 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Bird Diverter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. Saw What? Saw Whet!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the second year in a row, in early November, the Fernald Preserve in Ohio hosted a Northern Saw-Whet Owl banding demonstration by master bander, Tim Tolford. Bird banding is a technique used to...

  4. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. The program is designed for grades first through seventh grade students and scout...

  5. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 22, 2012: Fermilab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. For additional information, call 630-840-5588 or e-mail edreg@fnal.gov. About...

  7. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | Fermilab Outdoor Family...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. The program is designed for first through seventh grade students. Scout troops are...

  8. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    completely dark, new study concludes From Forbes, April 16, 2015 Imagine you've got two guns pointed at one another from a great distance away. If the guns are filled with bird...

  9. NREL: Solar Research - Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at Solar Energy Facilities May 4, 2015 Understanding how birds are affected by utility-scale solar facilities is the focus of a new NREL report...

  10. Report for the Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... are also caused by prions, and not by a virus or any other conventional infectious agent. ... H5N1 Influenza H5N1 influenza is a subtype of the influenza A virus that causes "bird ...

  11. SciDB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Screen Shot 2014 03 15 at 12.06.05 AM Bird's Eye View - SciDB Testbed at NERSC Pioneers High Usability Big Data Analytic Infrastructure. Motivation? It's painful to manage and ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Luigi ; Viel, Matteo ; Bird, Simeon ; Haehnelt, Martin G. ; Coupon, Jean ; McCracken, Henry Joy ; Mellier, Yannick, E-mail: xia@sissa.it, E-mail: ben.granett@brera.inaf.it, ...

  13. Have Fun With Astronomy at JLab on Oct. 14 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14. Learn, laugh and be amazed as Wayne "Skip" Bird shares wonders of the night sky, the solar system and the universe. Find your way through the maze of 13 planets, and explore...

  14. The (Scientific) Flight of the Falcon - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed by Laufer Wind and NREL that may decrease the number of bird interactions with wind turbines. Photo by Ismael Mendoza, NREL A trained falcon named Houdini darts and...

  15. doe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAST GRADUATE STUDENTS Dr. Stephen Habay, Ph.D. program. Graduated 2006 Dr. Christopher Levins, Ph.D. program. Graduated 2006 Dr. Gregory Bird, Ph.D. program. Graduated 2006 Dr. ...

  16. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three...

  17. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that can take out an unprecedented number of different types of flu viruses, including H5N1 'bird flu' and the 1918 H1N1 'Spanish flu', which killed millions around the world...

  18. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents,...

  19. PRELIMINARY DRAFT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Sect. 3.4.1, the historic accident rate for general aviation ... 39 bird species that are tolerant of human presence). 40 A ... They 7 may include chemicals such as aircraft fuels, ...

  20. PRELIMINARY DRAFT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Sect. 3.4.1, the historic accident rate for general aviation ... and bird species that are tolerant of human presence). ... They may include chemicals such as aircraft fuels, solvents, ...

  1. X:\\ARM_19~1\\PGS53-62.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radar Wind Profilers and Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems A comparison of three months of data on hourly winds and temperatures from the two RWPs collocated at the SGP birds passing ...

  2. NREL: Technology Transfer - Report Targets Data on Avian Issues...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at Solar Energy Facilities May 4, 2015 Understanding how birds are affected by utility-scale solar facilities is the focus of a new NREL report...

  3. Getting something new out of something old

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting something new out of something old Scientists are pursing one example of such a long-livedshort-lived isotope system for medical applications. February 10, 2016 Bird's eye ...

  4. CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak Bird Diversion Equipment AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 12/15/2010Location(s): Yavapai County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. Inspection Report: IG-0784 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 19, 2007 The Department of Energy's Pandemic Influenza Planning According to the ... of its workforce, could become sick from a mutated avian influenza (bird flu) H5N1 strain. ...

  6. J. C. Fulton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MSA on bird deterrent methods; developed work package to ... It was determined that SO2 was the cause of the irritation. ... the plant is successfully reducing the concentration of ...

  7. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ASH BU RN C REEK HUNT ING CREEK RED BIRD C OALBED GREEN GROVE RPD-WAYNE-3 LOC UST HILL BU ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  8. Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research & Development » Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. The Wind Program works to remove barriers to wind

  9. Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development » Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. The Wind Program works to remove barriers to wind

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - MBPCC CAMD Cancer Therapy Program, 12-6-10_Ken.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Perkins Cancer Center's CAMD Cancer Therapy Research Program CAMD Cancer Therapy Research Program Kenneth R Hogstrom, PhD, PI Chief of Physics Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center y Baton Rouge, LA Professor and Director Professor and Director Medical Physics and Health Physics Program Dr. Charles M. Smith Chair of Medical Physics D t t f Ph i d A t Department of Physics and Astronomy Louisiana State University Why High-Z Enhanced Radiation Therapy? * Current radiation therapy practice targets a

  11. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection

  12. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  13. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  14. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  15. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  16. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  17. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1996-02-27

    A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  18. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1995-04-25

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  19. Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

  20. Wind Program: WINDExchange

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds June 30, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather.

  1. Getting something new out of something old

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting something new out of something old Getting something new out of something old Scientists are pursing one example of such a long-lived/short-lived isotope system for medical applications. February 10, 2016 Bird's eye view of a hot cell where the isotopes are separated and purified. Bird's eye view of a hot cell where the isotopes are separated and purified. Communications Office (505) 667-7000 In Los Alamos jargon, modern chemistry is often more suspenseful than a spy story. The quest for

  2. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  3. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public

  4. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public

  5. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public

  6. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print Wednesday, 25 July 2007 00:00 To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of

  7. Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen Print To date, the H5N1 avian influenza viruses, which are currently circulating in domestic and wild birds on three continents, have only a limited ability to infect humans. However, with continued outbreaks of the virus in poultry and wild birds, the potential for the emergence of a human-adapted H5 virus, either by reassortment (the mixing of genetic material from similar viruses) or mutation, is seen as a major threat to public health

  8. Session: Pre-development project risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

    2004-09-01

    This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

  9. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 USC §§ 668–668d) and Related Regulations (50 CFR Part 22)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668c) prohibits anyone from taking, possessing, or transporting a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) or golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), or the parts, nests, or eggs of such birds without prior authorization.

  10. EA-377 DC Energy Texas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DC Energy Texas EA-377 DC Energy Texas Order authorizing DC Energy Texas to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-377 DCE Texas Order.pdf (1.96 MB) More Documents & Publications Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-377 Alston&Bird LLP EA-403 Frontera Marketing,

  11. CX-100475 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hawthorne Charging Station at Lady Bird Park Rest Area Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Weatherization & Intergovernmental Programs Date: 02/11/2016 Location(s): NV Office(s): Golden Field Office

  12. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briant, James K.; Driver, Crystal J.

    1992-01-01

    An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

  13. Shining Sunlight on SunShot’s Project Portfolio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new interactive project map gives the public a birds-eye view of more than 200 active projects in EERE's SunShot Initiative. Working to make solar energy cost competitive, SunShot is showing where the projects are, what they're setting out to discover, and more.

  14. CX-100200 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stereo-Optic High Definition Imaging: A New Technology to Understand Bird and Bat Avoidance of Wind Turbines Award Number: DE-EE0006803 CX(s) Applied: B3.3 Wind Program Date: 03/23/2015 Location(s): ME Office(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-002865: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Density and Occupancy Patterns of Grassland Birds in the Competitive Renewable Energy Zones of the Texas PanhandleCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 07/02/2010Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  16. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

    1992-05-05

    An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

  17. Career Map: Environmental Science Technician | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Technician Career Map: Environmental Science Technician An environmental science technician inspects the wing of a large brown and black bird of prey. Environmental Science Technician Position Title Environmental Science Technician Alternate Title Environmental Protection Technician Education & Training Level Mid-level, Bachelor's degree preferred, not always required Education & Training Level Description Most environmental science technicians need an associate's degree or 2

  18. Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levenson, J. B.; Environmental Assessment

    2005-11-15

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  19. Avian survey and field guide for Osan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levenson, J.

    2006-12-05

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Osan Air Base (AB). This ongoing survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Osan AB, and the 51st Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred ten bird species representing 35 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Natural Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Three species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's (KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected. The primary objective of the avian survey at Osan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex J.14.c of the 51st Fighter BASH Plan 91-212 (51 FW OPLAN 91-212). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Osan AB throughout the year and from the survey results, determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Osan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Osan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a that are also favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  20. Rural migration in Nevada: Lincoln County. Phase 1, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soden, D.L.; Carns, D.E.; Mosser, D.; Conary, J.S.; Ansell, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    The principal objective of this project was to develop insight into the scope of migration of working age Nevadans out of their county of birth; including the collection of data on their skill levels, desire to out or in-migrate, interactions between families of migratory persons, and the impact that the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca mountain might have on their individual, and collective, decisions to migrate and return. The initial phase of this project reported here was conducted in 1992 and 1993 in Lincoln County, Nevada, one of the counties designated as ``affected`` by the proposed repository program. The findings suggest that a serious out-migration problem exists in Lincoln County, and that the Yucca mountain project will likely affect decisions relating to migration patterns in the future.

  1. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  2. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  3. Computer simulation of the probability that endangered whales will interact with oil spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.; Jayko, K.; Bowles, A.; Anderson, E.; Leatherwood, S.

    1987-03-01

    A numerical model system was developed to assess quantitatively the probability that endangered bowhead and gray whales will encounter spilled oil in Alaskan waters. Bowhead and gray whale migration and diving-surfacing models, and an oil-spill trajectory model comprise the system. The migration models were developed from conceptual considerations, then calibrated with and tested against observations. The movement of a whale point is governed by a random walk algorithm which stochastically follows a migratory pathway. The oil-spill model, developed under a series of other contracts, accounts for transport and spreading behavior in open water and in the presence of sea ice. Historical wind records and heavy, normal, or light ice cover data sets are selected at random to provide stochastic oil-spill scenarios for whale-oil interaction simulations.

  4. Assessment of the Flow-Survival Relationship Obtained by Sims and Ossiander (1981) for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    There has been much debate recently among fisheries professionals over the data and functional relationships used by Sims and Ossiander to describe the effects of flow in the Snake River on the survival and travel time of chinook salmon and steelhead smolts. The relationships were based on mark and recovery experiments conducted at various Snake and Columbia River sites between 1964 and 1979 to evaluate the effects of dams and flow regulation on the migratory characteristic`s chinook sa mon and steelhead trout smolts. The reliability of this information is crucial because it forms the logical basis for many of the flow management options being considered today to protect,upriver populations of chinook salmon and steelhead trout. In this paper I evaluate the primary data, assumptions, and calculations that underlie the flow-survival relationship derived by Sims and Ossiander (1981) for chinook salmon smolts.

  5. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  6. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947. Volume 2, Data: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  7. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    04, 2016 Articles Looking from space for nuclear detonations 'Space is hard' Sandia's 401(k) plan recognized among the best of the best 401(k) excellence CECOR students launch ThunderBird Cup Cyber challenges Keynote speaker shares keys to success at Sandia intern symposium Perspiration and passion Sandia installs largest Gigahertz Transverse ElectroMagnetic test chamber Testing, testing IEEE Albuquerque Section honors two Sandians Outstanding young engineers Portable blood clotting monitor wins

  9. School supply drive in full swing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Propane's School Bus History While propane has been used in buses for decades, recent technologi- cal advancements have made it more reliable than ever. Prior to 2007, all propane vehicles used vapor injection technology. In 2007, Blue Bird rolled out a propane school bus using direct liquid injection for the first time, and this was followed by Thomas Built Buses and Navistar. Liquid injection technology makes propane buses a more reliable option. Since 2007, vehicle emissions standards have

  10. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    archaeopteryx » Links Scientific Highlight SLAC Press Release BBC News » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging summary written by Raven Hanna Archaeopteryx, the half-reptilian, half-avian creature that lived 150 million years ago is famous as the fossil record's link between dinosaurs and birds. The discovery of the first Archaeopteryx fossil, which coincided with the publication of Charles

  11. NREL Releases Report Card on Environmental Efforts - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Releases Report Card on Environmental Efforts October 23, 2015 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to improve its environmental protection efforts at its South Table Mountain and National Wind Technology Center sites during 2014 by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, adding bird-safety features to campus structures, and assessing environmental impacts of potential laboratory development. NREL annually reports on the environmental performance and

  12. Office of Information Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY + + + + + THE NATIONAL COAL COUNCIL + + + + + FULL COUNCIL MEETING + + + + + THURSDAY, MAY 22, 2008 + + + + + The full council meeting convened at 9:00 a.m. in the Doubletree Hotel, 1515 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., Georgia Nelson, NCC Chair, presiding. NCC MEMBERS: GEORGIA NELSON, Chair ROBERT O. AGBEDE ALLEN B. ALEXANDER SY ALI BARBARA FARMER-ALTIZER GERARD ANDERSON GREGORY A. ANDERSON LYNN A. ANDERSON RICHARD BAJURA JANOS M. BEER JACQUELINE F. BIRD

  13. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane (Brochure), Clean Cities, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane's School Bus History While propane has been used in buses for decades, recent technologi- cal advancements have made it more reliable than ever. Prior to 2007, all propane vehicles used vapor injection technology. In 2007, Blue Bird rolled out a propane school bus using direct liquid injection for the first time, and this was followed by Thomas Built Buses and Navistar. Liquid injection technology makes propane buses a more reliable option. Since 2007, vehicle emissions standards have

  14. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Project Regulatory Considerations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Project Regulatory Considerations Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Project Regulatory Considerations August 31, 2016 11:00AM to 12:30PM MDT Learn about the many permitting and project regulatory issues that need to be addressed when developing energy projects. Considerations include the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Home Ownership (HEARTH) Act, land use, noise, birds, and other biological resources; visual impact; soil erosion and water quality; public

  15. Re: Ex parte communication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ex parte communication Re: Ex parte communication On April 20, 2010, Scott Bates, Corporate Vice President and General Counsel, and Karen Meyers, Director of Government Affairs, both of the Rheem Manufacturing Company ("Rheem"), accompanied by their counsel, Bill Anaya of Alston & Bird, LLP, met with Department of Energy ("DOE") officials Scott Harris, General Counsel, Maureen McLaughlin, Special Assistant to the General Counsel, and Stephanie Weiner, Special Assistant,

  16. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with EERE, Normandeau Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool will be used in environmental decision-making for the planning,

  17. Effects of zebra mussels, obtained from Lake Erie and St Lawrence River, as a food source on immune system of lesser scaup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flipo, D.; Fournier, M.; Beaulieu, C.; Tessier, C.

    1995-12-31

    A feeding study was undertaken to assess the influence of a zebra mussel diet from Lake Erie and the St.Lawrence river on the immune system of lesser scaup. The Great lakes and the St.Lawrence river are known to be among the most contaminated waters found in the country. Analytical studies have shown that zebra mussels are contaminated by organochlorines and other pollutants. The occurrence of these toxicants in the food diet of lesser scaup can cause serious injuries. The immune system, in its capacity to destroy foreign particles and protect the host against diseases, can serve as a useful sentinel of the health status of these environmentally stressed organisms. Immune parameters of lesser scaup fed with zebra mussels from Lake Erie or the St. Lawrence river were evaluated. The duration of the feeding trial was nine weeks. Phagocytic activity and oxidative bursts of heterophils were evaluated by flow cytometry. Intracellular thiol levels of lymphocytes and heterophils were also determined by flow cytometry. The results showed a dimunition of phagocytic activity and bactericidal potential after 6 weeks of the zebra mussel diet compared to the control. These results may be associated with pathology problems encountered in treated groups at the end of the diet. Birds from the St. Lawrence River group (40%) and the Lake Erie group (40%) demonstrated variable degrees of pododermatitis compared to the control group. The intracellular level of thiol was consistently found to be elevated in lymphocytes and heterophyls from birds feeding with on the St. Lawrence River. In conclusion, flow cytometry assays like phagocytosis, oxidative burst and thiol staining can serve as biomarkers of the immune status of birds and can give important information for evaluating the health of birds exposed to environmental contamination.

  18. WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community

  19. Kansas_City_Jul1995_ExecSummary.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the Kahuku Wind Power Facility in Kahuku, O'ahu, Hawaii Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion (4.75 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1726: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions

    Kahuku Wind to Power 7,700 Oahu Homes Kahuku Wind

  20. Kansas State University 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the Kahuku Wind Power Facility in Kahuku, O'ahu, Hawaii Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion (4.75 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1726: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions

    Turbine blades being delivered to Kahuku. | Courtesy of First Wind Turbine blades being delivered to Kahuku. | Courtesy of

  1. Comparison of Avian Responses to UV-Light-Reflective Paint on Wind Turbines: Subcontract Report, July 1999--December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D. P., Jr.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Good, R. E.; Sernka, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the numbers of avian collisions with wind turbines, several measures have been employed with various levels of success. One hypothesis is that painting turbine blades to increase their visibility may reduce avian fatalities. This study examined the effects of painting wind turbine blades with UV-reflective paint on bird use and mortality at the Foote Creek Rim Wind Plant in Carbon County, Wyoming.

  2. Ken Hogstrom, PI, & Medical Physics Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMD Targets Cancer Ken Hogstrom, Marie Varnes, Kip Matthews, Erno Sajo, Medical Physics Group Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Current radiation therapy techniques treat cancer by irradiating a volume of tissue that contains both healthy and cancerous tissue. Potential damage to healthy tissue can limit the amount of radiation dose to the cancer. Professor Hogstrom and his crew search for drugs that will allow radiation dose to preferentially target the

  3. Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights CAMD Targets Cancer Professor Ken Hogstrom and his associates Marie Varnes, Kip Matthews, and Erno Sajo of the Medical Physics Group Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center are searching for drugs that will allow radiation dose to preferentially target the cancerous cells. Research to date has focused on a well known radiosensitizing drug called iododeoxyuridine (IUdR). Functionalizing Nanotubes for Biomedical Applications In this project, Dr. Donhui

  4. CASL Test Stand Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Advanced Modeling Applications 28 March 2014 CASL-U-2014-0036-000 Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs ii CASL-U-2014-0036-000 REVISION LOG Revision Date Affected Pages Revision Description 0 3/28/2014 All Original Report Document pages that are: Export Controlled

  5. SSRL HEADLINES February 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 February, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: DOE Reviews SSRL and Strategic Plan Development Continues Science Highlight - A Complex Relationship between Active Layer and Output Current in Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - An mRNA Processing Complex with an Unusual Choice of Substrate SSRL Gains New Spectroscopy Capabilities SLAC Team Ensures Safety of SPEAR3 Upgrade Public Lectures: Dino-Bird

  6. SSRL HEADLINES June 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 June, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Looking Ahead Science Highlight - Estimating Cr(VI) in Coal-Derived Fly-Ash Science Highlight - Staying One Step Ahead of Antibiotic Resistance Science Highlight - SSRL's Microfocus Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Line 12-2 First SSRL Pump-Probe Experiments Under Way SSRL X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds Upcoming SSRL Events:

  7. Science, Technology, and Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PADSTE Science, Technology, and Engineering Delivering mission success and innovative solutions to national security problems through the agile, rapid application of our transformational scientific capabilities Bird's eye view of a hot cell where the isotopes are separated and purified The quest for an imaging radioisotope READ MORE Molecular clocks in human cells Molecular clocks control mutation rate in human cells READ MORE Glen Wurden in the stellarator's vacuum vessel during camera

  8. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System Paul Denholm, Robert Margolis, Bryan Palmintier, Clayton Barrows, Eduardo Ibanez, and Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Jarett Zuboy Independent Consultant Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-62447 September 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable

  9. HNF-55491

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    491 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Roadside Bird Surveys Report for Calendar Year 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 HNF-55491 Revision 0 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,

  10. HNF-57027

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7027 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Roadside Bird Surveys Report for Calendar Year 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 HNF-57027 Revision 0 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by tradename, trademark,

  11. HNF-58608

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    608 Revision 0 Approved for Public Release Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Roadside Bird Surveys Report for Calendar Year 2014 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 P.O. Box 650 Richland, Washington 99352 TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

  12. Importance of Carolina Bays to the Avifauna of Pinelands in the Southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czapka, Stephen, J.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2011-07-01

    Abstract - Past anthropogenic activity has led to the destruction or alteration of Carolina bay wetlands throughout the southeastern United States. Presently, urban development, combined with a 2001 ruling by the US Supreme Court relaxing protection of isolated wetlands, poses an increasing threat to these and other isolated wetland systems; however, little information exists on the importance of these wetland systems to birds. We compared breeding and wintering bird communities of upland pine (Pinus spp.) forests with and without Carolina bays. Estimated species richness was greater in pine forests with Carolina bays than without during the winter (31.7 ± 1.3 [mean ± SE] vs. 26.9 ± 1.2; P = 0.027), but not in the breeding season (27.9 ± 2.2 vs. 26.3 ± 2.2; P = 0.644). Total relative abundance did not differ between pine forests with Carolina bays and those without in either the breeding (148.0 ± 16.0 vs. 129.4 ± 10.4 birds/40 ha; P = 0.675) or winter (253.0 ± 36.4 vs. 148.8 ± 15.1 birds/40 ha; P = 0.100) seasons. However, 23 species, 43% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in pine forests with bays during the breeding season, and 20 species, 30% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in such sites during winter. In contrast, only 6 and 1 species were observed only in pine forests without bays during the breeding and winter seasons, respectively, indicating that few species were negatively affected by the presence of bays. Thus, Carolina bays appear to enrich the avifauna of pine forests in the southeastern United States.

  13. In other news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In other news Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit In other news Readers' survey, protecting Lab bird residents and major media mentions December 1, 2013 Community Connections readers' survey Please participate in our readers' survey Contacts Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Connections readers survey - please let

  14. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markers: Best Practices from International Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience Jaquelin Cochran, Lori Bird, Jenny Heeter, and Douglas J. Arent NREL/TP-6A00-53732 April 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

  15. Status

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Department of Energy Identity, Credential, and Access Management (ICAM) Cyber Security Training Conference Tuesday, May 18, 2010 Office of the Chief Information Officer 2 Announcement * LACS Birds-of-a-Feather Session - Logistics * Wednesday, May 19, 2010 * 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM EST * Room A708 - Focus: LACS ONLY! * LACS implementation experiences, lessons, questions, challenges, etc - Everyone is welcome * Science Identity Federation (Risk Management Track) - Logistics * Tuesday, May 18, 2010 *

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1999 ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, a multiprogram laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Technical Contact: Douglas L. Sisterson Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Birds Interact with the ARM Program With the end of summer drawing near, the fall songbird migration season will soon begin. Scientists with the ARM Program will be able to observe the onset of the migration season as

  17. Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Wallace P.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Strickland, Dale M.; Young, Jr., David P.; Sernka, Karyn J.; Good, Rhett E.

    2001-08-01

    It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.

  18. NERSC-ScienceHighlightsDecember2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2013 NERSC Science Highlights --- 1 --- NERSC User Science Highlights Energy Simulation couples with experiment to boost bioenergy research (L. Petridis, ORNL) Nuclear Physics Wherein Bert n' Ernie are followed by the even more energetic "BigBird" (L. Gerhardt, NERSC) Materials NERSC enables simulations that mimic some key features of carbonate crystallization. L. Hedges (LBNL) Astrophysics Helping to answer the question, "Are Earths Rare?" (E. Petigura, UC Berkeley)

  19. Sandia, UCLA develop screening libraries to discover drug targets for viral

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    infections | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sandia, UCLA develop screening libraries to discover drug targets for viral infections Friday, April 22, 2016 - 12:00am From left, Sandia National Laboratories researchers Oscar Negrete, Edwin Saada and Sara Bird check out a CRISPR library preparation. The work is part of the first-ever Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia and UCLA. As headlines highlight the threat of viruses like Ebola and Zika,

  20. Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the Kahuku Wind Power Facility in Kahuku, O'ahu, Hawaii Kahuku Wind Power Biological Opinion (4.75 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1726: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions

  1. 2015 News | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 News Below are news stories related to Concentrating Solar Power. RSS Learn about RSS. November 19, 2015 NREL Estimates Economically Viable U.S. Renewable Generation Analysts at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing, for the first time, a method for measuring the economic potential of renewable energy across the United States. May 4, 2015 Report Targets Data on Avian Issues at Solar Energy Facilities Understanding how birds are affected by

  2. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint Bird, L.; Milligan, M. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy)]; Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)] Failure analyses and weld repair of boiler feed water pumps Vulpen, R. van

  3. Hemicellulolytic organisms in the particle-associated microbiota of the hoatzin crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Malfatti, Stephanie; Garcia-Amado, Maria A.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Tringe, Susannah

    2011-05-31

    The hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a South American herbivorous bird, that has an enlarged crop analogous to the rumen, where foregut microbes degrade the otherwise indigestible plant materials, providing energy to the host. The crop harbors an impressive array of microorganisms with potentially novel cellulolytic enzymes. Thie study describes the composition ofthe particle-associated microbiota in the hoatzin crop, combining a survey of 16S rRNA genes in 7 adult birds and metagenome sequencing of two animals. The pyrotag survey demonstrates that Prevotellaceae, are the most abundant and ubiquitous taxa, suggesting that the degradation of hemicellulose is an important activity in the crop. Nonetheless, preliminary results from the metagnome of the particle-associated microbiota of two adult birds show that the crop microbiome contains a high number of genes encoding cellulases (such as GH5) more abundant than those of the termite gut, as well as genes encoding hemicellulases. These preliminary results show that the carbohydate-active enzyme genes in the cropmetagenome could be a source of biochemical catalysts able to deconstruct plant biomass.

  4. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10{sup -1} down to 10{sup -7}. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  5. LOPOS; Advanced device isolation for a 0. 8. mu. CMOS/BULK process technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzo, M.; Kaminsky, E.; Nissan-Cohen, Y.; Frank, P.; Saia, R. . Corporate Research and Development Dept.)

    1989-07-01

    Local oxidation of polysilicon over silicon (LOPOS) isolation has been characterized for use in a 0.8 {mu}m CMOS/BULK process with reduced field oxide edge encroachment (bird's beak). Compared to the standard local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) LOPOS adds a thin polysilicon layer between the stress relief oxide and the overlying nitride without changing the active area patterning procedure. To optimize the LOPOS structure, the thickness of the oxide and nitride layers was varied in a fully-factorial experiment, measuring the bird's beak and checking for the presence of silicon edge defects. It was found that for a 6000{Angstrom} field oxide the bird's beak can be safely reduced to {approx}0.3 {mu}m per side with LOPOS, which is significantly less than {approx}0.55 {mu}m with LOCOS. The corresponding stack consisted of 1500{Angstrom} Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/550{Angstrom} polysilicon (undoped)/200{Angstrom} SiO{sub 2}. LOPOS fabricated diodes exhibited low leakage of {lt} 0.5 nA/cm{sup 2} and {lt} 0.5 pA/cm for the area and edge components, respectively, while MOS capacitors were breakdown-free up to 8 MV/cm during voltage-stress tests, compared to 6 MV/cm for LOCOS.

  6. Synergized resmethrin and corticosterone alter the chicken's response to west nile virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Mark David; Franson, J Christian; Mostl, Erich; Porter, Warren P; Hofmeister, Erik K

    2009-01-01

    Debate concerning arbovirus control strategies remains contentious because concern regarding the relative risk of viral infection and environmental toxicant exposure is high but inadequately characterized. Taking this into account, mosquito control agencies employ aerial insecticides only after arbovirus surveillance data indicate high local mosquito-infection-rates. Successfully mitigating the risk of adult-mosquito-control insecticides ('adulticides') to non-target species such as humans, domestic animals, fish, beneficial insects and wildlife, while increasing their efficacy to reduce arbovirus outbreak intensity requires targeted scientific data from animal toxicity studies and environmental monitoring activities. Wild birds are an important reservoir host for WNv and are potentially exposed to insecticides used for mosquito control. However, no risk assessments have evaluated whether insecticides augment or extend the potential transmissibility of West Nile virus (WNv) in birds. In order to augment existing resmethrin risk assessments, we aimed to determine whether synergized resmethrin (SR) may cause chickens to develop an elevated or extended WN viremia and if subacute stress may affect its immunotoxicity. We distributed 40 chickens into four groups then exposed them prior to and during WNv infection with SR (50 {mu}g/l resmethrin + 150 {mu}g/l piperonyl butoxide) and/or 20 mg/I corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking-water. Corticosterone was given for 10 continuous days and SR was given for 3 alternate days starting the 3rd day of CORT exposure, then chickens were subcutaneously inoculated with WNv on the 5th day of CORT treatment. Compared to controls, CORT treatment extended and elevated viremia, enhanced WNv-specific antibody and increased the percentage of birds that shed oral virus, whereas SR treatment extended viremia, depressed WNv-specific IgG, and increased the percentage of CORT-treated birds that shed oral virus. Corticosterone and SR

  7. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl

    2008-11-20

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River

  8. Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Steven W.

    1992-07-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all

  9. Downregulation of COX-2 and CYP 4A signaling by isoliquiritigenin inhibits human breast cancer metastasis through preventing anoikis resistance, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Hao; Li, Ying; Wang, Yuzhong; Zhao, Haixia; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Yue, Jiang; Guo, Austin M.; Yang, Jing

    2014-10-01

    Flavonoids exert extensive in vitro anti-invasive and in vivo anti-metastatic activities. Anoikis resistance occurs at multiple key stages of the metastatic cascade. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid from Glycyrrhiza glabra, inhibits human breast cancer metastasis by preventing anoikis resistance, migration and invasion through downregulating cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A signaling. ISL induced anoikis in MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 human breast cancer cells as evidenced by flow cytometry and the detection of caspase cleavage. Moreover, ISL inhibited the mRNA expression of phospholipase A2, COX-2 and CYP 4A and decreased the secretion of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in detached MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, it decreased the levels of phospho-PI3K (Tyr{sup 458}), phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}) and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Conversely, the exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2}, WIT003 (a 20-HETE analog) and an EP4 agonist (CAY10580) or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed ISL-induced anoikis. ISL exerted the in vitro anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities, whereas the addition of PGE{sub 2}, WIT003 and CAY10580 or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed the in vitro anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities of ISL in MDA-MB-231 cells. Notably, ISL inhibited the in vivo lung metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells, together with decreased intratumoral levels of PGE{sub 2}, 20-HETE and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). In conclusion, ISL inhibits breast cancer metastasis by preventing anoikis resistance, migration and invasion via downregulating COX-2 and CYP 4A signaling. It suggests that ISL could be a promising multi-target agent for preventing breast cancer metastasis, and anoikis could represent a novel mechanism through which flavonoids may exert the anti-metastatic activities. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin induces anoikis and suppresses

  10. Mutual regulation of TGF-β1, TβRII and ErbB receptors expression in human thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincione, Gabriella; Tarantelli, Chiara; Vianale, Giovina; Di Marcantonio, Maria Carmela; Cotellese, Roberto; Francomano, Franco; Di Nicola, Marta; Costantini, Erica; Cichella, Annadomenica; Muraro, Raffaella

    2014-09-10

    The role of EGF and TGF-β1 in thyroid cancer is still not clearly defined. TGF-β1 inhibited the cellular growth and migration of follicular (FTC-133) and papillary (B-CPAP) thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Co-treatments of TGF-β1 and EGF inhibited proliferation in both cell lines, but displayed opposite effect on their migratory capability, leading to inhibition in B-CPAP and promotion in FTC-133 cells, by a MAPK-dependent mechanism. TGF-β1, TβRII and EGFR expressions were evaluated in benign and malignant thyroid tumors. Both positivity (51.7% and 60.0% and 80.0% in FA and PTC and FTC) and overexpression (60.0%, 77.7% and 75.0% in FA, PTC and FTC) of EGFR mRNA correlates with the aggressive tumor behavior. The moderate overexpression of TGF-β1 and TβRII mRNA in PTC tissues (61.5% and 62.5%, respectively), counteracted their high overexpression in FTC tissues (100% and 100%, respectively), while EGFR overexpression was similar in both carcinomas. Papillary carcinomas were positive to E-cadherin expression, while the follicular carcinomas lose E-cadherin staining. Our findings of TGF-β1/TβRII and EGFR overexpressions together with a loss of E-cadherin observed in human follicular thyroid carcinomas, and of increased migration ability MAPK-dependent after EGF/TGF-β1 treatments in the follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line, reinforced the hypothesis of a cross-talk between EGF and TGF-β1 systems in follicular thyroid carcinomas phenotype. - Highlights: • We reinforce the hypothesis of a cross talk between EGF and TGF-β1 in follicular thyroid carcinoma. • Increased migration MAPK-dependent is observed after EGF+TGF-β1 treatment in follicular thyroid carcinoma cells. • EGF and TGF-β1 caused opposite effect on the migratory ability in B-CPAP and in FTC-133 cells. • TGF-β1, TβRII and EGFR are overexpressed in follicular thyroid carcinoma.

  11. Canada Geese at the Hanford Site Trends in Reproductive Success, Migration Patterns, and Contaminant Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Stegen, Amanda; Hand, Kristine D.; Brandenberger, Jill M.

    2010-05-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has conducted several studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the status and condition of Canada geese on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. This report summarizes results of studies of Canada geese (Branta canadensis moffitti) at the Hanford Site dating back to the 1950s. Results include information on the nesting (reproductive) success of Canada geese using the Hanford Reach, review of the local and regional migration of this species using data from bird banding studies, and summary data describing monitoring and investigations of the accumulation of Hanford-derived and environmental contaminants by resident goose populations.

  12. SREL Reprint #3202

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Rapid Microsatellite Identification from Illumina Paired-End Genomic Sequencing in Two Birds and a Snake Todd A. Castoe1, Alexander W. Poole1, A. P. Jason de Koning1, Kenneth L. Jones1, Diana F. Tomback2, Sara J. Oyler-McCance3, Jennifer A. Fike3, Stacey L. Lance4, Jeffrey W. Streicher5, Eric N. Smith5, and David D. Pollock1 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA 2Department of Integrative Biology, University of

  13. SREL Reprint #3277

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Energetic constraints and parental care: Is corticosterone indicative of energetic costs of incubation in a precocial bird? Sarah E. DuRant1,2, William A. Hopkins1, Gary R. Hepp3, and L. Michael Romero2 1Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA 24061, USA 2Department of Biology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA 3School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA Abstract: Suppression of the adrenocortical response (e.g.,

  14. Are flying wildlife attracted to (or do they avoid) wind turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, Ronald

    2010-03-31

    A DOE-sponsored research project found strong evidence that flying wildlife avoid or are attracted to commercial-scale wind turbines from a distance. Some nocturnally migrating birds avoid flying near turbines and few or none change flight paths to approach them. High-flying bats less often avoid flying near turbines and some are attracted to them from a distance, although bats’ flight paths were often complex and convoluted. The findings are being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed scientific journal (Larkin, in prep 2013).

  15. 5 Things to Know Before You Claim Your Energy Tax Credit: Part 1 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Things to Know Before You Claim Your Energy Tax Credit: Part 1 5 Things to Know Before You Claim Your Energy Tax Credit: Part 1 January 25, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL I suppose it's officially "tax season," though that term doesn't seem to be tossed out by popular media until late March or early April, when the deadline is looming and pressure is on. If you're an early bird, you may already be thinking about your taxes. At the

  16. Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 28, 2013 On Your Mark, Get Set....TORTOISE! The sun is out and the weather is warm. The plants are blooming and the birds are chirping - Spring has sprung at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)! And that can only mean one thing... It's time for the Great Tortoise Derby! Fresh from their winter siestas, Scurry and his desert tortoise friends at the NNSS have been spotted basking outside of their winter burrows. It's been a long winter and everyone is anxious to see what the tortoises

  17. Amy Ross

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amy Ross Amy Ross-Helping kids soar high The Materials Science and Technology Division's Amy Ross is a volunteer pilot and coordinator for the Experimental Aircraft Association's Young Eagles Program. January 9, 2015 Amy Ross Amy Ross owns a bright-yellow 1968 Beechcraft Musketeer Super III called Big Bird. While still on the ground, Ross explains how planes fly to her young visitors and what will happen once they are in the air. As they walk toward the planes, Ross asks, "Can you guess

  18. Xeon Phi Users Group: Performance Tuning and Functional Debugging for Xeon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phi Performance Tuning and Functional Debugging for Xeon Phi Xeon Phi Users Group: Performance Tuning and Functional Debugging for Xeon Phi November 19, 2014 Intel Xeon Phi Users Group SC14 BoF Session LOCATION: At SC14 in New Orleans, LA, Nov. 19, 2014. SC14 Web Link: http://sc14.supercomputing.org/schedule/event_detail?evid=bof176 EVENT TYPE: Birds of a Feather TIME: 5:30PM - 7:00PM Central Time SESSION LEADER(S): Richard Gerber, Kent Milfeld, Chris Gottbrath, Chris J. Newburn ROOM:286-87

  19. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chapter 5 ▪ Long-Term Environmental Consequences 5-1163 5.3.3 Ecological Risk This section presents the results of the evaluation of long-term impacts on ecological resources of releases to air and groundwater under the Waste Management alternatives. Risk indices-Hazard Quotient and Hazard Index-were calculated by comparing the predicted dose to the benchmark dose (see Appendix P). Risk indices could not be calculated for soil-dwelling invertebrates, lizards, toads, or birds exposed to organic

  20. Revision of species inventory checklists for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N.T. )

    1990-10-01

    This report revises and updates the 1974 report by W. C. Martin and W. L. Wagner, Biological Survey of Kirtland Air Force Base (East). The biological communities of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) are described with respect to the Biome classification system of Brown (1982), and a standardized system of habitat types is proposed based on biome and soil type. The potential occurrence of state or federally endangered species is discussed. No species listed as endangered or threatened is known to occur on KAFB, although five are identified as potentially occurring. Updated lists of amphibians, reptiles, breeding birds, mammals, and plants are presented. 18 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Modelling long-distance seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Tewlsbury, Joshua, J.; Bolker, Benjamin, M.

    2008-01-01

    1. Long-distance seed dispersal is difficult to measure, yet key to understanding plant population dynamics and community composition. 2. We used a spatially explicit model to predict the distribution of seeds dispersed long distances by birds into habitat patches of different shapes. All patches were the same type of habitat and size, but varied in shape. They occurred in eight experimental landscapes, each with five patches of four different shapes, 150 m apart in a matrix of mature forest. The model was parameterized with smallscale movement data collected from field observations of birds. In a previous study we validated the model by testing its predictions against observed patterns of seed dispersal in real landscapes with the same types and spatial configuration of patches as in the model. 3. Here we apply the model more broadly, examining how patch shape influences the probability of seed deposition by birds into patches, how dispersal kernels (distributions of dispersal distances) vary with patch shape and starting location, and how movement of seeds between patches is affected by patch shape. 4. The model predicts that patches with corridors or other narrow extensions receive higher numbers of seeds than patches without corridors or extensions. This pattern is explained by edgefollowing behaviour of birds. Dispersal distances are generally shorter in heterogeneous landscapes (containing patchy habitat) than in homogeneous landscapes, suggesting that patches divert the movement of seed dispersers, holding them long enough to increase the probability of seed defecation in the patches. Dispersal kernels for seeds in homogeneous landscapes were smooth, whereas those in heterogenous landscapes were irregular. In both cases, long-distance (> 150 m) dispersal was surprisingly common, usually comprising approximately 50% of all dispersal events. 5. Synthesis . Landscape heterogeneity has a large influence on patterns of long-distance seed dispersal. Our results

  2. Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 3.2.3.3 Additional Wildlife Observations In September, a dead crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) was observed dangling from the top of a spruce tree at the Site. Closer inspection revealed there was fishing line wrapped around the foot of the bird. Evidently the crow picked up the fishing line on its foot at one of the nearby reservoirs (since fishing is not allowed at the Site). The line was probably dangling from its foot when it landed on the branch. When it attempted to take off the line

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Kingman Quadrangle, Arizona, Nevada, and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luning, R.H.; Penley, H.M.; Johnson, C.L.; Dotterrer, F.E.

    1982-09-01

    Literature research, surface geologic investigations, and rock sampling were conducted for the Kingman Quadrangle, Arizona, Nevada, and California, to identify geologic environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Favorability criteria developed during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program were used. The studies were augmented by aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment surveys. No environments favorable for uranium deposits of at least 100 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ were found. Unfavorable environments include all sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian to Laramide age; Tertiary volcanic sequences; and Quaternary caliche. Unevaluated environments include the Bird Spring Formation and the intermontane valleys.

  4. How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping By Raphael Rosen August 19, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Graduate student Vinícius Duarte (Photo by Elle Starkman) Graduate student Vinícius Duarte "Chirp, chirp, chirp." The familiar sound of birds is also what researchers call a wave in plasma that breaks from a single note into rapidly changing notes. This behavior can cause heat in the form of high energy particles - or

  5. PCBs as environmental estrogens: Turtle sex determination as a biomarker of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, J.M.; Crews, D. ); McLachlan, J.A. )

    1994-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread, low-level environmental pollutants associated with adverse health effects such as immune suppression and teratogenicity. There is increasing evidence that some PCB compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans, particularly during development. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds act to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, whereby the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. Here we demonstrate the estrogenic effect of some PCBs by reversing gonadal sex in a reptile species that exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Integration of Long-Term Research into a GIS Based Landscape Habitat Model for the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzreb, K.; Lloyd, F.T.

    2000-10-01

    The red cockaded woodpecker has been intensively studied since 1985 when the population was on the verge of extinction. The population decline is primarily the result of timber harvesting prior to 1950 and restricted burning. Construction of artificial cavities, translocations, competitor control, and removal of hardwood mid-story has provided suitable habitat. Since 1985, the population has increased from 4 to 99 birds. A GIS model is being developed to simulate the development of habitat at SRS in relation to management and existing vegetation.

  7. DOE Ex Parte re UEF_Rheem | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    re UEF_Rheem DOE Ex Parte re UEF_Rheem On July 16, 2015, Karen Meyers, Vice President of Government Affairs, Rheem Manufacturing Company ("Rheem"), and Bill Anaya, counsel for Rheem at Alston & Bird, LLP, met with Anne Harkavy, Deputy General Counsel of the Department of Energy ("the Department" or "DOE"), to discuss issues related to the Department's proceeding to develop a mathematical onversion factor with regard to energy efficiency testing for consumer

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battling bird flu by the numbers May 27, 2008 Los Alamos mathematical model gauges epidemic potential of emerging diseases LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 27, 2008-A pair of Los Alamos National Laboratory theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. In a paper published recently in the Public Library of Science, researchers Luís

  9. How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab How to keep the superhot plasma inside tokamaks from chirping By Raphael Rosen August 19, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Graduate student Vinícius Duarte (Photo by Elle Starkman) Graduate student Vinícius Duarte "Chirp, chirp, chirp." The familiar sound of birds is also what researchers call a wave in plasma that breaks from a single note into rapidly changing notes. This behavior can cause heat in the form of high energy particles - or

  10. the Y-12 Times, March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 March 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Y-12's nuclear forensics role Page 3 First Y-12 demolition funded by ARRA Page 4 Bird's-eye view enhances security Page 6 Y-12 UW campaign has best year ever Page 6 Turn your bright idea into a patent B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A

  11. Amy Ross

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ross January 9, 2015 Helping kids soar high The Materials Science and Technology Division's Amy Ross is a volunteer pilot and coordinator for the Experimental Aircraft Association's Young Eagles Program, which introduces kids ages 8 to 17 to the joy of flying during free flights. She even has her own plane, a bright-yellow 1968 Beechcraft Musketeer Super III called Big Bird. While still on the ground, Ross explains how planes fly to her young visitors and what will happen once they are in the

  12. Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps J. Heeter, R. Gelman, and L. Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-61858 September 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No.

  13. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  14. The (Scientific) Flight of the Falcon - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The (Scientific) Flight of the Falcon April 22, 2015 Photo of a man with a peregrine falcon with a GPS and a very high frequency radio tracker before a flight. NREL researcher Jason Roadman, right, works with falconer Sam Dollar and Houdini, a peregrine falcon. The falcon is part of a research project to test radar technology being developed by Laufer Wind and NREL that may decrease the number of bird interactions with wind turbines. Photo by Ismael Mendoza, NREL A trained falcon named Houdini

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE Ex Parte re UEF_Rheem.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2015 Office of the General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy Via Email: expartecommunications@hq.doe.gov Re: Ex Parte Communication On July 16, 2015, Karen Meyers, Vice President of Government Affairs, Rheem Manufacturing Company ("Rheem"), and Bill Anaya, counsel for Rheem at Alston & Bird, LLP, met with Anne Harkavy, Deputy General Counsel of the Department of Energy ("the Department" or "DOE"), to discuss issues related to the Department's proceeding to

  16. Contents A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 April/May 2004 NTS receives $13 million Homeland Security grant NTS receives $13 million Homeland Security grant 1 Profile: Thomas R. Clark 1 TA-18 to relocate to NTS 2 Contractors receive Awards of Excellence 2 OPSEC secures second place award 3 Patton captures local championship3 Maintenance in the U1a complex 3 Company seeks new technologies 3 Detective work at your fingertips 4 Information at a touch 4 FRMAC goes to California 4 Free range birds 4 Nevada Reading Week 5 Let's get physical 6

  17. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  18. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

    1984-03-01

    This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

  19. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  20. Strontium isotope investigation of ungulate movement patterns on the Pleistocene Paleo-Agulhas Plain of the Greater Cape Floristic Region, South Africa

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Copeland, Sandi R.; Cawthra, Hayley C.; Fisher, Erich C.; Lee-Thorp, Julia A.; Cowling, Richard M.; le Roux, Petrus J.; Hodgkins, Jamie; Marean, Curtis W.

    2016-04-16

    Middle Stone Age sites located within the Greater Cape Floristic Region on the South African southern coast have material culture with early evidence for key modern human behaviors such as projectile weaponry, large animal hunting, and symbolic behavior. In order to interpret how and why these changes evolved, it is necessary to understand their ecological context as it has direct relevance to foraging behavior. During periods of lowered sea level, a largely flat and vast expanse of land existed south of the modern coastline, but it is now submerged by higher sea levels. This exposed area, the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, likelymore » created an ecological context unlike anything in the region today, as evidenced by fossil assemblages dominated by migratory ungulates. One hypothesis is that the Paleo-Agulhas Plain supported a migration ecosystem of large grazers driven by summer rainfall, producing palatable forage during summer in the east, and winter rainfall, producing palatable forage during winter in the west. Furthermore, ungulates may have been moving from the coastal plain in the south to the interior north of the Cape Fold Mountains, as observed for elephants in historic times.« less

  1. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  2. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  3. CD26-mediated regulation of periostin expression contributes to migration and invasion of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiya, Eriko; Ohnuma, Kei; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Hatano, Ryo; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: CD26-expressing MPM cells upregulate production of periostin. The intracytoplasmic region of CD26 mediates the upregulation of periostin. CD26 expression leads to nuclear translocation of Twist1 via phosphorylation of Src. Secreted periostin enhances migration and invasion of MPM cells. - Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy arising from mesothelial lining of pleura. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis, partly due to the lack of a precise understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with its malignant behavior. In the present study, we expanded on our previous studies on the enhanced motility and increased CD26 expression in MPM cells, with a particular focus on integrin adhesion molecules. We found that expression of CD26 upregulates periostin secretion by MPM cells, leading to enhanced MPM cell migratory and invasive activity. Moreover, we showed that upregulation of periostin expression results from the nuclear translocation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1, a process that is mediated by CD26-associated activation of Src phosphorylation. While providing new and profound insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in MPM biology, these findings may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for MPM.

  4. Computational Tools to Assess Turbine Biological Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2014-07-24

    Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now more than 50 years old. Plans are underway to refit these aging turbines with new runners. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when upgrading the turbines. In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is demonstrated. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We present an application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  5. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Li; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong ; Kong, Beihua; Sheng, Xiugui; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  6. A mutation causing Alport syndrome with tardive hearing loss is common in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, D.F.; Denison, J.C.; Atkin, C.L.

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the COL4A5 gene, located at Xq22, cause Alport syndrome (AS), a nephritis characterized by progressive deterioration of the glomerular basement membrane and usually associated with progressive hearing loss. We have identified a novel mutation, L1649R, present in 9 of 121 independently ascertained families. Affected males shared the same haplotype of eight polymorphic markers tightly linked to COL4A5, indicating common ancestry. Genealogical studies place the birth of this ancestor >200 years ago. The L1649R mutation is a relatively common cause of Alport syndrome in the western United States, in part because of the rapid growth and migratory expansion of mid-nineteenth-century pioneer populations carrying the gene. L1649R affects a highly conserved residue in the NC1 domain, which is involved in key inter- and intramolecular interactions, but results in a relatively mild disease phenotype. Renal failure in an L1649R male typically occurs in the 4th or 5th decade and precedes the onset of significant hearing loss by {approximately}10 years. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Field application of innovative grouting agents for in situ stabilization of buried waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, G.G.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents field applications for two innovative grouting agents that were used to in situ stabilize buried waste sites, via jet grouting. The two grouting agents include paraffin and a proprietary iron oxide based cement grout called TECT. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The field demonstrations were performed at the INEL in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit, which is adjacent to the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). At the RWMC, 56,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste is co-mingled with over 170,000 m{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial. Improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final disposition of this waste. Using jet-grouting technology to inject these materials into the pore spaces of buried waste sites results in the creation of buried monolithic waste forms that simultaneously protect the waste from subsidence, while eliminating the migratory potential of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in the waste.

  8. Statistical Evaluation of Travel Time Estimation Based on Data from Freeze-Branded Chinook Salmon on the Snake River, 1982-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, J.R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to assess the strengths and limitations of existing freeze brand recapture data in describing the migratory dynamics of juvenile salmonids in the mainstream, impounded sections of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. With the increased concern over the threatened status of spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River drainage, we used representative stocks for these races as our study populations. However, statistical considerations resultant from these analyses apply to other species and drainages as well. This report describes analyses we conducted using information derived from freeze-branded groups. We examined both index production groups released from hatcheries upstream from Lower Granite Dam (1982--1990) and freeze-branded groups used as controls in smolt transportation evaluations conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (1986, 1989). The scope of our analysis was limited to describing travel time estimates and derived relationships, as well as reach survival estimates through the mainstem Snake River from Lower Granite to McNary Dam.

  9. Snake River Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) Habitat/Limnologic Research : Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaulding, Scott

    1993-05-01

    This report outlines long-term planning and monitoring activities that occurred in 1991 and 1992 in the Stanley Basin Lakes of the upper Salmon River, Idaho for the purpose of sockeye salmon nerka) recovery. Limnological monitoring and experimental sampling protocol, designed to establish a limnological baseline and to evaluate sockeye salmon production capability of the lakes, are presented. Also presented are recommended passage improvements for current fish passage barriers/impediments on migratory routes to the lakes. We initiated O. nerka population evaluations for Redfish and Alturas lakes; this included population estimates of emerging kokanee fry entering each lake in the spring and adult kokanee spawning surveys in tributary streams during the fall. Gill net evaluations of Alturas, Pettit, and Stanley lakes were done in September, 1992 to assess the relative abundance of fish species among the Stanley Basin lakes. Fish population data will be used to predict sockeye salmon production potential within a lake, as well as a baseline to monitor long-term fish community changes as a result of sockeye salmon recovery activities. Also included is a paper that reviews sockeye salmon enhancement activities in British Columbia and Alaska and recommends strategies for the release of age-0 sockeye salmon that will be produced from the current captive broodstock.

  10. Migrational Characteristics, Biological Observations, and Relative Survival of Juvenile Salmonids Entering the Columbia River Estuary, 1966-1983, 1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawley, Earl M.

    1986-04-01

    Natural runs of salmonids in the Columbia River basin have decreased as a result of hydroelectric-dam development, poor land- and forest-management, and over-fishing. This has necessitated increased salmon culture to assure adequate numbers of returning adults. Hatchery procedures and facilities are continually being modified to improve both the efficiency of production and the quality of juveniles produced. Initial efforts to evaluate changes in hatchery procedures were dependent upon adult contributions to the fishery and returns to the hatchery. Procedures were developed for sampling juvenile salmon and steelhead entering the Columbia River estuary and ocean plume. The sampling of hatchery fish at the terminus of their freshwater migration assisted in evaluating hatchery production techniques and identifying migrational or behavioral characteristics that influence survival to and through the estuary. The sampling program attempted to estimate survival of different stocks and define various aspects of migratory behavior in a large river, with flows during the spring freshet from 4 to 17 thousand cubic meters per second (m/sup 3//second).

  11. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  12. Simulated Passage Through A Modified Kaplan Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-03-15

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The responses of fall Chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to these two stresses, both singly and in combination, were investigated in the laboratory. A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the ?worst case? pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more ?fish-friendly? mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa) or 30 ft (191 kPa) of pressure, then held at surface pressure at 100% saturation for a 48-hour observation period. Sensitivity of fall Chinook salmon to gas supersaturation was slightly higher than in the previous test series, with 15% mortality for surface-acclimated fish at 120% TDG, compared to 0% in the previous tests.

  13. Thymosin beta 4 expression and nuclear transport are regulated by hMLH1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, Angela Plotz, Guido; Zeuzem, Stefan; Trojan, Joerg

    2007-12-28

    For hMLH1, a key enzyme of DNA mismatch repair and frequently mutated in human cancers, several additional functions have been suggested. We now identified Thymosin {beta}{sub 4} (T{beta}{sub 4}), an actin-binding and cell motility regulating protein, by bacterial two-hybrid screening. Interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. T{beta}{sub 4} was weakly expressed in the hMLH1-deficient cell lines 293T and HCT-116. Reconstitution of hMLH1 resulted in strong expression of T{beta}{sub 4}. Confocal laser microscopy revealed nuclear colocalization of both proteins. Reconstitution with hMLH1 mutants lacking a functional nuclear localization sequence resulted in cytoplasmatic retention of both proteins. After T{beta}{sub 4}- or hMLH1-siRNA treatment, cell migration of hMLH1-proficient cells was markedly decreased. Our results show that hMLH1 interacts with T{beta}{sub 4} and regulates its expression and nuclear transport. Moreover, loss of hMLH1 causes T{beta}{sub 4} deprivation and results in reduced migratory activity in vitro. These data give insight into novel functions of hMLH1 and probably disease related dysregulated mechanisms.

  14. Outmigration of landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts and effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small scale hydroelectric facility. [Salmo salar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettles, D.C.; Gloss, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Modes of downstream passage (penstock, spillway, diversion chute) by Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts were monitored using radio telemetry to assess the effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small hydroelectric dam on the Boquet River, New York. Telemetry of 170 Atlantic salmon smolts and visual observations of stocked smolts were used to determine aspects of Atlantic salmon outmigration behavior. Smolts initiated mass migrations after river temperatures reached or exceeded 10/sup 0/C. Many radio-tagged smolts interrupted movements upon reaching ponded waters and/or the dam. River flow did not (P > .05) affect the frequency of migratory movements, passages, or rate of movement. Migrations were of approximately 30 days duration. Passages at the dam occurred primarily at night (61%) with diurnal passages (17%) and crepuscular passages (17%) of secondary importance. Timing of 5% of the passages was undetermined. All passages which occurred when angled trash racks were in place were through the bypass or over the spillway. Six (6) passages occurred when trash racks perpendicular to the penstock were in place: 3 of these were penstock passages. The angled trash rack and bypass structure served to reduce entrainment.

  15. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  16. Expellor extracted rape and safflower oilseed meals for poultry and sheep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, V.M.; Katz, R.J.; Auld, D.A.; Petersen, C.F.; Sauter, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to evaluate the feeding value of on-the-farm expellor extracted rape (RSM) and safflower (SM) oilseed meals for poultry and sheep. Rapeseed meal and SM contained 30.7 and 25.8% crude protein (CP) and 21.7 and 8.7% fat, respectively. Rapeseed meal contained a total glucosinolate concentration of 78.3 ..mu..moles/g. A 22-day feeding trial was conducted with 6-day-old chicks. Rapeseed meal and SM replaced 25 or 50% of the soybean meal (SBM) protein in isonitrogenous (23% CP), isocaloric (3250 kcal ME/kg) diets. Birds fed SBM and 25 or 50% SM consumed more (P < .01) daily feed and gained more (P < .01) per day than those fed 25 or 50% RSM. Birds fed RSM had enlarged thyroid glands in comparison to those fed SMB. Two lamb digestion trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing cottonseed meal (CSM) protein with either RSM or SM on nitrogen utilization and DM digestibility. Replacing 100% of the CSM protein with RSM had no effect (P > .05) on dry matter digestibility and N utilization. Nitrogen balance studies indicate that expellor extracted SM may replace up to 75% of the CSM protein in diets for wethers. 8 tables.

  17. Effects of radio transmitters on the behavior of Red-headed Woodpeckers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukovich, Mark; Kilgo, John, C.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Previous studies have revealed that radio-transmitters may affect bird behaviors, including feeding rates, foraging behavior, vigilance, and preening behavior. In addition, depending on the method of attachment, transmitters can potentially affect the ability of cavity-nesting birds to use cavities. Our objective was to evaluate effects of transmitters on the behavior of and use of cavities byRed-headedWoodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus). Using backpack harnesses, we attached 2.1-g transmitter packages that averaged 3.1% of body weight (range = 2.53.6%) to Red-headed Woodpeckers. We observed both radio-tagged (N = 23) and nonradio-tagged (N = 28) woodpeckers and determined the percentage of time spent engaged in each of five behaviors: flight, foraging, perching, preening, and territorial behavior. We found no difference between the two groups in the percentage of time engaged in each behavior. In addition, we found that transmitters had no apparent effect on use of cavities for roosting by radio-tagged woodpeckers (N = 25).We conclude that backpack transmitters weighing less than 3.6% of body weight had no impact on either their behavior or their ability to use cavities.

  18. Biomonitoring of heavy metals in the Pacific Basin using avian feathers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M.

    1995-07-01

    The authors used avian feathers to biomonitor heavy-metal distribution in several areas in the Pacific Basin including Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, China, Johnston Atoll, Hawaii, and Costa Rica. This paper is a preliminary synthesis of data gathered by the Pacific Basin Biomonitoring Project. They examined levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, chromium, and manganese. For sooty terns (Sterna fuscata) and brown noddy (Anous stolidus) mercury levels were lower in the Pacific than in Puerto Rico in the Atlantic, but his was reversed for lead and cadmium. Adult birds had higher metal levels in their feathers than did young birds of the same species from the same area. Cadmium levels were higher in terrestrial species; lead, chromium, and manganese were highest in coastal species; and mercury and selenium were highest in marine species. Mercury levels were lowest in forest species, intermediate in species that eat insects and small vertebrates, and highest in species that eat intermediate to large fish. Lead levels were highest in species feeding in industrialized estuaries of Hong Kong.

  19. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  20. Substrate inhibition and control for high rate biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This research addresses a critical aspect of the technical feasibility of biogas recovery with poultry manure using anaerobic digestion, namely, inhibition and toxicity factors limiting methane generation under high rate conditions. The research was designed to identify the limiting factors and to examine alternative pretreatment and in situ control methods for the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure as an energy producing system. Biogas production was indicated by the daily gas volume produced per unit digester capacity. Enhanced biogas generation from the anaerobic digester systems using poultry manure was studied in laboratory- and pilot-scale digester operations. It was found that ammonia nitrogen concentration above 4000 mg/l was inhibitory to biogas production. Pretreatment of the manure by elutriation was effective for decreasing inhibitory/toxic conditions. Increased gas production resulted without an indication of serious inhibition by increased volatile acids, indicating a limitation of available carbon sources. For poultry manure digestion, the optimum pH range was 7.1 to 7.6. Annual costs for pretreatment/biogas systems for 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 birds were estimated and compared with annual surplus energy produced. The economic break-even point was achieved in digesters for greater than 30,000 birds. Capital cost of the digester system was estimated to be $18,300 with annual costs around $4000. It is anticipated that the digester system could be economically applied to smaller farms as energy costs increase.

  1. Raceway behaviors in blast furnace with pulverized coal injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, J.K.; Han, J.W.; Cho, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    The blast furnace raceway shows different characteristics with PCR (pulverized coal injection rate). It was found in this study that with the increase of PCR the raceway depth decreases, and the size of birds nest and sometimes with liquid holdup, increases. Oxygen enrichment with co-axial lances was known to be very effective on the extension of raceway depth and size reduction of birds nest. It was also found that there are various factors which affect the coke properties at tuyere level of the blast furnace. Coke traveling time was calculated to be extended with PCR and it had a close relationship with the coke size in bosh. Coke mean size decreased with the increase of coke traveling time, that is, with the increase of PCR. Both DI (the strength of coke in cold) and CSR (the strength of coke after reaction) were also decreased with PCR. RAFT (Raceway Adiabatic Flame Temperature) had a tendency to be decreased with the increase of PCR, which is obtained by the estimation of coke temperature via XRD analysis. From the analysis of alkali contents in coke sampled along the radius of the blast furnace, it was understood that no difference in alkali contents between fine and lump coke represents that coke fines generated from upper burden might appear at tuyere level.

  2. Lensing reconstruction from a patchwork of polarization maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Nagata, Ryo E-mail: rnagata@post.kek.jp

    2014-09-01

    The lensing signals involved in CMB polarization maps have already been measured with ground-based experiments such as SPTpol and POLARBEAR, and would become important as a probe of cosmological and astrophysical issues in the near future. Sizes of polarization maps from ground-based experiments are, however, limited by contamination of long wavelength modes of observational noise. To further extract the lensing signals, we explore feasibility of measuring lensing signals from a collection of small sky maps each of which is observed separately by a ground-based large telescope, i.e., lensing reconstruction from a patchwork map of large sky coverage organized from small sky patches. We show that, although the B-mode power spectrum obtained from the patchwork map is biased due to baseline uncertainty, bias on the lensing potential would be negligible if the B-mode on scales larger than the blowup scale of 1/f noise is removed in the lensing reconstruction. As examples of cosmological applications, we also show 1) the cross-correlations between the reconstructed lensing potential and full-sky temperature/polarization maps from satellite missions such as PLANCK and LiteBIRD, and 2) the use of the reconstructed potential for delensing B-mode polarization of LiteBIRD observation.

  3. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  4. Metals in tissues of migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) from Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Niles, Lawrence; Dey, Amanda; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Tsipoura, Nellie

    2014-08-15

    There is an abundance of field data on levels of metals for feathers in a variety of birds, but relatively few data for tissues, especially for migrant species from one location. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in muscle, liver, brain, fat and breast feathers from migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) collected from Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Our primary objectives were to (1) examine variation as a function of tissue, (2) determine the relationship of metal levels among tissues, and (3) determine the selenium:mercury molar ratio in different tissues since selenium is thought to protect against mercury toxicity. We were also interested in whether the large physiological changes that occur while shorebirds are on Delaware Bay (e.g. large weight gains in 2–3 weeks) affected metal levels, especially in the brain. There were significant differences among tissues for all metals. The brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium, and was tied for the lowest levels of all other metals except lead and selenium. Correlations among metals in tissues were varied, with mercury levels being positively correlated for muscle and brain, and for liver and breast feathers. Weights vary among individuals at the Delaware Bay stopover, as they arrive light, and gain weight prior to migration north. Bird weight and levels of arsenic, cadmium, and selenium in the brain were negatively correlated, while they were positively correlated for lead. There was no positive correlation for mercury in the brain as a function of body weight. The selenium:mercury molar ratio varied significantly among tissues, with brain (ratio of 141) and fat having the highest ratios, and liver and breast feathers having the lowest. In all cases, the ratio was above 21, suggesting the potential for amelioration of mercury toxicity. - Highlights: • Metal levels were examined for migrant semipalmated sandpipers. • There

  5. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsipoura, Nellie; Burger, Joanna; Newhouse, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Gochfeld, Michael; Mizrahi, David

    2011-08-15

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean {+-}SE 4.29{+-}0.30 {mu}g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910{+-}386 ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249{+-}44.7 ng/g) and eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) may pose a

  6. Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S. ); Amidan, Brett G. ); Cada, G F.

    2003-07-31

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at

  7. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  8. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section

  9. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries

  10. Effect of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib on CUB-domain containing protein (CDCP1)-mediated breast cancer cell survival and migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidel, Jeanette; Kunc, Klaudia; Possinger, Kurt; Jehn, Christian; Lueftner, Diana

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} CDCP1 downregulation reduces anchorage free survival of breast cancer cells. {yields} Anoikis of CDCP1-positive breast cancer cells is increased after CDCP1 downregulation. {yields} CDCP1 knockdown decreases migration and extensively reduces invasiveness in vitro. {yields} Proliferation rate does not correlate with CDCP1 expression. {yields} Lapatinib does not influence tyrosine kinases of CDCP1 signal transduction. -- Abstract: The surface receptor CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is highly expressed in several adenocarcinomas and speculated to participate in anchorage-independent cell survival and cell motility. Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation seems to be crucial for intracellular signaling of CDCP1. Lapatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is approved for treatment of HER-2/neu overexpressing metastatic breast cancer and functions by preventing autophosphorylation following HER-2/neu receptor activation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CDCP1 expression on anchorage-independent growth and cell motility of breast cancer cells. Moreover, studies were performed to examine if lapatinib provided any beneficial effect on HER-2/neu{sup (+)/-}/CDCP1{sup +} breast cancer cell lines. In our studies, we affirmed that CDCP1 prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis when cultured in the absence of cell-substratum anchorage and that migratory and invasive properties of these cells were decreased when CDCP1 was down-regulated. However, only HER-2/neu{sup +}, but not HER-2/neu{sup (+)/-} cells showed decreased proliferation and invasion and an enhanced level of apoptosis towards loss of anchorage when treated with lapatinib. Therefore, we conclude that CDCP1 might be involved in regulating adhesion and motility of breast cancer cells but that lapatinib has no effect on tyrosine kinases regulating CDCP1. Nonetheless, other TKIs might offer therapeutic approaches for CDCP1-targeted breast cancer therapy and should be studied

  11. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  12. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  13. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  14. Movements of White Sturgeon in Lake Roosevelt : Final Report 1988-1991.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; Setter, Ann L.

    1992-06-01

    Historically, white sturgeon moved throughout the Columbia River system, ranging freely from the estuary to the headwaters, with the possible exception of limited passage at Cascades, Celilo and Kettle Falls during spring floods. Construction of Rock Island Dam in 1933, followed by Bonneville in 1938 and Grand Coulee in 1941, completely disrupted sturgeon migratory opportunity, and with the 17 successive Columbia and Snake river dams constructed over the next 32 years an entirely different river system was created for the species. Sturgeon caught between dams were essentially isolated populations with severely limited reproduction potential. Some reservoirs ran from dam to dam with no river habitat remaining, while other reaches had various lengths of free running river, but drastically reduced from historical situations. However, if reservoirs provide habitat for sturgeon use, and therefore compensate to some degree for river loss, the major limiting factors associated with population viability may be reduced spawning success, either from lack of suitable area or poor incubation environments. The most upstream impoundment of the Columbia River in the United States is Lake Roosevelt, behind Grand Coulee Dam. If sturgeon don`t use Lake Roosevelt the capacity of the system to sustain a large sturgeon population would be understandably limited, and much reduced from the pre-dam era. In general this study found that sturgeon spawner aggregations from early spring to mid- summer depend most heavily on the timing of increasing water temperature. In the spring the water temperatures seem to stimulate the fish to start feeding and leave deep pools. The summer provides access to broader and shallower areas for food. The study on sturgeon movement was an attempt to define habitat use in such a reservoir/river system.

  15. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuykendall, Tommie G.; Allsop, Jacob Lee; Anderson, Benjamin Robert; Boumedine, Marc; Carter, Cedric; Galvin, Seanmichael Yurko; Gonzalez, Oscar; Lee, Wellington K.; Lin, Han Wei; Morris, Tyler Jake; Nauer, Kevin S.; Potts, Beth A.; Ta, Kim Thanh; Trasti, Jennifer; White, David R.

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses are designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.

  16. Science& Technology Review May 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-05-01

    This May 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''Another Weapon in the Battle against Proliferation''; (2) ''Chemical Weapons Can't Evade This Lab'', Livermore's Forensic Science Center is certified to analyze samples collected during inspections conducted to monitor the Chemical Weapons Convention. (3) ''Bird's-Eye View Clarifies Research on the Ground'' Geobotanical remote sensing has applications in homeland security and energy resource development and provides new insights into complex ecologic systems. (4) ''Age Does Make a Difference'' Age-dating techniques and ultrasensitive technologies provide a comprehensive map of California's groundwater and indicate where it is most vulnerable to contaminants. (5) ''Reducing Aerodynamic Drag'' Simulations and experiments reveal ways to make heavy trucks more aerodynamic and fuel efficient.

  17. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Propane has been a proven fuel for buses for decades. For the first time in 2007, Blue Bird rolled out a propane school bus using direct liquid injection, which was later followed by Thomas Built Buses and Navistar. Because this new technology is much more reliable than previous designs, it is essentially reintroducing propane buses to many school districts. During this same time period, vehicle emissions standards have tightened. To meet them, diesel engine manufacturers have added diesel particulate filters (DPF) and, more recently, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. As an alternative to diesel buses with these systems, many school districts have looked to other affordable, clean alternatives, and they've found that propane fits the bill.

  18. Characterization and possible origins of isolated douglas fir stands on the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The floristic composition of several isolated stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii on the Colorado Plateau is compared. All occurred between 1700-2000 meters, which was about 300-500 meters below typical lower limits for the species. Most stands showed evidence of reproduction and recruitment. A small widespread group of species existed that was common to all stands, but beta diversity was high. A preliminary analysis of possible origins of the stands suggested that they are relictual from the late Wisconsin or early Holocene. Bird-dispersed species were less prevalent than expected compared with existing high elevation conifer forests. These stands represent important resources for Quaternary research, but are extremely vulnerable to human-caused disturbances. It is recommended that they be provided protection from disturbance through appropriate management activities of the various land management agencies.

  19. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  20. Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1992. Results of continuing basic environmental monitoring, January through December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, R.B.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents changes in the populations of plants and animals on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1992. It is part of a Department of Energy (DOE) program (Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program -- BECAMP) that also includes monitoring DOE compliance with the Endangered Species Act, the Historic Preservation Act, and the American Indian Freedom of Religion Act. Ecological studies were to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act and DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` These studies focused on the following: status of ephemeral plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of reptile and amphibian populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; trends in small mammal populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of large mammals and birds at Nevada Test Site, 1992; and status of perennial plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992.

  1. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  2. Ecology of the mangroves of south Florida: a community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odum, W.E.; McIvor, C.C.; Smith, T.J. III

    1982-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the community structure and ecosystem processes of the mangrove forests of south Florida. This description is based upon a compilation of data and hypotheses from published and unpublished sources. Information covered ranges from details of mangrove distribution, primary production, and diseases to asepcts of reproduction, biomass partitioning, and adaptations to stress. Mangrove ecosystems are considered in terms of zonation, succession, litter fall and decomposition, carbon export, and energy flow. Most of the components of mangrove communities are cataloged and discussed; these include mircoorganisms, plants other than mangroves, invertebrates, fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals. Finally, two sections summarize the value of mangrove ecosystems to man and present ways to manage this type of habitat. It is concluded that mangrove forests, which cover between 430,000 and 500,000 acres (174,000 to 202,000 ha) in Florida, are a resource of great value and should be protected and preserved wherever possible.

  3. Geographic Visualization of Power-Grid Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-18

    The visualization enables the simulation analyst to see changes in the frequency through time and space. With this technology, the analyst has a bird's eye view of the frequency at loads and generators as the simulated power system responds to the loss of a generator, spikes in load, and other contingencies. The significance of a contingency to the operation of an electrical power system depends critically on how the resulting tansients evolve in time andmore » space. Consequently, these dynamic events can only be understood when seen in their proper geographic context. this understanding is indispensable to engineers working on the next generation of distributed sensing and control systems for the smart grid. By making possible a natural and intuitive presentation of dynamic behavior, our new visualization technology is a situational-awareness tool for power-system engineers.« less

  4. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project: St. Anthony's Hospital

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. DOE conducts demonstration projects documenting the performance of LED luminaires relative to conventional technologies to increase market adoption of energy-efficient LED systems and to stimulate ongoing product development. These demonstration projects evaluate various aspects of lighting design, purchase, installation, and operation, and they assess the impacts LED technology might have on building owners and users.The prior reports featured NGL-recognized LED downlight luminaires in projects that were either new construction (Hilton Columbus Downtown) or a major renovation (Alston & Bird, LLC). But purchasing and installing new luminaires is not always feasible for existing buildings. For this report, the DOE evaluated the use of LED replacement lamps in the existing CFL downlights at St. Anthony Hospital in Gig Harbor, WA.

  5. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R

    2007-05-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  6. Vegetation of plowed and unplowed playa lake wetlands in southwestern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S.L.; Buckley, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    Playa lakes are shallow, circular basins within the High Plains that were formed by wind during the Pleistocene Era. These basins are often referred to as {open_quotes}buffalo wallows{close_quotes} by local residents. When rainfall occurs, playas pond water, allowing formation of hydric soils and wetland vegetation. Playa provide excellent waterfowl habitat and are second only to the Gulf Coast in importance as winter habitat for birds in the Central Flyway. Highly variable climatic conditions along with extensive changes in surrounding hydrology on agricultural lands contribute to alternating wet and dry cycles within the playas. As a result, the vegetative mixture of the playas can change drastically from one season to another.

  7. Geographic Visualization of Power-Grid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.

    2015-06-18

    The visualization enables the simulation analyst to see changes in the frequency through time and space. With this technology, the analyst has a bird's eye view of the frequency at loads and generators as the simulated power system responds to the loss of a generator, spikes in load, and other contingencies. The significance of a contingency to the operation of an electrical power system depends critically on how the resulting tansients evolve in time and space. Consequently, these dynamic events can only be understood when seen in their proper geographic context. this understanding is indispensable to engineers working on the next generation of distributed sensing and control systems for the smart grid. By making possible a natural and intuitive presentation of dynamic behavior, our new visualization technology is a situational-awareness tool for power-system engineers.

  8. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  9. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    663 DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity Not for the Birds l o S a l a m o S N a T i o N a l l a B o r a T o r y loS alamoS SCieNCe aND TeChNology magaziNe may 2007 1 663 From Terry Wallace About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. Located on

  10. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Kaschube, Danielle R.

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.

  11. No-migration variance petition. Appendices K--O, Response to notice of deficiencies: Volume 6, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N.T.

    1990-03-01

    This document reports data collected as part of the Ecological Monitoring Program (EMP) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for Calendar Year 1987. Also included are data from the last quarter (October through December) of 1986. This report divides data collection activities into two parts. Part A covers general environmental monitoring which includes meteorology, aerial photography, air quality monitoring, water quality monitoring, and wildlife population surveillance. Part B focuses on the special studies being performed to evaluate the impacts of salt dispersal from the site on the surrounding ecosystem. The fourth year of salt impact monitoring was completed in 1987. These studies involve the monitoring of soil chemistry, soil microbiota, and vegetation in permanent study plots. None of the findings indicate that the WIPP project is adversely impacting environmental quality at the site. As in 1986, breeding bird censuses completed this year indicate changes in the local bird fauna associated with the WIPP site. The decline in small mammal populations noted in the 1986 census is still evident in the 1987 data; however, populations are showing signs of recovery. There is no indication that this decline is related to WIPP activities. Rather, the evidence indicates that natural population fluctuations may be common in this ecosystem. The salt impact studies continue to reveal some short-range transport of salt dust from the saltpiles. This material accumulates at or near the soil surface during the dry seasons in areas near the saltpiles, but is flushed deeper into the soil during the rainy season. Microbial activity does not appear to be affected by this salt importation. Vegetation coverage and density data from 1987 also do not show any detrimental effect associated with aerial dispersal of salt.

  12. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  13. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frid, Chris; Andonegi, Eider; Judd, Adrian; Rihan, Dominic; Rogers, Stuart I.; Kenchington, Ellen

    2012-01-15

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  14. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crews, D.; Bergeron, J.M.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ between the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a process termed temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Research on TSD indicates that gonadal sex is not irrevocably set by the genetic composition inherited at fertilization but depends ultimately on which genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes and hormone receptors are activated during the midtrimester of embryonic development by temperature. Incubation temperature modifies the activity as well as the temporal and spatial sequence of enzymes and hormone receptors to determine gonad type. Estrogen is the physiologic equivalent of incubation temperature and the proximate cue that initiates female sex determination. increasing evidence indicates some polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans. Reproductive disorders resulting from exposure to these xenobiotic compounds may include reductions in fertility, hatch rate in fish and birds, and viability of offspring, as well as alterations in hormone levels or adult sexual behaviors. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds may be acting to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, by which the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. In TSD turtles, the estrogenic effect of some PCBs reverses gonadal sex in individuals incubating at an otherwise male-producing temperature. Furthermore, certain PCBs are synergistic in their effect at very low concentrations. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Kaschube, Danielle R.

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity andmore » Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.« less

  16. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in

  17. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams

  18. Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Fishes of the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, Kathy E.; Dawley, Earl; Geist, David R.

    2006-03-31

    Gas supersaturation problems generated by spill from dams on the Columbia River were first identified in the 1960s. Since that time, considerable research has been conducted on effects of gas supersaturation on aquatic life, primarily juvenile salmonids. Also since that time, modifications to dam structures and operations have reduced supersaturated gas levels produced by the dams. The limit for total dissolved gas saturation (TDGS) as mandated by current Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards is 110%. State management agencies issue limited waivers to water quality, allowing production of levels of up to 120% TDGS to facilitate the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids. Recently, gas supersaturation as a water quality issue has resurfaced as concerns have grown regarding chronic effects of spill-related total dissolved gas on salmonids, including incubating embryos and larvae, resident fish species, and other aquatic organisms. Because of current concerns, and because the last comprehensive review of research on supersaturation effects on fishes was conducted in 1997, we reviewed recent supersaturation literature to identify new or ongoing issues that may not be adequately addressed by the current 110% TDGS limit and the 120% TDGS water quality waiver. We found that recent work supports older research indicating that short-term exposure to levels up to 120% TDGS does not produce acute effects on migratory juvenile or adult salmonids when compensating depths are available. Monitoring programs at Snake and Columbia river dams from 1995 to the early 2000s documented a low incidence of significant gas bubble disease or mortality in Columbia River salmonids, resident fishes, or other taxa. We did, however, identify five areas of concern in which total dissolved gas levels lower than water quality limits may produce sublethal effects on fishes of the Columbia River. These areas of concern are 1) sensitive and vulnerable species or life stages, 2

  19. Identifying the Effects on Fish of Changes in Water Pressure during Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation. We investigated the responses of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, singly and in combination, in the laboratory. Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation while being held at either surface or 30 ft of pressure. Some of these fish were then subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a Kaplan turbine under worst case (to 0.1 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 0.5 atmospheres) scenarios. Surface- and depth-acclimated Chinook salmon and bluegill, with no exposure to dissolved gas above ambient levels, were subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a bulb turbine under worst case (to 0.68 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 1.0 atmospheres) scenarios. Bluegill, the most pressure-sensitive among the three species, incurred injuries that ranged from mild (internal hemorrhaging) (bulb turbine) to death (Kaplan turbine). For each type of turbine passage, bluegill acclimated to 30 ft depth and subjected to the more severe pressure nadir were more susceptible to injury/death. However, even control bluegill (i.e., not subjected to simulated turbine passage) experienced mild to moderate injury from rapidly ascending from 30 ft of pressure to surface pressure. The dissolved gas level had only a small additive effect on the injury/death rate of bluegill subjected to simulated Kaplan turbine passage. Thus, while physoclistous fish, such as bluegill, appear to be susceptible to injury from any rapid pressure decrease, those that are most severe (e.g., Kaplan turbine passage) are likely to be most injurious. Chinook salmon and rainbow trout were much less susceptible

  20. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Michael Vanden; Anderson, Paul; Wallace, Janae; Morgan, Craig; Carney, Stephanie

    2012-04-30

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary

  1. A luciferase reporter gene assay and aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 genotype predict the LD{sub 50} of polychlorinated biphenyls in avian species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Gillian E.; Farmahin, Reza; Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0H3 ; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2012-09-15

    Birds differ in sensitivity to the embryotoxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which complicates environmental risk assessments for these chemicals. Recent research has shown that the identities of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain (LBD) are primarily responsible for differences in avian species sensitivity to selected dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay was developed in our laboratory to measure AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 reporter gene in COS-7 cells transfected with different avian AHR1 constructs. In the present study, the LRG assay was used to measure the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on luciferase activity in COS-7 cells transfected with AHR1 constructs representative of 86 avian species in order to predict their sensitivity to PCB-induced embryolethality and the relative potency of PCBs in these species. The results of the LRG assay indicate that the identity of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the AHR1 LBD are the major determinants of avian species sensitivity to PCBs. The relative potency of PCBs did not differ greatly among AHR1 constructs. Luciferase activity was significantly correlated with embryolethality data obtained from the literature (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.87, p < 0.0001). Thus, the LRG assay in combination with the knowledge of a species' AHR1 LBD sequence can be used to predict PCB-induced embryolethality in potentially any avian species of interest without the use of lethal methods on a large number of individuals. -- Highlights: ► PCB embryolethality in birds can be predicted from a species' AHR1 genotype. ► The reporter gene assay is useful for predicting species sensitivity to PCBs. ► The relative potency of PCBs does not appear to differ between AHR1 genotypes. ► Contamination of PCB 105 and PCB 118 did not affect their

  2. Filling in the GAPS: evaluating completeness and coverage of open-access biodiversity databases in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Troia, Matthew J.; McManamay, Ryan A.

    2016-06-12

    Primary biodiversity data constitute observations of particular species at given points in time and space. Open-access electronic databases provide unprecedented access to these data, but their usefulness in characterizing species distributions and patterns in biodiversity depend on how complete species inventories are at a given survey location and how uniformly distributed survey locations are along dimensions of time, space, and environment. Our aim was to compare completeness and coverage among three open-access databases representing ten taxonomic groups (amphibians, birds, freshwater bivalves, crayfish, freshwater fish, fungi, insects, mammals, plants, and reptiles) in the contiguous United States. We compiled occurrence records frommore » the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), and federally administered fish surveys (FFS). In this study, we aggregated occurrence records by 0.1° × 0.1° grid cells and computed three completeness metrics to classify each grid cell as well-surveyed or not. Next, we compared frequency distributions of surveyed grid cells to background environmental conditions in a GIS and performed Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests to quantify coverage through time, along two spatial gradients, and along eight environmental gradients. The three databases contributed >13.6 million reliable occurrence records distributed among >190,000 grid cells. The percent of well-surveyed grid cells was substantially lower for GBIF (5.2%) than for systematic surveys (BBS and FFS; 82.5%). Still, the large number of GBIF occurrence records produced at least 250 well-surveyed grid cells for six of nine taxonomic groups. Coverages of systematic surveys were less biased across spatial and environmental dimensions but were more biased in temporal coverage compared to GBIF data. GBIF coverages also varied among taxonomic groups, consistent with commonly recognized geographic, environmental, and institutional

  3. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  4. Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-26

    The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant ecological and natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea continental shelf including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals including federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012 and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) were contracted to assist the MMS Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region in identifying and prioritizing information needs related to the North Aleutian Basin and potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities. The overall approach focused on three related but separate tasks: (1) identification and

  5. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L.; Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P.

    1996-07-01

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  6. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L.; Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.

    1995-09-01

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  7. WARP{trademark}: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L.; Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.

    1995-12-31

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kW each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/ kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  8. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  9. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in amore » group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.« less

  10. Assessment of stormwater impoundments as contaminant hazards to red-winged blackbirds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisemann, J.D.; Spading, D.

    1995-12-31

    Stormwater impoundments, a recent engineering solution to the treatment of stormwater, slow runoff and allow the settling of sediments and associated contaminants. They also provide valuable habitat in urban settings. In this study, the authors used red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) to indicate potential contaminant hazards to avian species reared in stormwater impoundments. The authors studied four types of impoundments, grouped by the development in the supplying drainage; residential, commercial and highway development and a reference site with no development. They examined physiological biomarkers of 56, 8-day old nestlings, nesting parameters and foraging location of parent birds, food items delivered to nestlings, water chemistry, and sediments. Biomarker analysis included whole blood analysis for ALAD, blood serum chemistry (i.e., ALT, AST, CK, LDH, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, uric acid) and oxidative stress enzymes in liver tissue. Hepatic EROD and brain acetylcholinesterase levels were analyzed to assess exposure to contaminants other than metals. All samples were assayed for heavy metals by atomic absorption. A total of 198 nests were located. Overall nest success was significantly higher at the impoundment with no development in the supplying drainage. Focal parent feeding observations indicated females foraged less often in impoundments in highway locations. Preliminary analyses indicate sediments are not accumulating high metal levels. Serum and hepatic biomarker analyses indicate no statistically significant effects among drainage types.

  11. Chromium accumulation in three species of central Florida centrarchids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, K.R. |

    1995-02-01

    Stormwater ponds are required in Central Florida when land is developed to treat the resulting stormwater. The St. Johns River Water Management District, the agency that regulates stormwater discharges in Central Florida, frequently approves plans that create habitat for fish and wildlife by planting desirable wetland and aquatic vegetation in the littoral zones of stormwater ponds to compensate for the loss of wetlands. The various species of fish that inhabit stormwater ponds serve as a food source to wildlife, especially wading birds. The objective of this study was to determine if fish that live in stormwater treatment ponds in Orlando, Florida contained significant concentrations of chromium. In order to determine if there were differences in chromium concentrations in fish with different foraging strategies, three species of sunfish (Centrarchidae) with substantially different foraging strategies were selected for this study: largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a predator; redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), a bottom feeder; and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), an omnivore. Many researchers have shown that large quantities of chromium are found in urban runoff. Chromium sources are largely associates with the operation of motor vehicles. Several investigators have determined that chromium from urban runoff concentrates in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Sediments represent the most concentrated physical pool of metals in aquatic environments, and they are ingested by many types of aquatic organisms. Most fish are capable of accumulating heavy metals from their diet and from water through their gills. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Panzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-08-24

    Panzer is a finite element assembly engine used for research on solving partial differential equations (PDEs). Panzer takes a physics model implemented by a user and creates and populates the linear algrbra objects, such as residuals and Jacobians, for use in implicit finite element methods. Panzer can be considered “glue code” that pulls together the capabilities of a number of open-source Trilinos packages (Epetra, Intrepid, Sacado, FEI, and Phalanx). This code provides a generic frameworkmore » for describing a set of partial differential equations. Panzer provides a simple example driver that solves the undergraduate textbook partial differential equation of heat transfer in a solid (see for example, “Transport Phenomena” by Bird Stewart, and Lightfoot 1960). Panzer is intended as a tool to simplify the use of the discretization tools in Trilinos (Intrepid and Phalanx) and is meant to aid in fundamental research on discretizations. Panzer will be released open-source as a package in Trilinos under a BSD license.« less

  13. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold; Edmonson, James; Standridge, Charles; Pervez, Nahid; Desai, Neel; Williams, Bruce; Clark, Aaron; Zeitler, David; Kendall, Scott; Biddanda, Bopi; Steinman, Alan; Klatt, Brian; Gehring, J. L.; Walter, K.; Nordman, Erik E.

    2014-06-30

    project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in

  14. Sitewide biological risk assessment Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska: Risks to terrestrial receptors from diverse contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Becker, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) is located southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska. Eielson AFB was listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List with a total of 64 potential terrestrial and aquatic source areas. Contaminants of concern include fuel and fuel components, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead. As part of the remedial investigations of these sites, a biological risk assessment (BRA) was conducted to estimate the risk of ecological effects on terrestrial receptors posed by contaminants in the Eielson environment. There are 32 mammal species, 117 bird species, 17 fish species, and 1 amphibian species known to inhabit Eielson AFB and vicinity. The BRA screened source areas based on completed biological exposure pathways, selected receptors for analysis, estimated exposure of receptors to contaminants, and compared these exposures to known toxicological effects. Lower Garrison Slough and Flightline Pond posed a substantial risk for shrikes and goshawks. Ingestion of PCBs constituted the primary pathway/contaminant combination contributing to this risk. The effects of the various sources of uncertainty in the ingestion exposure calculations for these sites were evaluated in a probabilistic risk assessment using Monte Carlo methods. There was an 11% risk of reproductive effects from PCBs for goshawks feeding from Flightline Pond and a 25 % risk from lower Garrison Slough. There was an 81 % risk of reproductive effects from PCB exposure for shrikes feeding near lower Garrison Slough.

  15. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Khan, Rawaiz; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Al-Othman, Othman Y.; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2015-05-22

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90?m. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  16. Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

    1994-06-01

    A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

  17. Unsupervised individual tree crown detection in high-resolution satellite imagery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N.; McDowell, Nate G.; Middleton, Richard S.

    2016-01-26

    Rapidly and accurately detecting individual tree crowns in satellite imagery is a critical need for monitoring and characterizing forest resources. We present a two-stage semiautomated approach for detecting individual tree crowns using high spatial resolution (0.6 m) satellite imagery. First, active contours are used to recognize tree canopy areas in a normalized difference vegetation index image. Given the image areas corresponding to tree canopies, we then identify individual tree crowns as local extrema points in the Laplacian of Gaussian scale-space pyramid. The approach simultaneously detects tree crown centers and estimates tree crown sizes, parameters critical to multiple ecosystem models. Asmore » a demonstration, we used a ground validated, 0.6 m resolution QuickBird image of a sparse forest site. The two-stage approach produced a tree count estimate with an accuracy of 78% for a naturally regenerating forest with irregularly spaced trees, a success rate equivalent to or better than existing approaches. In addition, our approach detects tree canopy areas and individual tree crowns in an unsupervised manner and helps identify overlapping crowns. Furthermore, the method also demonstrates significant potential for further improvement.« less

  18. Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1989--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, R.B.

    1994-03-01

    This volume includes six reports of monitoring work to determine the status of and trends in flora and fauna populations on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1989 through 1991. The Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy supported monitoring under its Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program (BECAMP) since 1987. Under this program several undisturbed baseline plots, and numerous plots in disturbed areas, are sampled on annual or three-year cycles. Perennial plant populations, ephemeral plants, small mammals, reptiles, birds, and large mammals were monitored. Monitoring results are reported for five baseline sites, one from each major landform on the NTS (Jackass Flats, Frenchman Flat, Yucca Flat, Pahute Mesa, and Rainier Mesa), and for areas cleared of vegetation by fires, atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, construction, and gophers. Roadside flora and fauna were studied at two locations, and several historical study plots around the NTS were recensused to determine vegetation changes over long time spans. Three subsidence craters resulting from below-ground nuclear weapons tests were also studied. A major influence on plants and animals during the report period was a severe drought during 1989 and 1990, followed by more moderate drought in 1991.

  19. Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

  20. Automation of MCDOR at NMT-3 Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1997-01-01

    The automation of various parts of multiple--cycle direct oxide reduction (MCDOR) at LANL`s NMT-3 was the goal of this research and development activities. In particular, originally the following goals were assigned to the author by the NMT-3 technical staff leaders (Greg Bird, Jim McNeese, Joel Williams): (1) Design and fabricate an automation set up; (2) Step-wise automation is preferred; (3) Step 1 involves automatic metering and mixing of powders; and (4) Step 2-automatic transport of powder to furnace location The initial task assigned in May 91 was to get the appropriate design developed and order equipment and parts to automatically weight powders. In fact the work statement read {open_quotes}Create an experimental automation set up in the ME Department at UNM to automatically weigh powders using an electronic balance. Further, design the set up such that the electronic balance is reprogrammable for specific weight set points. Thus, when a set point in weight is reached by means of a vibratory feeder feeding a container on the balance, the electronic balance will send an electronic signal out to switch off the vibratory feeder{close_quotes}. The automation of the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium is described.

  1. The Canadian experience in frontier environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.H. )

    1991-03-01

    Early Canadian frontier exploration (from 1955 onshore and from 1966 for offshore drilling) caused insignificant public concern. The 1967-1968 Torrey Canyon Tanker and Santa Barbara disasters roused public opinion and governments. In Canada, 1969-1970 Arctic gas blowouts, a tanker disaster, and damage to the 'Manhattan' exacerbated concerns and resulted in new environmental regulatory constraints. From 1970, the Arctic Petroleum Operations Association learned to operate safely with environmental responsibility. It studied physical environment for design criteria, and the biological and human environment to ameliorate impact. APOA's research projects covered sea-ice, permafrost, sea-bottom, oil-spills, bird and mammal migration, fish habitat, food chains, oceanography, meteorology, hunters'/trappers' harvests, etc. In 1971 Eastcoast Petroleum Operators' Association and Alaska Oil and Gas Association followed APOA's cooperative research model. EPOA stressed icebergs and fisheries. Certain research was handled by the Canadian Offshore Oil Spill Research Association. By the mid-1980s these associations had undertaken $70,000,000 of environmental oriented research, with equivalent additional work by member companies on specific needs and similar sums by Federal agencies often working with industry on complementary research. The frontier associations then merged with the Canadian Petroleum Association, already active environmentally in western Canada. Working with government and informing environmental interest groups, the public, natives, and local groups, most Canadian frontier petroleum operations proceeded with minimal delay and environmental disturbance.

  2. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  3. UAS Detection Classification and Neutralization: Market Survey 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark; Erdman, Matthew Kelly

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to briefly frame the challenges of detecting low, slow, and small (LSS) unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The conclusion drawn from internal discussions and external reports is the following; detection of LSS UAS is a challenging problem that can- not be achieved with a single detection modality for all potential targets. Classification of LSS UAS, especially classification in the presence of background clutter (e.g., urban environment) or other non-threating targets (e.g., birds), is under-explored. Though information of avail- able technologies is sparse, many of the existing options for UAS detection appear to be in their infancy (when compared to more established ground-based air defense systems for larger and/or faster threats). Companies currently providing or developing technologies to combat the UAS safety and security problem are certainly worth investigating, however, no company has provided the statistical evidence necessary to support robust detection, identification, and/or neutralization of LSS UAS targets. The results of a market survey are included that highlights potential commercial entities that could contribute some technology that assists in the detection, classification, and neutral- ization of a LSS UAS. This survey found no clear and obvious commercial solution, though recommendations are given for further investigation of several potential systems.

  4. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in early life stages of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina) from a coastal wetland on Lake Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, C.A.; Lean, D.R.S.; Carey, J.H.; Brooks, R.J.; Ng, P.

    1995-03-01

    To assess intra-clutch variation in contaminant concentrations in eggs, and to investigate the dynamics of chlorinated hydrocarbon accumulation in embryos of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), concentrations of p,p{prime}-DDE, hexachlorobenzene, trans-nonachlor, cis-chlordane, and six PCB congeners were measured in eggs, embryos, and hatchlings. Samples were collected from Cootes Paradise, a wetland at the western end of Lake Ontario, Ontario, Canada. The intra-clutch variation in chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations within four snapping turtle clutches was determined by analyzing the first, last, and middle five eggs oviposited in the nest. The first five eggs had the highest mean concentrations of all chlorinated hydrocarbons, wet weight, and egg diameter. On a lipid weight basis, the first five eggs contained the highest concentration of all compounds except total PCBs and cis-chlordane. The concentration of cis-chlordane was the only parameter measured that was significantly different among the three sets of eggs. At hatching, snapping turtles without yolk sacs contained from 55.2 to 90.5% of the absolute amount of organochlorine compounds measured in the egg at oviposition. Eighteen days after hatching, the body burden of PCBs and pesticides decreased to 45.3 to 62.2% of that in the fresh egg. The accumulation of organochlorine chemicals in embryonic turtles peaked at or just before hatching and then declined thereafter, which is consistent with trends reported in developing sea turtles, fish, and birds.

  5. AmeriFlux CA-TPD Ontario - Turkey Point Mature Deciduous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arain, M. Altaf

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-TPD Ontario - Turkey Point Mature Deciduous. Site Description - The forest is approximately 90 years old. Naturally regenerated on sandy terrain and abandoned agricultural land. Predominantly hardwood species with a few scattered conifers. Site has been managed (thinned) in the past. It has a high biodiversity with 573 tree and plant species, 102 bird species, 23 mamal species and 22 reptile and amphibian species (SWALSREP Report, 1999). The dominant tree species is white oak (Quercus alba), with other scattered broadleaf Carolinian species including sugar and red maple (Acer saccharum, A. rubrum), American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black and red oak (Q. velutina, Q. rubra) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) . There are also scattered conifers, mostly white and red pine (Pinus strobes, P. resinosa), comprising about 5% of the trees. Average tree height is 25.7 m with a stand density of 504 ± 18 trees per hectare. Average tree diameter at breast height is 22.3 cm and basal area is 0.06 m2 or approximately 29 square meters per hectare.

  6. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  7. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  8. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  9. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  10. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  11. Evidence for temperate conditions along the Antarctic peninsula during the Early Tertiary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinsmeister, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several investigators based on deep sea glacial marine sediments from the southern oceans and volcanic sequences in West Antarctica have suggested extreme glacial conditions existed around Antarctica during the early Tertiary. Their data suggest ice sheets with ice shelves greater than those today were present on Antarctica by the late Eocene. If these data are correct, conditions during the Eocene along the Peninsula were similar to those that exist today. Late Eocene faunas and floras from Seymour Island indicate that conditions along the Peninsula were temperature. No paleontologic or geologic evidence have been obtained from Seymour Island (64/degree/18'S) to support the existence of glacial conditions along the northern part of the Peninsula during the early Tertiary. The presence of large quantities of fossil wood and plant debris in the upper Eocene sediments on Seymour Island indicates the presence of dense forests on the Peninsula during the Eocene. The discovery of marsupial and land birds remains on Seymour Island also indicate the presence of abundant terrestrial life on the Peninsula. The occurrence of an abundant marine life on Seymour Island supports the existence of temperate conditions along the Peninsula. Similarities of the Eocene faunas and floras with present day biotas from Tasmania, New Zealand and southern South America indicate that conditions along the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene were comparable to present day mid latitudes of the southern hemisphere.

  12. Structural Basis for a Switch in Receptor Binding Specificity of Two H5N1 Hemagglutinin Mutants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Xueyong; Viswanathan, Karthik; Raman, Rahul; Yu, Wenli; Sasisekharan, Ram; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-11-01

    Avian H5N1 influenza viruses continue to spread in wild birds and domestic poultry with sporadic infection in humans. Receptor binding specificity changes are a prerequisite for H5N1 viruses and other zoonotic viruses to be transmitted among humans. Previous reported hemagglutinin (HA) mutants from ferret-transmissible H5N1 viruses of A/Viet Nam/1203/04 and A/Indonesia/5/05 showed slightly increased, but still very weak, binding to human receptors. From mutagenesis and glycan array studies, we previously identified two H5N1 HA mutants that could more effectively switch receptor specificity to human-like α2-6 linked sialosides with avidity comparable to wild-type H5 HA binding to avian-like α2-3 linked sialosides.more »Here, crystal structures of these two H5 HA mutants free and in complex with human and avian glycan receptor analogues reveal the structural basis for their preferential binding to human receptors. These findings suggest continuous surveillance should be maintained to monitor and assess human-to-human transmission potential of H5N1 viruses.« less

  13. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 64 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the oceanatmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 20102011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  14. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in hydra attenuata and in rat whole-embryo culture. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M.C.

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a class of biaryl compounds that have little commercial application, but appear to be widespread in the environment. They have been found in wood preservative waste dumpsites and in fly ash from municipal waste incinerators. They have been detected in bird eggs and tissues, fish, and other edible marine organisms in the United States, Canada, and Europe. There are limited reports in the extant literature on the toxicity of PCDEs. This study was designed to evaluate the toxicity of selected PCDEs in cultures of Hydra attenuata and post-implantation rat whole embryos. The toxicity of several closely related polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was evaluated in both cultures and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was evaluated in whole embryo culture. Embryonic growth and development parameters (yolk sac diameter, crown-rump length, somite count, and DNA and protein content) and gross morphology were determined. Findings indicated that these chemicals were neither embryotoxic nor teratogenic. Thus, the PCDEs, which elicit other diverse toxic and biochemical responses in rodents, are relatively inactive in these bioassays for developmental toxicity.

  15. Impacts of an oil well blowout near Trecate, Italy on ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.; Becker, J.; Dauble, D.

    1995-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted after the February 1995 blowout of an oil well near Trecate, Italy to quantify injuries to terrestrial and aquatic biological resources from effects of oil and habitat changes. Avian surveys were conducted on a surrogate area near Varallino to estimate species and numbers potentially exposed to oil and displaced by habitat alteration in the affected area. Of the 43 avian species observed, 20 are considered protected by European Community laws. The most abundant species were passero domestico, fringuello, cornacchia grigia, rondine, piccione torraiolo, and cardellino. These species likely suffered the greatest losses due to inhalation of volatile aromatics, dermal loading of oil, and/or habitat loss in the affected area. Based on CHARM model outputs, inhalation exposures to volatile aromatics and oil aerosols occurred above LOELs for all receptors within 2 km of the blowout. The most significant exposure pathway to large birds was dermal loading, which likely exceeded LC50 levels within 900m of the well. Terrestrial insects seldom contained detectable levels of PAHs, consistent with their shorter life span and residence time in the contaminated area. The highest concentrations of PAHs were found in dike vegetation, frogs, and benthic invertebrates. Ingestion exposures of woodmice to PAHs exceeded toxic reference levels at one site and mice had EHQ = >1 at soil PAH concentrations >4.2 mg/kg. Based on known body burdens causing narcotic response, neither fish nor benthic invertebrates experienced toxic consequences from exposure to PAHs in irrigation canal sediments.

  16. A warm air poultry brooding system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nulte, W.H.

    1980-12-01

    As the energy crisis escalated during the mid-70's, it became apparent that energy intensive industries must seek alternate fuel sources. Georgia Tech realized that one of these industries was the poultry industry. Consequently, a demonstration project of a wood-fired, warm air poultry brooding system was designed and built. Since its completion in mid-1978, the system has demonstrated considerable cost savings as well as being a very functional and reliable system. The system consists of 3 main components--a wood burning furnace, a supply distribution and return duct, and 20 flexible ducts which simulate the function of the propane brooders by providing warm air close to the ground. A separate structure houses the furnace and wood supply. This house is located at the midpoint of the growout house to allow symmetrical and naturally balanced air distribution. Since the system became operational, 16 flocks of birds have been brooded. During this time, wood usage has averaged approximately 30 cords per year while in a neighboring house, that is used as a control house, the propane usage has averaged 3,800 gallons per year. In the area of Georgia where the demonstration project is located, the cost of fuelwood has remained stable over the last 2 years, whereas the price of propane has continually increased. Thus the grower has the benefit of constantly increasing cost savings while utilizing a renewable resource as fuel.

  17. USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

  18. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  19. Proposed IMS infrastructure improvement project, Seward, Alaska. Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) examines a proposal for improvements at the existing University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science (IMS), Seward Marine Center. The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS) Trustee Council is proposing to improve the existing research infrastructure to enhance the EVOS Trustee Council`s capabilities to study and rehabilitate marine mammals, marine birds, and the ecosystem injured by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The analysis in this document focuses on the effects associated with construction and operation of the proposed project and its proposed alternatives. The EIS gives a detailed description of all major elements of the proposed project and its alternatives; identifies resources of major concern that were raised during the scoping process; describes the environmental background conditions of those resources; defines and analyzes the potential effects of the proposed project and its alternatives on these conditions; and identifies mitigating measures that are part of the project design as well as those proposed to minimize or reduce the adverse effects. Included in the EIS are written and oral comments received during the public comment period.

  20. Biofuels feedstock development program. Annual progress report for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.; McLaughlin, S.B.; McNabb, W.A.; Martin, S.A.; Ranney, J.W.; Tuskan, G.A.; Turhollow, A.F.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) leads the nation in the research, development, and demonstration of environmentally acceptable and commercially viable dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS). The purpose of this report is to highlight the status and accomplishments of the research that is currently being funded by the BFDP. Highlights summarized here and additional accomplishments are described in more detail in the sections associated with each major program task. A few key accomplishments include (1) development of a methodology for doing a cost-supply analysis for energy crops and the application of that methodology to looking at possible land use changes around a specific energy facility in East Tennessee; (2) preliminary documentation of the relationship between woody crop plantation locations and bird diversity at sites in the Midwest, Canada, and the pacific Northwest supplied indications that woody crop plantations could be beneficial to biodiversity; (3) the initiation of integrated switchgrass variety trials, breeding research, and biotechnology research for the south/southeast region; (4) development of a data base management system for documenting the results of herbaceous energy crop field trials; (5) publication of three issues of Energy Crops Forum and development of a readership of over 2,300 individuals or organizations as determined by positive responses on questionnaires.

  1. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  2. Command and Control Architectures for Autonomous Micro-Robotic Forces - FY-2000 Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean

    2001-04-01

    Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and micro-technologies will soon give rise to production of large-scale forces of autonomous micro-robots with systems of innate behaviors and with capabilities of self-organization and real world tasking. Such organizations have been compared to schools of fish, flocks of birds, herds of animals, swarms of insects, and military squadrons. While these systems are envisioned as maintaining a high degree of autonomy, it is important to understand the relationship of man with such machines. In moving from research studies to the practical deployment of large-scale numbers of robots, one of critical pieces that must be explored is the command and control architecture for humans to re-task and also inject global knowledge, experience, and intuition into the force. Tele-operation should not be the goal, but rather a level of adjustable autonomy and high-level control. If a herd of sheep is comparable to the collective of robots, then the human element is comparable to the shepherd pulling in strays and guiding the herd in the direction of greener pastures. This report addresses the issues and development of command and control for largescale numbers of autonomous robots deployed as a collective force.

  3. Ecological investigation of a hazardous waste site, Warner Robins, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, M.C. ); Billig, P. )

    1993-01-01

    Zone 1, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has been designated a National Priorities List Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Remedial Investigation for Zone 1 recommended a quantitative analysis of ecological risk. To accomplish this task a characterization of the bottomland hardwood forest ecosystem present on the base was required. This ecological characterization included the study of hydrology, aquatic and wildlife biology, and wetlands ecology where potential impacts were in question. In addition, a suitable reference area was studied. The hydrologic investigation consisted primarily of the installation of water level recorders and staff gauges, collection of surface water data, installation of piezometers and collection of groundwater data, and the collection of rainfall data. The aquatic biology investigation centered around the sampling of benthic macroinvertebrate communities, bioassay toxicity tests for surface water and sediment, fish sampling, aquatic macrophyte collection, macrophyte collection, and emergent and free-floating plant collection. The wildlife biology investigation focused on a breeding bird survey. The wetlands ecology investigation comprised the collection of soil and vegetation samples and using the Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET) to assess the functions and values of the wetlands present.

  4. I Am Science - and So Can You!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiChristina, Mariette

    2013-05-08

    Science is humanitys best invention for getting at the truth about how things work (a.k.a. basic research) and solving problems (applied). I can even make a claim that most people are interested in science topicsthey just dont think of them as science. Consider how many of todays top headlines have a critical science underpinning: energy supply, social change from digital innovations, efforts to treat cancer and other diseases, emerging infectious agents like bird flu, climate change, and so on. Clearly, a basic understanding about science is more vital than ever. At the same time, we see two trends: the collapse of traditional science journalism jobs as newspapers have cut thousands of positions and a greater access toand a larger readership forscience-related materials than the world has ever known. Put another way, just when the public needs the Fourth Estate most, its instead drowning in a sea of 24/7 misinformation (a.k.a. the Internet). Whats a busy scientist to do to help engage the lay public? Glad you asked.

  5. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be

  6. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000

  7. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in

  8. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2005-11-01

    We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above

  9. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2004-04-01

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H

  10. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Umatilla, Tucannon, Asotin, and Grande Ronde River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Umatilla and Grande Ronde River basins, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power

  11. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau

  12. Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesa, Matthew

    2009-02-13

    Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field

  13. The activation of carbon dioxide by niobocene complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    The reduction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(Cl)R (Cp[prime] = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 5]H[sub 4]CH[sub 3]) by Na/Hg under one atmosphere of CO[sub 2] produces Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph, CH[sub 3]). Thermolysis of Cp [sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph) in THF at 60[degrees]C (at low concentration for R = CH[sub 2]Ph) resulted in decarbonylation of the complex with first order kinetics to generate the corresponding metal-oxo complexes Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(O)R. The same process is greatly accelerated photochemically with a quantum yield of 0.17 for R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3]. At higher concentration, carbonyl complex Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)Ch[sub 2]Ph is also generated in the thermolysis of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]Ph. In continuing effort to promote migratory insertion of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], its reactions with of a variety of Lewis acids (LiPF[sub 6], BF[sub 3][center dot]Et[sub 2]O, ZnCl[sub 2], HgCl[sub 2], CdCl[sub 2], and ClSiMe[sub 3]) have been investigated. The interaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3] with several Lewis acids resulted in its facile decarbonylation. The carbonyl complexes Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph, CH[sub 3]) reacted cleanly and quantitatively with molecular oxygen under ambient conditions to produce the corresponding CO[sub 2] complexes, Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R, in high yield. The interaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)H with O[sub 2] generates a novel formato complex. The reaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3] with elemental sulfur (S[sub 8]) gives a carbonyl sulfide complex Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CSO) CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], whose structure has been established crystallographically.

  14. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power

  15. Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John; Hatch, Douglas R.

    2006-12-01

    months of long-term reconditioning) or for the duration of the experiment. Long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used: an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.) and, a Formalin drip system was administered via drip system for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. From the steelhead kelts collected at the CJMF, four experimental groups were established; in-river release, direct transport and release, short-term reconditioning and long-term reconditioning. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released on May 15, 2006 and June 27, 2006. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for a 6-9 month period with a release in October 18, 2006. No-term release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts received PIT-tags with a portion of each group receiving hydro-acoustic tags to assess return survival, travel time, and migratory behavior below Bonneville Dam. In total, 49 No-term release kelts and 50 short-term reconditioned kelts were PIT-tagged, with all surviving No-term and short-term reconditioned kelts successfully receiving a surgically implanted hydroacoustic tag as well. With the conclusion of this third year we have completed a number of multi year analyses to better understand how kelts are faring in the lower river as well as laying the groundwork for a cost analysis.

  16. Modeling magnetic fields from a DC power cable buried beneath San Francisco Bay based on empirical measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T.; Klimley, A. Peter; Carretero, Luis

    2016-02-25

    Here, the Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable’s path; these included the Sanmore » Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR), the Benicia- Martinez Bridge (Ben) and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP) in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field) to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable’s contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing) were virtually identical to the measured

  17. Literature and information related to the natural resources of the North Aleutian Basin of Alaska.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, E.A.; Hlohowskyj, I.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-01-31

    The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea Outer Continental Shelf, including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals, including several federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, 'Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012' and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory were contracted to assist MMS with identifying and prioritizing information needs related to potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities in the North Aleutian Basin. Argonne focused on three related tasks: (1) identify and gather relevant literature published since 1996, (2) synthesize and summarize the

  18. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Management (AHM) program, and developed recommendations for the structure and function of a similar wind-facility related program. We provided a straw-man implementation of the analytical framework based on assumptions for APWRA-wide golden eagle fatalities, and presented a statistical examination of the model performance. APWRA-wide fatality rates appear substantial at all scales examined from the local APWRA population to the Bird Conservation Region. Documented fatality rates significantly influenced population performance in terms of non-territorial non-breeding birds. Breeder, Juvenile, Subadult, and Adult abundance were mostly unaffected by Baseline APWRA-wide fatality rates. However, increased variability in fatality rates would likely have impacts on long-term population performance, and would result in a substantially larger loss of resources. We developed four recommendations for future study. First, we recommend establishment of concept experts through the existing system of non-profits, regulatory agencies, academia, and industry in the wind energy sector. Second, we recommend the development of a central or distributed shared data repository, and establish guidelines for data sharing and transparency. Third, we recommend development a forum and process for model selection at the local and national level. Last, we recommend experimental implementation of the prescribed system at broader scales, and refinement the expectations for modeling and adaptive management.

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  1. Resolution of critical environmental issues with WARP{trademark} wind power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L.; Rainey, D.L.; Burns, R.E.

    1996-11-01

    A modular patented wind power technology, the TARP{trademark} Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for environmentally complying electric energy generation and power plants. A TARP Windframe provides two highly amplified wind flow fields to a set of two tailored conventional, low risk, small diameter wind turbines. It also serves as a support for the wind turbines, yaw assembly and protective housing for a core tower and other internal sub-systems. Wind Amplified Rotor Platforms (WARP{trademark}) Systems are tall TARP module arrays about a core tower. These intelligent towers can be flexibly and incrementally deployed into multi-megawatt size wind power plants. While heavily building on proven windmill technology, WARP systems may be shown to surpass current technology windmills in all aspects of system characteristics. WARPs have improved features as a result of amplified gearless and shrouded turbine performance, user friendly operation and maintenance, and high reliability and operation and maintenance, and high reliability and low risk due to small, simple and robust dynamic components. Environmental benefits include an order of magnitude less land requirement, absence of bird kill potential, attractive appearance, lower far field noise and EMI/TV interference, and improved rotor safety through containment means. Operation under extreme icing is also afforded due to both rotor shielding and inherent self-sustaining tower anti-icing shielding and inherent self-sustaining tower anti-icing capability. This avoids the large rotor imbalance and ice shedding predicaments of conventional windmills. System components are suited for low cost volume production, ease of transportation, erection and servicing.

  2. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-10-07

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We findmore » that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.« less

  3. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-10-07

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.

  4. Supplementary Feeding, Plumage Documentation and Early Season Prey of Peregrine Falcons at the New Mexico Alpha Eyrie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    A review of what is known about avian physiology and the biological effects of DDE suggests that some benefit to peregrine falcon egg condition could be attained by artificially feeding DDE free prey to the female from the time of her arrival on the nesting grounds until completion of egg laying; the magnitude of potential benefit is unknown. Sporadic efforts in the past demonstrated the need for precision methods of prey delivery. Two methods were developed and tried; providing dead prey items by dropping them in a day perch, and delivery of live prey by remotely controlled release from compartments positioned at the top of the cliff occupied by the falcons. Maintaining quail in the day perch for 21 days resulted in at least one and probably two meals for the female peregrine. Of 16 live birds released (mostly pigeons) 13 were pursued and three caught. Blinding the pigeons with tape proved to be necessary to enable capture. Also, some reluctance of the male peregrine to attack pigeons was observed, and problems with equipment, visibility, and the proximity of the falcons to the release box were encountered. Manpower was the most significant resource requirement. Baiting of great-horned owls, possibly leading to owl attack on the falcons, is judged to be the largest detrimental effect of supplemental feeding. It is recommended that supplemental feeding be reserved for falcons or eyries where complete reproductive failure is expected. Plumage documentation photography was successfully conducted by a remotely controlled camera as an aid to identification of individual falcons. American robin, red-winged blackbird, starling, white-throated swift, bluebird, and mourning dove were among natural prey consumed by the peregrines before completion of egg laying. All activities in close proximity to the cliff were conducted at night to preclude direct disturbance of the falcons.

  5. Comparison of indirect cost multipliers for vehicle manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Cuenca, R.

    2000-05-16

    In the process of manufacturing and selling vehicles, a manufacturer incurs certain costs. Among these costs are those incurred directly as a part of manufacturing operations and those incurred indirectly in the processes of manufacturing and selling. The indirect costs may be production-related, such as R and D and engineering; business-related, such as corporate staff salaries and pensions; or retail-sales-related, such as dealer support and marketing. These indirect costs are recovered by allocating them to each vehicle. Under a stable, high-volume production process, the allocation of these indirect costs can be approximated as multipliers (or factors) applied to the direct cost of manufacturing. A manufacturer usually allocates indirect costs to finished vehicles according to a corporation-specific pricing strategy. Because the volumes of sales and production vary widely by model within a corporation, the internal corporate percent allocation of various accounting categories (such as profit or corporate overheat) can vary widely among individual models. Approaches also vary across corporations. For these purposes, an average value is constructed, by means of a generic representative method, for vehicle models produced at high volume. To accomplish this, staff at Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Center for Transportation Research analyzed the conventional vehicle cost structure and developed indirect cost multipliers for passenger vehicles. This memorandum summarizes the results of an effort to compare and put on a common basis the cost multipliers used in ANL's electric and hybrid electric vehicle cost estimation procedures with those resulting from two other methodologies. One of the two compared methodologies is derived from a 1996 presentation by Dr. Chris Borroni-Bird of Chrysler Corporation, the other is by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA), as described in a 1995 report by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), Congress of the United

  6. Bioaccumulation of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls and pentachlorophenol in the serum of northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, Caroline; Stas, Marie; Malarvannan, Govindan; Dirtu, Alin C.; Debier, Cathy

    2015-01-15

    Northern elephant seals (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) from the Año Nuevo State Reserve (CA, USA) were sampled at 1-, 4-, 7- and 10-week post-weaning. Concentrations of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) and their parent PCBs were measured in the serum of each individual. The ΣHO-PCB concentrations in the serum increased significantly between early and late fast (from 282±20 to 529±31 pg/mL). This increase might result from a mobilisation of HO-PCBs transferred from the mother during gestation and/or lactation and stored in the pup's liver. Food deprivation has been shown to exacerbate biotransformation capacities in mammals, birds and fish. The HO-penta-CBs was the predominant homologue group, followed by HO-hexa-CBs and HO-hepta-CBs. No preferential pathway for the metabolism of HO-PCBs (HO-direct insertion or NIH-shift of a chlorine atom) could be evidenced. The concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the serum of weaned NES increased from 103±7 pg/mL at early fast to 246±41 pg/mL at late fast, which is within the range of PCP concentrations usually encountered in marine mammals. - Highlights: • Σ HO-PCB concentrations in serum significantly increased between early and late fast. • The HO-penta-CBs were the predominant homologue group measured in serum. • No preferential pathway for the metabolism of HO-PCBs could be evidenced. • PCP concentrations in serum significantly increased between early and late fast.

  7. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in macroinvertebrates living in stormwater wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouna, N.K.; Sparling, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The design of stormwater wetlands and ponds as wildlife habitats has prompted concern over the potential uptake of runoff contaminants by aquatic fauna. Stormwater wetlands provide a diverse array of habitat for aquatic macroinvertebrates. The importance of macroinvertebrates in aquatic communities has been well documented. Aquatic macroinvertebrates also serve as a major food source of many aquatic vertebrates, including fish and birds. The objectives of the study were to: (1) examine the responses of the macroinvertebrate community to water and sediment concentrations of heavy metals, and other water quality parameters; (2) determine whether macroinvertebrates living in stormwater wetlands bioaccumulate significant concentrations of heavy metals; (3) relate the concentrations of heavy metals in sediment, water and macroinvertebrates to land use in the surrounding watershed; (4) determine sediment and water toxicity to macroinvertebrates. Twenty stormwater wetlands, representing four land uses commercial, residential, highway and control, were monitored in this study. Water quality parameters, including pH, DO, turbidity, conductivity, hardness and metal concentrations were monitored bi-weekly for six months. Sediment samples were collected three times during the same period. Macroinvertebrate communities were sampled during alternate weeks after water collections. Ten-day sediment bioassays were conducted using the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Preliminary data analyses have indicated no significant difference in sediment and water metal concentrations between land uses. However, Zn concentrations in macroinvertebrates were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in wetlands serving commercial watersheds than in those serving the remaining three land uses. No differences have been detected in composition of invertebrate communities due to land use category.

  8. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  9. Survey to determine the value of DYNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, J.W.; Bellshaw, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the value of the DYNA software program to US Industry. The software conducts dynamic finite element analysis tailored specifically to simulating high energy impacts, such as car crashes or aircraft collisions with birds. DYNA is available at nearly zero cost to the public in two-dimensional (DYNA2D) and three-dimensional versions (DYNA3D). DYNA has had a major impact on US industry. Measuring this impact using conventional approaches, such as profitability or revenue size, does not apply to DYNA. A new approach is needed that will capture DYNA's value to US industry. Our challenge was two fold: (1) to develop a methodology for valuing technology transferred to the public domain; and (2) to apply this methodology to DYNA. We accomplished the evaluation task by using indirect measurements of value. These indicators encompassed three broad categories, answering three key questions: (1) Use of DYNA and DYNA-like'' codes: Are companies, academic institutions, government agencies actually using DYNA and codes like it (2) Savings generated from using these codes: Is the use of DYNA and codes like it creating a positive economic impact (3) Market size of afl DYNA-like'' codes: Has a commercial market developed for DYNA-like'' codes This study represents the results of interviews with people identified by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as users of DYNA. Some of the people surveyed for this study do not use DYNA. They rely upon other dynamic finite element analysis codes. We refer to these individuals as users of DYNA-like'' codes or codes like DYNA.'' Several of the DYNA-like'' codes used DYNA as their core. These codes are descendants of DYNA.

  10. Survey to determine the value of DYNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, J.W.; Bellshaw, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the value of the DYNA software program to US Industry. The software conducts dynamic finite element analysis tailored specifically to simulating high energy impacts, such as car crashes or aircraft collisions with birds. DYNA is available at nearly zero cost to the public in two-dimensional (DYNA2D) and three-dimensional versions (DYNA3D). DYNA has had a major impact on US industry. Measuring this impact using conventional approaches, such as profitability or revenue size, does not apply to DYNA. A new approach is needed that will capture DYNA`s value to US industry. Our challenge was two fold: (1) to develop a methodology for valuing technology transferred to the public domain; and (2) to apply this methodology to DYNA. We accomplished the evaluation task by using indirect measurements of value. These indicators encompassed three broad categories, answering three key questions: (1) Use of DYNA and ``DYNA-like`` codes: Are companies, academic institutions, government agencies actually using DYNA and codes like it? (2) Savings generated from using these codes: Is the use of DYNA and codes like it creating a positive economic impact (3) Market size of afl ``DYNA-like`` codes: Has a commercial market developed for ``DYNA-like`` codes? This study represents the results of interviews with people identified by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as users of DYNA. Some of the people surveyed for this study do not use DYNA. They rely upon other dynamic finite element analysis codes. We refer to these individuals as users of ``DYNA-like`` codes or ``codes like DYNA.`` Several of the ``DYNA-like`` codes used DYNA as their core. These codes are descendants of DYNA.

  11. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  12. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  13. Dynamic load balance scheme for the DSMC algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jin; Geng, Xiangren; Jiang, Dingwu; Chen, Jianqiang

    2014-12-09

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) algorithm, devised by Bird, has been used over a wide range of various rarified flow problems in the past 40 years. While the DSMC is suitable for the parallel implementation on powerful multi-processor architecture, it also introduces a large load imbalance across the processor array, even for small examples. The load imposed on a processor by a DSMC calculation is determined to a large extent by the total of simulator particles upon it. Since most flows are impulsively started with initial distribution of particles which is surely quite different from the steady state, the total of simulator particles will change dramatically. The load balance based upon an initial distribution of particles will break down as the steady state of flow is reached. The load imbalance and huge computational cost of DSMC has limited its application to rarefied or simple transitional flows. In this paper, by taking advantage of METIS, a software for partitioning unstructured graphs, and taking the total of simulator particles in each cell as a weight information, the repartitioning based upon the principle that each processor handles approximately the equal total of simulator particles has been achieved. The computation must pause several times to renew the total of simulator particles in each processor and repartition the whole domain again. Thus the load balance across the processors array holds in the duration of computation. The parallel efficiency can be improved effectively. The benchmark solution of a cylinder submerged in hypersonic flow has been simulated numerically. Besides, hypersonic flow past around a complex wing-body configuration has also been simulated. The results have displayed that, for both of cases, the computational time can be reduced by about 50%.

  14. Phase 1 archaeological investigation, cultural resources survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana districts, south shore of Maui, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erkelens, C.

    1995-04-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. The survey team documented a total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features. Archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Maonakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. Twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bones from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area.

  15. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, S.

    1998-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build, install, and operate a Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LMA) in Technical Area 53 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LEDA will demonstrate the accelerator technology necessary to produce tritium, but is not designed to produce tritium at LANL. USFWS reviewers of the Biological Assessment prepared for LEDA insisted that the main drainage be monitored to measure and document changes to vegetation, soils, wildlife, and habitats due to LEDA effluent discharges. The Biology Team of ESH-20 (LANL`s Ecology Group) has performed these monitoring activities during 1996 and 1997 to document baseline conditions before LEDA released significant effluent discharges. Quarterly monitoring of the outfall which will discharge LEDA blowdown effluent had one exceedance of permitted parameters, a high chlorine discharge that was quickly remedied. Samples from 12 soil pits in the drainage area contained no hydric indicators, such as organic matter in the upper layers, streaking, organic pans, and oxidized rhizospheres. Vegetation transacts in the meadows that LEDA discharges will flow through contained 44 species of herbaceous plants, all upland taxa. Surveys of resident birds, reptiles, and amphibians documented a fauna typical of local dry canyons. No threatened or endangered species inhabit the project area, but increased effluent releases may make the area more attractive to many wildlife species, an endangered raptor, and several other species of concern. Biological best management practices especially designed for LEDA are discussed, including protection of floodplains, erosion control measures, hazards posed by increased usage of the area by deer and elk and revegetation of disturbed areas.

  16. Autonomous Dynamic Soaring Platform for Distributed Mobile Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOSLOUGH, MARK B. E.

    2002-06-01

    This project makes use of ''biomimetic behavioral engineering'' in which adaptive strategies used by animals in the real world are applied to the development of autonomous robots. The key elements of the biomimetic approach are to observe and understand a survival behavior exhibited in nature, to create a mathematical model and simulation capability for that behavior, to modify and optimize the behavior for a desired robotics application, and to implement it. The application described in this report is dynamic soaring, a behavior that certain sea birds use to extract flight energy from laminar wind velocity gradients in the shallow atmospheric boundary layer directly above the ocean surface. Theoretical calculations, computational proof-of-principle demonstrations, and the first instrumented experimental flight test data for dynamic soaring are presented to address the feasibility of developing dynamic soaring flight control algorithms to sustain the flight of unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs). Both hardware and software were developed for this application. Eight-foot custom foam sailplanes were built and flown in a steep shear gradient. A logging device was designed and constructed with custom software to record flight data during dynamic soaring maneuvers. A computational toolkit was developed to simulate dynamic soaring in special cases and with a full 6-degree of freedom flight dynamics model in a generalized time-dependent wind field. Several 3-dimensional visualization tools were built to replay the flight simulations. A realistic aerodynamics model of an eight-foot sailplane was developed using measured aerodynamic derivatives. Genetic programming methods were developed and linked to the simulations and visualization tools. These tools can now be generalized for other biomimetic behavior applications.

  17. Structural Divergence in Vertebrate Phylogeny of a Duplicated Prototype Galectin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, R.; Chakraborty, M.; Mian, I. S.; Newman, S. A.

    2014-09-25

    Prototype galectins, endogenously expressed animal lectins with a single carbohydrate recognition domain, are well-known regulators of tissue properties such as growth and adhesion. The earliest discovered and best studied of the prototype galectins is Galectin-1 (Gal-1). In the Gallus gallus (chicken) genome, Gal-1 is represented by two homologs: Gal-1A and Gal-1B, with distinct biochemical properties, tissue expression, and developmental functions. We investigated the origin of the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence to gain insight into when their developmental functions originated and how they could have contributed to vertebrate phenotypic evolution. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction showed that the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence can be traced back to the origin of the sauropsid lineage (consisting of extinct and extant reptiles and birds) although lineage-specific duplications also occurred in the amphibian and actinopterygian genomes. Gene synteny analysis showed that sauropsid gal-1b (the gene for Gal-1B) and its frog and actinopterygian gal-1 homologs share a similar chromosomal location, whereas sauropsid gal-1a has translocated to a new position. Surprisingly, we found that chicken Gal-1A, encoded by the translocated gal-1a, was more similar in its tertiary folding pattern than Gal-1B, encoded by the untranslocated gal-1b, to experimentally determined and predicted folds of nonsauropsid Gal-1s. This inference is consistent with our finding of a lower proportion of conserved residues in sauropsid Gal-1Bs, and evidence for positive selection of sauropsid gal-1b, but not gal-1a genes. We propose that the duplication and structural divergence of Gal-1B away from Gal-1A led to specialization in both expression and function in the sauropsid lineage.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships among amphisbaenian reptiles based on complete mitochondrial genomic sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-19

    Complete mitochondrial genomic sequences are reported from 12 members in the four families of the reptile group Amphisbaenia. Analysis of 11,946 aligned nucleotide positions (5,797 informative) produces a robust phylogenetic hypothesis. The family Rhineuridae is basal and Bipedidae is the sister taxon to the Amphisbaenidae plus Trogonophidae. Amphisbaenian reptiles are surprisingly old, predating the breakup of Pangaea 200 million years before present, because successive basal taxa (Rhineuridae and Bipedidae) are situated in tectonic regions of Laurasia and nested taxa (Amphisbaenidae and Trogonophidae) are found in Gondwanan regions. Thorough sampling within the Bipedidae shows that it is not tectonic movement of Baja California away from the Mexican mainland that is primary in isolating Bipes species, but rather that primary vicariance occurred between northern and southern groups. Amphisbaenian families show parallel reduction in number of limbs and Bipes species exhibit parallel reduction in number of digits. A measure is developed for comparing the phylogenetic information content of various genes. A synapomorphic trait defining the Bipedidae is a shift from the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement to the derived state of trnE and nad6. In addition, a tandem duplication of trnT and trnP is observed in B. biporus with a pattern of pseudogene formation that varies among populations. The first case of convergent rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome among animals demonstrated by complete genomic sequences is reported. Relative to most vertebrates, the Rhineuridae has the block nad6, trnE switched in order with cob, trnT, trnP, as they are in birds.

  19. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Monica

    2011-01-31

    Background: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7percent of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineagespecific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals? evolutionary response to global climate change.

  20. Constructing rigorous and broad biosurveillance networks for detecting emerging zoonotic outbreaks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Mac; Moore, Leslie; McMahon, Benjamin; Powell, Dennis; LaBute, Montiago; Hyman, James M.; Rivas, Ariel; Jankowski, Mark; Berendzen, Joel; Loeppky, Jason; et al

    2015-05-06

    Determining optimal surveillance networks for an emerging pathogen is difficult since it is not known beforehand what the characteristics of a pathogen will be or where it will emerge. The resources for surveillance of infectious diseases in animals and wildlife are often limited and mathematical modeling can play a supporting role in examining a wide range of scenarios of pathogen spread. We demonstrate how a hierarchy of mathematical and statistical tools can be used in surveillance planning help guide successful surveillance and mitigation policies for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens. The model forecasts can help clarify the complexities ofmore » potential scenarios, and optimize biosurveillance programs for rapidly detecting infectious diseases. Using the highly pathogenic zoonotic H5N1 avian influenza 2006-2007 epidemic in Nigeria as an example, we determined the risk for infection for localized areas in an outbreak and designed biosurveillance stations that are effective for different pathogen strains and a range of possible outbreak locations. We created a general multi-scale, multi-host stochastic SEIR epidemiological network model, with both short and long-range movement, to simulate the spread of an infectious disease through Nigerian human, poultry, backyard duck, and wild bird populations. We chose parameter ranges specific to avian influenza (but not to a particular strain) and used a Latin hypercube sample experimental design to investigate epidemic predictions in a thousand simulations. We ranked the risk of local regions by the number of times they became infected in the ensemble of simulations. These spatial statistics were then complied into a potential risk map of infection. Finally, we validated the results with a known outbreak, using spatial analysis of all the simulation runs to show the progression matched closely with the observed location of the farms infected in the 2006-2007 epidemic.« less

  1. Constructing rigorous and broad biosurveillance networks for detecting emerging zoonotic outbreaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Mac; Moore, Leslie; McMahon, Benjamin; Powell, Dennis; LaBute, Montiago; Hyman, James M.; Rivas, Ariel; Jankowski, Mark; Berendzen, Joel; Loeppky, Jason; Manore, Carrie; Fair, Jeanne; Viboud, Cecile

    2015-05-06

    Determining optimal surveillance networks for an emerging pathogen is difficult since it is not known beforehand what the characteristics of a pathogen will be or where it will emerge. The resources for surveillance of infectious diseases in animals and wildlife are often limited and mathematical modeling can play a supporting role in examining a wide range of scenarios of pathogen spread. We demonstrate how a hierarchy of mathematical and statistical tools can be used in surveillance planning help guide successful surveillance and mitigation policies for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens. The model forecasts can help clarify the complexities of potential scenarios, and optimize biosurveillance programs for rapidly detecting infectious diseases. Using the highly pathogenic zoonotic H5N1 avian influenza 2006-2007 epidemic in Nigeria as an example, we determined the risk for infection for localized areas in an outbreak and designed biosurveillance stations that are effective for different pathogen strains and a range of possible outbreak locations. We created a general multi-scale, multi-host stochastic SEIR epidemiological network model, with both short and long-range movement, to simulate the spread of an infectious disease through Nigerian human, poultry, backyard duck, and wild bird populations. We chose parameter ranges specific to avian influenza (but not to a particular strain) and used a Latin hypercube sample experimental design to investigate epidemic predictions in a thousand simulations. We ranked the risk of local regions by the number of times they became infected in the ensemble of simulations. These spatial statistics were then complied into a potential risk map of infection. Finally, we validated the results with a known outbreak, using spatial analysis of all the simulation runs to show the progression matched closely with the observed location of the farms infected in the 2006-2007 epidemic.

  2. The pathogen transmission avoidance theory of sexual selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.

    1997-08-01

    The current theory that sexual selection results from female preference for males with good genes suffers from several problems. An alternative explanation, the pathogen transmission avoidance hypothesis, argues that the primary function of showy traits is to provide a reliable signal of current disease status, so that sick individuals can be avoided during mating. This study shows that a significant risk of pathogen transmission occurs during mating and that showy traits are reliable indicators of current disease status. The origin of female choosiness is argued to lie in a general tendency to avoid sick individuals, even in the absence of showy traits, which originate as exaggerations of normal traits that are indicative of good health (bright feathers, vigorous movement, large size). Thus, in this new model the origins of both showy traits and female choosiness are not problematic and there is no threshold effect. This model predicts that when the possession of male showy traits does not help to reduce disease in the female, showy traits are unlikely to occur. This case corresponds to thorough exposure of every animal to all group pathogens, on average, in large groups. Such species are shown with a large data set on birds to be less likely to exhibit showy traits. The good-genes model does not make this prediction. The pathogen transmission avoidance model can also lead to the evolution of showy traits even when selection is not effective against a given pathogen (e.g., when there is no heritable variation for resistance), but can result in selection for resistance if such genes are present. Monogamy is argued to reduce selection pressures for showy traits; data show monogamous species to be both less parasitized and less showy. In the context of reduction of pathogen transmission rates in showy populations, selection pressure becomes inversely frequency-dependent, which makes showy traits likely to be self-limiting rather than runaway.

  3. Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

    2004-12-10

    could be complemented with biological surveys of bird use and invertebrates to produce a robust long-term monitoring strategy for habitat health and sustainability.

  4. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is

  5. Effects of Precommercial Thinning and Midstory Control on Avian and Small Mammal Communities during Longleaf Pine Savanna Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Vanessa R; Kilgo, John C

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - Restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savanna is a goal of many southern land managers, and longleaf plantations may provide a mechanism for savanna restoration. However, the effects of silvicultural treatments used in the management of longleaf pine plantations on wildlife communities are relatively unknown. Beginning in 1994, we examined effects of longleaf pine restoration with plantation silviculture on avian and small mammal communities using four treatments in four 8- to 11- year-old plantations within the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Treatments included prescribed burning every 3 to 5 years, plus: (1) no additional treatment (burn-only control); (2) precommercial thinning; (3) non-pine woody control with herbicides; and (4) combined thinning and woody control. We surveyed birds (1996-2003) using 50-m point counts and small mammals with removal trapping. Thinning and woody control alone had short-lived effects on avian communities, and the combination treatment increased avian parameters over the burn-only control in all years. Small mammal abundance showed similar trends as avian abundance for all three treatments when compared with the burn-only control, but only for 2 years post-treatment. Both avian and small mammal communities were temporarily enhanced by controlling woody vegetation with chemicals in addition to prescribed fire and thinning. Therefore, precommercial thinning in longleaf plantations, particularly when combined with woody control and prescribed fire, may benefit early-successional avian and small mammal communities by developing stand conditions more typical of natural longleaf stands maintained by periodic fire.

  6. Structural Divergence in Vertebrate Phylogeny of a Duplicated Prototype Galectin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhat, R.; Chakraborty, M.; Mian, I. S.; Newman, S. A.

    2014-09-25

    Prototype galectins, endogenously expressed animal lectins with a single carbohydrate recognition domain, are well-known regulators of tissue properties such as growth and adhesion. The earliest discovered and best studied of the prototype galectins is Galectin-1 (Gal-1). In the Gallus gallus (chicken) genome, Gal-1 is represented by two homologs: Gal-1A and Gal-1B, with distinct biochemical properties, tissue expression, and developmental functions. We investigated the origin of the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence to gain insight into when their developmental functions originated and how they could have contributed to vertebrate phenotypic evolution. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction showed that the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence can bemore » traced back to the origin of the sauropsid lineage (consisting of extinct and extant reptiles and birds) although lineage-specific duplications also occurred in the amphibian and actinopterygian genomes. Gene synteny analysis showed that sauropsid gal-1b (the gene for Gal-1B) and its frog and actinopterygian gal-1 homologs share a similar chromosomal location, whereas sauropsid gal-1a has translocated to a new position. Surprisingly, we found that chicken Gal-1A, encoded by the translocated gal-1a, was more similar in its tertiary folding pattern than Gal-1B, encoded by the untranslocated gal-1b, to experimentally determined and predicted folds of nonsauropsid Gal-1s. This inference is consistent with our finding of a lower proportion of conserved residues in sauropsid Gal-1Bs, and evidence for positive selection of sauropsid gal-1b, but not gal-1a genes. We propose that the duplication and structural divergence of Gal-1B away from Gal-1A led to specialization in both expression and function in the sauropsid lineage.« less

  7. Recent studies in the behavioral toxicology of ELF electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovely, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral responses to ELF electric and magnetic fields are reviewed starting with the simple sensory awareness or detection by an animal and moving on through more-complicated behavioral responses such as behavior that averts exposure. The literature selected in this review is taken primarily from the area of behavioral toxicology. As such, it does not review work on specialized response systems to ELF fields. The most notable of these omitted specialized response systems are electroreception, which occurs in a number of fish species, and homing/navigation and communication of the location of food that occurs in several species of birds and in honeybees, respectively. The toxicologic orientation of most researches that evaluate the effects of exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields has been influenced primarily by the missions of DOE and the power industry programs to determine the health effects of power frequency (50- and 60-Hz) electric and magnetic fields. Because of these large programmatic efforts, most of the recent research has in fact been done at 50 or 60 Hz. In the context of the above limitations, remarkably few robust behavioral effects have been reported. Those that have been reported probably relate to an animal's perception of the electric field, although there are some exceptions to this generalization. The apparent lack of deleterious effects in animals is consistent with recent studies on humans that have been conducted in the UK. With this in mind, it is tempting to conclude that exposure to an ELF field is a rather innocuous event and, other than possible mini-shocks, is without hazard. 43 references.

  8. Avian study protocols and wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, K.

    1995-12-01

    This paper identifies the need to develop and use standardized avian study protocols to determine avian impacts at new and existing wind energy facilities. This will allow data collected from various sites to be correlated for better understanding wind energy related avian impacts. Factors contributing to an increased interest in wind energy facilities by electric utilities include: (1) Increased demand for electricity;(2) increased constraints on traditional electrical generating facilities (i.e. hydroelectric and nuclear power plants);(3) improved wind turbine technology. During the 1980`s generous tax credits spawned the development of wind energy facilities, known as wind farms, in California. Commercial scale wind farm proposals are being actively considered in states across the country - Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Wisconsin, Texas, and Vermont to name a few. From the wind farms in California the unexpected issue of avian impacts, especially to birds-of-prey, or raptor, surfaced and continues to plague the wind industry. However, most of the avian studies did not followed a standardized protocol or methodology and, therefore, data is unavailable to analyze and compare impacts at different sites or with differing technologies and configurations. Effective mitigation can not be designed and applied until these differences are understood. The Bonneville Power Administration is using comparable avian study protocols to collect data for two environmental impact statements being prepared for two separate wind farm proposals. Similar protocol will be required for any other avian impact analysis performed by the agency on proposed or existing wind farms. The knowledge gained from these studies should contribute to a better understanding of avian interactions with wind energy facilities and the identification of effective mitigation measures.

  9. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality

  10. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  11. Cytochrome P4501A induction in avian hepatocyte cultures exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls: Comparisons with AHR1-mediated reporter gene activity and in ovo toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Gillian E.; Mundy, Lukas J.; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Chiu, Suzanne; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian-specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) were developed by the World Health Organization to simplify environmental risk assessments of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), but TEFs do not account for differences in the toxic and biochemical potencies of DLCs among species of birds. Such variability may be due to differences in species sensitivity to individual DLCs. The sensitivity of avian species to DLCs was recently associated with the identity of amino acids 324 and 380 in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 (CYP1A5) reporter gene, in combination with a species' AHR1 ligand binding domain sequence, were also shown to predict avian species sensitivity to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and PCB relative potency in a given species. The goals of the present study were to (1) characterize the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA in chicken, ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail embryo hepatocytes and (2) compare these in vitro results to those previously generated by the LRG assay and in ovo toxicity studies. EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression data support and complement the findings of the LRG assay. CYP1A enzyme activity and mRNA expression were significantly correlated both with luciferase activity and in ovo toxicity induced by PCBs. Relative potency values were generally similar between the LRG and EROD assays and indicate that the relative potency of some PCBs may differ among species. -- Highlights: ► The chicken isn't the most sensitive species to CYP1A induction by PCB 105 and 118. ► The relative potency of PCBs differs between avian species. ► EROD activity was correlated with luciferase activity from the LRG assay. ► EROD activity was a better predictor of toxicity than CYP

  12. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  13. Phase I Archaeological Investigation Cultural Resources Survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana Districts, South Shore of Maui, Hawaii (DRAFT )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erkelens, Conrad

    1994-03-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. A total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features were documented. A GPS receiver was used to accurately and precisely plot locations for each of the documented sites. Analysis of the locational information suggests that archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Moanakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. A total of twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bone from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area. A small test unit was excavated at one habitation site

  14. A radionuclide tracer is used to identify potential contamination zones on the Alaskan shelf in response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M. ); Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L. )

    1990-01-09

    On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground and spilled over 10 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound (PWS). Alaska, a deep fjord supporting large populations of birds, fish, marine mammals, and benthic organisms. We participated in 2 cruises in May and October to identify specific sedimentary areas and benthic habitats on the Alaskan shelf that may be potentially contaminated by crude oil. To identify benthic areas of potential oil impact, we measured the distribution of Beryllium-7 ([sup 7]Be 53.3-d half-life), an atmospherically deposited radioisotope, in 24 sediment cores collected in PWS and along the Kenai Peninsula at water depths ranging from 80-775 m. Like petroleum hydrocarbons, [sup 7]Be rapidly sorbs to suspended matter in coastal waters and tends to accumulate in sedimentary areas where suspended matter accumulates. The sedimentary distribution of [sup 7]Be was used to identify benthic areas that may be subject to oil contamination and for tracing dispersal and fate of this energy-related contaminant. [sup 210]Pb and [sub 137]Cs were also measured to determine an associated sediment accumulation rate at selected sites. No detectable levels of [sup 7]Be were found in surface sediments at about half of the stations. This suggests that little or no material from the water column has accumulated here in the last 3 months. Sites on the eastern side of Knight Island and along the Kenai Peninsula, downstream of the spill, had [sup 7]Be accumulation inventories ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 pCi/cm[sup 2] occurred at a site on the western side of Montague Island (246 m depth) within the the tidal mixing zone of PWS and the Gulf of Alaska. The high value suggests that water-column materials are focusing and depositing at this site so this benthic habitat may likely be affected by the oil spill. Data from new and reoccupied stations during the October cruise will be presented and areas of potential impact from oil contamination discussed.

  15. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  16. Phase transformation of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} and its disordered crystal structure at 1073 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurokawa, Daisuke; Takeda, Seiya; Colas, Maggy; Asaka, Toru; Thomas, Philippe; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2014-07-01

    The phase transformation of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} and the crystal structure of its high-temperature phase were investigated by differential thermal analysis, temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction (CuKα{sub 1}). We determined the starting temperature of the orthorhombic-to-cubic transformation during heating (=711 K) and that of the reverse transformation during cooling (=742 K). The thermal hysteresis was negative (=−31 K), suggesting the thermoelasticity of the transformation. The space group of the high temperature phase is I4{sup ¯}3m with the unit-cell dimensions of a=0.92426(2) nm and V=0.78955(2) nm{sup 3} (Z=2) at 1073 K. The initial structural model was derived by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The final structural model showed the orientational disordering of SO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. At around the transformation temperature during heating, the vibrational spectra, corresponding to the Raman-active SO{sub 4} internal stretching mode, showed the continuous and gradual change in the slope of full width at half maximum versus temperature curve. This strongly suggests that the orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transformation would be principally accompanied by the statistical disordering in orientation of the SO{sub 4} tetrahedra, without distinct dynamical reorientation. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Three-dimensional electron-density distributions of the SO{sub 4} tetrahedron with the split-atom model, and (right) a bird's eye view of electron densities on the plane parallel to (111). - Highlights: • Crystal structure of Ca{sub 4}[Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}]SO{sub 4} at 1073 K is determined by powder XRD. • The atom arrangements are represented by the split-atom model

  17. Ethnic differences in ecological concerns: Spanish-speaking Hispanics are more concerned than others

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna . E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Greenberg, Michael

    2006-09-15

    We postulated that environmental concern encompasses a wide range of different issues, often lumping pollution with habitat loss (or land use) and ecological resources (fish and wildlife). In this paper, we compare perceptions about a range of environmental and ecological resource issues, and explore ethnic/racial differences. We surveyed 1513 residents of New Jersey about 'environmental concerns', using both general environmental questions (two questions: How serious are environmental problems in New Jersey? Are you concerned about the loss of open space?) and ecological resource questions (12 questions: e.g., how important is planting trees in your neighborhood, how concerned are you about loss of breeding and feeding habitat for fish and birds?) in New Jersey. Not all concerns were rated equally. For the ecological questions, there were no ethnic differences in concerns over preserving areas around water supplies, loss of places to hunt and fish, and loss of places for quiet walks and cycling, but there were for the other 9 ecological concerns. For eight of these nine concerns, Spanish-speaking Hispanics were more concerned than others (including English-speaking Hispanics). We divided the ecological resources into three categories: ecological services (clean water and safety), ecological resources (fish and wildlife), and recreational services. The strongest correlates of people's association with enlarging and enhancing recreational services were Spanish-speaking Hispanics, who are supportive of regulations and believe local government is not doing enough for environmental problems. People concerned about the loss of ecological resources and open space believe the federal government and the state are not doing enough for the environment, were non-Hispanic White, want continued environmental regulations, were longer-term residents, were high school graduates, and were older (45-54 years). People interested in ecological services were college-educated, non

  18. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol

  19. Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2006-09-01

    BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with

  20. Electron density distribution and disordered crystal structure of 15R-SiAlON, SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banno, Hiroki; Hanai, Takaaki; Asaka, Toru; Kimoto, Koji; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2014-03-15

    The crystal structure of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4} was characterized by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction (CuKα{sub 1}). The title compound is trigonal with space group R3-bar m. The hexagonal unit-cell dimensions (Z=3) are a=0.301332(3) nm, c=4.18616(4) nm and V=0.3291825(5) nm{sup 3}. The initial structural model was successfully derived by the charge-flipping method and further refined by the Rietveld method. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three (Si,Al) sites. The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting (MPF) method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. The reliability indices calculated from the MPF were R{sub wp}=5.05%, S (=R{sub wp}/R{sub e})=1.21, R{sub p}=3.77%, R{sub B}=1.29% and R{sub F}=1.01%. The disordered crystal structure was successfully described by overlapping three types of domains with ordered atom arrangements. The distribution of atomic positions in one of the three types of domains can be achieved in the space group R3-bar m. The atom arrangements in the other two types of domains are noncentrosymmetrical with the space group R3m. These two structural configurations are related by the pseudo-symmetry inversion. -- Graphical abstract: A bird's eye view of electron densities up to 75.3% (0.133 nm{sup −3}) of the maximum on the plane parallel to (110) with the corresponding atomic arrangements of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4}. Highlights: • Crystal structure of SiAl{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 4} is determined by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction. • The atom arrangements are represented by the split-atom model. • The maximum-entropy method-based pattern fitting method is used to confirm the validity of the model. • The disordered structure is described by overlapping three types of domains with ordered atom arrangements.