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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U.S. FOB Costs of Mexican Mayan Crude Oil (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

30.75: 26.91: 2005: 29.69: 31.95: 36.55: 38.31: 39.06: 43.09: 44.38: 48.30: 50.08: 45.85: 41.06: 42.94: 2006: 47.80: 45.97: 48.62: 55.11: 55.32: 53.41: 57.83: 58.75 ...

2

Mexican Hat | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mexican Hat Mexican Hat Mexican Hat January 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report Installation Name, State: Mexican Hat Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Mexican Hat Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? No Depth (feet): 0 Mulitple Units Affected? No Avg Velocity (feet/year): 0 Plume Information Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 0 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach

3

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat Mill Site -...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site. LMSS09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Mexican Hat Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Mexican...

4

FDI as a Sustainable Development Strategy: Evidence from Mexican Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Mexican steel industry. Industry and Environment inin the Mexican steel industry led to better environmentalstate-patronized industries such as steel, cement, and pulp

Gallagher, Kevin P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. The Mexican Petroleum Industry in the Twentiethshaped the politics of petroleum development in Tabasco,who nationalized the petroleum industry in 1938, likely won

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Algerian Saharan Blend 65.95 81.78 115.82 114.02 2009-2012 Angolan Cabinda 69.17 W 1978-2008 Brazilian Marlim 58.94 76.63 107.13 114.32 2009-2012 Canadian Bow River 52.36 84.29 55.71 68.92 82.02 77.19 1978-2012 Canadian Light Sour Blend 59.12 76.56 96.52 87.82 2009-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 50.94 82.50 53.44 68.13 82.24 81.33 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Napo 48.74 72.97 97.91 101.53 2009-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente 64.57 87.25 56.97 75.48 101.74 105.50 1978-2012 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 72.93 95.46 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 64.38 77.96 106.67 106.93 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 60.93 84.29 56.03 70.87 98.81 100.29 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.77 101.14 1978-2008

7

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Crude Stream Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Angolan Cabinda 1983-2010 Canadian Bow River 1996-2010 Canadian Light Sour Blend W 90.81 W W W W 2010-2013 Canadian Lloydminster 70.87 79.48 80.36 W 92.04 W 1983-2013 Ecuadorian Oriente 1983-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 1996-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 100.31 W W 97.05 101.32 W 2009-2013 Mexican Mayan 98.74 98.36 96.26 99.63 99.74 99.31 1983-2013 Mexican Olmeca 1996-2010 Nigerian Forcados Blend 1996-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe W W W 2009-2013 Venezuelan Furrial 1996-2008 Venezuelan Leona 1996-2010

8

F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Angolan Cabinda 64.60 W 1978-2008 Canadian Bow River 52.38 81.82 1978-2008 Canadian Light Sour Blend 74.59 93.75 83.54 2010-2012 Canadian Lloydminster 48.54 79.33 50.11 64.41 78.41 77.01 1978-2012 Ecuadorian Oriente W 74.74 1978-2008 Gabon Rabi-Kouanga 71.27 89.56 1978-2008 Iraqi Basrah Light 62.98 74.36 104.51 103.17 2009-2012 Mexican Mayan 59.96 82.99 55.07 70.36 98.27 99.81 1978-2012 Mexican Olmeca 72.12 99.40 1978-2008 Nigerian Forcados Blend 93.72 110.57 1978-2008 Nigerian Qua Iboe 65.60 82.66 115.82 115.85 2009-2012 Venezuelan Furrial - - 1978-2008 Venezuelan Leona W W 1978-2008 Venezuelan Merey

9

Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE) Place Mexico Sector Services Product General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic / Research foundation ) References Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE) is a company located in Mexico . References ↑ "Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mexican_Electric_Research_Institute_IIE&oldid=348756" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

10

MEXICAN CORN: Genetic Variability and Trade Liberalisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is now a well established fact that corn (Zea mays) originated in Mexico and that a great part of the evolution that may be observed in terms of this plant’s genetic variability took place in this country. 2 As the plant’s history unfolded, early forms of these races were taken by people into a wide variety of environments and ecological niches from which many distinct varieties developed in the relative isolation of these separated regions. Thus, Mexico also became a center of genetic diversity for corn, and its stock of germplasm has contributed in a decisive manner to global production of corn. Even the dented varieties of the U.S. Corn Belt are close descendants of the first Mexican landraces. The germplasm resources that are deposited in Mexico’s corn varieties, as well as in the wild relatives of this crop, are of prime importance for the world’s food production system of the next century. 3 Corn germplasm of Mexican origin has played a critical role in improvements for corn cultivated in tropical regions in relation to yield increments, plague resistance, short growth cycle, drought resistance and increases of protein content of grain. It has also been instrumental in increasing yields in the case of corn produced in temperate regions at high latitudes. Mexican 1

Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México; Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

GIZ-Mexican-German Climate Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexican-German Climate Alliance Mexican-German Climate Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican-German Climate Alliance Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner SEMARNAT, Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Programmes and projects in Mexico[1] Overview The project aims to implement Mexican climate policies Alliance in an effective and efficient way. After 2012 the alliance is supposed to continue to support the Mexican climate policies and to introduce innovative mechanisms for adaptation and mitigation. To this end, the project will provide policy advice for SEMARNAT with regard to strategies

12

Mexican-German Climate Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mexican-German Climate Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexican-German Climate Alliance Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner SEMARNAT, Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Mexico Central America References Programmes and projects in Mexico[1] Overview The project aims to implement Mexican climate policies Alliance in an effective and efficient way. After 2012 the alliance is supposed to continue to support the Mexican climate policies and to introduce innovative mechanisms for adaptation and mitigation. To this end, the

13

Surges over the Gulf of California during the Mexican Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northward surges of relatively cool, moist, maritime air from the tropical Pacific into the southwestern United States occur via the Gulf of California every summer during the Mexican monsoon season. These surges advect large amounts of moisture ...

David J. Stensrud; Robert L. Gall; Mel K. Nordquist

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

United States -- Mexican joint ventures: A case history approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the Mexican government has encouraged investment in Mexico by increasing the percentage of ownership of a Mexican business that a US company can hold, joint ventures are more attractive now than they had been in the past. This study provides preliminary information for US renewable energy companies who are interested in forming a joint venture with a Mexican company. This report is not intended to be a complete reference but does identifies a number of important factors that should be observed when forming a Mexican joint venture: (1)Successful joint ventures achieve the goals of each partner. (2)It is essential that all parties agree to the allocation of responsibilities. (3)Put everything in writing. (4)Research in depth the country or countries in which you are considering doing business.

Moore, N.L.; Chidester, R.J.; Hughes, K.R.; Fowler, R.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The nostalgia of change : a history of Mexican return migration to Acámbaro, Guanajuato, 1930-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

me the ins and outs of the history department—Carol Larking,The Course of Mexican History. (New York: Oxford Universityas significant to the Mexican history as more traditionally

Pérez, Jesús Varela

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

San Diego, Texas -- Plazas of San Diego Texas: Signatures of Mexican-American Place Identity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1989). Moreover, most South Texas towns stage these and1978). 4. Some other South Texas Mexican- American townsPlazas of San Diego Texas: S i g n a t u r e s of Mexican-

Arreola, Daniel D

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mexican demand for US natural gas  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the Mexican natural gas industry as it exists today and the factors that have shaped the evolution of the industry in the past or that are expected to influence its progress; it also projects production and use of natural gas and estimates the market for exports of natural gas from the United States to Mexico. The study looks ahead to two periods, a near term (1993--1995) and an intermediate term (1996--2000). The bases for estimates under two scenarios are described. Under the conservative scenario, exports of natural gas from the United States would decrease from the 1992 level of 250 million cubic feet per day (MMCF/d), would return to that level by 1995, and would reach about 980 MMCF/D by 2000. Under the more optimistic scenario, exports would decrease in 1993 and would recover and rise to about 360 MMCF/D in 1995 and to 1,920 MMCF/D in 2000.

Kanter, M.A.; Kier, P.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

19

Mexican law in Texas courts and the role of judicial interaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores issue of whether Texas courts are currently capable of applying and willing to apply Mexican law. Texas courts and legal practitioners have… (more)

Bellows, Elizabeth Carmichael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

From Servants To Engineers: Mexican Immigration And Labor Markets In The San Francisco Bay Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican migrants in California havc worked temporarily or1 993), three theories havc been proposed to explain theargues that softwarc factories havc emerged as an attempt to

Alacron, Rafael

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Foreign firms to get equal opportunity in Mexican selloff plans  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) has not finalized details of its long-awaited petrochemical privatization program. However, the state oil group has made it clear the selloff schedule, due to begin during the next two months, will give equal investment opportunity to foreign firms, dashing the hopes of Mexican groups that they would be given first right of refusal in the privatization program. Meanwhile, Pemex has agreed with Shell Oil on a previously announced refining joint venture involving Shell's 225,000-bbl/day refinery at Deer Park, TX. Under the plan, Pemex will purchase a 50% stake in the refinery and join Shell in a $1-billion upgrade with would enable it to handle more Mexican crude. Sources believe that Shell and other US oil groups are interested in acquiring assets from Pemex Petroquimica.

Wood, A.; Alvarez, C.

1993-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cost of being a Mexican immigrant and being a Mexican non-citizen in California and Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to examine hourly wage differences across different groups of Mexican-origin workers. First, I assess the cost of foreign-born status by comparing the hourly wages of Mexican immigrant workers with those of native-born Mexican American workers. Second, I assess the cost of non-citizenship status by comparing the hourly wages of non-citizens with those of Mexican-born U.S. naturalized citizens. I also seek to determine if these costs are greater in California than in Texas. The data are drawn from the 2000 5% Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) U.S. Census. The results from multiple linear regression analyses show that being an immigrant, particularly a non-citizen immigrant, is associated with lower hourly wages, especially in California. Thus, Mexicanorigin workers, especially those in California, bear dual costs for being foreign-born and not being naturalized citizens. Furthermore, I focus on length of U.S. residence to assess the social and economic impact of the different periods on the costs associated with foreign-born status. First, those who came to the United States before the IRCA of 1986 and a series of California propositions during the 1990s have higher hourly wages than those who arrived later, because of more stable labor market conditions and the effect of the duration of stay in the United States. Second, those who arrived during the last decade have much lower hourly wages because of their disadvantaged labor market contexts.

Takei, Isao

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Grassroots cosmopolitanism : transnational communication and citizenship practices among indigenous Mexican immigrants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

longer active organizations may be still in the directory.directory by the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs 5 , there are 2080 Mexican immigrant organizationsOrganization (ORO) and members of FOCOICA embarked in a communication campaign where they got a current telephone directory

Mercado, Antonieta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Mexican oil sector in the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

During this decade of the 1980s and into the 1990s, the relative participation of hydrocarbons in the energy supply will not be reduced significantly and the contribution of alternative energy sources will be modest in upcoming years. Hence, it is necessary to design and implement policies which will promote energy conservation and savings, both directly and indirectly. Topics discussed include: hydrocarbon participation in the Mexican energy sector, the influence of petroleum on the major macroeconomic variables, perspectives for the 1980s and elements of policy.

Willars, J.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CENTER FOR U.S. AND MEXICAN LAW UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON LAW CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of internships with Pemex and with the Mexican Foreign Ministry (Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores to applicants available for the full summer): 2. Internship Preference (Pemex or Foreign Ministry

Azevedo, Ricardo

26

New Mexican taxes to transform Pemex capital spending strategy  

SciTech Connect

Mexico's government this year will introduce petroleum tax reforms that will transform how its state owned petroleum company approaches capital spending. Effective Jan. 1, 1994, the Mexican government began to implement a revamped tax regime designed to accompany the breakup of Petroleos Mexicanos into four new operating subsidiaries. Each of the four new companies -- Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Refining, Pemex Natural Gas and Basic Petrochemicals, and Pemex Secondary Petrochemicals -- will be responsible for paying a new income tax. Levies on E and P will be tied to a ring-fence mechanism tailored after the scheme employed by the U.K. and Norwegian governments in the North Sea. The paper discusses the affected investment rationale, the North Sea ring-fence model, other tax changes, and shifting the burden.

Not Available

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Mexican petrochemical sector in the NAFTA negotiations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, there have been important changes in the Mexican petrochemical sector, including trade liberalization, deregulation and the elimination of subsidies. NAFTA represents another step towards liberalization of the sector. Given the low tariffs currently applied to international trade among the three nations, the authors do not anticipate major impacts of NAFTA on trade flows. Nevertheless, the elimination of restrictions to foreign investment is expected to increase capital flows into the sector and to promote productivity increases. On the other hand, the new barriers to trade in petrochemical feedstocks and the restrictions on private investment in infrastructure may negatively affect the sector`s growth, making it necessary to adjust domestic regulations to improve the performance of Pemex. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

Kessel, G.; Kim, C.S. [Instituto Technologico Autonomo de Mexico, Magdalena Contreras (Mexico)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Since May, 1990, the Institute for Public Policy (IPP) has published Quarterly Profiles (QPs) of New Mexico`s citizenry. Each QP has focused on a different issue, but they have all asked a set of standard items, including questions about the public`s perceptions of the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). Each year, the IPP has used the University of New Mexico`s Survey Research Center to conduct a telephone survey of a representative random sample of New Mexicans, and respondents were asked whether they had favorable or unfavorable views of LANL and the degree to which they perceived LANL as an environmentally responsible institution. As a result of this sustained research effort, the IPP now has a collection of fifteen consecutive QPs. With an aggregate sample size of over 8800, we are now able to make precise statistical inferences with greater confidence than was possible when using individual QP samples. Such an extremely large sample mitigates two kinds of common survey research problems.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

Ludlam, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

"The Map of the Mexican's Genome": overlapping national identity, and population genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the intersections between national identity and the production of medical/population genomics in Mexico. The ongoing efforts to construct a Haplotype Map of Mexican genetic diversity offers a unique opportunity to illustrate and analyze ... Keywords: Ethnography, Haplotypes, Mestizo identity, Nationalism, Population genomics

Ernesto Schwartz-Marín; Irma Silva-Zolezzi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Racial Stratification, Social Consciousness, and the Education of Mexican Americans in Fabens, Texas: A Socio-Historical Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the North. El Paso, TX: Texas Western Press. Spring, J.1992. Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986.Austin, TX: University of Texas Press. A Socio-Historical

Verdugo, Richard R. Dr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Evidence of Increment of Efficiency of the Mexican Stock Market Through the Analysis of its Variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that there exist statistical and structural differences between the stock markets of developed and emerging countries. In this work, we present an analysis of the variations and autocorrelations of the Mexican Stock Market index (IPC) for different periods of its historical daily data, showing evidence that the Mexican Stock Market has been increasing its efficiency in recent times. We have analyzed the returns autocorrelation function (ACF) and used detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) methods. We also analyze the volatility of the IPC and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) and compare their evolution. The data samples analyzed here, correspond to daily values of the IPC and DJIA for the period 10/30/1978 to 02/28/2006.

Coronel-Brizio, H F; Huerta-Quintanilla, R; Rodriguez-Achach, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

given to the source. Mexican Entrepreneurship: A Comparison of Self-Employment in Mexico and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We would like to thank Lori Kletzer, David Neumark and seminar participants at UC Davis and the NBER conference on Mexican immigration from helpful comments and suggestions. Daniel Beltran, Kuntal Das, and Jose Martinez provided excellent research assistance. The views expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Robert Fairlie; Christopher Woodruff; Robert Fairlie; Christopher Woodruff; Robert W. Fairlie; Christopher Woodruff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Standardization and improvement of processes and practices using XP, FDD and RUP in the systems information area of a mexican steel manufacturing company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work focuses on standardization and improvement of processes and practices using a combination of methodologies including Agile Methodologies (AM). It was implemented at a Mexican steel manufacturing company using FDD, XP and RUP. The main goal ...

Luis Carlos Aceves Gutiérrez; Enrique Sebastián Canseco Castro; Mauricio Ruanova Hurtado

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEC Ore Buying Station AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.0-02) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The ideal scenario was to accumulate a sufficient stockpile of ore and

39

Networks in the modern economy: Mexican migrants in the u.s. labor market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to identify job networks among Mexican migrants in the U. S. labor market. The empirical analysis uses data on migration patterns and labor market outcomes, based on a sample of individuals belonging to multiple origin-communities in Mexico, over a long period of time. Each community’s network is measured by the proportion of the sampled individuals who are located at the destination (the United States) in any year. We verify that the same individual is more likely to be employed and to hold a higher paying nonagricultural job when his network is exogenously larger, by including individual ?xed effects in the employment and occupation regressions and by using rainfall in the origin-community as an instrument for the size of the network at the destination. I.

Kaivan Munshi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Latinas in the city: a discussion of how young Mexican women identify and engage with Sex and the City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization trends and treaties, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), have increased the access and flow of United States media and popular culture products in Mexico. Limited research has been done examining the exposure of Mexican audiences to U.S. media products and the possibility of mass media’s impact on Mexican cultural identity. This qualitative study examines how twenty college-educated Mexican women identify and engage with the transnational popular culture text of Sex and the City (SATC). A multi-disciplinary theoretical approach, mainly from cultural studies and media studies, provides the backbone for my study of a foreign audience’s identification and engagement with a U.S. popular culture text. Thematic categorization of my interview data showed that genre, gender, class and location all played a role in the media engagement process. SATC enabled these twenty women to examine their lived experiences in Mexican society and be exposed to alternative viewpoints. The women interviewed were active audience members that discussed their experiences as college-educated, career driven women associated with modernity but living in the traditional, patriarchal society of Mexico. The women interviewed preferred watching television from other countries, such as the U.S., because it resonated with their lived experiences more than the telenovelas, which are the most common form of television programming in Latin America. In terms of discussing the representation of women on SATC, women talked about the gender roles, myths and structural forces of Mexican society to engage in resistive pleasure and to talk about gender politics. For these Mexican women, discussing SATC allowed them to express concerns over the representation of women in telenovelas, the importance of having alternative viewpoints available to women, and the experiences that have allowed them to foster spaces for change based on SATC’s content and characters. While factors, such as education, socioeconomics and geographic location framed the respondent comments, SATC was a source of strategic knowledge and cultural capital for women to open up new discussions with friends and family, new ways of looking and living out their sexuality, and ideas of the female body.

Cantu, Elizabeth Angelica

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Phthalate exposure associated with self-reported diabetes among Mexican women  

SciTech Connect

Background: Phthalates are ubiquitous industrial chemicals used as plasticizers in plastics made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to confer flexibility and durability. They are also present in products used for personal-care, industry and in medical devices. Phthalates have been associated with several adverse health effects, and recently it has been proposed that exposure to phthalates, could have an effect on metabolic homeostasis. This exploratory cross-sectional study evaluated the possible association between phthalate exposure and self-reported diabetes among adult Mexican women. Methods: As part of an on-going case-control study for breast cancer, only controls were selected, which constituted 221 healthy women matched by age ({+-}5 years) and place of residence with the cases. Women with diabetes were identified by self-report. Urinary concentrations of nine phthalate metabolites were measured by online solid phase extraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Participants with diabetes had significantly higher concentrations of di(2-ethylhexyl) pththalate (DEHP) metabolites: mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP) and mono(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP) but lower levels of monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) a metabolite of benzylbutyl phthalate, compared to participants without diabetes. A marginally significant positive associations with diabetes status were observed over tertiles with MEHHP (OR{sub T3vs.T1}=2.66; 95% CI: 0.97-7.33; p for trend=0.063) and MEOHP (OR{sub T3vs.T1}=2.27; 95% CI; 0.90-5.75; P for trend=0.079) even after adjusting for important confounders. Conclusions: The results suggest that levels of some phthalates may play a role in the genesis of diabetes. - Highlights: {yields} This study evaluated phthalate exposure and diabetes status among Mexican women. {yields} Urinary phthalates metabolite concentrations were used to determine association. {yields} Participants with diabetes had higher concentrations of three DEHP metabolites. {yields} A positive association with diabetes status was found with MEHHP and MEOHP metabolites. {yields} Results suggest phthalate exposure can have a role in diabetes.

Svensson, Katherine [Graduate School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR (Puerto Rico) [Graduate School of Public Health, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR (Puerto Rico); National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655, Col. Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, Cerrada los Pinos y Caminera, CP. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Hernandez-Ramirez, Raul U.; Burguete-Garcia, Ana [National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655, Col. Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, Cerrada los Pinos y Caminera, CP. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655, Col. Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, Cerrada los Pinos y Caminera, CP. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E. [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico)] [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico); Calafat, Antonia M.; Needham, Larry L. [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Claudio, Luz [Division of International Health, Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [Division of International Health, Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth, E-mail: lizbeth@insp.mx [National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655, Col. Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, Cerrada los Pinos y Caminera, CP. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655, Col. Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, Cerrada los Pinos y Caminera, CP. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeownership is both an individual and society objective, because of the positive neighborhood effects associated with areas of higher homeownership. To help realize these positive effects, the Mexican government has several programs directed to increasing homeownership. Many factors, however, may influence homeownership including shocks experienced by households. Shocks such as death in family, illness or accidents, unemployment, and business, crop, or livestock loss affect homeownership if households are unable to cushion the impact of the shock. Government income support programs, however, may help cushion the effect of a shock. The main objective is to determine how shocks that households’ experience and government income support programs influence homeownership in Mexico. A secondary objective is to determine how socio-demographic variables influence homeownership in Mexico. Based on the Random Utility Model, logit models of homeownership are estimated using data are from the 2002 Mexican National Survey on Living Levels of Households. Two models are estimated; with and without income. Income is excluded because of a large number of households that did not report income. Generally, inferences from the two models are similar. Homeownership appears to not be affected by shocks experienced by households. It appears households are able to cushion the impact of shocks. The two income support programs, the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROGRESA) and the Program of Direct Rural Support of Mexico (PROCAMPO), appear to be increasing homeownership. These social welfare programs provide cash transfers to households. For whatever reason, PROGRESA has a larger effect on homeownership than PROCAMPO. Households with older heads have a larger probability of being a homeowner than households with younger heads. No statistically significance relationship exists between education and homeownership. Regional differences are seen in homeownership, with households located in the northwest region having a higher probability of homeownership than other regions. Differences in the significance of variable representing the household head’s gender, marital status, and occupation on homeownership exist between logit models that include and do not include current income. The most likely reason for these differences is interactions between the variables and a wealth effect.

Lopez Cabrera, Jesus 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Complementation in Chol (Mayan) : a theory of split ergativity :  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central claim of this dissertation is that aspect-based split ergativity does not mark a split in how Case is assigned, but rather, a split in sentence structure. Specifically, I argue that the contexts in which we ...

Coon, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Stories of the Unheard: A Case Study of Five Mexican American Dropouts Labeled as Demonstrating Learning Disabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This qualitative study examined the dropout crises from the perspectives of Mexican American dropouts labeled as learner disabled who were receiving special education services. Such study is imperative as this group increases both in school and in special education classes. There were two research questions that guided the study: 1. What are the perceptions of Mexican American dropouts who participated in a special education program regarding their educational experiences? 2. What were the factors that influenced these students’ decisions to drop out of school? From the participant interviews, historical academic documents, and rich-descriptive information gathered from the students’ voices, three themes were revealed as the primary reason for dropping out of school: non-responsive school culture, lack of supportive environment, and social factors. It was evident in the data collected that the school culture was unfavorable toward their learning and in meeting successful graduation requirements. Under non-responsive school culture, the following subthemes emerged as underlining factors to their dropping out: (a) low expectations, (b) non-caring for the student, (c) ineffective curriculum content, and (d) social issues at school. School-related factors such as the lack of a supportive environment revealed the following subthemes: (a) symptoms of school failure, (b) negative learning environment, and (c) culturally non-responsive instruction. Other attributing factors for dropping out of school included family structures and peer pressure. While each of the participants had unique experiences, each attributed non-responsive school culture, lack of supportive environment, and social context as major factors for dropping out of school. Therefore, the significance of this study lies in the potential to impact Mexican American student achievement in the reduction of dropouts.

Villafranca, Darlene 1975-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the 2011 Energy Information Agency (EIA) global assessment, Mexico ranks 4th in shale gas resources. The Eagle Ford shale is the formation with the greatest expectation in Mexico given the success it has had in the US and its liquids-rich zone. Accurate estimation of the resource size and future production, as well as the uncertainties associated with them, is critical for the decision-making process of developing shale oil and gas resources. The complexity of the shale reservoirs and high variability in its properties generate large uncertainties in the long-term production and recovery factors of these plays. Another source of uncertainty is the limited production history. Given all these uncertainties, a probabilistic decline-curve analysis approach was chosen for this study, given that it is relatively simple, it enables performing a play-wide assessment with available production data and, more importantly, it quantifies the uncertainty in the resource size. Analog areas in the US Eagle Ford shale were defined based on available geologic information in both the US and Mexico. The Duong model coupled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology was used to analyze and forecast production of wells located in the previously defined analog sectors in the US Eagle Ford shale. By combining the results of individual-well analyses, a type curve and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) distribution for each of the defined analog sectors was obtained. These distributions were combined with well-spacing assumptions and sector areas to generate the prospective-resources estimates. Similar probabilistic decline-curve-analysis methodology was used to estimate the reserves and contingent resources of existing wells. As of March 2013, the total prospective resources (P90-P50-P10) for the Eagle Ford shale in Mexico (MX-EFS) are estimated to be 527-1,139-7,268 MMSTB of oil and 17- 37-217 TSCF of gas. To my knowledge, this is the first oil estimate published for this formation in Mexico. The most attractive sectors based on total estimated resources as well as individual-well type curves are located in the southeast of the Burgos Basin and east-west of the Sabinas basin. Because there has been very little development to date, estimates for reserves and contingent resources are much lower than those for prospective resources. Estimated reserves associated with existing wells and corresponding offset well locations are 18,375-34,722-59,667 MMSCF for gas and zero for oil. Estimated contingent resources are 14-64-228 MSTB of oil and 8,526-13,327- 25,983MMSCF of gas. The results of this work should provide a more reliable assessment of the size and uncertainties of the resources in the Mexican Eagle Ford shale than previous estimates obtained with less objective methodologies.

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP).

NONE

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Do desperate times call for desperate measures? Strategic responses to regulatory punctuations in the Mexican banking industry, 1991-2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drawing insights from liability of foreignness, the punctuated equilibrium model and the resource-based view, this dissertation develops an integrated model to identify the successful strategies and characteristics of both domestic and foreign firms operating in emerging markets, affected by regulatory punctuations. Accordingly, three research questions are addressed: Why are some foreign firms more likely to survive than other foreign firms? Why are some domestic firms more likely to survive than other domestic firms? Are there any similarities between successful foreign firms and successful domestic firms? Using event-history methodologies and the Mexican banking industry as the unit of analysis, this dissertation shows the following results: Foreign firms (banks) from countries with stronger commercial ties to Mexico (the focal emerging market), were less likely to exit the banking industry. Also, the likelihood of exiting the industry, by a foreign firm, was negatively related to domestic firm (bank) acquisitions. For the domestic firms (banks), there was a positive relationship between international diversification and firm survival and a negative relationship between aggressive (loan) growth and firm survival. Also, marginal support was found about the positive relationship between “grupo” affiliation and firm survival. This research contributes to the extant literature by extending current theories when considering the effect of radical change. For instance, while punctuated equilibrium provides a good “environmental” explanation about a firm’s need to adapt to radical change, it does not suggest how firms should adapt to this change. However, by providing an explanation on how firms suppose to adapt to this radical change, this dissertation had expanded the theoretical implication of the punctuated equilibrium model. Similarly, the present dissertation provides a theoretical extension to liability of foreignness by finding that not all foreign firms face the same liability of foreignness. Lastly, the resource-based view is also extended by this dissertation research, as it is found to have implications for emerging markets firms that are different from foreign developed market firms.

Perez Batres, Luis Antonio

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Mexican Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pronounced maximum in rainfall during the warm season over southwestern North America has been noted by various investigators. In the United States this is most pronounced over New Mexico and southern Arizona; however, it is but an extension ...

Michael W. Douglas; Robert A. Maddox; Kenneth Howard; Sergio Reyes

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pemex to acquire interest in Shell Texas refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that Petroleos Mexicanos and Shell Oil Co. have signed a memorandum of understanding to form a joint refining venture involving Shell's 225,000 b/d Deer Park, Tex., refinery. Under the agreement, Mexico's state owned oil company is to purchase a 50% interest in the refinery, and Shell is to sell Pemex unleaded gasoline on a long term basis. Under the venture, Shell and Pemex plan to add undisclosed conversion and upgrading units tailored to process heavy Mexican crude. The revamp will allow Pemex to place more than 100,000 b/d of Mayan heavy crude on the U.S. market. Mayan accounts for 70% of Mexico's crude oil exports. In turn, Shell will sell Pemex as much as 45,000 b/d of unleaded gasoline to help meet Mexico's rapidly growing demand.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

The effect of urinary cadmium on cardiovascular fitness as measured by VO{sub 2} max in white, black and Mexican Americans  

SciTech Connect

Objectives: We explored potential effects of cadmium exposure on cardiovascular fitness measures, including gender and racial/ethnic differences. Methods: Data were from the 1999 to 2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); 1963 participating subjects were included in our analysis. Volume of oxygen consumed at sub-maximum activity (VO{sub 2} max) were recorded in a series of graded exercises; the goal was to elicit 75% of predetermined age-specific heart rates. Cadmium from urine samples was measured in the laboratory using standard methods. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to determine potential relationships. Results: Increased urinary cadmium concentrations were generally associated with decreased estimated VO{sub 2} max values. Gender and racial/ethnic differences were also observed. Specifically, associations were statistically significant for white males and Mexican American females. Conclusion: Inverse associations between urinary cadmium concentrations and estimated VO{sub 2} max values were observed, including racial and gender differences. The implications of such gender and racial/ethnic differences on long-term cardiovascular health and health disparities of present public health concern warrant further investigation.

Egwuogu, Heartley [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shendell, Derek G. [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-School of Public Health (and EOHSI), 683 Hoes Lane West, 3rd Floor, P.O. Box 9, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: shendedg@umdnj.edu; Okosun, Ike S. [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goodfellow, Lynda [School of Health Professions, College of Health and Human Sciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 26. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1985 Average .................................. 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .................................. 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .................................. 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .................................. 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .................................. W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .................................. 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .................................. 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .................................. W -

57

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F.O.B. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1983 Average .......... 24.54 - 23.99 - - 1984 Average .......... 24.70 - 25.35 - - 1985 Average .......... 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .......... 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .......... 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .......... 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .......... W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .......... 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .......... 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .......... W - 13.42 - - 1993 Average .......... W - 12.03 - - 1994 Average .......... W - 12.39 - - 1995 Average .......... 14.44 - 14.37 - - 1996 Average .......... 17.14 - 17.43 - - 1997 Average .......... 14.29 - 14.97 - -

58

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

companies: Pemex Exploration and Production (PEP), Pemexcompanies, PEP (exploration and production) is the largest

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tatexco) in the refinery zone of Coatzacoalcos/Minatitlánvery powerful in the refinery zone of southern Veracruz, thePetrochemical, and Pemex Refineries (Shields 2003). Despite

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Spanish Dermatological Vocabulary Used by Mexican Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The last section in the glossary is a list of English wordsstudy was to develop a glossary of Spanish dermatologicalEnglish words. This glossary is a supplement to other

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sustainable construction in Mexican housing markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines recent developments in Mexico's housing markets as an example of how sustainable construction is being adapted and applied in developing countries. The recognition that the construction, operation, and ...

Jung, Bomee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mexican firms commit to responsabilidad integral  

SciTech Connect

With the prospect of Mexico joining the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), eyes are on the environmental performance of that country's chemical industry. Its image has already been dented directly by pollution problems at certain maquiladora plants on the U.S. border, and indirectly by the April explosions at Guadalajara, blamed on gasoline leaks from state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos, (Pemex). NAFTA has drown the issue into focus, since the pact could encourage companies to build plants in Mexico to take advantage of cheaper labor costs. Concerned that laxer environmental provisions could also play a part, environmentalists are pressuring Washington to ensure that NAFTA puts Mexico on a par with the rest of North America. But chemical markers assert that Mexico's environmental legislation is already similar to that of the US. And, under the administration of President Carlos Salinas Gortari, the Ministry of Social Development has upped enforcement, fined a number of producers, and closed down some chemical units for failing to meet environmental regulations.

Wood, A.

1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

444. LaBotz, D. 2002. Fox and Pemex Win Against Oil Worker’sShields, David 2003. Pemex: Un Futuro Incierto. Mexico:websites of the pro-sovereigntist Pemex professional union

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Re-Regulating the Mexican Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mexico’s Gulf region is of crucial significance to American energyenergy sovereignty and consumer protection (as seen in Greenpeace Mexico’ibliography Energy Information Administration. 2005. Mexico

Zalik, Anna

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Migration and development in Mexican communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration from Mexico to the United States constitutes one of the world's largest labor flows and generates enormous capital flows in the opposite direction. Corresponding to each of these flows is a distinct view of the ...

Schnabl, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Representation of the Modern Mexican Nation in Contemporary Mexican Chronicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gaseras no registradas en PEMEX, las cuales habían sidoy ex funcionarios de PEMEX. 5) No se corrigieron los signosde las instalaciones de PEMEX para garantizar las medidas de

Alfaro Porras, Arianna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mexico Week: Record Mexican natural gas imports include higher ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... more than 0.5 Bcf/d. LNG's share of Mexico's imports has declined since then because of growing natural gas imports via pipelines from the United ...

68

Mexican Sugarcane Growers: Economic Restructuring and Political Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Culture and Society, vol. 4. Albany, New York: Institute forState University of New York at Albany (distributed by the

Singelmann, Peter, editor

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Linguistic Acculturation and Food Behaviors among Mexican-Origin Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that  sell  food.   Restaurant  spending  includes  dine-­?of  Eating  Fast  Food  or   Restaurant  Food  within  the  Food  or  Sit-­?Down  Restaurants  in  the  Previous  Two  

Langellier, Brent Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mexico Week: Lower Mexican oil production contributes to lower ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil exports anchor the energy trade between Mexico and the United States. In 2012 Mexico was the world's ninth largest oil producer. The value of crude oil ...

71

Commission ushers in new era in Mexican gas industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation and distribution of natural gas in Mexico are undergoing fundamental changes as a result of the 1995 passage by the Congress of Mexico of the law that created the Energy Regulatory Commission (Comision Reguladora de Energia--CRE). The law mandates that the commission must achieve a competitive, efficient, safe, and sustainable gas industry, allowing the country to make the difficult energy transition to open gas and electricity markets relying on cleaner fuels. The paper discusses the situation before CRE, the regulatory framework, market development, and the North American market.

Monteforte, R. [Energy Regulatory Commission of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico)

1998-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Early Childbearing among Mexican-American Young Women: Place Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County Teen Birth Rates by Zip Code. Alameda County Publicteenagers in California zip code areas. Family Planningteenagers in California zip code areas. Family Planning

Richardson, Dawn Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

New pemex agency, smog checks greet Mexican LPG vehicle users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the relaxation of prohibitions on the use of propane as a motor fuel has spurred sizeable business activity in carburetion and higher demand for LPG throughout Mexico and particularly in Mexico City. However, a number of unforeseen problems have developed that required tough, immediate solutions. After the alternative fuels project began at city hall in Mexico City, publicity spread nationwide, reportedly spurring conversion activity in many other cities. That led to additional demand for fuel of a magnitude that few people had anticipated. In order to assume control of the situation, the national oil company, Pemex, established an official LPG Motor Fuel Department on June 1. Operating in conjunction with the Ministry of Industry, the new department has been busy registering every major propane-powered fleet in the country. Most important, the rate of conversion work must now be pegged to the availability of fuel. It is believed that conversion activity has become more evenly paced since the new Pemex agency took over.over.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evaluation of Mexican Transportation Infrastructure Leigh B. Boske  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development to the state oil company, Pemex (Law Business Research, 2010). Canada, unlike Mexico, has few

Texas at Austin, University of

75

Free trade and freer petchems drive Mexican restructuring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When Mexico first opened up its protected markets in 1987 by cutting import tariffs, it thrust the chemical industry into a phase of change. Now, with the advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA) and the liberalization of petrochemicals by state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), restructuring has moved up a gear.

Wood, A.

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

The enacted environment--the creation of "place" by Mexicans and Mexican Americans in East Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I will examine how residents of East Los Angeles use their front yards and streets to create a sense of "place." The environment created in this way I call "enacted." People are both users and creators of a ...

Rojas, James Thomas

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Algerian Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average .......... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 - 1979 Average .......... W 21.51 - 25.40 29.17 20.78 22.23 1980 Average .......... 37.73 34.68 W 37.89 34.61 33.42 29.49 1981 Average .......... 40.03 36.84 W 38.95 33.56 36.87 31.52 1982 Average .......... 33.71 33.08 W 34.95 32.97 33.11 25.86 1983 Average .......... 30.79 29.31 25.27 30.28 28.90 30.00 24.56 1984 Average .......... 28.59 28.63 25.35 29.51 28.79 29.46 25.84 1985 Average .......... 27.21 27.48 24.38 27.94 26.97 27.60 24.57 1986 Average .......... 14.54 14.27 13.52 13.71 14.39 14.28 11.24 1987 Average .......... 17.72 18.43 15.98 18.63 17.60 18.32 16.03 1988 Average .......... W 14.96 12.21 15.21 13.77 14.69 11.65 1989 Average .......... W 18.15 15.36 18.71 17.69 W

78

Nontechnical Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Mayan Mars: TMS Member Mixes Science Fact and Fiction in New Novel" (End Notes), .... "Preserving the USS Arizona: Retired Engineer Applies Skills to Public ... "Quality and Quantity: The Goal of Global Energy Resource Development" ...

79

Tseltal clause structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the syntax of clausal structure in Tseltal (Mayan) with a particular focus on agreement phenomena. The first domain of investigation is the External Possession Construction, in which the clausal ...

Shklovsky, Kirill

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

What do we do with Nuclear Weapons Now?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990 What Do We Do with Nuclear Weapons Now? by Michael M.for the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy MICHAEL M. MAYan electoral majority in nuclear weapons states. Unlike

May, Michael M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Citizens' evaluation of the president and democratic transition : determinants and effects of presidential approval in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex (Petróleos Mexicanos), wasMexican state oil monopoly Pemex (Petróleos Mexicanos), was

Gomez Vilchis, Ricardo Roman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gender, Bilingualism, and the Early Occupational Careers of Second-Generation Mexicans in the South  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brian. 2009. “Closing of Pilgrim’s Pride Dalton plant leadsnews/2009/apr/14/closing-pilgrims-pride-dalton- plant -

Hernandez-Leon, Ruben; Morando, Sarah J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration from the Mexican oil industry : an action plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change has become an important focus of international environmental negotiations. In response, global energy corporations have been looking for practical ways of reducing their industrial carbon dioxide (CO?) ...

Lacy, Rodolfo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Winter Garden area in the south. In the Eagle Ford Shale play, fracking is used to create pathways

Althoff, David M.

85

Beneth corporate codes of conduct : what drives compliance in two Mexican garment factories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the question: under what conditions do corporate codes of conduct work? To answer this question, I develop two case studies of subcontracting factories that are subject to a multinational company's ...

Romis, Monica

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

¡Quiero estudiar! Mexican Immigrant Mothers' Participation in Their Children's Schooling--and Their Own  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t graduate. Jewish World Review. Ac- cessed March 14, 2009world of authoritative dis- courses and may need to counter those with internally persuasive discourses that ac-

Miano, Alice Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Influence of the geological history of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-eight populations (210 individuals) were sequenced for one nuclear (rpb2) and two chloroplast (trnL­F and psb time, geology, Mexico, nuclear marker, phylogeography, plant spe- ciation, psbA­trnH, rpb2, Trans-Miocene around the mod- ern-day cities of Morelia and Queretaro in central Mexico, ª 2013 Blackwell Publishing

88

The Social Impacts of the Maquiladora Industry on Mexican Border Towns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sion o Labor. Albany: State University of New Press, 1983. fof Labor. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1 98Frontier. Albany: State University of New York Press,

Molina, Frieda

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Independent Mexican cinema and the dream of a national cinema in 1970s Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Occult…………………………………………………………………………………………………. Juanitos and other leaders’ seemingly occult power is intrinsicallylanguage of magic and the occult that the Dominican masses

Ramirez Vargas, Erika Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gender(ed) Migrations: Shifting Gender Subjectivities in a Transnational Mexican Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sotelo, Pierrette, ed. 1999. “Gender and Contemporary U.S.Vol. 42, No. 4, January. 2003b. Gender and U.S. Immigration:in the United States. ” In “Gender and Contemporary U.S.

Boehm, Deborah A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Grassroots cosmopolitanism : transnational communication and citizenship practices among indigenous Mexican immigrants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appiah, K.A. (2002). Cosmopolitan patriots. In MarthaTransculturalism: Towards a Cosmopolitan Citizenship. LondonHemispheric Migrations and Cosmopolitan Encounters. American

Mercado, Antonieta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Language Socialization Experiences of Mixed-Status Mexican Families Living in the New Latino Diaspora  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28. Gregory, E. , Long, S. and Volk, D (Eds. ). (2004). Manyactivities (Gregory, Long & Volk, 2004), and how they2005; Gregory, Long & Volk, 2004). The analysis presented

Mangual, Ariana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Trade-concentration and its impact on commerce and traders of a Mexican city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation evaluates the changes in food retailing patterns in the face of openmarket trends in a medium sized city (Citlalicalli) in central Mexico. This evaluation is carried out using the model of retail trade-concentration. The following questions are addressed: whether trade-concentration had occurred in the field-site; if yes, what were the causes; and, what were the effects of retail concentration on preexisting food retailers. The fieldwork for this study was conducted over a 14 month period (May 2005 and June 2006). Empirical data were collected using three surveys, over 25 interviews, and several hours of participant observations. Along with these primary data, secondary data from official records were also collected. The survey data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. The findings from the study revealed that trade-concentration is proceeding in Citlalicalli and the recent spread of large stores in the region has been encouraged by free-trade policies adopted by Mexico since the mid-1980s. Trade-concentration in the Altepetl metropolitan area has also been aided by the positive behavior that consumers show towards large retail chains. Contrary to popular belief, the impact of retail concentration on preexisting small retailers in Citlalicalli has been minimal. Partly traditions and partly the nearness of a particular store explain the continued patronization of small stores by consumers. The product category and income of consumers also influence their purchase decisions. This research shows that competition in food retailing in developing countries is between same size and same type retailers. Small retailers are not always in direct competition with modern retailers as they serve different sections of the society. Retail development is a part of urban development and, therefore, has direct implications for the quality of life in cities. In emerging economies, cities like Citlalicalli have vibrant town centers which provide convenient access to offices, shops, and entertainment areas for its citizens. This study concludes that appropriate policy measures can ensure the coexistence of large and small retailers in developing countries and, thereby, the continued vitality of city centers.

Anand, Jayant

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mexican--American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto project incorporates studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and geophysical setting of the geothermal field as well as its structural, reservoir engineering, and subsidence characteristics. A description of the activities involved in each part of this cooperative program is presented. Text of the agreement between the Comision Federal de Electricidad of Mexico and the USERDA for the cooperative study of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field is included.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Espinosa, H.A.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mercado, A.M.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

IRIS Reactor a Suitable Option to Provide Energy and Water Desalination for the Mexican Northwest Region  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest region of Mexico has a deficit of potable water, along this necessity is the region growth, which requires of additional energy capacity. The IRIS reactor offers a very suitable source of energy given its modular size of 300 MWe and it can be coupled with a desalination plant to provide the potable water for human consumption, agriculture and industry. The present paper assess the water and energy requirements for the Northwest region of Mexico and how the deployment of the IRIS reactor can satisfy those necessities. The possible sites for deployment of Nuclear Reactors are considered given the seismic constraints and the closeness of the sea for external cooling. And in the other hand, the size of the desalination plant and the type of desalination process are assessed accordingly with the water deficit of the region.

Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, C.; Viais, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Do Mexican Immigrants “Import” Social Gradients in Health Behaviors to the US?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conde, & Popkin, 2001). The “hockey-stick” shape of thisto interpret. Certainly the “hockey-stick” shape of the

Buttenheim, Alison; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R.; Wong, Rebeca; Rodriguez, German; Chung, Chang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Independent Mexican cinema and the dream of a national cinema in 1970s Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vampires and Nationhood in Puerto Rico. ” Past & Present,y exiliadas en Puerto Rico. San Juan: Isla Negra, 2008.Working Papers. San Juan, Puerto Rico: HIV/AIDS Research and

Ramirez Vargas, Erika Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An Exploration of Mexican American Spanglish as a Source of Identity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rose. "Spanglish: Language Contact in Puerto Rico." AmericanLanguage Contact in Puerto Rico." American Speech 46.1/1 (Spanglish" en Nueva York. Puerto Rico: Ediciones Librería

Rell, Amy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Working but Poor: Mexican Immigrant Workers in a Low-Income Enclave in San Jose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formal and informal jobs that havc cspanded in the Siliconimprovement programs that havc bcen dcvcloped to address theo f the economic changes that havc occurred in Santa Clara

Zlolniski, Christian; Palerm, Juan-Vicente

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

From ideals to institutions : institutional entrepreneurship in Mexican small business finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through a combination of in-depth research and unique loan-level data, this dissertation explores the mechanisms of intentional institutional change. It argues that current accounts of institutions and institutional change ...

Canales, Rodrigo (Rodrigo J.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stability in a new destination : Mexican immigrants in Clark County, Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s plans to privatize Pemex, the national oil and gasve never seen any money from Pemex come here to the rancho.

Keyes, David Gordon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Smart vs. The Hardworking: The Academic Self-Concepts of Mexican Descent GATE students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and essays, learning material quickly and easily, and engaging class material in a productive and creative

Medrano, Catherine R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Independent Mexican cinema and the dream of a national cinema in 1970s Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Representation in Mexico. New York: Columbia Universityen la ruralía dominicana. México Instituto Mora, 2004.s Rights in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. ” CR: The New Centennial

Ramirez Vargas, Erika Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

After the "Mexican Miracle": Writers reworking national character tropes in contemporary Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. “7 mayors charged in Mexico drug probe. ” msnbc.com,de morbo y frivolidad. Mexico City: Producciones el Salario1st ed. Plaza y Janes Mexico, S.A. , 2002. ———. “Culturas

Sanchez, Alberto William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Summary of the Experience of Two Mexican Industrial Energy Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) began a program in Mexico to promote energy efficient products and services. Faculty and students at two universities were trained to perform assessments to identify energy-conserving opportunities at small and medium-sized manufacturers. Recommendations included improving combustion equipment, such as boilers; process equipment, such as motors and air compressors; and buildings and grounds, such as lighting or heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. On average, the cost savings recommended from the assessments were approximately 13% of the annual energy costs for the plants and manufacturers implemented approximately 50% of the recommended cost savings. Initial feedback indicates that there is a great potential for future assessments in the Mexico City and Monterrey areas.

Paroby, R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Choreographing Politics, Dancing Modernity: Ballet and Modern Dance in the Construction of Modern México (1919-1940)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

city and the Hellenicized cosmopolitan soul that Pavlovaa class of Mexican cosmopolitans distinctively participatingmodernity 9 that a class of cosmopolitan Mexican artists and

Reynoso, Jose Luis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

BNL Guest, User and Visitor Center | Identification Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are only issued by Michigan, New York, Vermont, Washington, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec. Mexican Citizens Mexican citizens are required to present a...

108

The Housing Transition in Mexico: Local Impacts of National Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFE) and Mexican Petrol (PEMEX), the two largest state-SHF FOVISSSTE Banks INVI PEMEX C F E SOFOLES Other Number ofproperty. Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the Mexican national

Monkkonen, Paavo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

la Marginación en la Población Rural de México, 1990-2000:Estudios para el Desarollo Rural Sustentable y la Soberaníain protected areas and rural communities: Case studies from

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Rural Democratization and Decentralization at the State/Society Interface: What Counts as ‘Local’ Government in the Mexican Countryside?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the actual communities – rural and urban, continue to lackin large cities. In rural areas, these sub-municipalMobilization in Contemporary Rural Mexico,’, Unpublished PhD

Fox, Jonathan A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Communication Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled.

Claudia P. Peregrino; Myriam V. Moreno; Silvia V. Mir; Alma D. Rubio; Luz O. Leal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Freedom's Journal and El Clamor Publico: African American and Mexican American Cultural Fronts in Nineteenth-Century Newsprint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources, 1997. Print. Noah, Mordecai Manuel, ed. , New-Resources, 1997. Print. Noah, Mordecai Manuel, ed. , New-vs. The New York Enquirer The “Noah Thesis” Countering Black

Nunez, Arturo Romero

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrological services, carbon sequestration, biodiversitysecond program focused on carbon sequestration, biodiversityconservation and carbon sequestration. Initiated in 1996,

Shapiro, Elizabeth N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Challenge of Transparency: A Review of the Regulations Governing Access to Public Information in Mexican States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to publish their financial statements and their balanceVeracruz, Yucatán. Financial Statements and Balance sheets

Merino, Mauricio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Toward a greener campus : experiments with sustainable resource management at one Mexican university and two United States universities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern society faces a range of difficult resource management problem like climate change, acid rain and soil depletion. To confront problems like these successfully, educational institutions, along with all other public ...

Coffie, Randall Gregory Jesus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The promise and perils of private voluntary regulation: Labor standards and work organization in two Mexican garment factories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What role can corporate codes of conduct play in monitoring compliance with international labor standards and improving working conditions in global supply chains? How does this system of private voluntary regulation relate ...

Locke, Richard M.

117

The Promise and Perils of Private Voluntary Regulation: Labor Standards and Work Organization in Two Mexican Garment Factories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What role can private voluntary regulation play in improving labor standards and working conditions in global supply chain factories? How does this system relate to and interact with other systems of labor regulation and ...

Locke, Richard M.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of anti-poverty programs on electoral behavior : evidence from the Mexican Education, Health, and Nutrition Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ever since Latin American economies collapsed in the 1980s and early 1990s, traditional redistributive programs began to coexist with new anti-poverty programs that usually took the form of conditional cash transfers (CCT). ...

De La O Torres, Ana Lorena

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Race, Citizenship, and the Negotiation of Space: Chinese, Japanese, and Mexicans in Fresno, California, 1870-1949  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Window:  Confronting  Concentrated  Poverty  Across   America,”  in  Brooking Institution and Metropolitan Policy Program (Washington, DC,Window:  Confronting Concentrated Poverty Across America,”  in  Brooking Institution and Metropolitan Policy Program (Washington, DC,Window:  Confronting  Concentrated   Poverty Across America. ” Brooking Institution and Metropolitan Policy Program (Washington, DC,

Guzmán, Christina Morales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cleaning the Buildings of High Tech Companies in Silicon Valley: The Case of Mexican Janitors in Sonix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Buildings of High Tech Companies in Silicon Valley: Thethe Buildings of High-Tech Companies in Silicon Valley: Theof the numerous high-tech companies that are concentrated in

Zlolniski, Christián

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Impacts of Policy Reforms on the Supply of Mexican Labor to U.S. Farms: New Evidence from Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Migration in a U.S. – Mexico Free Trade Area. ” Journal561–92. Taylor, J. E. Undocumented Mexico-U.S. MigrationReturns to Households in Rural Mexico. American Journal of

Boucher, Stephen R.; Smith, Aaron; Taylor, J. Edward; Yúnez-Naude, Antonio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

2013 GRC Poster Session Presenter & Title Easel Suppression of transpiration due to cloud immersion in a seasonally dry Mexican weeping pine plantation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Kinetics of Domestic and Non-domestic Coal, Locally Sourced Biomass Waste, and Their Blends 12

Pohl, Karsten

123

Female mating preferences for male traits used in species and mate recognition in the Mexican sailfin mollies, Poecilia velifera and P. petenensis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%) with Brine Shrimp Flake (38%) and Spirulina132 Flake (2%) mixture) (Burlingame, California, U.S.A.) (Clemson or reversed (Wiens 2001). Reversal of preferences may, for example,573 occur if choice incurs a high cost

Ptacek, Margaret B.

124

Examining the Perils and Promises of an Informal Niche in a Global City: A Case Study of Mexican Immigrant Gardeners in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

George C.. 1894. “The Apprentice System in the Buildingmodel; (2) Informal Master-Apprentice (IMA) model; and (3)44 4.1.2 Informal Master-Apprentice (IMA)

Huerta, Alvaro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Mexican-American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: recent results of the well-drilling program at Cerro Prieto  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 and 1981 well drilling activities at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field are summarized. Details are given on the new series of deeper wells completed in the western (older) part of the field (Cerro Prieto I), and on the development and step-out wells drilled in the eastern part of the field (Cerro Prieto II and III). Production characteristics of on-line and standby wells are discussed. Recent changes in well completion procedures are also described.

Dominguez A, B.; Lippmann, M.J.; Bermejo M.; F.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Examining the Perils and Promises of an Informal Niche in a Global City: A Case Study of Mexican Immigrant Gardeners in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formal economy, such as dishwashers, bus boys and factorylocations, such as dishwashers, janitors, carwash workers,farm workers, dishwashers, busboys, housecleaners, meat

Huerta, Alvaro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Plenary lecture 4: nanotechnology in Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexican Research groups are dealing with theoretical and applied problems in Nanotechnology. And nanoproducts are being distributed along the country as well as nanotechnology patents are being registered and used in Mexican companies. Computational ...

Armando Barranon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 13571376, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/1357/2013/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploration drillings financed by the Mexican oil company PEMEX. In 1981, Glen Penfield used the PEMEX data

Meskhidze, Nicholas

129

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LULUCF NAFTA NGO NIE NRDC OECD PEMEX Bioclimate Research andFoundation, Mexican Petroleum (PEMEX), the World Bank, and

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Informe de ActIvIdAdes y Resultados del subsistema  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploration drillings financed by the Mexican oil company PEMEX. In 1981, Glen Penfield used the PEMEX data

Islas, León

131

Rogelio Rebolledo After receiving his MBA from Iowa in 1971, Rogelio Rebolledo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's President Vincente Fox as a distinguished member of the Board of Pemex, the Mexican Petroleum Company. He

Anstreicher, Kurt M.

132

An Evaluation of Process Rights Applying the U.N. Standard Minimum Rules for the Administration of Juvenile Justice and U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Study of Mexican Children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

authority to conduct an initial investigation; b) whetherattorney to conduct an initial investigation into facts ofobligation to conduct a formal investigation into the facts

Frias-Armenta, Martha; Jasa-Silveira, Graciela

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Testimony of the Mexican Indian Jusepe, who accompanied Francisco Leyva de Bonilla and Antonio Gutiérrez de Humaña on their unauthorized and ill-fated expedition of 1593. February 16, 1599.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alonso Nuñez, Christoval Guillen y Christoval de Herrera. Ende Herrera y Christoval Guillen; en testimonio de 20 lo qual20 de Herrera y Christoval Guillen. En testimonio de lo qual

De Marco, Barbara; Craddock, Jerry R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Miguel Angel Perez Angon: what is that really remains?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laudatio in honor of Dr. Miguel Angel Perez Angon, co-recipient of the 2008 Medal of the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society.

Contreras, J. G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, A. P. 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

An evaluation of Mexico's declining oil production and waning petroleum reserves .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??rather than invested in exploration projects, infrastructure modernization, or process efficiency improvement. Decades of severe financial constraints placed on Pemex by the Mexican government, coupled… (more)

Rangel, Erik.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Green pricing programs allow electricity customers to express their willingness to pay for renewable energy ... (i.e., FERC Gas Tariff, Canadian Gas, Mexican ...

137

Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods to explore the use of directives by Mexican Americanwork on children’s acquisition of directives has focused onsyntactic aspects of directives; more recently, studies have

Lowi, Rosamina; Mikesell, Lisa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, September 22 - Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken - Tuna Melt on Nine Grain - BBQ Ribs - Chicken Casserole - Buffalo Chicken Wrap - Mexican...

139

Las Anarquistas : the history of two women of the Partido Liberal Mexicano in early 20th Century Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tejanas: 300 Years of History (Austin: University of Texason Mexicana/Chicana History, ed. Adelaida R. Del Castillo. (Contemporary Mexican History 1910-1989. Austin: University

Ellstrand, Nathan Kahn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Chinese Automobile Industry. ? Asia Pacific Journal ofof the Mexican Auto Industry. Princeton, NJ: Princeton2008. China Automotive Industry Yearbooks 2004, 2005, 2006,

Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The North American Free Trade Agreement: A Legal Analysis of Effects and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is unclear whether foreign oil service companies will beforbidding foreign participation in Mexico's oil industry,Market While foreign investment in Mexican oil and some

Steinberg, Richard

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have work beginning on a new refinery during the Calderóngovernment. The refinery would M exico ’ s D eteriorating Orecent problems at Mexican refineries. By 2016, demand will

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Essays in Regulatory Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

municipality by time and gas station fixed effects. Tablethe newspapers about Mexican gas stations that cheat theThe information about gas stations that commit fraud is

Guerrero, Santiago

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear electric power accounted for 8 ... Canadian and Mexican petroleum imports together ... The peak level occurred in 1985 when the SPR stocks ...

145

mexicanhat.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Regulations Disposal Site Description Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF to the north and east are the ephemeral drainages North...

146

PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership More Documents &...

147

PP-235 Sempra Energy Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-235 Sempra Energy Resources More Documents & Publications PP-235-2...

148

PP-226 Brownsville public Utilities Board | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Board to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-226 Brownsville public Utilities Board More Documents & Publications...

149

PP-16 Alendatory Permit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-16 Alendatory Permit More Documents & Publications PP-16-1 UNS...

150

Creating foreign policy locally: migratory labor and the Texas border, 1943-1952.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texas participated in the bracero program until 1943, when the Mexican government instituted a labor embargo against the state because of numerous reports of racial… (more)

Robinson, Robert Steven

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

September 2011 NNSA NEWS.pmd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations has provided training in nuclearradiological search and detection to representatives of the Mexican government in preparation for the Pan...

152

2011 September NNSA News Viewable.pmd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations has provided training in nuclearradiological search and detection to representatives of the Mexican government in preparation for the Pan...

153

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flags at full staff Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, Feb. 14 - Breakfast: Mexican omelet - New Brunswick stew - Ranchero steak tacos - Stuffed porkchops - Smart cuisine: baked penne...

154

Usability study and proposal to the RENAUT (Registro Nacional de Usuarios de Telefonía Móvil de México)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mexican Registrar for Users of Mobile Phones, (Registro Nacional de Usuarios de Telefonia Móvil, or RENAUT) is a federal Mexican government programme created in order to built an official inventory with all the mobile phone lines in the country. ... Keywords: Mexico, mobile phones, national security, usability

Cuauhtémoc Rivera Loaiza; Mario A. Moreno Rocha

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Industry sector analysis, Mexico: Annual petroleum report. Export Trade Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comprehensive appraisal of the Mexican Petroleum industry was completed in July 1991. Some of the topics concerning the Mexican petroleum industry covered in the Annual Petroleum Report include: exploration efforts, oil reserves, pipelines, refining, finances, transportation, alternative energy sources, and others. The report also contains lists of petrochemicals produced in Mexico and extensive statistics on oil production and export prices.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pemex sets petchem privatization plan  

SciTech Connect

Last week, Mexico's state-owned oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), was scheduled to unveil plans for the sale of basic petrochemical plants. The first privatization package - Pemex ammonia plants at Cosoleacaque and Camargo - will involve the sale of securities on the Mexican Stock Exchange, allowing a large number of Mexican investors to acquire parts of the business.

Alvarez, C.

1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

A quantitative analysis of the effects of tariff and non-tariff barriers on U.S. - Mexico poultry trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the inception of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994, tariff restriction to U.S. poultry products entering the Mexican market has decreased significantly. While poultry trade from the U.S. to Mexico has increased considerably, Mexican chicken exports to the U.S. face a sanitary restriction. This concerns chicken producers in Mexico. Consequently, the Mexican government negotiated with the U.S. government an extension, from 2003 to 2008, of the tariff rate quota (TRQ) on U.S. chicken leg quarters entering the Mexican market. The purpose of this study was to estimate the economic impact of trade policies restricting the chicken trade between Mexico and the U.S. Two trade policy scenarios were analyzed: (1) a removal of the Mexican tariff rate quota (TRQ) on U.S. chicken leg quarters, and (2) a removal of the TRQ and, in addition, a removal of the U.S. sanitary restrictions to Mexican chicken. A cost minimization mathematical programming model was used to estimate the optimum levels of production, consumption and trade, subject to policy restrictions. The study found that if the Mexican TRQ on U.S. chicken leg quarters is eliminated, chicken production in Mexico would shrink by 51% compared to the actual level of production as of 2003. A less drastic effect on Mexican production of chicken was found when, in addition to the TRQ removal, the U.S. sanitary restriction on Mexican chicken is eliminated. In this second scenario total production in Mexico would decrease by 24%. Under both scenarios chicken production in the U.S. is estimated to have an increase, 8% and 4% for the first and second scenarios, respectively. These new levels of production would affect trade levels and prices for chicken and chicken parts in both countries.

Magana Lemus, David

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Absorbing devaluation: Pemex penalized  

SciTech Connect

Shock from Mexico`s international finance debacle has created a ripple across the global pond, affecting trading markets from Buenos Aires to Hong Kong. Mexican consumers must cope with a currency that can purchase 40% fewer imported goods than it could seven weeks ago. The Mexican government has taken austerity measures controlling prices on staple consumer items designed to prevent rampant inflation. State oil company Petroleos Mexicanos is left exposed to some of the costs of the peso devaluation to supply Mexican gasoline markets with imported supply. However, Mexico`s flexible tax structure allows Pemex to divert the cost throughout its operations.

NONE

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

mexicanhat.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Location and History Regulatory Setting The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and about 10 miles north of the Utah-Arizona border. The site is also the location of a former uranium-ore-processing mill. Texas-Zinc Minerals Corporation constructed the Mexican Hat mill on land leased from the Navajo Nation and operated the facility from 1957 to 1963. Atlas Corporation purchased the mill in 1963 and operated it until it closed in 1965. A sulfuric acid

160

Microsoft Word - HAT 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat, Utah Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 29, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in excellent condition and functioning as designed. Runoff from storm events continues to transport sediment into the west diversion channel, resulting in low-density vegetation growth within the entire length of the channel; however, the performance of the diversion channel has not been impaired. Vandalism continues at the site as indicated by new bullets holes in several perimeter signs. The seismic monitoring station installed on site in 2007 as part of the EarthScope USArray Project continues to collect data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

mexhat.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat Disposal Site Mexican Hat Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Mexican Hat, Utah, between 1957 and 1963. These operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1989. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the Mexican Hat Disposal Cell under general license in 1997. DOE is responsible, under the general license, for the long-term custody, monitoring, and maintenance of the site. The DOE Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Program at the DOE Grand Junction (Colorado) Office is responsible for the long- term safety and integrity of the disposal site. Because the site is on Navajo Nation land, the Navajo Nation

162

Intraseasonal Variability of the Summer Monsoon over Southeast Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraseasonal fluctuations associated with the Mexican monsoon system are examined for the semiarid Sonoran Desert region. Daily rain gauge accumulations, radiosonde reports, satellite imagery, and global analyses are all analyzed. Composite wet ...

Steven L. Mullen; Jeffrey T. Schmitz; Nilton O. Rennó

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microsoft Word - HAT-2012_Final.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat, Utah Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Annual Inspection of the Mexican Hat, Utah, UMTRCA Title I Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 3, 2012. The disposal cell was in excellent condition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site lead and three inspectors from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) were part of the annual inspection. The cell condition was unchanged from the previous year. Minor fence repair was performed near the beginning of the north diversion channel. A slight rockslide near perimeter sign P22 loosened fence strands, and a radiation protection sign was missing from perimeter sign P31; these repairs are the only future

164

Essays on the Economics of Crime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S TATISTICS Logs Mexican share O B W Violent crimes O BW Property crimes O B W Murder O B W Rape O B W Robbery O Bshare and each of the crime variables both in logs and in

Chalfin, Aaron James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy Wide Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Stylized Village Economy-Wide Model with Nonseparable FarmNetworks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U.S.in a Household-farm Economy. ” Journal of Development

Taylor, J. Edward; Dyer, George

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mexico -- Fond Memories of Place: Luis Barragan and Ricardo Legorreta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creative potential, the architect must listen and heed hisare complex, and as do other architects, they depend on boththe work of these Mexican architects that could be of value

Attoe, Wayne

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Late Holocene Climate Change on Isla Isabela, Gulf of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the North American Monsoon as revealed by QuikSCAT.of the North American Monsoon to tropical and north PacificHoward, K. 1993. The Mexican Monsoon. Journal of Climate 6:

Englebrecht, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Sensitivity of the Great Plains Severe-Storm Environment to Soil-Moisture Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the influence of differences in ground moisture over the southern Great Plairs and the Mexican plateau on the formation and evolution of the dryline, the elevated mixed layer, and the local planetary boundary layer. These ...

John M. Lanicci; Toby N. Carlson; Thomas T. Warner

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Hopwood Decision in Texas as an Attack on Latino Access to Selective Higher Education Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher Education in Texas." The Social Science Journal.Amici Curae" Hopwood v. Texas, United States Court ofMexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986. (The University

Chapa, Jorge

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CALDERÓN, HÉCTOR. Narratives of Greater México: Essays on Chicano Literary History, Genre, and Borders. Austin, TX: U of Texas P, 2004. 284 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borders. Austin, TX: U of Texas P, 2004. 284 pp. "There areEl New Paso and Río Grande, Texas; México; San Francisco andthe and cultural migrant Texas-Mexican farmworker community

Pérez, Marisol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Where the Sky Is the Right Color: Scale and Air Pollution in the Big Bend Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Your Eyes - Mexican Power Plant Threatens Texas’s Air. ”Atten. North American Power Plant Air Emissions. Montréal (to two large coal-fired power plants in the city of Piedras

Donez, Francisco Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

"Against the real dangers of modern life the home is no safeguard": Examining Spheres of Affect and Coercion in the Home in Nineteenth Century California Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

who participated in the hide and tallow trade, carrying rawThe trade in hide and tallow that carried Dana to CaliforniaU.S. market for hide and tallow. When the Mexican government

Tejeda, Carla Alicia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to:...

174

The Mining Life : : A Transnational History of Race and Family in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1890-1965  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Mexico, 1940, reprinted in Keen’s Latin American Civilization: History and41-53. A recent history of the U.S. oil industry in Saudithe history of U.S. involvement with Mexican railroads, oil,

Maiorana, Juliette Charlie

175

Private vs. public ownership of power generation in Mexico : should environmental policymakers care?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress has not yet approved regulatory reform in the Mexican energy sector. In fact, the debate is deadlocked, with many political actors disagreeing on even the most basic principles that ought to guide future investments ...

Flores Montalvo, Andres, 1967-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

PP-235-2 Termoelectrica U.S LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-235-2 Termoelectrica U.S LLC More Documents & Publications PP-235-1 Termoelectrica U.S LLC PP-235 Sempra Energy Resources...

177

Chicano and black radical activism of the 1960s : a comparison between the Brown Berets and the Black Panther Party in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elaine. A Taste of Power: A Black Women’s Story. New York:Enemies nor Friends: Latino, Blacks, Afro-Latinos. New York:The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in the

Yañez, Angélica María

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hispanics in the U.S. Labor Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Generation 3rd+ Generation Source: March 1998- 2002 CPSGeneration 1st 2nd 3rd+ Blacks All Hispanics Mexicans Puerto Ricans Cubans Central/South Americans Other Hispanics Source:

Duncan, Brian; Hotz, V. Joseph; Trejo, Stephen J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

New trends in industrial energy efficiency in the Mexico iron and steel industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry" in 1997 ACEEE Summer Studyin the Mexican Iron and Steel industry are the B O F and theInternational Iron and Steel Industry, Brussels, pp. 47-48

Ozawa, Leticia; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Sheinbaum, Claudia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Meteoritics & Planetary Science 38, Nr 9, 12991317 (2003) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for exploration purposes by the Mexican oil company PEMEX (Fig. 1). Preserved fragments of the recovered drill of the suevite (Claeys et al. 1995). Lower Suevite(ThermometamorphicorAnnealed Suevite) Below 1253 m, the Pemex

Claeys, Philippe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the United States ultimately depends on the actions of state-owned Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), which holds), 30 percent of the Mexican government's revenues come from PEMEX. CERI expects PEMEX to continue

Texas at Austin, University of

182

US Relations with Mexico and Central America, 1977-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new-found Mexican oil reserves became extremely appealingproduction based on vast new oil reserves discovered in May,Mexico announced large oil reserves, the U.S. faced severe

Rosenblum, Marc

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Regional Observations during the Landfall of Tropical Cyclone Juliette (2001) in Baja California, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an observational analysis of tropical cyclone landfall over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The tropical cyclone that developed during the 2001 season off the Mexican coast was named Juliette and made landfall in the Baja ...

Luis M. Farfán

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Mining Life : : A Transnational History of Race and Family in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1890-1965  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexican Mining Department, Mexico, City, Dec. 1, 1961; Lic.de 1949; L. Vega Lavin, Mexico City, letter marked “personalChihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, July 17, 1962; H.K.

Maiorana, Juliette Charlie

185

PDO–ENSO Effects in the Climate of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) in El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related Mexican climate anomalies during winter and summer is investigated. The precipitation and mean temperature data of approximately 1000 stations ...

Edgar G. Pavia; Federico Graef; Jorge Reyes

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 SHARE Media Contact: Fred Strohl Communications 865.574.4165 Boatner elected to Mexican Academy of Sciences OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 11, 1997 - Dr. Lynn A. Boatner of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently was elected as a Corresponding Member of the Academia Mexicana de Ciencias (Mexican Academy of Sciences). As a corresponding member of the Academy, Boatner, a section head in the Solid State Division, will collaborate with Mexican scientists for the further development of science in Mexico. The academy, established in 1959, is a not-for-profit non-government association, with membership including distinguished members of the scientific community. One of the main objectives is to promote science research in Mexico, as well as to support communication and interaction

187

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

188

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- MexHat  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Utah Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet

189

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

190

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula Received 2 October 2006; accepted for publication 30 May 2007 The yucca moths (Tegeticula of yuccas. Revisionary work in recent years has revealed far higher species diversity than historically

Maerz, Norbert H.

191

Acceleration and energy loss in N = 4 SYM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution is based on two talks given at the XIII Mexican School of Particles and Fields. We revisit some of the results presented in [19], concerning the rate of energy loss of an accelerating quark in strongly-coupled N = 4 super-Yang-Mills.

Chernicoff, Mariano; Gueijosa, Alberto [Departamento de Fisica de Altas Energias, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mecanica Clasica (Classical Mechanics)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Internet undergraduate course on Classical Mechanics in Spanish (Castellano). This is about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. English and Romanian versions are in (slow) progress and hopefully will be arXived. For a similar course on Quantum Mechanics, see physics/9808031

Rosu, H C

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas Revolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas to use in conjunction with teaching the battles of the Texas Revolution. A large area is needed the students into two teams: the Mexican Army and the Texas Army. Line each team up, shoulder to shoulder

Wilkins, Neal

194

Opportunity for America: Mexico`s coal future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the history, current status and future prospects for increased coal use in Mexico. Environmental implications of the power-generation capacity expansion plans are examined in general terms. Mexican environmental law and regulations are briefly reviewed along with the new sense of urgency in the cleanup of existing environmental problems and avoidance of new problems as clearly mandated in recent Mexican government policy initiatives. It is expected that new capital facilities will need to incorporate the latest in process and technology to comply with existing environmental regulation. Technology developments which address these issues are identified. What opportunities have new initiatives caused by the recent diversification of Mexico`s energy economy offered US firms? This report looks at the potential future use of coal in the Mexican energy economy, examining this issue with an eye toward identifying markets that might be available to US coal producers and the best way to approach them. Market opportunities are identified by examining new developments in the Mexican economy generally and the energy economy particularly. These developments are examined in light of the current situation and the history which brought Mexico to its present status.

Loose, V.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 54, NO. 4, APRIL 2006 1243 High-Order Generalized Extended Born  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 31, 2005. This work was supported by The University of Texas at Austin's Research ConsortiumPhillips, ENI E&P, ExxonMobil, Halliburton Energy Services, Mexican Institute for Petroleum, Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Petrobras, Precision Energy Services, Schlumberger, Shell International E&P, Statoil

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

196

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 44, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2006 2445 Efficient Numerical Simulation of Axisymmetric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This work was supported by the University of Texas Austin's Research Consortium on Formation EvaluationMobil, Halliburton Energy Services, Mexican Institute for Petroleum, Occidental Oil and Gas Corporation, Petrobras, Precision Energy Services, Schlumberger, Shell International E&P, Statoil, and TOTAL. G. Gao

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

197

p u b l i c s a f e t y . c o l o s t a t e . e d u p o l i c e . c o l o s t a t e . e d u  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; hyperthermia; addiction Flunitrazepam*** Rohypnol: forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, roach, Roche, roofies to share or sell. They do not hesitate to ask, may offer to buy or trade for other drugs, or even go so far. Colorado is considering legislation that will also require suspension of your driver's license if you buy

198

Can't figure out how to eat healthy during hurricane/disaster conditions? Under hurricane/disaster conditions, we often struggle with the question: What will I eat during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 Pita Bread with Sardines 16 Cashew Chicken Salad Sandwiches 16 Peanut Butter 16 California Crab-Cucumber Sandwich 17 Tuna Pockets 17 Tuna-Carrot Sandwiches 18 California Chicken Sandwich 18 Mexican Bean Burrito as important, and perhaps even more important, than when things are normal. Eating high-sugar, high-fat, high

Florida, University of

199

One Hundred SixteentH COmmenCement Friday, May 11, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Presenter:JamesMcLaughlin Symposium:EmotionsinSchool Contexts: Perspectives of Teachers # G1-12, 8 Mexican Immigrant Students" Presenter:JamesMcLaughlin New Member Poster Session: SchoolImprovement # A3:LloydRieber Discussant:ThomasReeves UGA Professor James McLaughlin with students in Mexico #12;Paper Session: Envisioning

Stuart, Steven J.

200

EUROPEAN UNION OFFERS HELP TO BUILD ANOTHER CHERNOBYL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Union offers help to build another Chernobyl 1 LES delays license application 2 Serious incident vindicates Belgian nuclear phaseout 4 Mexican nuclear nightmare 5 Update on TEPCO scandal 6 South Africa PBMR recommendation imminent 8 International consortium to build Chernobyl ‘shield ’ 9

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SENHOD: scarce-resources wireless sensor network for healthcare in oil derricks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present our experience with designing, developing, and deploying of a Scarce-resource Wireless Sensor Network (SWSN) for monitoring temperature and humidity high above oil derricks (drilling tower) in PEMEX (Parastatal Mexican Petroleum Company) drilling ... Keywords: derrickmen, exposure, healthcare, humidity, oil derrick, sensor, temperature, wireless sensor network

Pablo Pancardo; Juan C. Dueñas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mexico's Petroleum Sector: Performance and prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexico's Petroleum Sector: Performance and Prospect discusses the intricacies of the psychology and cultural mix of Mexican political and corporate roles. Contents: Structure; Size; Investments; Output; Sales; Procurement; Costs; Pemex financial management; Political management; National policy; Prospect; Mexico as an LDC; Appendix; Index.

Baker, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

New pipeline policy  

SciTech Connect

This article outlines regulations addressing the sale, transportation, storage, and distribution of natural gas in Mexico. The regulations were issued in November 1995 by the Comision Reguladora de Energia. The major policy decisions of the regulations are summarized. The current role of Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state owned oil and gas entity, which formerly monopolized the Mexican industry, is discussed.

Schaefgen, J.R. Jr.; Colucci, D.M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

RECENT ADVANCES IN HNC'S CONTEXT VECTOR INFORMATION RETRIEVAL TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detects the relationship between "monopoly" and "pemex" the Mexican national oil company. Table 4. Stem Dot Freq. Freq. Product monopoly i 20 43 1.000 pemex 44 314 0.639 oil 36 48 0.565 stolen 16 16 0

205

FIELD TRIP TO THE NORTHERN ALISITOS ARC SEGMENT: ANCESTRAL AGUA BLANCA FAULT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of corporatization/commercialization (Pemex). When the hydrocarbon reforms were made in 1997, the natural gas sector The Mexican state owns all hydrocarbon reserves and Pemex is the only entity permitted to engage in oil of the board of Pemex; as a result, there is not a clear separation between policymaking (SENER) and upstream

Wetmore, Paul H.

206

The western margin of Mexico is ideally suited for testing two opposing models for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Much of the original work in our study area of the coastal Zihuatanejo terrane was done by PEMEX in an IMP (Mexican Petroleum Institute) unpub- lished report by Grajales and López (1984). The PEMEX work (Garduño-Monroy et al., 1999). The stratigraphy proposed by PEMEX in the numer- ous internal reports

Busby, Cathy

207

Long-Term Climate and Derived Surface Hydrology and Energy Flux Data for Mexico: 1925–2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying the role of land surface conditions in the Mexican portion of the North American monsoon system (NAMS) region has been a challenge due to the paucity of long-term observations. A long-term gridded observation-based climate dataset ...

Chunmei Zhu; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Methods to improve and measure texture of sorghum cookies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of wheat flour substitution with sorghum flour (SF) on the quality of cookies was evaluated. The three point bending test and sensory panels were used to evaluate changes in cookie texture and acceptability. The formulations used were a Mexican style, standard AACC recipe, and a chocolate chip type. The Mexican style cookie was optimum to evaluate changes in SF on cookie quality. Mexican style cookies made with 100% SF were very gritty, dry and fragile. The chocolate chip cookies had improved palatability, although they remained fragile. Intensive milling methods increased the amount of damaged starch, reduced particle size and moisture in the flour in hopes of improving cookie quality. Milling detoxicated sorghum with a Udy cyclone mill was the best alternative. Flours with higher damaged starch (1x and 2x Udy milled, 11 and 16% DS) produced better cookies than flour with low damaged starch (Sr. milled, 7% DS). Substitution with native corn or sorghum starch did not improve cookie texture. Substituting 5% of SF with pregelatinized waxy corn starch (PCS) or with 10% vital wheat gluten improved the Mexican style cookie quality, making them less gritty and more resistant to breakage during handling, having bending force values close to wheat flour control. Enzymes (?-amylase, xylanase, pentosanase, and protease) and two reducing agents (L-cysteine and sodium metabisulfite) at different concentrations did not have detectable effects on Mexican style cookies made with 100% SF. Environmental SEM analysis was helpful in detecting the continuous starch/lipid phase in the chocolate chip formulation that coated the sharp edges of SF particles in the cookie. The Mexican style cookie crumb improved when 5% PCS was added; more air tunnels developed within the crumb with thicker walls and a starchy continuous matrix that functioned like gluten did in the wheat flour cookie. Sensory evaluation confirmed the improvement in cookie texture for sorghum flours with higher damaged starch levels and when 5% PCS-95% SF ratios were used. Sorghum flour can be used in various cookie formulations to levels as high as 95% in combination with 5% PCS and up to 50% in combination with 50% wheat flour.

Leon-Chapa, Martha Cecilia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microsoft Word - S03535_Oct2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan for the Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1530 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1530-2007 Revision 3 Office of Legacy Management Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat (UMTRCA Title I) Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

210

RegIntlElecTrade_Eng_final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North America North America Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group December 2002 2 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEW G) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and interconnections consistent with the goal of sustainable development, for the benefit of all.

211

ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Canonsburg, Pennsylvania,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, 2012 Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, 2012 Green River, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Green River, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site, 2012 Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site, 2012 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site, 2012 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites February 2013 LMS/S09461 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed in this report,

212

Secretary Chu to Attend U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun Secretary Chu to Attend U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Sunday and Monday, December 5-6, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will attend the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Cancun, Mexico. On Monday, Secretary Chu will participate in a conversation with Mexican Secretary of Energy Georgina Kessel about energy efficiency, the future of clean energy and our two countries' bilateral cooperation to address shared climate change challenges. The conversation will be moderated by U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Carlos Pascual and is part of the Green Solutions showcase hosted by the Mexican government. Later that day, Secretary Chu will speak at the U.S. Center to business leaders, government officials and

213

North America Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North American Energy Efficiency North American Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling North American Energy Working Group NORTH AMERICAN ENERGY WORKING GROUP The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and interconnections

214

MAC-GWHAT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GWHAT GWHAT 1.1 Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0014-03-000 Document Number U0026800 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0026800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-1 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1 Ground Water Compliance Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

215

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose a simple graphic and statistical method for processing short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectivity spectra of alteration minerals, which classifies spectra according to their shape and absorption features, thus obtaining groups of spectra equivalent to mineral assemblages. It also permits selection of fewer samples for further mineralogical verification.

216

Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States - English Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDE TO FEDERAL GUIDE TO FEDERAL REGULATION OF SALES OF IMPORTED ELECTRICITY IN CANADA, MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group January 2005 1 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The NAEWG is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and

217

Statefinder Diagnostic for Born-Infeld Type Dark Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a new method--statefinder diagnostic which can differ one dark energy model from the others, we investigate in this letter the dynamics of Born-Infeld(B-I) type dark energy model. The evolutive trajectory of B-I type dark energy with Mexican hat potential model with respect to $e-folding$ time $N$ is shown in the $r(s)$ diagram. When the parameter of noncanonical kinetic energy term $\\eta\\to0$ or kinetic energy $\\dot{\\phi}^2\\to0$, B-I type dark energy(K-essence) model reduces to Quintessence model or $\\Lambda$CDM model corresponding to the statefinder pair $\\{r, s\\}$=$\\{1, 0\\}$ respectively. As a result, the the evolutive trajectory of our model in the $r(s)$ diagram in Mexican hat potential is quite different from those of other dark energy models.

Z. G. Huang; H. Q. Lu

2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

On Pemex`s shoulders - update: Mexico`s currency devaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The peso has continued to fall versus the dollar despite recent attempts by concerned parties to stop the descent. International elements look towards one of Mexico`s fundamental strengths, oil. The US Congress did not fully support President Clinton`s $40-billion foreign aid package for Mexico. Clinton has since abandoned the package and instead organized a $50-billion package including $20-billion from the US by Presidential order, $17.8-billion from the IMF, $10-billion from the Bank for International Settlements, and $2-billion form Latin American countries. The notable factor in the loan from the US is use of Mexican oil exports revenue as collateral. This is a first for Mexico, a country that constitutionally protects its oil from outside control. The strength of the Mexican economy is closely linked to oil as Pemex comprises roughly 6% of the GDP and is the largest source of exports as well as foreign currency.

NONE

1995-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

A fast directional continuous spherical wavelet transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fast algorithm for Antoine and Vandergheynst's (1998) directional continuous spherical wavelet transform (CSWT) is presented. Computational requirements are reduced by a factor of O(\\sqrt{N}), when N is the number of pixels on the sphere. The spherical Mexican hat wavelet Gaussianity analysis of the WMAP 1-year data performed by Vielva et al. (2003) is reproduced and confirmed using the fast CSWT. The proposed extension to directional analysis is inherently afforded by the fast CSWT algorithm.

J. D. McEwen; M. P. Hobson; A. N. Lasenby; D. J. Mortlock

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

Overcoming the dialectic of solitude: historical and narrative discourses in the works of Tomas Rivera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following thesis offers new interpretations of the works of Tomas Rivera. The first chapter documents the history of the twentith-century Mexican American migrant worker, historicizing Riveras life and works. The second chapter is a textual analysis of Rivera's novel, And the earth did not devour him. The third and final chapter proposes that a dialectic exists between the works of Rivera and Octavio Paz and explores how Rivera's works are a "response" to Paz's monumental book, The Labyrinth of Solitude.

Cole, Kevin Lee

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

(The Spanish version of Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mechanical Properties of Unreinforced Brick Masonry, Section1  

SciTech Connect

Before the advent of concrete and steel, masonry helped build civilizations. From Egypt in Africa, Rome in Europe, Maya in the America to China in Asia, masonry was exploited to construct the most significant, magnificent and long lasting structures on the Earth. Looking at the Egyptian pyramids, Mayan temples, Roman coliseum and Chinese Great Wall, one cannot stop wondering about the significance and popularity that masonry has had through out history. Lourenco et al (1989) summed up the reasons for the popularity of masonry in the following, 'The most important characteristic of masonry construction is its simplicity. Laying pieces of stone or bricks on top of each other, either with or without cohesion via mortar, is a simple, though adequate, technique that has been successful ever since remote ages. Other important characteristics are the aesthetics, solidity, durability, low maintenance, versatility, sound absorption and fire protection' Despite these advantages, masonry is no longer preferred structural material in many parts of the developed world, especially in seismically active parts of the world. Partly, masonry and especially unreinforced masonry (URM) has mechanical properties such as strength and ductility inferior to those of reinforced concrete and steel. Moreover, masonry structures were traditionally built based on rules of thumb acquired over many years of practice and/or empirical data from testing. Accordingly, we do not have a rigorous and uniform method of analysis and design for masonry. Nevertheless, the world still possesses numerous historic and ordinary masonry structures, which require maintenance and strengthening to combat the assault of time and nature. Hence, it is important to study fundamental properties of masonry so that new masonry structures can be effectively designed and built, and the cost for servicing old structures and for building new ones will be less expensive.

Mosalam, K; Glascoe, L; Bernier, J

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

UNCLASSIFIED Texas Gang Threat Assessment 2012 Texas Gang Threat Assessment 2012 A State Intelligence Estimate Produced by the Texas Fusion Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key analytic judgments of this assessment are: Gangs continue to represent a significant public safety threat to the State of Texas, and are responsible for a disproportionate amount of crime in our communities. Of incarcerated members of Tier 1 and Tier 2 gangs, more than half are serving a sentence for a violent crime, including robbery (25 percent), homicide (14 percent), and assault/terroristic threat (12 percent). The Tier 1 gangs in Texas are Tango Blast (estimated at 10,000 members), Texas Syndicate (4,500 members), Barrio Azteca (3,500 members), and Texas Mexican Mafia (6,000 members). These organizations pose the greatest gang threat to Texas due to their relationships with Mexican cartels, large membership numbers, high levels of transnational criminal activity, and organizational effectiveness. Mexican cartels continue to use gangs in Texas as they smuggle drugs, people, weapons, and cash across the border. Members of Tier 1 gangs have been recruited by the cartels to carry out acts of violence in both Texas and Mexico. The relationships between gangs and cartels have evolved over the past year, due in part to volatility and changes in cartel

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Trade and the environment: Discussion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author presents a synopsis of several papers on the issue of international trade and the environment. The papers address the following topics: the complex interrelationships of international trade, environment, and poverty in developing countries; environmental aspects of economic relations between nations; and the debate between environmentalists and free trade advocates. The author also adds comments about the US embargo on Mexican yellow-fin tuna imports, concluding that this unilateral embargo action, while initially creating tentions, may have provided a useful impetus to working out a multinational environmental standard.

Lutz, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Asia, North America lead way in growth of NGL, LPG trade  

SciTech Connect

Recent analyses of world NGL trade indicate that important changes in LPG supply and demand are under way in Asia and North America. LPG markets in the 1990s reflect a rapidly shifting balance between East-of-Suez and West-of-Suez markets. This shift has increased concern about availability of future LPG supplies for Asia. The paper discusses world developments, East versus West of Suez, end uses and supplies in Asia, Canadian ethane, propane, butane, and natural gasoline, Mexican ethane, LPG, and natural gasoline, US ethane, propane, butanes, and iso-C{sub 4} and C{sub 5}.

Otto, K.; Gist, R.; Whitley, C. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Haun, R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Giralang, AU)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Kaleen, AU)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

EPRI BWR BRAC Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of BRAC point average dose rates for the forty-six BWRs (thirty-five U.S., two Mexican, five European, and four Asian) currently participating in the EPRI BWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment project. The BRAC value is normally the average of the reactor recirculation suction and discharge contact dose rates measured with a shielded directional probe in the vertical piping sections. The results are categorized by chemistry regime, drains path, and, for NMCA plants, by BW...

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Statefinder Diagnostic for Dilaton Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statefinder diagnostic is a useful method which can differ one dark energy model from the others. The Statefinder pair $\\{r, s\\}$ is algebraically related to the equation of state of dark energy and its first time derivative. We apply in this paper this method to the dilaton dark energy model based on Weyl-Scaled induced gravitational theory. We investigate the effect of the coupling between matter and dilaton when the potential of dilaton field is taken as the Mexican hat form. We find that the evolving trajectory of our model in the $r-s$ diagram is quite different from those of other dark energy models.

Z. G. Huang; X. M. Song; H. Q. Lu; W. Fang

2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Restructuring proposed for Mexico's Pemex  

SciTech Connect

Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari soon will send a legislative proposal to Congress that splits state owned Petroleos Mexicanos into four subsidiaries. This paper reports that Pemex functions will be divided into Pemex Exploration Production, Pemex Refining, Pemex Gas Basic Petrochemicals, and Pemex Secondary Chemicals. An earlier report the the company would be split into seven units. Each of the four new operating companies will be an independent business unit with a separate board of directors and its own staff and support functions.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Private sector cautious on Pemex reorganization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Private sector interest in the privatization of the petrochemical subsidiaries of Mexico`s state oil company Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) will hinge on the government`s decisions on minority ownership, says Raul Millares, president of Aniq, the Mexican chemical industry association. The murkiest issues are how the subsidiaries will be operated and what rights minority owners will have. {open_quotes}The question is who is going to manage the subsidiaries on a day-to-day basis,{close_quotes} says Millares. {open_quotes}There is a lot of doubt as to whether private companies will be able to get the flexibility they need.{close_quotes}

Sissell, K.

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vista and Pemex in LAB deal  

SciTech Connect

Vista Chemical (Houston) and Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex; Mexico City) have firmed up their long-negotiated plans for Pemex to supply feedstock for a linear alkylbenzene (LAB) plant that Vista will build in Mexico (CW, Sept. 16, 1992 p. 8). Specifically, the two companies have signed an agreement of understanding to pursue negotiations and finalize agreements. The plant would cost $250 million, produce 260 million-330 million lbs/year of LAB, and create about 200 permanent jobs. Final agreements, including a site selection, are expected to be completed by midyear. Vista expects startup in 1996, and is considering forming aj oint venture with a Mexican partner.

Morris, G.D.L.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

1988: A good year, if prices hold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes the 1988's North American oil market. Some of the highlights are: average rig count for the year should range between 1,010 and 1,020 units; Canadian survey shows E and P expenditures could be up over 20%; drilling in Canada will also be spurred by government incentives expiring in '88; Pemex will double Mexican activity due to a marked E and P budget increase; and last half U.S. wells/footage should post good gains if prices settle around $15.

Maciej, H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Pemex faces up to field decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although Mexican state oil company Pemex publishes only the most general statistics about its operations, there is indirect evidence that the nation's oil fields are in serious decline. To increase hydrocarbon production 3% a year, Pemex says it will be necessary to bring 1.6 million bopd of new production onstream over the next five years. When combined with estimated production from secondary recovery, this figure implies an annual field decline rate of 16%. The rate may even be higher for Mexico's two major oil provinces, Campeche and Reforma.

Baker, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fault intersections and hybrid transform faults in the southern Salton Trough geothermal area, Baja California, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of 55 wells drilled at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field and a suite of geological and geophysical studies throughout the southern Salton Trough from the Mexican-United States border to the Gulf of California clarify two concepts important to geothermal development: (1) increased natural convective fluid flow and better permeability should occur at intersecting faults both regionally and within a producing field, and (2) the Cerro Prieto and Imperial faults are best conceived of as hybrid types having features of both San Andreas style wrench faults and oceanic tranform faults.

Vonder Haar, S.; Puente Cruz, I.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CD version of the Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL’s Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. The 200 West Pump and Treat System design and construction teams utilized energy efficient and sustainable design elements, including recycled steal. This photo shows the system’s processing equipment. Approximately 539 tons, or 5 percent, of the steel used in construction was recycled.

240

Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waters from 20 to 200m deep in the northern Gulf from the U.S.-Mexican border to the Florida Keys (Figure 1). Both “coastal ” and “offshore ” ecotypes of bottlenose dolphins occur in the Gulf of Mexico (Hersh and Duffield 1990; LeDuc and Curry 1998). The Continental Shelf Stock probably consists of a mixture of both the coastal and offshore ecotypes. The offshore and coastal ecotypes are genetically distinct using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers (Hoelzel et al. 1998). In the northwestern Atlantic, Torres et al. (2003) found a statistically significant break in the distribution of the ecotypes at 34 km from shore. The offshore ecotype was found exclusively seaward of 34km and in waters deeper than 34 m. Within 7.5km of shore, all animals were of the coastal ecotype. The continental shelf is much wider in the Gulf of Mexico so these results may not apply. The continental shelf stock range may extend into Mexican and Cuban territorial waters; however, there are no available estimates of either abundance or mortality from those countries. A stranded dolphin from the Florida Panhandle was rehabilitated and released over the shelf off western Florida, and traveled into the Atlantic Ocean (Wells et al. 1999). The bottlenose dolphins inhabiting waters <20m deep in

Bottlenose Dolphin (tursiops Truncatus Truncatus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

Scinicariello, Franco, E-mail: fes6@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)] [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)] [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar Two technology for Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar power towers, based on molten salt technology, have been the subject of extensive research and development since the late 1970s. In the mid 1980s, small experimental plants were successfully fielded in the USA and France that demonstrated the feasibility of the concept at a 1 to 2 MW{sub e} scale. Systems analyses indicate this technology will be cost competitive with coal-fired power plants after scaling-up plant size to the 100 to 200 MW{sub e} range. To help bridge the scale-up gap, a 10 MW{sub e} demonstration project known as Solar Two, was successfully operated in California, USA from 1996 to 1999. The next logical step could be to scale-up further and develop a 30 MW{sub e} project within the country of Mexico. The plant could be built by an IPP industrial consortium consisting of USA's Boeing and Bechtel Corporations, combined with Mexican industrial and financial partners. Plausible technical and financial characteristics of such a ``Solar-Two-type'' Mexican project are discussed in this paper.

KOLB,GREGORY J.; STRACHAN,JOHN W.; GASCO,CLAUDIO ESTRADA

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

243

Quantifying Pemex E and P benefits from foreign strategic associations  

SciTech Connect

The recent critique by the Heritage Foundation of the management of Mexico's petroleum sector deserves attention by oil industry observers of Mexico as well as government and academic analysts. The foundation argues that sweeping changes are needed-for Mexico's own good-in upstream and downstream policy. The following analysis presents one form of quantifying the upstream argument: the Mexican government stands to gain $5.7 billion/year in taxable revenue from state petroleum company Petroleos Mexicanos by 2000 from strategic associations with international petroleum companies. In addition, there are efficiency advantages that Pemex would gain by strategic associations with international petroleum companies. The ripple effects would include not only oil production and tax revenue increases from Pemex operations but also the advantages of new management skills, new sources of funding and technology, and lower operating and overhead costs in Pemex. It will not be possible, however, for the Mexican government to choose one or more strategic partners by quantitative methods alone. To the contrary, a significant measure of trust will be required.

Baker, G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Mexssub responds to shallow pipe corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexssub recently came to the aid of the Mexican state-owned oil company Pemex to repair corrosion problems on a 36-inch sour gas pipeline located in the Atasta-Ciudad Pemex corridor. Mexssub began development of a sleeve system in 1982 in an effort to develop solutions for risers located in the Campeche Bay area. High operating temperatures of these risers was causing failures of the protective coating and accelerated corrosion to the riser at the splash zone. The sleeve system and flexible habitat developed by Mexssub during this research program allowed the repair of these risers in situ and without suspending production. The sleeve system developed by Mexssub is a welded oversize sleeve with a specially formulated epoxy resin injected into the annular space. The epoxy resin completely integrates the sleeve and the pipe, providing structural reinforcement. This technology was demonstrated to Pemex at the Mexssub testing facility in Lerma, Mexico in 1986. In 1987 the Mexssub Sleeve System was approved by the Mexican Petroleum Institute and actual field repairs were initiated. To date, Mexssub has made in excess of 72 repairs in situ without suspending production on risers up to 36-inch diameter. Additionally, the sleeve system has been installed on 50 new risers prior to their installation in the field.

Cajiga, A.; Perez, V.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Mexico: energy point man. [Period July 1981-January 1982  

SciTech Connect

This issue examines retail petroleum-product prices in the Western Hemisphere and presents tabular data, but the focus is on Mexico. During the period July 1981 to January 1982, the Lopez Portillo government in Mexico doubled the prices of Nova (regular leaded) gasoline and diesel fuel, and raised (premium unleaded) gasoline prices 43%. A few other countries increased prices moderately. The Mexican government justified the drastic increases, using the following rationale: (1) Mexico wastes a lot of energy, its use per unit of Gross Domestic Product more than double that of the industrialized countries; (2) during recent years gasoline consumption has run amuck, increasing 15% annually; and (3) the fuel price increases would not greatly impact the buying power of the Mexican people. The government explained that subsidizing fuel consumption cost PEMEX $12.5 billion during 1981. What hurt worst was the fact that selling a barrel of refined products within the country brings only 1/4 the money that a barrel of exported crude brings. Very little of the subsidy trickles down to lower classes, and 85% of the vehicular fuel is burned by 20% of the population. It is concluded that cheap energy is still risky business, even for major petroleum-exporting countries; further, Mexico may prove to be the point man, in the international movement to reduce domestic fuel subsidies. The petroleum product price/tax report and the hydrocarbon price series are updated for the Western Hemisphere countries.

Not Available

1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

246

Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Third Quarter Report 1999  

SciTech Connect

The second quarter 1997 Quarterly Report of Natural Gas Imports and Exports featured a Quarterly Focus report on cross-border natural gas trade between the United States and Mexico. This Quarterly Focus article is a follow-up to the 1997 report. This report revisits and updates the status of some of the pipeline projects discussed in 1997, and examines a number of other planned cross-border pipeline facilities which were proposed subsequent to our 1997 report. A few of the existing and proposed pipelines are bidirectional and thus have the capability of serving either Mexico, or the United States, depending on market conditions and gas supply availability. These new projects, if completed, would greatly enhance the pipeline infrastructure on the U.S.-Mexico border and would increase gas pipeline throughput capacity for cross-border trade by more than 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. The Quarterly Focus is comprised of five sections. Section I includes the introduction as well as a brief historic overview of U.S./Mexican natural gas trade; a discussion of Mexico's energy regulatory structure; and a review of trade agreements and a 1992 legislative change which allows for her cross-border gas trade in North America. Section II looks at initiatives that have been taken by the Mexican Government since 1995to open its energy markets to greater competition and privatization. Section III reviews Mexican gas demand forecasts and looks at future opportunities for U.S. gas producers to supplement Mexico's indigenous supplies in order to meet the anticipated rapid growth in demand. Section IV examines the U.S.-Mexico natural gas trade in recent years. It also looks specifically at monthly import and export volumes and prices and identifies short-term trends in this trade. Finally, Section V reviews the existing and planned cross-border gas pipeline infrastructure. The section also specifically describes six planned pipelines intended to expand this pipeline network and their planned in-service dates.

none

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Natural Gas Regulation » Frequently Asked Questions Services » Natural Gas Regulation » Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation Why do I need to have an authorization to import natural gas Do I have to get an authorization to export natural gas? Who is importing and exporting natural gas? What are the requested volumes of natural gas for import or export? What are the countries of origin for natural gas imported into the U.S. and destination of gas exported from the U.S.? What do I have to do to get an Authorization? Do I need to have an import authorization to use Canadian or Mexican natural gas in my factory? I don't know if I should request an import authorization or not. Who can I talk to about filing an application or whether I need to file an

248

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Mexico Central America References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "For more than ten years, the US Forest Service has collaborated with the Government of Mexico to provide forest management training and has fostered many opportunities to share the Mexican case study with international groups. The result has often been to inspire innovative incentives that serve multiple purposes: halting deforestation, improving both watershed

249

Director at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Sidney Gutierrez Director at Sandia National Laboratories Sidney Gutierrez Sidney Gutierrez Role: Director at Sandia National Laboratories Award: 2010 Notable New Mexican

250

Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA Programme Mexico-NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

251

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 2nd Quarter FY 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1999 June 1999 1 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT For Second Quarter FY 1999 June 1, 1999; Issue No. 19 continued on page 6 NEPA and Habitat Management Plan: Environmental Synergy By: Elizabeth Withers, NEPA Compliance Officer, Los Alamos Area Office, with John Stetson, Pacific Western Technologies, Ltd. On the day DOE issued the Draft EIS for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), LANL biologists discovered a nesting pair of Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) – which had only recently been listed as threatened – in the canyons directly below the proposed site. Today, this nest site, at the edge

252

Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico Solar Decathlon 2011 Menu and Recipes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHADE SHADE TAPAS corn chips tacos nopales salad sopapillas virgin margaritas *allergens are listed on Team ASUNM's official recipe submission flavored water DINNER DESSERT BEVERAGES SIDES DINNER MENU pico de gallo & guacamole carne asada or black beans with your choice of flour tortillas or lettuce wrap; garnishes include sauteed peppers and onions, cotija cheese, sour cream, pico de gallo, and spanish rice prickly pear cactus with lime juice and olive oil topped with a cojita cheese garnish topped with honey and powdered sugar 10 october 2013 SHADE TAPAS southwestern bruschetta mexican crepes chilled corn salad prickly pear granita prickly pear arnold palmer *allergens are listed on Team ASUNM's official recipe submission flavored water DINNER DESSERT BEVERAGES SIDES DINNER MENU

253

Margin turnaround at hand: reprieve for US refiners  

SciTech Connect

After unseasonal US gasoline price deterioration during the summer driving months, a turnaround in rack (unbranded, undelivered wholesale) prices is helping to reverse the downward trend in refining margins on the Gulf Coast. In turn, the improved margins are buoying up light crude oil prices in the US Gulf Coast and strengthening spot-market prices. A graph tracks apparent margins on four important crudes utilized on the US Gulf Coast. August 1984 saw negative margins even for heavy Venezuelan Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) and Mexican Maya (22/sup 0/ API), but both were again positive in September. Energy Detente refining netback data for September 1984 are presented for the US Gulf Coast, the US West Coast, Rotterdam, and Singapore. The fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices are presented for September 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

1984-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS Signed by Secretary Spencer Abraham January 2001-December 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS Joint Statement of ntent between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and The Ministry of Energy and Mines of the Republic ofPeru on Cooperation in the Field of Energy -Tab 1 Fifth Hemispheric Energy Ministers Meeting Mexico City, Mexico - March 9, 2001. Mexico Declaration - Energy: A Crucial Factor for Integration and Sustainable Development in the Hemisphere - Tab 2 Extension of the Agreement for Energy Cooperation between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and the Secretariat ofEnergy of the United Mexican States, and its Four Annexes - Tab3 Implementing Agreement between the Department ofEnergy of the United States ofAmerica and the

255

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 27430 of 31,917 results. 21 - 27430 of 31,917 results. Article Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today met with Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Gary Lunn and Mexican Secretary of Energy Fernando Canales Clariond to discuss... http://energy.gov/articles/secretary-bodman-hosts-energy-ministers-canada-and-mexico Article Energy Department Awards Half a Million Dollars to 12 Fellows Studying Nuclear Fuel Cycle WASHINGTON, DC - To help meet the growing demand for nuclear-educated scientists and engineers, and to build upon President Bush's American Competitiveness Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy... http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-awards-half-million-dollars-12-fellows-studying-nuclear-fuel-cycle

256

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-eared Owl Status Long-eared Owl Status Name: Joll Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is the long-eared owl endangered? I have mixed information. Replies: No, long-eared owls are not on the US endangered species list, either as endangered or threatened. The only owls on the list are both northern and Mexican spotted owls. The US list is on line at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html A species may be listed as endangered as a population within a state even if it is not on the US list. You could search for information for your state to see the status. If your location as noted below is California, long-eared owls are not endangered in California. J. Elliott Joll It's endangered. br> http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?q=326032

257

Secretary Chu to Join President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago Secretary Chu to Join President Obama in Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu will travel with President Obama to Mexico City, Mexico and Port of Spain, Trinidad this week to highlight the Administration's commitment to working with our partners in the region to address our shared energy, economic, security and climate challenges. On Thursday, April 16, Secretary Chu will accompany President Obama to Mexico City for bilateral talks with President Felipe Calderón and Mexican Energy Minister Georgina Kessel on the important partnership between the two countries on economic and security issues as well as on matters related to energy and climate change.

258

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

259

EM Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newsletters Newsletters EM Newsletters RSS August 27, 2013 James Shuler, manager of DOE's Packaging Certification Program, within EM's Office of Packaging and Transportation, discusses the radiofrequency identification technology he developed. At left is RFID Team Leader Yung Liu, with Argonne National Laboratory. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking Shipments WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's James Shuler felt honored being named a technology innovation award finalist for developing radiofrequency identification (RFID) technology to track and monitor radioactive material shipments. August 27, 2013 The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox.

260

Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., June 3, 2009 - Cleanup of the nation's defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste has reached an important milestone. Today, the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico arrived safely at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the southeast corner of the state. "Shipping this waste to WIPP is important for our national cleanup mission, but this event is especially important for New Mexicans," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "It's great to see progress being made right here in our own state." WIPP's mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 27, 2013 August 27, 2013 The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL's Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention RICHLAND, Wash. - A groundwater treatment system at the Hanford site is in the international spotlight and is being called a technological marvel. August 27, 2013 Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old chemical truck. Pictured, left to right, are Hanford Fire Lt. Robert Smith, Firefighter/Paramedic Kyle Harbert, Firefighter Don Blackburn and Capt. Sean Barajas. Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money

262

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The The Monument Valley Processing Site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site. These source materials and other site-related contamination were removed during surface remediation at the

263

Microsoft Word - Table 1 POEE-Trasporters Rev 8-27-12.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table 1 Table 1 Natural Gas Pipeline Points of Entry/Exit and Transporters U.S. Point of Entry/ Exit Corresponding Canadian/Mexican Point of Entry/Exit U.S. Transporter Foreign Transporter Alamo, Texas Reynosa, Tamaulipas Tennessee Gas Pipeline PEMEX Pipeline Babb, Montana Cardston, Alberta (Carway) EnCana Pipelines Ltd. Canadian-Montana Pipeline Company Baudette, Minnesota Rainy River, Ontario Centra Minnesota Pipelines Centra Transmission, Inc. Calais, Maine St. Stephen, New Brunswick Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline U.S. Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline Canada Brunswick Pipeline Calexico, California Mexicali, Baja California SoCalGas DGN Pipeline Champlain, New York Napierville, Quebec North Country Gas Pipeline TransCanada PipeLines, Ltd.

264

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San Diego’s Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison Just north of the U.S.-Mexican border, San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant processes up to 34 million gallons of water a day. Thanks to the city's ambitious solar energy program, the facility may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption. In early April, workers activated a 945-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) energy

265

HAWC Observatory captures first image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April » April » HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under

266

Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities Mexico-REEEP EERE Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name REEEP-Mexico Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Geothermal, Transportation Topics Policies/deployment programs, Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.reeep.org/655/proje Country Mexico Central America References REEEP project database[1] REEEP has been working with Mexico to establish a Legal Framework for Renewable Energy in the State of Guanajuato, to develop low enthalpy geothermal projects for power generation and is working toward the creation of a cap and trade market for the Mexican auto industry. References ↑ "REEEP project database" Retrieved from

267

At LANL-sponsored networking forum, businesses make their pitch for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act work Recovery Act work At LANL-sponsored networking forum, businesses make their pitch for Recovery Act work One key goal of the Recovery Act is to provide jobs and opportunities for Northern New Mexicans. October 22, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa

268

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Monument Valley processing site is located on the The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore-processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site.

269

Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government August 24, 2011 - 11:55am Addthis Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government "Hispanics United in Strengthening America," this year's theme for the National Organization for Mexican American Rights, Inc. (NOMAR) Training Conference, speaks to recruiting, training, and engaging a diverse workforce to accomplish our country's goals. Bill Valdez, Acting Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, will be joining invited NOMAR conference participants at the Tropicana Las Vegas Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada to co-lead a general session on job outlook, Hispanic representation, and Federal employment. Elizabeth Montoya, Chief of Staff and Director of External Affairs at the

270

Restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick-find list Argonne | Continental | Mixed Menu | Burgers & Dogs | Pizza | Chicken | Seafood | Italian Mexican | Breakfast | Sandwiches | Asian | Other/Ethnic | BBQ | Brew Pubs | 24-Hour | Dinner/Movie updated 12/11/2013 Argonne Cafeteria (ANL access only) Bldg. 213 Argonne Guest House Bldg. 460 630-739-6000 401 Grill Bldg. 401 CONTINENTAL 2100 Blue (Renaissance Hotel) 2100 Spring Road, Oak Brook 630-573-2800 The Clubhouse Restaurant 298 Oak Brook Center, Oak Brook 630-472-9322 J. Alexander's 1410 W. 16th., Oak Brook 630-573-8180 The Flame 803 Joliet Rd., Countryside 708-352-3442 MIXED MENU Baker's Square 7409 Rt. 83, Hinsdale 630-986-9330 Baker's Square 2020 W. 75th St., Woodridge 630-241-0609 Bar Louie 619 E Boughton Rd #A, Bolingbrook 630-410-7100

271

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

272

Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

Streit, G.E. [comp.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Acceleration and Energy Loss in N=4 SYM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a brief overview of the results obtained in arXiv:0803.3070, concerning the rate of energy loss of an accelerating quark in strongly-coupled N=4 super-Yang-Mills, both at zero and finite temperature. For phenomenological purposes, our main result is that, when a quark is created within the plasma together with its corresponding antiquark, the quark starts feeling the plasma only after the q-\\bar{q} separation becomes larger than the (v-dependent) screening length, and from this point on the motion is correctly described by the analytic energy loss formula previously derived by Herzog et al. and Gubser within the stationary or late-time approximations. The present text is a slightly expanded version of two talks given at the XIII Mexican School of Particles and Fields in October 2008.

Mariano Chernicoff; Alberto Guijosa

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Renewable energy load assessment for Boquillas Del Carmen Coahuila, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the estimates that were made in 1992 of the potential load requirements for Boquillas del Carmen, a small Mexican village on the northern border of the state of Coahuila, Mexico near Big Bend National Park in southern Texas. The study was made to help determine the possibility that village might be electrified by solar or wind energy. Various estimates of are given of the potential load based on estimates ranging from basic use of lights, radio, television, and small household appliances to microwave ovens, refrigerators, and direct evaporative coolers. The low-energy consumption case was estimated to be at 23.0 kWh/month per residence per month, and the high-energy consumption case (with cooling) was 140.7 kWh/month per residence. On average, the typical residence is occupied by five individuals.

Foster, R. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An interpretation theory based on the fluid-filled crack model of geothermal systems is being developed and tested against a variety of data from various geothermal areas. Progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) analysis and interpretation of seismic data obtained from the bore holes at the LASL Hot Dry Rock geothermal site. (2) Collection, analysis and interpretation of data on deep volcanic tremors at the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory. (3) Development of a new method for determining seismic attenuation at frequencies higher than 1HZ, and initiation of a cooperative work with Mexican seismologists on the attenuation measurements at various geothermal areas in Baja, California using the method. (4) Installation of 3-component digital event-recorders at four stations in the Newberry Peak volcano, Oregon. (5) Developing a computer program for calculating seismic motion generated by the vibration of fluid-filled crack in a layered medium.

Aki, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

Scherr, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy efficiency and conservation in Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparing the degree of efficiency in energy production and the uses to which energy resources are allocated in Mexico with that in other countries, this book addresses three basic questions: What are the major reasons for differences in energy efficiency between industrial economies and a newly industrializing country like Mexico. To what extent is energy conservation possible in the Mexican economy. And what are the social and economic benefits of more efficient use and conservation of energy in comparison with their costs. Using the history and operations of two state-owned energy agencies, PEMEX and the Federal Electricity Commission, as case studies, the contributors explore the patterns of energy use in all major sectors of the economy and discuss the prospects for energy-saving policies between the mid-1980s and the end of the century.

Guzman, O.M.; Yunez Naude, A.; Wionczek, M.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mexico's gas dilemma may become solution  

SciTech Connect

Lack of port facilities, and adequate storage capacity, and weak international oil market conditions are serious obstacles to Mexico's ability to greatly increase petroleum exports. The new Administration will set Mexico's export levels, but for now PEMEX says 2.5-million barrels of crude per day to 1985 is the upper limit for exports. At that level, the most viable way to increase hydrocarbon export earnings is to increase natural gas exports. A chart shows the upward climb of gas production since 1938 and the almost vertical climb since 1979. Whereas two years ago the natural gas surplus was a dilemma for Mexico, today it could mean a solution. The question hinges on future Mexican policy opening the doors to the US gas market. This issue includes the update of the fuel price/tax series for the Eastern Hemisphere countries.

Not Available

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Oil's role in free trade agreement crux of Mexico's petroleum sector dilemma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexico's president Salinas' efforts at privatization have not yet touched Mexico's most valuable industry, oil. That remains under control of state owned Petroleos Mexicanos. Pemex and Mexico's huge oil union have come under increasing criticism for alleged abuses of power. In addition, controversy rages as to the true extent of Mexican oil resources and whether Pemex has the wherewithal to meet domestic demand and sustain oil exports. Critics also contend opening Mexico's oil sector to foreign participation would introduce new efficiencies and cost cutting measures in the cash strapped state oil industry. This paper reports that at the center of the controversy is the proposed Free Trade Agreement among Mexico, the U.S., and Canada, pushed strongly by Salinas. Oil's role in the FTA may prove the pact's main sticking point.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

North America: There's never been a slump like this  

SciTech Connect

The perspectives for petroleum development in North America are the subject of this survey. Observations include: Revised forecast of U.S. drilling calls for 34,028 wells and 165.8 million ft in 1986; Exploration will suffer the worst loss, with activity down as much as 70%; At best, an average of 675 to 725 rigs are expected to be active the second half; Canadian drillers ride roller coaster up on taxes, down on plunging oil prices; Incentives offered by various Canadian governments are a help, but not a cure; Pemex export earnings nosedive, bringing Mexican debt repayment into question; Guatemalan operators resume activity, major production increases planned for '86; Weak oil prices slash Castro's earnings from resale of Soviet-supplied crude oil.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

1 Regulation of Gas Marketing Activities in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study linking the Mexican market for natural gas with the North American market and the implications of these links on efficient marketing of gas in Mexico. We argue that PEMEX should be permitted to enter into spot contracts or future contracts to sell gas, however, the price of gas should always be the net back price based on the Houston Ship Channel at the time of delivery. PEMEX should not be permitted to discount the price of gas from the Houston netback price even in a nondiscriminatory fashion. This arrangement is transparent, it is easy to enforce and does not eliminate any legitimate market options for any of the parties involved. PEMEX or consumers of gas can use the Houston market for hedging of speculative transactions.

Dagobert L. Brito; Juan Rosellon; Mexico D. F

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image April 30, 2013 An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. Although only 10 percent of the observatory is constructed, the team has made its first astrophysical image-a shadow in the detected directions of cosmic rays caused by the Moon. Full-time operations at HAWC will begin this summer with one third of the observatory, making HAWC the most sensitive, wide field of view, continuously operating gamma-

285

GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA Programme NAMA Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Mexico NAMA Programme Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Buildings - Residential, Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Topics - Energy Access, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Resource assessment Website http://www.conavi.gob.mx/docum Program Start 2011 Program End 2015 Country Mexico Central America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The programme aims at contributing to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public and/or private sector and that are framed by an

286

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents estimates of the undisturbed formation temperatures in a geothermal exploration well drilled in the Ceboruco area in the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. The method used assumes

287

Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico Secretary Bodman Hosts Energy Ministers from Canada and Mexico May 4, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today met with Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Gary Lunn and Mexican Secretary of Energy Fernando Canales Clariond to discuss further integration of North American energy markets. The energy leaders addressed energy security and prosperity through investments in science and technology research, enhanced natural gas markets, and the expanded use of alternative energy sources among the three countries. "Canada and Mexico are the top energy suppliers to the U.S. accounting for 30% of U.S. crude oil imports. Our nations have a long tradition of close cooperation that provides a base for economic and energy security,"

288

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

289

Perceptions of selected senior administrators of higher education institutions in Mexico regarding needed administrative competencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher education institutions have an important role in changing societies; those in developing countries present an ample spectrum of differences, particularities, and needs. The role that senior administrators play as managers of those institutions is fundamental in the decision making process; consequently, it is very important that those administrators possess the needed attributes during the development of their endeavors. The purpose of this study is to identify the competencies needed by senior administrators in higher education institutions in Mexico, as current administrators project them. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and acquire and analyze data. The sample consisted of twenty senior administrators from eight Mexican higher education institutions. The researcher visited those campuses on three trips between June 2001 and March 2002. Data came from three sources: interviews with respondents; observation of participants before, during, and after the interview sessions; and analysis of records and documents. Data from interviews were unitized and sorted into categories. Some of the conclusions of the researcher included: ?Social forces and trends inside and outside of Mexican higher education institutions are pushing the need for a senior administrator with a broad understanding of the national situation, with the resources to support the national initiatives, and with the ability to make appropriate responses in their own institutions. ?Identified needed competencies for the future higher education senior administrator are organized by personal characteristics and skills, administrative competencies, competencies of social responsibility, and institutional competencies. ?Public university leaders believe that they face more difficult situations in their institutions that their private institution counterparts in order to adapt and change. ?Differences between and within public and private higher education institutions in Mexico make evident the need for specific training for their senior administrators to achieve professional development necessary to the specific needs of their institutions.

Gonzalez y Gonzalez, Elsa Maria

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The social construction of adulthood: Menarche and motherhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographic and sociological theories usually do not incorporate biological variable into their explanations. This dissertation addresses this void by examining the influence of age at menarche on age at first birth, the event of a first birth, and the number of children ever born (CEB). I expand on Demographic Transition theory by incorporating biology as one of the effects of modernization that has an effect on reducing fertility. Age at menarche decreases as a society modernizes. I use data from the 1995 Survey of Family Growth, Cycle V for the U.S., and the 1997 China Survey of Population and Reproductive Health. I further stratify the data into five race/ethnic groups: Chinese Han, Chinese minorities, U.S. Non-Hispanic Whites, U.S. Non-Hispanic Blacks, and U.S. Hispanics of Mexican origin. I use four different statistical methods to model my dependent variables: Ordinary Least Squares Regression, Cox Proportional Hazard Analysis, Poisson Regression, and Negative Binominal Regression. My first major finding is that the younger a woman is when reaching menarche, the younger she will be when giving birth to her first child. Second, the younger a woman is when reaching menarche, the longer the duration to a first birth and the less likely she is to experience a first birth. These two results are consistent in all the groups I analyze. Third, the younger a woman when reaching menarche, the fewer children she will produce. The U.S. Mexican-Origin women are an exception in this final outcome. It is well known that as a society modernizes, age at menarche decreases. Analyses in my dissertation indicate that as women?s ages at menarche decrease, their ages at giving birth to the first child also decrease, but their chances of having a first birth also decrease and their waiting time for having the first birth increases. Also, fertility will decline as age at menarche declines.

McKibben, Sherry Lynne

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of the Pass Cavallo shipwreck assemblage, Matagorda Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey conducted in February of 1998 located an anomaly originally believed to be the remains of L'Aimable. L'Aimable was one of four ships utilized by Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, for his voyage to colonize the Gulf Coast in 1684. The anomaly, a wrecked vessel with a heavy iron signature, was located outside the entrance to the historic pass into Matagorda Bay, Texas. Artifacts were extracted from the wreck site to aid in the identification of the vessel, which was subsequently determined to be more recent in origin. A preliminary examination of the artifacts indicates that the shipwreck dates to the first half of the 19th century. The survey recovered over two hundred artifacts. The assemblage of artifacts includes over 80 lead shot, over 40 examples of brass firearm furniture, over 15 firearm fragments, several pieces of copper sheathing, and iron bar stock. Almost two-thirds of the material is associated with small arms. The majority of the identifiable firearms are military arms of three patterns: the British Short Land Pattern, the British India Pattern, and the 1757 Spanish musket. Historical research has determined that these arms were circulating in Texas, New Orleans, and Mexico, as early as 1815. The British Pattern arms were both purchased for the Mexican army in the 1820s, and used by the British Infantry in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. The 1757 Spanish musket was used chiefly by Spanish expeditionary forces in North America in the late 18th century. Evidence garnered from the artifacts suggest that the firearms were shipboard cargo onboard a small, wood-hulled sailing vessel that wrecked between the years 1815 and 1845. Archival and historical research isolated nine wreck candidates for this period. Historical research and artifact analysis suggest the Hannah Elizabeth as the primary candidate for this wreck site. The Hannah Elizabeth was a small merchant schooner from New Orleans laden with a munitions cargo for Texas troops stationed at Goliad. The vessel wrecked at the entrance of the historic Pass Cavallo while evading capture from a Mexican brig-of-war in November of 1835.

Borgens, Amy Anne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

293

Diversity and Inclusion Events Calendar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 « National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » « National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 « National German - American Heritage Month 3:45PM EDT » « National Hispanic Heritage Month 3:45PM to 11:45PM EDT » International Day of Democracy 3:45PM EDT African American Federal Executive Association, Inc. 9th Annual Training Workshop 9:00AM to 5:00PM EDT Equal Opportunity Publications' STEM Diversity Career Expo 9:45AM EDT International Day of Peace 3:45PM EDT Mexican Independence Day 3:45PM EDT Constitution / Citizenship Day 3:45PM EDT

294

Sustainable fuelwood use in rural Mexico. Volume 1: Current patterns of resource use  

SciTech Connect

The present report summarizes the results of the first phase of a project of cooperation between the Mexican National Commission for Energy Conservation (CONAE) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) on sustainable biofuel use in rural Mexico. This first phase has been devoted to (i) conducting an in-depth review of the status of fuelwood use in rural and peri-urban areas of Mexico, (ii) providing improved estimates of biomass energy use, (iii) assessing the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of fuelwood use, and (iv) identifying preliminary potential lines of action to improve the patterns of biomass energy use in Mexico; in particular, identifying those interventions that, by improving living conditions for rural inhabitants, can result in global benefits (such as the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions). A comprehensive review of the existing documentation of biofuel use in rural and peri-urban Mexico was conducted. Reports from official, academic, and non-governmental organizations were gathered and analyzed. A computerized rural energy database was created by re-processing a national rural energy survey. Because of the paucity of information about biofuel use in small rural industries, most of the analysis is devoted to the household sector.

Masera, O.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Price and policy cast cloud on U. S. imports of LNG  

SciTech Connect

LNG use in the U.S. may be less than previously anticipated, due to a U.S. Government policy which de-emphasizes reliance on imported fuels and to price disputes with suppliers, notably Algeria. According to the American Gas Association, the U.S. could be importing 3 trillion cu ft/yr of LNG by 2000, compared with the 1.8 trillion cu ft/yr in pipeline exports expected from Canada and Mexico. Of the three existing LNG import projects, the two run by El Paso Natural Gas Co. are suspended, due to a dispute with Algeria on whether the LNG price should match the price of crude oil at the point of shipment, or be set equivalent to the price of alternative fuels at the point of use. Distrigas Corp., Everett, Mass., continues to import LNG. The attitude of some U.S. agencies on LNG imports, factors, including Canadian and Mexican gas pricing, which enter into the LNG pricing dispute, and safety and investment decisions required if LNG imports are increased are discussed, and a checklist of LNG import projects in the U.S., with information on company, terminal, contract, delivery, number of ships, investment, and LNG cost is given.

Jennrich, J.

1980-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector EnergyEfficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexicoand China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector)program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designingenergy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years ofpursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced fewresults, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 tofocus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum.Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leadingto an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federallevel. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China wassuccessfully initiated and led at the central government level withstrategic support from international experts. The very different successtrajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons fordesigning country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives.Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasinginitiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiencyperformance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsementlabeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simplepilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosenproducts), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasingprograms are likely to be more successful where there is high-levelpolitical endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supportedby a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led)purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to settheir own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks ofcities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasingofficials.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris,Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Limit Cycle and Conserved Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a potential coexists with limit cycle. Here the potential determines the final distribution of population. Our demonstration consists of three steps: We first show the existence of limit from a typical physical sciences setting: the potential is a type of Mexican hat type, with the strength of a magnetic field scale with the strength the potential gradient near the limit cycle, and the friction goes to zero faster than the potential near the limit cycle. Hence the dynamics at the limit cycle is conserved. The diffusion matrix is nevertheless finite at the limit cycle. Secondly, we construct the potential in the dynamics with limit cycle in a typical dynamical systems setting. Thirdly, we argue that such a construction can be carried out in a more general situation based on a method discovered by one of us. This method of dealing with stochastic differential equation is in general different from both Ito and Stratonovich calculus. Our result may be useful in many related applications, such as in the discussion of metastability of limit cycle and in the construction of Hopfield potential in the neural network computation.

X. -M. Zhu; L. Yin; P. Ao

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

299

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

300

Corn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Corn Nature Bulletin No. 118 May 31, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CORN Corn, or maize, has never been found growing wild. Columbus found it being grown by the Carib Indians and called it " Mahiz". The Aztecs told Cortez it was a gift from their gods, but the Mayas and the Incas already had been growing corn for thousands of years. Teosinte, a coarse native Mexican grass, appears to be its closest relative and its origin was probably in Central or South America. Our first colonists planted seed obtained from the Indians and, "corn" being the English word for all grain, called this strange new plant "Indian corn". Without man' s help, corn soon would disappear. Each year the seed must be carefully selected, carefully planted, and the soil kept cultivated to remove competition from other plants. Modern scientific breeding has produced varieties remarkable for their rapid growth, uniform size and heavy yield.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

302

Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Facts on Women and Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. In 2006, 315,930 women died from it. 1 ? Heart disease killed 26 % of the women who died in 2006—more than one in every four. 1 Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a "man's disease, " around the same number of women and men die each year of heart disease in the United States. Unfortunately, 36 % of women did not perceive themselves to be at risk for heart disease in a 2005 survey. 2 Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian American women, heart disease is second only to cancer. 3 In 2006, about 6.9 % of all white women, 8.8 % of black women, and 6.6 % of Mexican American women were living with coronary heart disease. 4

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers  

SciTech Connect

A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom.

James Graham, Robert Leslie [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rl.graham@ulster.ac.uk; Graham, Ciaren [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); McClean, Stephen [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Chen, Tianbao [School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ (United Kingdom); O'Rourke, Martin [School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ (United Kingdom); Hirst, David [School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ (United Kingdom); Theakston, David [The Venom Unit, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, University of Liverpool, L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Shaw, Chris [School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ (United Kingdom)

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Repetitive precision gravity studies at the Cerro Prieto and Heber geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study subsidence and mass removal, a precise gravity network was established on 60 permanent monuments in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in early 1978, and repeated annually through early 1981; the survey was tied to two bedrock sites outside the limits of the current production zone. The looping technique of station occupation was utilized, in which occupation of the base was followed by occupation of several stations, followed by a return to the base. Use of two LaCoste and Romberg gravity meters, and replication of values within loops as well as entire loops, enhanced precision such that the median standard deviations of the base-to-station differences, reduced to observed gravity values, ranged from 7 to 15 microgals for individual surveys. The smaller values were obtained as field and data reduction techniques were improved and experience was gained. A similar survey was initiated in the Heber area just north of the Mexican border in early 1980. It too was established on permanent monuments, was tied to bedrock stations outside the geothermal area, and used multiple repetitions of values with two meters to achieve high precision.

Grannell, R.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Railroad system of Texas: A component of the state and national transportation infrastructure. Research report, September 1996--November 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Railroads continue to play an important role in the Texas transportation system. This study addresses the potential for implementing a rail planning process in the Texas Department of Transportation. The study is documented in three reports, produced in coordinated and parallel efforts by the Center for Transportation Research and the Texas Transportation Institute. This report documents the work performed by TTI, whereby a rail planning framework is presented which formalizes the planning process and presents the key elements as a series of discrete and logical steps. These steps may be used to guide TxDOT in the formation of goals, identification of issues and affected parties, selection of appropriate analytical methodologies, location of data sources, and implementation of results. The report also presents an in-depth discussion of several key issues facing transportation agencies. These include rail line abandonment, intermodal service planning, and urban rail rationalization. A discussion of the Texas rail system covers the Class 1 railroads, shortline railroads, Amtrak, and the Mexican rail system.

Roop, S.S.; Warner, J.E.; Rosa, D.; Dickinson, R.W.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Subsidence and uplift at Heber Geothermal field, California  

SciTech Connect

Heber Geothermal field is in the Imperial Valley near the City of Heber, California, about 3 1/2 miles north of the Mexican border. The field is at the southern end of a network of irrigated agricultural fields extending across the valley floor. The Heber geothermal system is circular, producing water of moderate temperature (360{degrees}F) and low-salinity (13,000-14,000 ppm TDS). In cross section, the geothermal system resembles a lopsided mushroom. The system has three major permeability units: capping clays form 500 to 1800 feet; a high-matrix-permeability, deltaic-sandstone outflow reservoir from 1,800 to 5,500 feet; and feeder faults and fractures in indurated sediments below 5,500 feet. The deltaic sandstones were deposited by the ancestral Colorado River. As both power plants continue operating in Heber field, the need persists to monitor subsidence and uplift. The field`s subsidence bowl is not expected to expand significantly, but some small changes are expected due to pressure changes caused by production for the SIGC binary power plant. The three SIGC injection wells, located between the production areas for the two power plants, will be managed for adequate reservoir pressure support.

Boardman, T.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assessment of particulate concentrations from domestic biomass combustion in rural Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Recent evidence has suggested that woodsmoke exposure in developed countries is associated with acute and chronic health impacts. Particulate concentrations were measured in rural Mexican kitchens using biomass combustion for cooking. To investigate differences in indoor particle concentrations between kitchens using different fuels and stove types, measurements were made in eight kitchens using only biomass, six using only liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), six using a combination of biomass and LPG, and three using biomass in ventilated stoves. Outdoor samples were collected at the same time as the indoor samples. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were made with inertial impactors, and particle light scattering was measured continuously with an integrating nephelometer. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations (mean concentrations of 768 and 555 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively) in the kitchens burning only biomass were greater than in all other types (biomass > biomass + LPG > ventilated > LPG > outdoor). A similar trend was evident for the indoor/outdoor concentration ratio. Based on the short-term measurements estimated from the nephelometer data, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} cooking period average and 5-min peak concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in kitchens using only biomass than in those using LPG, a combination of LPG and biomass, or a ventilated biomass stove. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Brauer, M.; Bartlett, K. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouer (Canada); Regalado-Pineda, J.; Perez-Padilla, R. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Tlalpan (Mexico)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mathematical modeling to predict residential solid waste generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges faced by waste management authorities is determining the amount of waste generated by households in order to establish waste management systems, as well as trying to charge rates compatible with the principle applied worldwide, and design a fair payment system for households according to the amount of residential solid waste (RSW) they generate. The goal of this research work was to establish mathematical models that correlate the generation of RSW per capita to the following variables: education, income per household, and number of residents. This work was based on data from a study on generation, quantification and composition of residential waste in a Mexican city in three stages. In order to define prediction models, five variables were identified and included in the model. For each waste sampling stage a different mathematical model was developed, in order to find the model that showed the best linear relation to predict residential solid waste generation. Later on, models to explore the combination of included variables and select those which showed a higher R{sup 2} were established. The tests applied were normality, multicolinearity and heteroskedasticity. Another model, formulated with four variables, was generated and the Durban-Watson test was applied to it. Finally, a general mathematical model is proposed to predict residential waste generation, which accounts for 51% of the total.

Ojeda Benitez, Sara [Engineering Institute, UABC, Boulevard Benito Juarez y Calle de la Normal S/N, Col. Insurgentes Este, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)], E-mail: sojedab@uabc.mx; Lozano-Olvera, Gabriela [Engineering Institute, UABC, Boulevard Benito Juarez y Calle de la Normal S/N, Col. Insurgentes Este, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Morelos, Raul Adalberto [CESUES Superior Studies Center, San Luis R.C. Sonora (Mexico); Vega, Carolina Armijo de [Engineering Faculty, UABC, Km 103, Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

Stakeholder identification of advanced technology opportunities at international ports of entry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Advanced Technologies for International and Intermodal Ports of Entry (ATIPE) Project, a diverse group of stakeholders was engaged to help identify problems experienced at inland international border crossings, particularly those at the US-Mexican border. The fundamental issue at international ports of entry is reducing transit time through the required documentation and inspection processes. Examples of other issues or problems, typically manifested as time delays at border crossings, repeatedly mentioned by stakeholders include: (1) lack of document standardization; (2) failure to standardize inspection processes; (3) inadequate information and communications systems; (4) manual fee and tariff collection; (5) inconsistency of processes and procedures; and (6) suboptimal cooperation among governmental agencies. Most of these issues can be addressed to some extent by the development of advanced technologies with the objective of allowing ports of entry to become more efficient while being more effective. Three categories of technologies were unambiguously of high priority to port of entry stakeholders: (1) automated documentation; (2) systems integration; and (3) vehicle and cargo tracking. Together, these technologies represent many of the technical components necessary for pre-clearance of freight approaching international ports of entry. Integration of vehicle and cargo tracking systems with port of entry information and communications systems, as well as existing industry legacy systems, should further enable border crossings to be accomplished consistently with optimal processing times.

Parker, S.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Policy and Planning Dept.; Icerman, L. [Icerman and Associates, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lack of an energy policy remains a major barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the war with Iraq provided a new dimension to the ongoing oil industry struggle to cope with oppressive government action and regulation. Coming as it did just before the administration was to announce guidelines for a long-awaited National Energy Strategy (NES), the war created a renewed and dramatic focus on the national energy security question. Now, numerous congressmen, senators and administration leaders are taking a fresh look at how the U.S. can extricate itself from excessive dependence on Middle East oil imports. For example, the planned free-trade agreement with Mexico could figure prominently in an alliance that would bring much more Mexican oil to the U.S. Meanwhile, the wild card is proposals to open up U.S. drilling offshore and in the Arctic National Wildlife Region (ANWR). Prior to hostilities, Middle East tensions brought on significant increases in the price of oil, and with it a large gain in oil company profits for fourth-quarter 1990. Result: talk in Congress of a new windfall profits tax.

Owen, D.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The impact of natural gas imports on air pollutant emissions in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the impact that natural gas imports could have on fuel emissions in northern Mexico. The authors discuss the problem created in the 1980s when a shift from natural gas to residual oil in industrial processes increased emissions of air pollutants significantly. The benefits of substituting leaded for unleaded gasoline in the 1990s are discussed also. In July 1992 the Mexican government announced for the first time since oil nationalization that private companies in Mexico are allowed to directly import natural gas. The transportation of natural gas, however, remains reserved only for Pemex, the national oil company. This opens the possibility of reducing the burning of high-sulfur residual oil in both the industrial and the energy production sectors in Mexico, particularly in the northern region where only 6.7% of the of the country`s natural gas is produced. Natural gas imports have also opened the possibility of using compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles in northern Mexico. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Bustani, A.; Cobas, E. [Center for Environmental Quality, Monterrey (Mexico)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Spotlight on Mexico. The domino effect: crude price changes since December 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While world crude prices continue their downward slide, the world is watching Mexico to see how it follows the trend. If the cut to be announced is too deep, petro-dollars will be sacrificed; if the cut is too modest, share of market may suffer. Just as Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state oil company, was the means for overextension in borrowing and for wrong-headed administration, at this moment PEMEX is becoming the means for Mexico's restoration. While Mexico confronts its worst financial crisis since the revolution, PEMEX confronts its most difficult challenge since nationalization of the oil industry in 1938. To stop the compromising flood of petro-dollars out of PEMEX, the national oil company has been made subordinate to the Ministry of Energy, Mines, and State Industries. What Mexico is doing about the PEMEX crisis may be promotive of Mexican nationalism and international bankers' security at the same time. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for February 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. 5 figures, 7 tables.

Not Available

1983-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Pemex opts for catalytic dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

In the gas-rich areas such as the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Canada, and Mexico, low-cost ethane is the feed of choice for ethylene production. Coproduct production is minimal. Continued growth in demand for propylene, isobutylene, normal butone-1, and butadiene requires that alternate sources of these normally coproduct olefins be developed. Catalytic dehydrogenation, with its high selectivity to the desired olefin, is the logical and economic choice. Mexico is a case in point. It's ethylene production is based on ethane. Demand is rising for propylene and butadiene derivatives, and a potential demand exists for isobutylene to produce octane enhancers to implement an announced lead phase down. Only modest amounts of by-product monoolefin will be available from refining operations. Pemex, the Mexican refining and petrochemical giant, recognized this and started up its first Houdry Catadene /SUP TM/ plant in 1975 at Ciudad Madero to produce 55,000 metric ton/year of butadiene from normal butane. Pemex recently committed to a large (350,000 metric ton/year) propylene-from-propane plant at Morelos based on the Houdry Catofin /SUP TM/ catalytic dehydrogenation process. The plant will supply propylene to a long list of derivative plants (Table 1).

Craig, R.G.; Penny, S.J.; Schwartz, W.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and clams (Rangia cuneata) in Laguna de Pom, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Laguna de Pom is a coastal lagoon within the Laguna de Terminos system in southern Gulf of Mexico. It belongs to the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin, and is located between 18{degrees} 33{prime} and 18{degrees} 38{prime} north latitude and 92{degrees} 01{prime} and 92{degrees} 14{prime} west longitude, in the Coastal Plain physiographic Province of the Gulf. It is ellipsoidal and approximately 10 km long, with a surface area of 5,200 ha and a mean depth of 1.5 m. Water salinity and temperature ranges are 0 to 13 {per_thousand} and 25{degrees} to 31{degrees}C, respectively. Benthic macrofauna is dominated by bivalves such as the clams Rangia cuneata, R. flexuosa, and Polymesoda carolineana. These clams provide the basis of an artisanal fishery, which is the main economic activity in the region. The presence of several oil-processing facilities around the lagoon is very conspicuous, which together with decreasing yields has created social conflicts, with the fishermen blaming the mexican state oil company (PEMEX) for the decrease in the clam population. This work aims to determine if the concentration of hydrocarbons in the clams (R. cuneata) and sediments of Laguna de Pom are responsible for the declining clam fishery. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Alvarez-Legorreta, T.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Zapata-Perez, O. [Unidad Merida (Mexico)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mayan mexican olmeca" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mexico hopes its economy will soon be cooking with gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last 60 years, the logo of Mexico`s energy sector could easily have been a `No trespassing` sign. Everything from finding, storing, and transporting oil and gas to siting, financing, and operating powerplants has been handled by only two state-owned entities and controlled out of a handful of offices in Mexico City. Decentralization is changing the ground rules and playing field for all of corporate Mexico. But it`s hard to imagine any Mexican company being affected more than Pemex - and not just because of its size. Analysts believe that the company wants to spend more money looking for new oil and gas reserves, both on- and off-shore. But to justify a larger investment in exploration, the company needs a larger domestic market, and that will require an expanded gas pipeline system. Gas is the focus because Pemex already knows that industrial demand for it will soon skyrocket: Last year, CFE issued new regulations that call for all of its oil-burning powerplants to switch to natural gas by 1998 to help reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}.

Reyser, J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PEMEX: Incentives in a government-owned firm  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation analysis the capture of Mexico's oil company, PEMEX, through a historical overview of the Mexican oil industry and through a reference model of PEMEX's behavior. From this analysis, the dissertation will claim the following: (1) Due to the collective-action strength acquired by the PEMEX union in its initial decade (1938-1947) the government found it is less costly to co-opt union leaders than to negotiate with a militant union. The costs of this arrangement have increased ever since. Chapters 2 through 4 contain discursive and historical arguments to sustain this claim. (2) When the government's co-optation model can account for overmanning (more generally, relative factor input distortions) but fails to explain promotion practices based on union militancy, or for the relative decline of tenured contracts (Chapters 5 and 6). Based on the historical understanding of operational features and the incompleteness of the co-option model, one can draw that PEMEX does not operate on the (minimum) cost function. Therefore, PEMEX's sources of inefficiency go beyond overmanning and subcontracting distortions (Chapter 7). This dissertation concludes that governmental operation of an extractive industry in the form of a monopoly does not efficiently transfer to taxpayers their ownership rights to subsoil rents.

Salas, F.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Concentration system performance degradation in the aftermath of Mount Pinatubo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic eruptions occur every few years, but most have little effect on solar radiation or climate. However, in the last ten years two volcanoes have decreased solar radiation and influenced weather at a level that might be expected at the frequency of about once a century. The Mexican volcano El Chichon and the Philippine volcano Mount Pinatubo put 6 and 20 million metric tons of SO{sub 2} in the stratosphere, respectively. SO{sub 2} is converted into H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which mixes with water to produce aerosol. Since there is no weather in the stratosphere and the aerosol is small, these aerosol particles remain suspended until coagulation and sedimentation bring them to the troposphere where they are removed by normal wet and dry deposition processes. The extinction in the direct solar irradiance from El Chichon was found to peak during the winter of 1983 at about 11% for northern, mid latitudes. Mount Pinatubo`s peak extinction during 1992 was about 15%. Data from four northern, mid-latitude sites are examined to compare the direct consequences of the volcano`s eruption on the performance of concentrating solar energy systems and the indirect effects that may be associated with Mount Pinatubo`s perturbation of the weather.

Michalsky, J.J.; Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center; Ineichen, P. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Groupe de Physique Appliquee

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Value at Risk (VaR) is a relatively new methodology used to quantify risk exposure. Although widely used in the financial and energy sectors of the economy, VaR has yet to gain the same acceptance in the field of agriculture. This thesis provides an introduction to Value at Risk and explains both its strengths and weaknesses. Empirical case studies are developed, and VaR calculation is shown for the unique portfolios of three different agricultural processor situations. The procurement division of a domestic bread baking company is used to empirically demonstrate how VaR could be implemented to evaluate the price risk associated with both the ingredient and energy inputs. A second case considers the same input portfolio; however, the analysis is expanded to include output price risk and show how considering input and output risk simultaneously impacts the risk-reducing effects of numerous hedging strategies. The third case introduces foreign currency exchange risk as VaR is computed for the portfolio of a Mexican flour milling company that purchases its inputs in a foreign currency. iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Cullen Richard Hawes

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

High school students' perceptions of and attitudes toward globalization: an analysis of international baccalaureate students in Estado de Mexico, Mexico, and Texas, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the last few decades have seen a proliferation of debate concerning todayâ��s international system referred to as â��globalization,â� education has seen an exponential rise in curriculum (such as that promoted by global education, international education, and the International Baccalaureate Organization) that instills students with â��international understandingâ� and â��global perspectives.â� Through a two-site, interpretive study, this dissertation explored the nature of 15 studentsâ�� international understanding and their grasp of globalization. Qualitative techniques for data collection involved open-ended questionnaires and interviews, and emergent category designation was employed for qualitative data analysis. International Baccalaureate students from Estado de M�©xico and Texas revealed complex, yet well-developed, perceptions of globalization that spoke of a system which privileges the powerful and leaves the developing world behind. Both U.S. and Mexican students were skeptical of the United Statesâ�� position as the dominant player in world politics, economics, and global culture, and students from both sides of the border lamented local culture loss in globalization.

Brown, Jennifer Gayle

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nonlinear Thomson scattering of an ultrashort laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear scattering of an ultrashort laser pulse by free electrons is considered. The pulse is described in the 'Mexican hat' wavelet basis. The equation of motion for a charged particle in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave has an exact solution allowing, together with the instant spectrum approximation, the calculation of the intensity of nonlinear Thomson scattering for a high-intensity laser pulse. The spectral distribution of scattered radiation for the entire pulse duration is found by integrating with respect to time. The maximum of the emission spectrum of a free electron calculated in 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} fields lies in the UV spectral region between 3 and 12 eV. A part of the continuous spectrum achieves high photon energies. One percent of the scattered energy for the field intensity 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} is concentrated in the range h{omega} > 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} eV, for a field intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} in the range h{Omega} > 7.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} eV, and for an intensity of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} in the range h{Omega} > 2.45 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} eV. These results allow us to estimate nonlinear scattering as a source of hard X-rays.

Golovinski, P. A., E-mail: golovinski@bk.ru; Mikhin, E. A. [Voronezh State Architectural-Building University (Russian Federation)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hantavirus testing in small mammal populations of northcentral New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, an outbreak of a new strain of hantavirus in the southwestern US indicated that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the primary carrier of the virus. In 1993 and 1994, the Ecological Studies Team (EST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory surveyed small mammal populations in Los Alamos County, New Mexico, primarily for ecological risk assessment (ecorisk) studies. At the request of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico, EST also collected blood samples from captured animals for use in determining seroprevalence of hantavirus in this region due to the recent outbreak of this virus in the four-comers region of the Southwest. The deer mouse was the most commonly captured species during the tripping sessions. Other species sampled included harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis), least chipmunk (Eutamias minimus), long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus), Mexican woodrat (Neotoma mexicana), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii). The team collected blood samples from tripped animals following CDC`s suggested guidelines. Results of the 1993 and 1994 hantavirus testing identified a total overall seroprevalence of approximately 5.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The highest seroprevalence rates were found in deer mice seri (3--6%), but results on several species were inconclusive; further studies will be necessary, to quantify seroprevalence rates in those species. Seroprevalence rates for Los Alamos County were much lower than elsewhere in the region.

Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Foxx, T. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

329

Mexico Border HIV Drug abuse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ó The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38 % were Hispanic, 72 % male and median age was 37; 27 % ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession.

Tyson Volkmann; Sanghyuk S. Shin; Richard S. Garfein; Irina Artamanova; Steffanie A. Strathdee; T. Volkmann; S. S. Shin; R. S. Garfein; R. A. Pollini; K. D. Wagner; I. Artamanova; S. A. Strathdee; T. L. Patterson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Symposium in the field of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mexico and the US are nations with abundant sources of geothermal energy, and both countries have progressed rapidly in developing their more accessible resources. For example, Mexico has developed over 600 MWe at Cerro Prieto, while US developers have brought in over 2000 MWe at the Geysers. These successes, however, are only a prologue to an exciting future. All forms of energy face technical and economic barriers that must be overcome if the resources are to play a significant role in satisfying national energy needs. Geothermal energy--except for the very highest grade resources--face a number of barriers, which must be surmounted through research and development. Sharing a common interest in solving the problems that impede the rapid utilization of geothermal energy, Mexico and the US agreed to exchange information and participate in joint research. An excellent example of this close and continuing collaboration is the geothermal research program conducted under the auspices of the 3-year agreement signed on April 7, 1986 by the US DOE and the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The major objectives of this bilateral agreement are: (1) to achieve a thorough understanding of the nature of geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary and fractured igneous rocks; (2) to investigate how the geothermal resources of both nations can best be explored and utilized; and (3) to exchange information on geothermal topics of mutual interest.

Ramirez, Miguel; Mock, John E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

333

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

334

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

335

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

336

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

337

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

338

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

339

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

340

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

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341

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

342

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

343

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

344

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

345

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

346

Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach ? Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback ? With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements ? Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee ? Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007 ? Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf. ? Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged. ? Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications ? Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems ? Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs ? Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning ? Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability ? Analyzed SAV cover change at five other bays in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate extensibility of the analytical tools ? Initiated development of a conceptual model for understanding the causes and effects of HABs in the Gulf of Mexico IT Tool Development ? Established a website with the GoMRC web-based tools at www.gomrc.org ? Completed development of an ArcGIS-based decision support tool for SAV restoration prioritization decisions, and demonstrated its use in Mobile Bay ? Developed a web-based application, called Conceptual Model Explorer (CME), that enables non-GIS users to employ the prioritization model for SAV restoration ? Created CME tool enabling scientists to view existing, and create new, ecosystem conceptual models which can be used to document cause-effect relationships within coastal ecosystems, and offer guidance on management solutions. ? Adapted the science-driven advanced web search engine, Noesis, to focus on an initial set of coastal and marine resource issues, including SAV and HABs ? Incorporated map visualization tools with initial data layers related to coastal wetlands and SAVs

Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; hardin, danny; Estes, Maury

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact of the Desert Dust on the Summer Monsoon System over Southwestern North America  

SciTech Connect

The radiative forcing of dust emitted from the Southwest United States (US) deserts and its impact on monsoon circulation and precipitation over the North America monsoon (NAM) region are simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for 15 years (1995-2009). During the monsoon season, dust has a cooling effect (-0.90 W m{sup -2}) at the surface, a warming effect (0.40 W m{sup -2}) in the atmosphere, and a negative top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) forcing (-0.50 W m{sup -2}) over the deserts on 24-h average. Most of the dust emitted from the deserts concentrates below 800 hPa and accumulates over the western slope of the Rocky Mountains and Mexican Plateau. The absorption of shortwave radiation by dust heats the lower atmosphere by up to 0.5 K day{sup -1} over the western slope of the Mountains. Model sensitivity simulations with and without dust for 15 summers (June-July-August) show that dust heating of the lower atmosphere over the deserts strengthens the low-level southerly moisture fluxes on both sides of the Sierra Madre Occidental. It also results in an eastward migration of NAM-driven moisture convergence over the western slope of the Mountains. These monsoonal circulation changes lead to a statistically significant increase of precipitation by up to {approx}40% over the eastern slope of the Mountains (Arizona-New Mexico-Texas regions). This study highlights the interaction between dust and the NAM system and motivates further investigation of possible dust feedback on monsoon precipitation under climate change and the megadrought conditions projected for the future.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

A hybrid source apportionment model integrating measured data and air quality model results - article no. D07301  

SciTech Connect

The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility (BRAVO) study was an intensive air quality study designed to understand the causes of haze in Big Bend National Park. Daily speciated fine aerosols were measured from July through October 1999 at 37 sites located mostly in Texas. In support of BRAVO, two chemical transport models (CTMs) were used to apportion particulate sulfate at Big Bend and other sites in Texas to sources in the eastern and western United States, Texas, Mexico, and the Carbon I and II coal-fired power plants, located 225 km southeast of Big Bend in Mexico. Analysis of the CTM source attribution results and comparison to results from receptor models revealed systematic biases. To reduce the multiplicative biases, a hybrid source apportionment model, based on inverse modeling, was developed that adjusted the initial CTM source contributions so the modeled sulfate concentrations optimally fit the measured data, resulting in refined daily source contributions. The method was tested using synthetic data and successfully reduced source attribution biases. The refined sulfate source attribution results reduced the initial eastern U.S. contribution to Big Bend, averaged over the BRAVO study period, from about 40% to about 30%, while Mexico's contribution increased from 24 - 32% about 40%. The contribution from the Carbon facility increased from similar to 14% to over 20%. The increase in Mexico's contribution is consistent with more recent SO{sub 2} emissions estimates that indicate that the BRAVO Mexican SO{sub 2} emissions were underestimated. Source attribution results for other monitoring sites in west Texas were similar to results at Big Bend.

Schichtel, B.A.; Malm, W.C.; Gebhart, K.A.; Barna, M.G.; Knipping, E.M. [Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Performance of a new wind updating system for a prognostic meteorological model in the environs of Mexico City  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory and Institute Mexicano del Petroleo are completely a joint study of options for improving air quality in Mexico City. The US Department of Energy supported the efforts of the Los Alamos investigators, while PEMEX supported the efforts of the Mexican researchers. One of the first steps in the process was to develop an understanding of the existing air quality situation. In this context we have modified a three-dimensional, prognostic, higher order turbulence model for atmospheric circulation (HOTMAC) to treat domains which include an urbanized area. This sophisticated meteorological model is required because of the complexity of the terrain and the relative paucity of meteorological data. Mexico City lies at an elevation of approximately 7500 feet above sea level in a ``U`` shaped basin which opens to the north. The city occupies a major part of the southwest portion of the basin. Upper level winds are provided by rawinsondes at the airport, while low-level winds are measured at several sites within the city. Many of the sites have obstructed upwind fetches for a variety of directions. During the wintertime when the worst air quality episodes occur, the winds are frequently light, and out of the northeast at lower levels, while above 1000 meters above the surface they are usually from the southwest. This means the winds are light within the city, but significant slope winds develop which influence the behavior of the pollutants. Frequently, the winds in the basin change as a seabreeze penetrates the basin from the northeast. The seabreeze produces a much different wind regime after its arrival in the late afternoon or early evening. This makes it important to update the winds in a realistic fashion.

Williams, M.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Decision support model for evaluating biofuel development along the U.S.-Mexico border.  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors cooperated on the development of the Biofuels Deployment Model (BDM) to assess the feasibility, implications, limitations, and enablers of producing 90 billion gallons of ethanol per year by 2030. Leveraging the past investment, a decision support model based on the BDM is being developed to assist investors, entrepreneurs, and decision makers in evaluating the costs and benefits associated with biofuels development in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Specifically, the model is designed to assist investors and entrepreneurs in assessing the risks and opportunities associated with alternative biofuels development strategies along the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as, assist local and regional decision makers in understanding the tradeoffs such development poses to their communities. The decision support model is developed in a system dynamics framework utilizing a modular architecture that integrates the key systems of feedstock production, transportation, and conversion. The model adopts a 30-year planning horizon, operating on an annual time step. Spatially the model is disaggregated at the county level on the U.S. side of the border and at the municipos level on the Mexican side. The model extent includes Luna, Hildalgo, Dona Anna, and Otero counties in New Mexico, El Paso and Hudspeth counties in Texas, and the four munipos along the U.S. border in Chihuahua. The model considers a variety of feedstocks; specifically, algae, gitropha, castor oil, and agricultural waste products from chili and pecans - identifying suitable lands for these feedstocks, possible yields, and required water use. The model also evaluates the carbon balance for each crop and provides insight into production costs including labor demands. Finally, the model is fitted with an interactive user interface comprised of a variety of controls (e.g., slider bars, radio buttons), descriptive text, and output graphics allowing stakeholders to directly explore the tradeoffs between alternative biofuels development scenarios.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Correa, Alberto (Bi-National Sustainability Laboratory Santa Teresa, NM); Maxwell, Paul (Bi-National Sustainability Laboratory Santa Teresa, NM); Malczynski, Leonard A.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling and assessment of flow and transport in the Hueco Bolson, a transboundary groundwater system: the El Paso / Cuidad Juarez case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential contamination from hazardous and solid waste landfills stemming from population increase, rapid industrialization, and the proliferation of assembly plants known as the maquiladoras, are of major concern in the U.S.-Mexican border area. Additionally, historical, current, and future stresses on the Hueco Bolson alluvial aquifer in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area due to excessive groundwater withdrawal can affect contaminant migration in the area. In the current study, an updated and improved threedimensional numerical groundwater flow and transport model is developed using a current Hueco Bolson groundwater availability model as its basis. The model with contaminant transport is required to access and characterize the extent of vulnerability of the aquifer to potential contamination from landfills in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez border area. The model developed in this study is very capable of serving as the basis of future studies for water availability, water quality, and contamination assessments in the Hueco Bolson. The implementation of fate and transport modeling and the incorporation of the Visual MODFLOW® pre and post processor, requiring MODFLOW 2000 data conversion, enabled significant enhancements to the numerical modeling and computing capabilities for the Hueco Bolson. The model in the current research was also developed by employing MT3DMS©, ZONEBUDGET, and Visual PEST® for automated calibrations. Simulation results found that the Hueco Bolson released more water from storage than the aquifer was being recharged in response to increased pumping to supply the growing border area population. Hence, significant head drops and high levels of drawdown were observed in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area. Predictive simulations were completed representing scenarios of potential contamination from the border area sites. Fate and transport results were most sensitive to hydraulic conductivities, flow velocities, and directions at the sites. Sites that were located within the vicinity of the El Paso Valley and the Rio Grande River, where head differences and permeabilities were significant, exhibited the highest potentials for contaminant migration.

Nwaneshiudu, Okechukwu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Expression and Evaluation of Recombinant Babesia bovis Antigens of Vaccine Potential Against Tick Fever in Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Babesia bovis is a causative agent of bovine babesiosis and is transmitted by vector ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp. The disease has a high mortality rate in susceptible cattle, causing serious economic loss. At present, the only commercial vaccine is culture-based with limited availability. No effective molecular vaccine has been developed to date. Generating a vaccine with specific critical epitopes responsible for protection against B. bovis is critically important. Immunity against B. bovis requires both innate and adaptive responses, with antigen-specific CD4+ T cells essential to the latter through production of IFN-?. Fourteen B. bovis proteins were selected as putative vaccine candidates and their full-length genes cloned for recombinant protein production intended for evaluating peripheral blood mononuclear cell IFN-? secretion level from experimentally infected animals in ELISPOT. All proteins expressed in insoluble form (inclusion bodies) and could not be purified. B. bovis genes were then truncated to exclude signal peptide and transmembrane regions, then cloned and expressed using pET101/D-TOPO in Escherichia coli to obtain soluble, useable proteins. Only recombinant B. bovis MSA1, MSA2b and MSA2a1 proteins were successfully expressed in soluble form. These proteins induce invasion-blocking antibodies in immunized cattle, are hypothesized to elicit protection in susceptible animals, but were previously studied by others. Due to failure to produce new candidates to assay, the animal experiments were not performed. Instead, sera from field-infected cattle were assayed for reactivity against the MSA proteins by indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) and western blot (WB) analysis. Field sera from South Texas (#41) and the Mexican Yucatan (#6, #9 and #11) along with positive and negative controls were tested. In IFA test, cattle #6, #9 and #41 were positive while #11 was negative. In WB, #41 and #6 reacted with the recombinant MSA proteins and with control B. bovis whole parasite lysate. However, both #11 and #9 had no signal in WB, although the latter was positive in IFA. Several theories may explain this phenomenon, such as the different preparation process of the antigen in the two tests, strain differences between sera and test antigens, or the different design and nature of each test.

Lin, Huaiying 1986-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Interannual variability of summer precipitation in Texas and its implication to summer drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Texas normally receives most of its precipitation in the warm season, precipitation deficits in summertime may bring serious agricultural and hydrological disasters. While the underlying physical processes of summer precipitation deficit and drought are unclear, they can be understood in terms of convective instability. This research is designed to investigate how convective instability influences monthly mean precipitation in Texas in the summertime and to examine the modulation of convective instability and precipitation by upper-level circulations, soil moisture, vertical motion, and low-tropospheric warm air transport using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. Statistical approaches including correlation analysis, multiple linear regression analysis and back trajectory analysis were used to reveal the underlying dynamics of their linkage and causality. The results show that warming at 700 mb and surface dryness result in excessive convective inhibition (CIN), leading to precipitation deficits on a monthly time-scale. Temperature at 700 mb (Tlt) and surface dewpoint have little correlation suggesting different processes contribute to warming at 700 mb and surface dryness, respectively. Correlation analysis among the surface variables emphasizes the role of soil moisture on the dewpoint and thermodynamics at the surface. Back trajectory analysis indicates that a significant contributor to warming at 700 mb is the inversion caused by warm air transport from the Rocky Mountains and the Mexican Plateau where the surface potential temperature is greater than 307.5K rather than by subsidence. It was found that downward motion and warm air transport are enhanced in Texas when upper-level anticyclonic circulation develops in the southern US. Upper-level anticyclonic circulations in the southern US strongly affect Texas summertime precipitation by modulating the principal processes as follows. They increase CIN not only by enhancing warm air transport from the high terrain but also by suppressing occurrence of disturbances. The resulting reduced precipitation and dry soil significantly modulate surface conditions, which elevates CIN and decreases precipitation. The aforementioned chain-reaction of upper-level anticyclone influences can be understood in the context of CIN.

Myoung, Boksoon

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Investigation of colonias residents' potential for self-help housing construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The colonias of the Lower Rio Grande Valley are rural, unincorporated subdivisions where infrastructure exists in an embryonic stage. Although many of the houses in these communities are of substandard quality, the communities provide a unique environment where self-help home building flourishes. The residents of colonias comprise a homogeneous population, predominately unskilled, Mexican-American immigrants who earn minimum wage and command little or no English language ability. Most colonias residents cannot afford housing alternatives available within the city limits, hence, the find the colonias their only alternative. This study looked at the existing conditions in the colonias and evaluated the level of potential that colonias households possessed for self-help construction. The guiding hypothesis was that colonias resident groups possess different levels of self-help housing potential. Reconnaissance pointed to types of employment as an appropriate method of grouping residents. Through the methodology of triangulation, often employed in the social sciences, the issues were probed repeatedly from multiple vantage points. The primary data was derived from a survey of key informants (social professionals working in the colonias communities) and case studies of colonias residents. Secondary data was derived from a review of germane self-help studies, particularly those from the Third World, and from studies conducted in the colonias of South Texas. After comparing data, the consistent patterns which emerged were relied upon as outcomes. The conclusions of this investigation describe the impetuses for choosing a colonia location and self-help construction, the deployment of resources in the construction effort, the builders' impressions of the self-help process, and the quality of the housing product produced through the self-help process. Once the requisite skills for self-help construction were defined, and the residents' construction potential was assessed, it was possible to suggest recommendations for methods of providing assistance. Because the findings showed that colonias residents could not be grouped according to employment, that the original hypothesis needed revision. It was found that no abilities were requisite to self-help construction; there were only those variables which facilitate or hinder the self-help construction process.

Roach, Katherine Anne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Neurobiology of Bat Vocal Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vocal plasticity is presumed to be a key element underlying the evolution of human speech and language, but the mechanisms and neuroanatomical basis for this plasticity remain largely unknown. The Mexican free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis, presents a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of the evolution and neurobiology of mammalian vocal communication because this animal displays elements of vocal complexity and plasticity that are more sophisticated than any mammal other than humans, including non-human primates. Current models of vocal control in mammals do not account for the vocal complexity of free-tailed bats. The purpose of this dissertation is to fill that gap in knowledge by identifying a possible neuronal basis for vocal complexity in free-tailed bats. This will be achieved by 1) providing a detailed analysis of the free-tailed bat’s vocal behaviors, 2) mapping the distribution of neurotransmitter receptor types suspected of involvement in vocal control, 3) identifying brain regions that exhibit increased neuronal activity during vocalizing, and 4) pharmacologically manipulating putative vocal control regions to confirm and characterize their function in vocalizing. Analysis of Tadarida’s vocal behavior indicated that they have a vast vocal repertoire, including many different call types, context-dependent sensory-feedback driven vocal plasticity, and syntactically-organized stereotyped songs. Their vocal behavior changed seasonally, so I mapped the distribution of melatonin binding sites in the brain, finding high densities in the striatum, similar to dopamine receptor distribution. I then used immunohistochemical labeling of the immediate early gene cfos to map neuronal activation in brains of highly vocal bats to find ROIs activated by vocal production. This technique not only identified all previously known regions of the mammalian vocal motor pathway but also revealed activity in novel brain regions that could potentially account for vocal plasticity, including a localized region of the basal ganglia, the dorsolateral caudate nucleus, and the anterior cingulate region of the frontal cortex. Pharmacological excitation of these regions evoked complex vocal sequences similar to the songs recorded in the field and lab. These results support the hypothesis that the mammalian basal ganglia may play a crucial role in the plasticity and complexity of mammalian vocal behaviors.

Schwartz, Christine Patrice

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS OF THE IRIS PROJECT OF INTEREST FOR LATIN AMERICA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor design is being developed by an international consortium of 21 organizations from ten countries, including three members from Brazil and one from Mexico. This reflects the interest that Latin America has for a project which addresses the energy needs of the region. Presented here are some of the most recent developments in the IRIS project. The project's highest priority is the current pre-application licensing with the US NRC, which has required an investigation of the major accident sequences and a preliminary probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The results of the accident analyses confirmed the outstanding inherent safety of the IRIS configuration and the PRA analyses indicated a core damage frequency due to internal events of the order of 2E-8. This not only highlights the enhanced safety characteristic of IRIS which should enhance its public acceptance, but it has also prompted IRIS to consider the possibility of being licensed without the need for off-site emergency response planning which would have a very positive economic implication. The modular IRIS, with each module rated at {approx} 335 MWe, is of course an ideal size for developing countries as it allows to easily introduce a moderate amount of power on limited electric grids. IRIS can be deployed in single modules in regions only requiring a few hundred MWs or in multiple modules deployed successively at time intervals in large urban areas requiring a larger amount of power increasing with time. IRIS is designed to operate ''hands-off'' as much as possible, with a small crew, having in mind deployment in areas with limited infrastructure. Thus IRIS has a 48-months maintenance interval, long refueling cycles in excess of three years, and is designed to increase as much as possible operational reliability. For example, the project has recently adopted internal control rod drive mechanisms to eliminate vessel head penetrations and the possibility of corrosion cracking as in Davis-Besse and other plants. Latin America, as many other regions on the earth, needs water as much as electricity. IRIS has developed a water desalination co-generation design which can employ a variety of processes as dictated by local and economic conditions. Applications to the arid Brazilian Nord-Este and Mexican Nord-Oeste are being considered.

Carelli, M.D.; Petrovic, B.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

Vocal Timing in the Bat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bats are social organisms that live in large colonies. However, reliance upon echolocation in order to hunt and navigate, means that bats also face pressing acoustic challenges due to overlap with surrounding noise. Bats also possess fine control over the properties of their echolocation pulses. This study's goal was to determine how bats are able to effectively function in large groups despite the interfering noise generated by conspecifics. Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were exposed to both artificially generated interfering noises and noise generated by conspecifics, and the temporal characteristics of their resulting echolocation calls were analyzed. In addition, bats were given injections of dopaminergic and serotonergic drugs, in an effort to determine which monoamine(s) were capable of altering vocal motor timing and to determine which regions of the brain play a role in regulating the timing of echolocation. I hypothesized that bats would alter the timing of emission of their own echolocation pulses in response to noise, and that drugs affecting the 5HT2A receptor would shift the timing of emission of echolocation pulses. The first part of this dissertation describes a novel temporal alteration behavior that occurs in response to artificially generated intermittent noise, and is characterized by a period of pulse suppression followed by a gradual return to normal call rates. Bats alter the timing of emission of their echolocation pulses to avoid overlap with noise and call within silent periods. The second part of this study investigated whether dopamine or serotonin, or both, could alter the timing of this vocal behavior. The results of this study were inconclusive, although I found some evidence that 5HT2A agonists can produce faster responses. Finally, I show that echolocating bats suppress pulse emission in nearby conspecifics. The resulting decrease in call rate leads to an overall increase in information throughput. This study also demonstrates that bats respond to continuous noise by increasing their call rate, and that the switch between the responses to intermittent noise and continuous noise occurs at a duty cycle of 50% or higher. Overall, this dissertation establishes that bats alter the timing of emission of their echolocation calls in response to noise, and that these mechanisms may be regulated by serotoninergic mechanisms.

Jarvis, Jenna N

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Riding Waves of Dissent: Counter-Imperial Impulses in the Age of Fuller and Melville  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the interplay between antebellum frontier literature and the counter-imperial impulses that impelled the era's political, cultural, and literary developments. Focusing on selected works by James Fenimore Cooper, Margaret Fuller, Francis Parkman, and Herman Melville, I use historicist methods to reveal how these authors drew upon and contributed to a strong and widespread, though ultimately unsuccessful, resistance to the discourse of Manifest Destiny that now identifies the age. For all their important differences, each of the frontier writings I examine reflects the presence of a culturally-pervasive anxiety over issues such as environmental depletion, slavery, Indian removal, and expansion's impact on the character of a nation ostensibly founded on republican, anti-imperialist principles. Moreover, the later works reflect an intensification of such anxiety as the United States entered into war with Mexico and the slavery debate came to increasingly dominate the political scene. Chapter I emphasizes the ideological contestations bred by the antebellum United States' westward march, and signals a departure from recent critical tendencies to omit those contestations in order to portray a more stable narrative of American imperialism. The chapter concludes by arguing that Cooper established an initial narrative formulation that sought to suppress counter-imperial impulses within a mainline triumphalist vision. Chapter II examines Fuller's first published book, Summer on the Lakes, in 1843, in the context of hotbutton controversies over expansion that informed the 1844 presidential contest; employing the metaphor of the dance as her governing trope for engaging unfamiliar landscapes, peoples, and even modes of community, Fuller placed persistently marginalized counter-imperial impulses at the center of her western travelogue. Chapter III discusses Parkman's sub-textual engagement with controversies surrounding the Mexican War; though thoroughly invested in conquest ideologies, Oregon Trail nevertheless resonates with the war's most popular negative associations. Chapter IV explores Melville's attunement to national ambivalences towards rhetorics of Manifest Destiny from the late 1840s through the early 1850s. During this stage of his career, Melville both payed tribute to the Anglo-American triumphalism freighting the antebellum era, and enacted a powerful articulation of the era's counter-imperial impulse.

Lawrence, Nicholas M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research 3 Observations (MILAGRO 2006) campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of 4 Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) pollution outflow and its downwind impacts on air 5 quality and climate. Four aircraft (DOE G-1, NSF/NCAR C-130, NASA-J31, and NASA 6 DC-8) made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and over 7 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of MCMA pollution as it aged and 8 dispersed over the central Mexican plateau and the Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, 9 free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET) balloons, capable of changing altitude on 10 command via satellite, characterized the MCMA outflow by performing repeated soundings 11 during the transit. In this paper, we present an analysis based on the data from two CMET 12 balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated 13 downwind with the outflow for nearly 30 hours. Continuous profile measurements made by 14 the balloons show the evolving structure of the MCMA outflow in considerable detail: its 15 stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion 16 into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon 17 wind profiles, show three different transport pathways for Mexico City outflow on 18-19 18 March: (a) high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b) low-altitude flow 19 over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf, 20 and (c) the same decoupling scenario with entrainment into a cleaner westerly jet below the 21 plateau. The C-130 intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once 22 along each transport pathway. In all three cases, distinct peaks in the urban tracer signature 23 and LIDAR backscatter imagery provided evidence for Mexico City air. The coherence of the 24 high-altitude outflow was well preserved after 25 hours whereas that lower in the atmosphere 25 was more widely dispersed over the same time period. Other C-130 intercepts, previously 26 thought to be from Mexico City, are shown to have likely originated elsewhere. These 27 findings address key questions about the long-range transport of Mexico City pollution and its 28 impact on the regional background. The particular intercepts identified should prove useful in 29 answering a wide range scientific questions pertaining to the transport, transformation, and 30 downwind impacts of megacity air pollution. 31 32

Voss, Paul B.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Flocke, Frank M.; Mao, Huitimg; Hartley, Tom; DeAmicis, Pam; Deonandan, Indira; Contrerars-Jimenez, G.; Martinez-Antonio, O.; Figueroa Estrada, M.; Greenberg, David; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Montzka, DeeDee; Crounse, J. D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Apel, Eric; Madronich, Sasha; de Foy, B.

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Title Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-60144 Year of Publication 2006 Authors McGrory, Laura Van Wie, Philip Coleman, David Fridley, Jeffrey P. Harris, and Edgar Villasenor Franco Conference Name 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2006 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Abstract The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexico and China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing energy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years of pursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced few results, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 to focus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum. Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leading to an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federal level. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China was successfully initiated and led at the central government level with strategic support from international experts. The very different success trajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons for designing country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives. Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasing initiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiency performance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsement labeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simple pilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosen products), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasing programs are likely to be more successful where there is high-level political endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supported by a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led) purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to set their own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks of cities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasing officials.

362

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, México  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report fulfills the deliverables required by the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES/03-PL- 02: Modification No. 3) on behalf of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council. Tasks accomplished in this phase include (a) assessment of data availability for expansion of the URGWOM model, identification of data gaps, generation of data needed from historic data using empirical methods, compilation and verification of the water quality data for reaches between the Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas; (b) development of the RiverWare physical model for the Rio Grande flow for the selected reaches between Elephant Butte Reservoir and El Paso, beginning with a conceptual model for interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys, and within the limits of available data; and (c) implementation of data transfer interface between the coordinated database and hydrologic models. This Project was conducted by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) under the direction of Zhuping Sheng of TAMU and J. Phillip King of New Mexico State University. It was developed to enhance the coordinated database, which was originally developed by the Paso del Norte Watershed Council with support of El Paso Water Utilities to fulfill needs for better management of regional water resources and to expand the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) to cover the river reaches between Elephant Butte Dam, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas. In Phases I and II of this Project (TAES/03-PL-02), hydrological data needed for flow model development were compiled and data gaps were identified and a conceptual model developed. The objectives of this phase were to develop a physical model of the Rio Grande flow between Elephant Butte Dam and American Dam by using data collected in the first development phase of the PdNWC/Corps Coordinated Water Resources Database and to enhance the data portal capabilities of the PdNWC Coordinated Database Project. This report is Part III of a three part completion report for Phase III and provides information on water sources, uses, and GIS of the canals and ditches of the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009 (ID 009) in the Juárez Lower Valley, Chihuahua, México. The author explains that the water needs of this region have changed in recent years from being primarily for agricultural purposes to domestic and industrial uses currently. Also, the United States wanted to assess and identify new data sources on a GIS format for the Mexican side. Therefore, this project produced several maps with the location of channels and ditches along the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District. This information also will support water planning of the Valle de Juárez Irrigation District 009. The maps were produced from existing digital data regarding water resources and by adding thematic layers such as soil salinity and soil texture from analog maps. ASTER satellite imagery and official panchromatic aerial photography were used to produce the maps.

Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

U.S.-MEXICO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; BILATERAL TECHNICAL EXCHANGES FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE BORDER REGION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a strong commitment to transfer the results of its science and technology programs to the private sector. The intent is to apply innovative and sometimes advanced technologies to address needs while simultaneously stimulating new commercial business opportunities. Such focused “technology transfer” was evident in the late 1990s as the results of DOE investments in environmental management technology development led to new tools for characterizing and remediating contaminated sites as well as handling and minimizing the generation of hazardous wastes. The Department’s Office of Environmental Management was attempting to reduce the cost, accelerate the schedule, and improve the efficacy of clean-up efforts in the nuclear weapons complex. It recognized that resulting technologies had broader world market applications and that their commercialization would further reduce costs and facilitate deployment of improved technology at DOE sites. DOE’s Albuquerque Operations Office (now part of the National Nuclear Security Administration) began in 1995 to build the foundation for a technology exchange program with Mexico. Initial sponsorship for this work was provided by the Department’s Office of Environmental Management. As part of this effort, Applied Sciences Laboratory, Inc. (ASL) was contracted by the DOE Albuquerque office to identify Mexico’s priority environmental management needs, identify and evaluate DOE-sponsored technologies as potential solutions for those needs, and coordinate these opportunities with decision makers from Mexico’s federal government. That work led to an improved understanding of many key environmental challenges that Mexico faces and the many opportunities to apply DOE’s technologies to help resolve them. The above results constituted, in large part, the foundation for an initial DOE-funded program to apply the Department’s technology base to help address some of Mexico’s challenging environmental issues. The results also brought focus to the potential contributions that DOE’s science and technology could make for solving the many difficult, multi-generational problems faced by hundreds of bi-national communities along the 2,000-mile shared border of the United States and Mexico. Efforts to address these U.S.-Mexico border issues were initially sponsored by the DOE’s Albuquerque and Carlsbad offices. In subsequent years, the U.S. Congress directed appropriations to DOE’s Carlsbad office to address public health, safety and security issues prevalent within U.S.-Mexico border communities. With ASL’s assistance, DOE’s Albuquerque office developed contacts and formed partnerships with interested U.S and Mexican government, academic, and commercial organizations. Border industries, industrial effluents, and public health conditions were evaluated and documented. Relevant technologies were then matched to environmental problem sets along the border. Several technologies that were identified and subsequently supported by this effort are now operational in a number of U.S.-Mexico border communities, several communities within Mexico’s interior states, and in other parts of Latin America. As a result, some serious public health threats within these communities caused by exposure to toxic airborne pollutants have been reduced. During this time, DOE’s Carlsbad office hosted a bilateral conference to establish a cross-border consensus on what should be done on the basis of these earlier investigative efforts. Participating border region stakeholders set an agenda for technical collaborations. This agenda was supported by several Members of Congress who provided appropriations and directed DOE’s Carlsbad office to initiate technology demonstration projects. During the following two years, more than 12 private-sector and DOE-sponsored technologies were demonstrated in partnership with numerous border community stakeholders. All technologies were well received and their effectiveness at addressing health, safety and security issues w

Jimenez, Richard, D., Dr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z