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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

2

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacityseems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. Thereport presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

Information Center

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate natural gas storage capacity that was released in 2006.

Information Center

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of working gas observed in each facility over the previous 5-year ...

5

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (see Table 1), and why any given week's storage ... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of ...

6

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

7

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

8

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

9

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

10

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

11

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

12

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Working...

13

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 12,862 9,993...

14

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 234,149...

15

Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 100,467...

16

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Residential: $750 Commercial: $60,000 Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Residential''' Residential Construction: $750 '''Commercial/Industrial''' 10% to 20% to 30% above code, $40/MMBtu first-year savings Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) provides incentives to developers, home

17

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: 1) 'Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period as...

18

Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Peak Working Natural Gas Capacity. Data and Analysis from the Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

20

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 48.7 19.2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial EnergySense Retrofit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial EnergySense Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial EnergySense Retrofit Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial EnergySense Retrofit Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate $75,000 Program Info Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Widely Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Commercial and Industrial Retrofit Incentive Program is part of EnergySense, PGW's portfolio of energy efficiency

22

Estimates of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

report presents three alternative ... All facilities have a design ... • Some facilities are not operated at design capacity because of operational guidelines ...

23

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

24

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

25

End-of-Month Working Gas in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The level of gas in storage at the end of the last heating season (March 31, 2000) was 1,150 billion cubic feet (Bcf), just above the 1995-1999 average of 1,139 Bcf. However, according to American Gas Association data, injection rates since April 1 have been below average, resulting in a 10-percent shortfall compared to the 5-year average for total stocks as of September 1. Net injections in August have been 10 percent below average. If net injections continue at 10 percent below historically average rates through the remainder of the refill season, gas inventories would be 2,750 Bcf on November 1, which is 8 percent below the 5-year average of about 3,000 Bcf. We are currently projecting that working gas will be between 2,800 and 2,900 Bcf at the end of October, entering the heating season

26

Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

27

Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

28

Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

29

Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

30

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

31

Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

32

New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New York Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

33

Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

34

Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

35

Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

36

Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

37

Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

38

Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

39

Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

40

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

42

Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

43

Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

44

Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

45

Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

46

Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

47

Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

48

Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

49

Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

50

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 184,212 180,918 178,620 181,242 179,235 181,374 183,442 187,348 185,848 181,029 1991 179,697 178,285 176,975 176,918 178,145 179,386 181,094 182,534 182,653 181,271 178,539 174,986 1992 111,256 109,433 109,017 109,150 110,146 110,859 111,885 112,651 112,225 110,868 107,520 101,919 1993 96,819 92,399 89,640 87,930 86,773 86,048 87,257 87,558 88,012 87,924 85,137 81,930 1994 78,106 72,445 71,282 70,501 71,440 73,247 74,599 75,685 77,456 78,490 76,784 74,111 1995 70,612 68,618 67,929 68,727 70,007 72,146 75,063 78,268 79,364 78,810 75,764 70,513

51

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 22,371 18,661 17,042 17,387 20,796 23,060 26,751 30,924 33,456 34,200 30,588 1991 24,821 19,663 16,425 15,850 17,767 18,744 22,065 26,710 31,199 37,933 35,015 30,071 1992 23,328 18,843 14,762 14,340 15,414 17,948 23,103 27,216 32,427 35,283 32,732 29,149 1993 23,702 18,626 15,991 17,160 18,050 20,109 24,565 29,110 33,303 34,605 32,707 30,052 1994 23,623 20,052 18,102 17,396 17,194 19,647 24,780 29,088 33,077 35,877 36,408 33,424 1995 27,732 21,973 19,542 18,899 19,227 21,026 23,933 27,541 31,972 36,182 36,647 31,830

52

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 33,234 33,553 34,322 39,110 43,935 47,105 53,425 58,298 62,273 65,655 66,141 60,495 1991 43,838 39,280 39,196 45,157 48,814 50,833 52,841 54,954 60,062 64,120 56,034 50,591 1992 40,858 39,723 37,350 37,516 41,830 46,750 51,406 51,967 58,355 59,621 59,164 52,385 1993 46,427 38,859 32,754 35,256 42,524 46,737 51,884 55,215 61,028 60,752 38,314 31,086 1994 21,838 17,503 20,735 25,099 29,837 30,812 37,339 42,607 44,739 47,674 48,536 43,262 1995 32,938 27,069 23,018 27,735 34,699 36,337 40,488 41,240 47,530 50,166 40,729 32,224

53

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 65,683 55,509 49,604 47,540 48,128 53,233 64,817 76,933 92,574 99,253 115,704 93,290 1991 59,383 54,864 49,504 47,409 53,752 61,489 64,378 67,930 78,575 89,747 80,663 82,273 1992 76,311 63,152 53,718 48,998 51,053 53,700 57,987 69,653 79,756 82,541 73,094 61,456 1993 44,893 33,024 27,680 26,796 46,806 58,528 64,198 75,616 89,955 92,825 87,252 76,184 1994 52,998 41,644 39,796 40,779 49,519 55,059 64,664 77,229 86,820 91,309 84,568 74,364 1995 59,292 47,263 37,998 39,071 48,761 60,148 65,093 65,081 81,654 93,880 90,905 73,982

54

Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1995 499 497 233 233 260 302 338 556 1,148 1,075 886 485 1996 431 364 202 356 493 971 1,164 1,553 1,891 2,008 1,879 1,119 1997 588 404 429 559 830 923 966 1,253 1,515 1,766 1,523 1,523 1998 773 585 337 582 727 1,350 1,341 1,540 1,139 1,752 1,753 1,615 1999 802 688 376 513 983 1,193 1,428 1,509 1,911 1,834 1,968 1,779 2000 865 863 1,178 1,112 1,202 1,809 1,890 1,890 1,780 1,638 1,434 1,349 2001 1,020 1,261 657 851 807 1,384 1,538 1,651 1,669 1,549 2,837 2,848 2002 2,435 2,119 1,849 2,106 2,206 2,076 2,326 2,423 2,423 1,863 2,259 2,117

55

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 125,898 106,575 111,248 132,203 157,569 170,689 174,950 177,753 182,291 196,681 196,382 153,841 1991 132,323 132,935 115,982 136,883 163,570 187,887 201,443 204,342 199,994 199,692 193,096 168,789 1992 125,777 109,000 93,277 107,330 134,128 156,158 170,112 182,680 197,049 207,253 197,696 140,662 1993 106,890 87,612 100,869 109,975 138,272 152,044 175,917 185,337 199,629 210,423 198,700 164,518 1994 121,221 77,055 76,162 95,079 123,190 143,437 161,081 170,434 191,319 203,562 186,826 161,202 1995 130,241 125,591 117,650 114,852 141,222 167,231 181,227 179,508 194,712 212,867 214,897 188,927

56

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 115,418 117,492 109,383 110,052 117,110 131,282 145,105 158,865 173,570 188,751 197,819 190,747 1991 141,417 109,568 96,781 103,300 122,648 146,143 159,533 169,329 190,953 211,395 197,661 165,940 1992 120,212 91,394 79,753 85,867 106,675 124,940 136,861 152,715 174,544 194,414 187,236 149,775 1993 103,287 66,616 47,157 49,577 86,976 120,891 149,120 176,316 212,046 227,566 213,581 170,503 1994 112,054 93,499 80,056 101,407 134,333 155,279 184,802 207,383 230,726 239,823 235,775 197,145 1995 145,373 106,289 97,677 107,610 126,266 154,036 174,808 175,953 199,358 213,417 188,967 141,572

57

Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 53,604 51,563 52,120 53,225 54,581 56,980 58,990 61,428 62,487 60,867 1991 54,085 53,423 53,465 53,581 54,205 56,193 58,416 60,163 61,280 61,366 59,373 57,246 1992 30,371 28,356 27,542 27,461 27,843 28,422 29,588 29,692 30,555 29,505 27,746 23,929 1993 20,529 18,137 17,769 18,265 19,253 21,322 23,372 24,929 26,122 27,044 24,271 21,990 1994 21,363 18,661 19,224 20,115 21,689 22,447 23,568 25,072 26,511 27,440 26,978 25,065 1995 22,086 20,762 19,352 18,577 19,027 20,563 22,264 23,937 25,846 27,025 26,298 24,257

58

Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 459 343 283 199 199 199 333 467 579 682 786 787 1999 656 532 401 321 318 462 569 645 749 854 911 855 2000 691 515 452 389 371 371 371 371 371 420 534 619 2001 623 563 490 421 525 638 669 732 778 840 598 597 2002 647 648 650 650 625 622 609 605 602 600 512 512 2003 404 294 226 179 214 290 365 460 463 508 508 447 2004 344 293 281 312 345 391 454 509 514 539 527 486 2005 444 364 265 184 143 126 126 126 88 79 73 60 2006 52 52 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44

59

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 163,571 125,097 100,438 110,479 158,720 215,000 265,994 318,024 358,535 364,421 359,766 306,561 1991 194,349 153,061 137,579 147,399 174,145 196,678 219,025 254,779 297,531 315,601 305,179 272,103 1992 201,218 144,582 93,826 103,660 140,908 188,078 222,215 264,511 306,113 331,416 332,959 288,433 1993 217,967 120,711 66,484 89,931 133,866 187,940 233,308 272,685 320,921 334,285 328,073 278,791 1994 172,190 97,587 75,470 114,979 166,013 222,300 272,668 315,887 339,424 354,731 335,483 294,393 1995 232,561 139,624 111,977 124,790 168,112 221,731 253,442 290,185 338,021 355,887 311,749 236,656

60

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 311,360 252,796 228,986 221,127 269,595 333,981 410,982 481,628 534,303 553,823 542,931 472,150 1991 348,875 285,217 262,424 287,946 315,457 372,989 431,607 478,293 498,086 539,454 481,257 405,327 1992 320,447 244,921 179,503 179,306 224,257 292,516 367,408 435,817 504,312 532,896 486,495 397,280 1993 296,403 194,201 133,273 148,416 222,106 303,407 386,359 468,790 534,882 568,552 516,491 426,536 1994 282,144 193,338 162,719 203,884 276,787 351,286 425,738 502,577 568,235 599,504 579,874 516,887 1995 410,946 298,325 247,016 245,903 299,050 364,569 438,995 492,773 545,157 577,585 511,573 392,896

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 27,491 22,694 17,504 13,313 17,552 23,767 28,965 33,972 35,196 34,955 34,660 1991 26,266 24,505 17,544 16,115 17,196 21,173 25,452 30,548 35,254 36,813 37,882 36,892 1992 33,082 29,651 22,962 18,793 18,448 20,445 24,593 30,858 36,770 38,897 35,804 33,066 1993 28,629 23,523 21,015 17,590 20,302 24,947 28,113 31,946 36,247 34,224 30,426 29,254 1994 24,249 19,331 16,598 11,485 16,989 18,501 23,590 28,893 34,044 34,298 32,687 29,307 1995 24,948 21,446 16,467 12,090 14,043 19,950 25,757 29,774 32,507 33,707 35,418 30,063

62

Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 129,245 118,053 119,532 116,520 130,817 139,698 150,336 158,048 165,206 171,008 180,706 154,515 1991 111,225 106,204 111,759 125,973 140,357 150,549 151,393 156,066 166,053 169,954 144,316 133,543 1992 115,658 107,281 103,919 109,690 117,435 128,505 145,962 153,948 166,637 174,182 154,096 123,225 1993 46,462 26,472 19,429 30,902 49,259 67,110 82,104 95,435 111,441 118,880 101,220 86,381 1994 56,024 35,272 32,781 49,507 73,474 86,632 102,758 115,789 124,652 129,107 126,148 109,979 1995 86,312 72,646 62,779 67,245 83,722 96,319 103,388 101,608 113,587 126,287 116,265 92,617

63

Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 55,226 54,179 53,869 54,783 56,160 57,690 56,165 56,611 57,708 58,012 57,606 54,005 1991 52,095 51,060 50,341 51,476 54,531 56,673 56,409 56,345 57,250 56,941 56,535 54,163 1992 52,576 51,568 51,525 52,136 53,768 56,396 58,446 59,656 60,842 60,541 57,948 54,512 1993 51,102 49,136 48,100 49,069 52,016 55,337 57,914 59,772 61,281 10,707 8,936 6,562 1994 3,476 743 886 1,845 3,983 4,882 6,505 6,852 8,978 9,908 10,078 8,075 1995 6,063 5,068 4,138 3,940 4,583 5,449 3,881 4,059 4,443 3,676 2,078 485 1996 - - - - - 806 1,938 3,215 3,960 3,389 2,932 1,949

64

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 8,882 5,257 3,304 2,365 1,893 5,005 7,942 10,880 11,949 12,154 12,235 9,008 1991 6,557 6,453 3,509 6,342 7,864 10,580 12,718 12,657 12,652 14,112 15,152 14,694 1992 12,765 9,785 9,204 8,327 9,679 10,854 11,879 13,337 14,533 13,974 13,312 9,515 1993 6,075 2,729 3,958 4,961 9,491 10,357 12,505 13,125 15,508 13,348 9,567 11,274 1994 9,672 5,199 4,765 6,867 9,471 11,236 13,045 13,496 14,629 14,846 14,458 12,884 1995 10,750 8,520 8,267 8,500 11,070 12,622 14,035 13,764 16,258 16,158 16,224 12,869 1996 6,547 5,488 4,672 4,780 6,742 10,060 11,344 15,100 14,244 12,391 11,634 9,724

65

Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 1,708 1,141 1,211 1,688 2,017 2,129 2,261 2,309 2,370 2,397 2,395 2,007 1991 1,551 1,313 1,207 1,362 1,619 1,931 2,222 2,214 2,307 2,273 2,191 2,134 1992 1,685 1,556 1,228 1,019 1,409 1,716 2,013 2,193 2,319 2,315 2,307 2,104 1993 1,708 1,290 872 824 1,141 1,485 1,894 2,022 2,260 2,344 2,268 1,957 1994 1,430 1,235 1,045 888 1,237 1,642 2,011 2,213 2,362 2,360 2,356 2,284 1995 1,771 1,294 1,037 990 1,321 1,584 1,890 2,121 2,362 2,368 2,365 2,110 1996 1,329 1,069 847 935 1,301 1,596 1,883 2,093 2,295 2,328 2,297 2,070

66

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 8,081 5,796 6,047 7,156 7,151 7,146 7,140 7,421 7,927 8,148 8,157 7,869 1991 7,671 5,875 4,819 6,955 7,638 7,738 8,033 8,335 8,547 8,765 8,964 8,952 1992 7,454 6,256 5,927 7,497 7,924 8,071 8,337 8,555 8,763 8,954 8,946 8,939 1993 7,848 6,037 4,952 6,501 7,550 8,001 8,104 8,420 8,627 8,842 8,720 8,869 1994 7,602 7,073 6,794 4,640 6,094 7,449 7,765 8,072 8,341 8,548 8,778 8,783 1995 8,200 7,921 7,879 7,608 8,230 8,221 8,210 8,559 9,022 9,145 9,311 8,981 1996 7,558 7,658 7,225 6,931 8,250 8,511 8,751 8,958 9,162 9,372 9,067 8,993

67

Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 1,309 844 534 742 1,055 1,364 1,553 1,894 2,218 2,349 2,255 1,897 1999 1,519 1,070 745 929 1,202 1,413 1,641 1,830 2,248 2,357 2,175 1,708 2000 998 843 814 1,063 1,642 1,848 2,066 2,215 2,223 2,594 2,242 1,529 2001 991 823 532 963 1,477 1,869 2,113 2,416 2,677 2,651 2,711 2,503 2002 2,029 1,356 968 1,090 1,627 1,899 2,181 2,322 2,631 2,838 2,559 2,065 2003 1,042 546 367 660 1,107 1,582 1,994 2,710 3,247 3,281 3,167 2,621 2004 1,570 1,195 865 1,024 1,706 1,990 2,188 2,925 3,253 4,115 4,082 3,077

68

Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,705 2,366 1,668 2,849 4,357 5,601 6,365 7,001 7,373 7,562 7,517 6,766 1991 5,691 4,726 2,959 1,980 2,694 4,248 5,706 6,798 7,472 7,811 7,834 7,347 1992 5,779 4,239 2,653 2,211 3,783 5,323 6,518 7,528 7,981 8,154 7,055 6,475 1993 4,557 3,161 2,433 2,007 3,651 4,949 6,130 7,172 7,750 8,240 7,509 6,406 1994 5,145 4,018 3,073 648 1,858 3,357 4,553 5,628 6,312 6,566 6,129 5,491 1995 3,814 3,429 2,989 3,856 5,035 6,069 6,765 6,765 7,251 7,251 7,193 6,371 1996 5,120 4,179 3,528 3,396 4,119 5,292 6,425 6,862 6,965 6,759 6,206 4,967

69

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 393,598 297,240 289,617 356,360 461,202 516,155 604,504 678,168 747,928 783,414 775,741 673,670 1995 549,759 455,591 416,294 457,969 533,496 599,582 638,359 634,297 713,319 766,411 700,456 552,458 1996 369,545 263,652 195,447 224,002 279,731 339,263 391,961 474,402 578,991 638,500 562,097 466,366 1997 314,140 248,911 297,362 326,566 401,514 471,824 478,925 532,982 617,733 705,879 642,254 494,485 1998 391,395 384,696 362,717 457,545 550,232 610,363 684,086 748,042 784,567 893,181 888,358 768,239 1999 611,978 585,458 530,610 568,307 653,498 728,071 744,307 750,460 826,493 858,836 849,011 718,513

70

West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 95,718 84,444 80,152 86,360 105,201 122,470 139,486 155,506 168,801 172,513 172,198 155,477 1991 102,542 81,767 79,042 86,494 101,636 117,739 132,999 142,701 151,152 154,740 143,668 121,376 1992 87,088 60,200 32,379 33,725 57,641 75,309 97,090 115,537 128,969 141,790 135,853 143,960 1993 112,049 69,593 41,670 46,361 84,672 111,540 131,113 150,292 170,597 176,189 162,821 129,738 1994 71,547 38,973 20,662 41,766 67,235 97,887 125,442 147,683 168,538 174,514 166,920 140,377 1995 96,574 55,283 43,199 48,420 72,781 96,991 120,021 128,965 146,728 161,226 138,140 98,925

71

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

72

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update The aggregate peak capacity for U.S. underground natural gas storage is ...

73

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

74

Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry: A Case Study Thesis for the degree collaborative work practices within a large international oil and gas company (OGC). The work is founded empirical findings, we argue that in knowledge-intensive, interdisciplinary work such as oil and gas

Langseth, Helge

75

Working Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

76

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

77

Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration report, The Basics of Underground Storage, http:www.eia.doe.govpuboilgasnaturalgasanalysispublicationsstoragebasicsstoragebasics.html. 2 Working gas is...

78

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -2,863 -1,902 -2,297 -1,134 -1,671 -1,997 -907 -144 629 992 2,290 1,354 1991 30,778 27,964 37,141 36,920 15,424 -18,322 -46,969 -63,245 -61,004 -48,820 -54,587 -34,458 1992 6,870 -8,479 -43,753 -43,739 -33,236 -8,601 3,190 9,732 8,583 15,815 27,780 16,330 1993 16,748 -23,871 -27,342 -13,729 -7,043 -138 11,093 8,174 14,808 2,868 -4,885 -9,642 1994 -45,776 -23,124 8,987 25,048 32,148 34,360 39,360 43,202 18,502 20,447 7,409 15,602 1995 60,371 42,037 36,507 9,811 2,098 -569 -19,226 -25,702 -1,403 1,156 -23,733 -57,737

79

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 18.8 22.4 37.0 33.4 9.7 -8.5 -17.7 -19.9 -17.0 -13.4 -15.2 -11.2 1992 3.5 -5.5 -31.8 -29.7 -19.1 -4.4 1.5 3.8 2.9 5.0 9.1 6.0 1993 8.3 -16.5 -29.1 -13.2 -5.0 -0.1 5.0 3.1 4.8 0.9 -1.5 -3.3 1994 -21.0 -19.2 13.5 27.9 24.0 18.3 16.9 15.8 5.8 6.1 2.3 5.6 1995 35.1 43.1 48.4 8.5 1.3 -0.3 -7.1 -8.1 -0.4 0.3 -7.1 -19.6 1996 -32.3 -32.6 -49.9 -39.0 -28.4 -18.3 -0.5 4.4 0.7 -0.2 3.9 26.8 1997 31.1 63.7 89.6 41.7 24.2 9.7 -4.5 -6.2 -2.2 -2.4 -0.3 -8.7 1998 5.7 9.8 22.4 52.3 49.3 32.7 23.0 11.1 3.1 4.1 12.5 17.6

80

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Related Links: Storage Basics: ... natural gas consumption declined roughly 2 percent from the previous year a reflection of 2009's mild temperatures and weak ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Percent) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5.1...

82

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

83

Figuring on energy: can gas discounts work  

SciTech Connect

A Pennsylvania lawsuit is examining the effects of price competition among gas utilities in their efforts to retain industrial customers and the extra burdens discounts place on other users. Because gas markets have not matched the fall in oil prices, gas utilities face the loss of their largest customers to residual oil unless small users are willing to accept a surcharge to cover a larger share of the utility's fixed prices. The dilemma of when to switch is causing uncertainty among dual-fuel users. (DCK)

Schaffer, P.

1983-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor DO NOT 16 0 REMOVE 16 Small recuperated gas turbine engine, design rated at 13 hp and 27% efficiency of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

85

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work The combustion (gas) turbines being installed in many of today's natural-gas-fueled power plants are complex machines, but they basically involve three main sections: The compressor, which draws air into the engine, pressurizes it, and feeds it to the combustion chamber at speeds of hundreds of miles per hour. The combustion system, typically made up of a ring of fuel injectors that inject a steady stream of fuel into combustion chambers where it mixes with the air. The mixture is burned at temperatures of more than 2000 degrees F. The combustion produces a high temperature, high pressure gas stream that enters and expands through the turbine section. The turbine is an intricate array of alternate stationary and

86

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

87

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

88

Estimated Maximum Gas Retention from Uniformly Dispersed Bubbles in K Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report addresses the KE Basin sludge that will be retrieved and stored in large-diameter containers (LDCs.) A fraction of the hydrogen gas bubbles generated from the corrosion of uranium metal and oxides may be retained within the sludge matrix. Those entrapped bubbles will expand the sludge bed volume and, therefore, will affect how much sludge can be loaded into a container. The entrapped gas bubbles will also impact the overall thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sludge bed. The evaluation summarized here was performed to estimate the maximum gas holdup (volume fraction gas) that could occur sludge stored in large-diameter containers, assuming uniform gas generation (i.e., uniform distribution of metallic uranium particles). This report represents an evaluation of the retention of uniformly distributed bubbles and an estimate of the maximum gas fraction that might be retained in K Basin LDCs based on existing literature data on bubble retention and Basin sludge characterization data. Existing data show that the maximum gas fraction varies, depending on physical properties and the configuration of the material or waste.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 341 1994-Jan 01/07 331 01/14 316 01/21 303 01/28 290 1994-Feb 02/04 266 02/11 246 02/18 228 02/25 212 1994-Mar 03/04 206 03/11 201 03/18 205 03/25 202 1994-Apr 04/01 201 04/08 201 04/15 202 04/22 210 04/29 215 1994-May 05/06 225 05/13 236 05/20 242 05/27 256

90

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler Size 300-500 (kBtu/h): $800; $2900 Boiler Size 500-700 (kBtu/h): $1400; $3600 Boiler Size 700-900 (kBtu/h): $2000; $4200 Boiler Size 900-1100 (kBtu/h): $2600; $4800 Boiler Size 1100-1300 (kBtu/h): $3200; $5400 Boiler Size 1300-1500 (kBtu/h): $3800; $6000 Boiler Size 1500-1700 (kBtu/h): $4400; $6600 Boiler Size 1700-2000 (kBtu/h): $5200; $7400

91

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 841 2007-Jan 01/05 823 01/12 806 01/19 755 01/26 716 2007-Feb 02/02 666 02/09 613 02/16 564 02/23 538 2007-Mar 03/02 527 03/09 506 03/16 519 03/23 528 03/30 550 2007-Apr 04/06 560 04/13 556 04/20 568 04/27 590 2007-May 05/04 610 05/11 629 05/18 648 05/25 670

92

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 570 1994-Jan 01/07 532 01/14 504 01/21 440 01/28 414 1994-Feb 02/04 365 02/11 330 02/18 310 02/25 309 1994-Mar 03/04 281 03/11 271 03/18 284 03/25 303 1994-Apr 04/01 287 04/08 293 04/15 308 04/22 334 04/29 353 1994-May 05/06 376 05/13 399 05/20 429 05/27 443

93

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 19, 2013 December 19, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through September 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

94

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 7, 2013 November 7, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through August 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

95

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Small Business Equipment Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Small Business Equipment Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Small Business Equipment Rebate Program Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Small Business Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 4/1/2011 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler (Purchase prior to 02/17/12): $1000 Boiler (Purchase 02/17/12 or after): $2000 Furnace (Purchase prior to 02/17/12): $250 Furnace (Purchase prior to 02/17/12): $500

96

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 280,414 208,968 200,997 216,283 261,894 293,909 326,049 349,274 387,670 405,477 381,931 342,394 1995 288,908 270,955 251,410 246,654 284,291 328,371 362,156 372,718 398,444 418,605 419,849 366,944 1996 280,620 236,878 221,371 232,189 268,812 299,619 312,736 313,747 330,116 333,134 322,501 282,392 1997 216,113 179,067 171,563 184,918 227,756 273,507 306,641 330,075 351,975 363,189 350,107 263,455 1998 211,982 163,084 150,923 155,766 206,048 254,643 281,422 305,746 346,135 379,917 388,380 330,906

97

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas (MMcf)" Working Gas (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5410us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5410us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:28 PM"

98

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas (MMcf)" Working Gas (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5510us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5510us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:32 PM"

99

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 101 2007-Jan 01/05 109 01/12 107 01/19 96 01/26 91 2007-Feb 02/02 78 02/09 63 02/16 52 02/23 54 2007-Mar 03/02 59 03/09 58 03/16 64 03/23 70 03/30 78 2007-Apr 04/06 81 04/13 80 04/20 80 04/27 83 2007-May 05/04 85 05/11 88 05/18 92 05/25 97 2007-Jun 06/01 100 06/08 101 06/15 102 06/22 102 06/29 102

100

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 2,322 1994-Jan 01/07 2,186 01/14 2,019 01/21 1,782 01/28 1,662 1994-Feb 02/04 1,470 02/11 1,303 02/18 1,203 02/25 1,149 1994-Mar 03/04 1,015 03/11 1,004 03/18 952 03/25 965 1994-Apr 04/01 953 04/08 969 04/15 1,005 04/22 1,085 04/29 1,161 1994-May 05/06 1,237 05/13 1,325 05/20 1,403 05/27 1,494

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 1,411 1994-Jan 01/07 1,323 01/14 1,199 01/21 1,040 01/28 958 1994-Feb 02/04 838 02/11 728 02/18 665 02/25 627 1994-Mar 03/04 529 03/11 531 03/18 462 03/25 461 1994-Apr 04/01 465 04/08 475 04/15 494 04/22 541 04/29 593 1994-May 05/06 636 05/13 690 05/20 731 05/27 795

102

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 905,018 584,386 467,210 599,207 831,273 1,086,355 1,342,894 1,578,648 1,775,994 1,885,465 1,819,517 1,589,500 1995 1,206,116 814,626 663,885 674,424 850,290 1,085,760 1,300,439 1,487,188 1,690,456 1,811,013 1,608,177 1,232,901 1996 812,303 520,053 341,177 397,770 612,572 890,243 1,192,952 1,456,355 1,695,873 1,838,842 1,664,539 1,423,793 1997 965,310 711,444 521,508 539,750 735,527 985,803 1,230,970 1,474,855 1,702,601 1,816,709 1,706,526 1,416,580 1998 1,108,737 878,420 669,205 772,790 1,017,260 1,248,564 1,462,360 1,644,247 1,797,048 1,918,157 1,878,225 1,630,559

103

Lower 48 States Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,985 38,541 -75,406 -222,622 -232,805 -210,409 -190,434 -133,607 -91,948 -46,812 73,978 350,936 2012 778,578 852,002 1,047,322 994,769 911,345 800,040 655,845 556,041 481,190 406,811 271,902 259,915 2013 -216,792 -360,517 -763,506 -767,663 -631,403 -489,573 -325,475 -214,105 -148,588 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

104

U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2,034,000 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2,403,000 NA 2,050,000 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2,468,000 2,599,000 2,541,000 2,212,000 1976 1,648,000 1,444,000 1,326,000 1,423,000 1,637,000 1,908,000 2,192,000 2,447,000 2,650,000 2,664,000 2,408,000 1,926,000 1977 1,287,000 1,163,000 1,215,000 1,427,000 1,731,000 2,030,000 2,348,000 2,599,000 2,824,000 2,929,000 2,821,000 2,475,000 1978 1,819,000 1,310,000 1,123,000 1,231,000 1,491,000 1,836,000 2,164,000 2,501,000 2,813,000 2,958,000 2,927,000 2,547,000

105

Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 74,086 66,477 61,296 61,444 65,918 70,653 76,309 82,236 85,955 89,866 87,913 73,603 1991 71,390 60,921 57,278 59,014 63,510 74,146 79,723 86,294 97,761 109,281 101,166 86,996 1992 67,167 54,513 50,974 53,944 62,448 70,662 82,259 93,130 103,798 112,898 103,734 83,223 1993 18,126 8,099 5,896 10,189 16,993 25,093 35,988 46,332 58,949 64,538 57,880 40,257 1994 21,994 12,505 9,508 11,414 16,978 23,485 33,733 44,726 56,420 65,515 60,945 43,175 1995 22,656 11,780 7,447 6,865 10,632 18,717 28,858 43,748 55,435 62,560 51,890 36,857

106

Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 321,678 314,918 308,955 347,344 357,995 370,534 383,549 377,753 378,495 396,071 402,265 365,396 1991 279,362 271,469 271,401 289,226 303,895 323,545 327,350 329,102 344,201 347,984 331,821 316,648 1992 284,571 270,262 264,884 267,778 286,318 298,901 320,885 338,320 341,156 345,459 324,873 288,098 1993 165,226 149,367 141,472 157,250 183,990 198,041 207,344 220,032 216,071 222,798 210,181 194,014 1994 143,701 103,889 111,945 135,634 168,679 181,683 207,232 226,641 248,857 261,209 266,958 235,718 1995 215,449 192,489 184,914 206,178 228,388 238,593 238,850 234,779 254,339 265,781 248,336 200,382

107

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,305,843 1,721,875 1,577,007 1,788,480 2,186,855 2,529,647 2,775,346 3,019,155 3,415,698 3,803,828 3,842,882 3,462,021 2012 2,910,007 2,448,810 2,473,130 2,611,226 2,887,060 3,115,447 3,245,201 3,406,134 3,693,053 3,929,250 3,799,215 3,412,910 2013 2,693,215 2,088,293 1,709,624 1,843,563 2,255,657 2,625,874 2,919,726 3,192,029 3,544,465 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

108

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. I. THE FLOCCULENT GALAXY M 33  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass M{sub max} and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the flocculent galaxy M 33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 4.7{+-}0.4}{sub gas}, M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.3{+-}0.1}{sub H{sub 2}}, and M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.0{+-}0.1}{sub SFR}. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of the sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage - Working Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 47,455 36,864 41,979 49,646 58,678 56,813 63,882 64,460 70,583 72,447 73,277 69,641 1995 72,965 64,476 58,510 66,025 73,529 78,437 76,026 63,026 80,949 87,711 83,704 71,638 1996 58,880 47,581 37,918 56,995 62,439 71,476 70,906 75,927 84,962 88,061 87,029 85,140 1997 57,054 49,490 55,865 58,039 73,265 79,811 65,589 66,536 77,598 93,020 95,180 82,610 1998 69,390 68,851 63,549 80,476 82,711 83,080 90,544 92,319 83,365 115,709 118,521 104,104 1999 82,043 77,133 67,758 77,908 94,436 101,788 95,521 102,210 111,680 115,048 116,495 99,921

111

New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 35,239 28,083 24,437 26,484 32,304 42,192 50,845 59,950 66,681 69,508 68,996 59,183 1991 38,557 30,227 25,695 29,076 35,780 43,534 51,822 60,564 69,005 73,760 68,941 61,246 1992 49,781 35,441 23,732 26,771 36,307 45,716 57,152 66,993 72,724 76,134 72,836 56,289 1993 43,019 26,790 16,578 20,740 30,875 41,858 51,917 54,363 63,952 65,899 62,563 53,140 1994 40,502 26,320 17,867 26,755 35,465 47,773 56,880 65,819 70,776 72,168 69,544 60,807 1995 46,883 32,592 26,685 27,192 35,773 47,125 54,358 62,641 71,561 73,249 63,560 45,810

112

New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 12,085 11,213 10,893 12,718 8,903 13,496 17,077 20,270 21,829 24,996 26,006 23,472 1991 20,026 18,023 15,855 8,701 11,626 14,635 15,689 13,734 16,376 16,270 16,031 16,988 1992 14,969 14,258 13,522 11,923 11,828 12,369 10,270 12,215 13,412 15,976 14,938 15,350 1993 12,704 8,540 8,417 5,490 8,195 9,416 9,685 7,367 8,356 10,544 7,832 7,914 1994 4,952 3,973 3,588 3,256 4,025 4,716 5,087 5,306 8,708 10,826 10,274 9,735 1995 7,590 7,588 8,025 8,247 9,470 10,575 10,593 9,503 10,022 10,057 8,980 7,490 1996 6,178 4,942 4,250 3,871 4,212 4,219 4,193 4,308 5,444 5,866 5,030 4,605

113

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -114 -943 -336 775 774 774 773 -107 103 55 -146 1,291 1991 -410 79 -1,227 -201 487 592 893 913 620 617 807 1,083 1992 -216 381 1,107 542 286 333 304 220 216 189 -18 -13 1993 393 -220 -975 -996 -374 -69 -233 -135 -136 -112 -226 -70 1994 -245 1,036 1,842 -1,862 -1,456 -552 -338 -348 -285 -294 58 -85 1995 598 848 1,085 2,969 2,136 772 445 487 680 597 533 197 1996 -642 -262 -655 -677 21 290 541 398 140 226 -244 12 1997 309 461 -279 -42 -162 -311 -119 55 90 95 607 453

114

Withdrawals from Working Natural Gas Stocks During Summer 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

natural gas for air conditioning. According to the Edison Electric Institute, electricity consumption reached record highs during the week ended July ...

115

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Work...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Work Plans API has developed a work plan based on API's commitment letter and the Climate Challenge Program which addresses the overall elements of the Climate VISION program...

116

What is the total working gas capacity in underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

117

Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -30,641 13,186 6,384 -1,434 1,227 -3,129 3,399 2,573 2,606 1,953 968 1,423 1991 1,986 2,360 1,291 -869 -1,664 -1,353 -659 -203 99 250 317 582 1992 89 -487 -305 231 1,089 1,075 811 730 509 343 -779 -872 1993 -1,222 -1,079 -221 -204 -131 -374 -387 -356 -231 86 454 -69 1994 587 858 640 -1,359 -1,793 -1,593 -1,578 -1,544 -1,438 -1,674 -1,380 -915 1995 -1,331 -589 -83 3,208 3,177 2,713 2,212 1,136 939 685 1,065 880 1996 1,306 751 539 -460 -916 -777 -340 97 -286 -492 -987 -1,405

118

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -10,714 -2,484 2,221 9,026 9,501 3,159 1,926 1,511 539 1,182 1,803 9,892 1991 10,604 5,727 4,873 6,047 4,879 3,728 -584 -3,344 -2,211 -1,535 -10,107 -9,904 1992 -2,980 443 -1,846 -7,642 -6,984 -4,083 -1,435 -2,987 -1,706 -4,499 3,130 1,793 1993 5,569 -864 -4,596 -2,260 694 -12 478 3,249 2,672 1,131 -20,850 -21,299 1994 -24,589 -21,355 -12,019 -10,157 -12,687 -15,926 -14,545 -12,608 -16,289 -13,079 10,221 12,176 1995 11,100 9,566 2,283 2,636 4,862 5,526 3,149 -1,367 2,792 2,492 -7,807 -11,038

119

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 9,275 18,043 13,193 1,851 5,255 9,637 5,108 8,495 9,773 7,534 9,475 11,984 1991 -9,933 -7,259 454 6,145 6,270 3,648 2,744 1,010 -13 7,942 -12,681 -9,742 1992 -9,345 -8,466 -9,599 -19,126 -16,878 -15,372 -13,507 -9,010 -7,228 -7,653 -6,931 -18,707 1993 -51,572 -52,876 -51,081 -40,760 -41,229 -40,132 -39,867 -44,533 -43,110 -44,873 -36,080 -34,184 1994 -6,101 -1,289 8,929 5,795 -3,558 -6,807 -4,948 -4,181 -3,006 -678 -77 11,376 1995 20,962 7,104 -805 -3,970 -29,257 -30,038 -32,571 -35,022 -40,472 -36,406 -41,858 -53,433

120

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -3,295 -2,048 303 1,673 2,267 2,054 632 690 1,081 1,169 1,343 2,765 1991 2,450 1,002 -617 -1,537 -1,372 -2,052 -995 -41 274 4,477 815 -517 1992 -1,493 -820 -1,663 -1,510 -2,353 -796 1,038 506 1,229 -2,650 -2,283 -922 1993 374 -217 1,229 2,820 2,636 2,160 1,462 1,893 876 -679 -25 903 1994 -79 1,426 2,111 236 -856 -462 215 -22 -226 1,272 3,701 3,372 1995 4,108 1,921 1,440 1,503 2,033 1,379 -847 -1,547 -1,105 305 239 -1,594 1996 -2,809 -931 -2,059 -2,296 -2,608 -2,010 -508 2,016 1,499 -9 283 1,806

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -2,696 -5,556 -4,018 -2,430 -2,408 3,493 3,414 4,058 11,806 19,414 13,253 13,393 1992 -4,224 -6,407 -6,304 -5,070 -1,061 -3,484 2,536 6,836 6,037 3,618 2,568 -3,773 1993 -49,040 -46,415 -45,078 -43,755 -45,456 -45,569 -46,271 -46,798 -44,848 -48,360 -45,854 -42,967 1994 3,868 4,407 3,612 1,225 -15 -1,608 -2,255 -1,606 -2,529 977 3,064 2,918 1995 662 -725 -2,062 -4,549 -6,346 -4,768 -4,875 -978 -985 -2,955 -9,054 -6,318 1996 -2,596 -433 -1,982 -2,204 -5,609 -6,677 -4,290 -5,912 -4,983 -1,206 3,642 151

122

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 701 995 446 26 639 1,368 2,249 3,219 1,102 2,496 892 1991 -1,225 1,811 40 2,493 3,883 3,621 1,685 1,583 1,282 1,616 2,927 2,233 1992 6,816 5,146 5,417 2,679 1,253 -728 -859 310 1,516 2,085 -2,078 -3,827 1993 -4,453 -6,128 -1,947 -1,204 1,853 4,502 3,520 1,087 -522 -4,673 -5,378 -3,812 1994 -4,380 -4,192 -4,417 -6,105 -3,313 -6,446 -4,523 -3,052 -2,203 74 2,261 53 1995 699 2,115 -131 605 -2,947 1,448 2,167 881 -1,537 -592 2,731 756 1996 -3,583 -1,460 -1,587 1,297 1,828 892 223 -114 831 -332 -2,174 183

123

West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -1,093 -693 -375 128 493 786 2 -447 -512 -333 -99 1,138 1991 6,825 -2,677 -1,109 134 -3,564 -4,731 -6,487 -12,806 -17,650 -17,773 -28,530 -34,101 1992 -15,454 -21,567 -46,663 -52,768 -43,995 -42,430 -35,909 -27,164 -22,183 -12,950 -7,815 22,584 1993 24,960 9,394 9,292 12,636 27,031 36,232 34,023 34,755 41,628 34,399 26,968 -14,222 1994 -40,501 -30,621 -21,008 -4,595 -17,438 -13,653 -5,670 -2,609 -2,058 -1,674 4,099 10,639 1995 25,027 16,310 22,537 6,655 5,546 -896 -5,421 -18,718 -21,810 -13,288 -28,780 -41,453

124

New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -4,944 -5,851 -5,300 -3,038 -4,576 -4,057 77 1,820 2,686 6,478 7,515 9,209 1991 7,941 6,810 4,962 -4,017 2,723 1,139 -1,388 -6,536 -5,453 -8,726 -9,976 -6,483 1992 -5,057 -3,765 -2,333 3,222 202 -2,266 -5,420 -1,519 -2,964 -294 -1,093 -1,638 1993 -2,265 -5,717 -5,105 -6,433 -3,632 -2,953 -584 -4,847 -5,056 -5,431 -7,107 -7,436 1994 -7,752 -4,567 -4,829 -2,234 -4,170 -4,700 -4,598 -2,062 352 281 2,443 1,820 1995 2,638 3,615 4,436 4,991 5,445 5,859 5,506 4,197 1,314 -768 -1,294 -2,244

125

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -16,163 -3,291 4,933 5,735 6,541 3,761 1,457 -2,718 333 6,361 22,218 1991 25,998 -7,924 -12,602 -6,752 5,539 14,861 14,428 10,464 17,383 22,644 -158 -24,807 1992 -21,205 -18,174 -17,028 -17,433 -15,973 -21,203 -22,672 -16,614 -16,409 -16,981 -10,425 -16,165 1993 -16,925 -24,778 -32,596 -36,290 -19,699 -4,049 12,259 23,601 37,502 33,152 26,345 20,728 1994 8,768 26,882 32,899 51,830 47,357 34,388 35,682 31,067 18,680 12,257 22,195 26,643 1995 33,319 12,790 17,621 6,203 -8,067 -1,243 -9,994 -31,430 -31,368 -26,406 -46,809 -55,574

126

Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -525 -558 -653 -568 -437 -289 -114 76 566 493 1,000 1,188 1991 482 1,359 1,901 1,461 980 1,611 1,437 1,173 -147 -1,122 -1,494 -1,591 1992 -23,715 -25,067 -25,923 -26,121 -26,362 -27,771 -28,829 -30,471 -30,725 -31,860 -31,627 -33,317 1993 -9,841 -10,219 -9,773 -9,196 -8,590 -7,100 -6,215 -4,763 -4,433 -2,461 -3,475 -1,939 1994 834 524 1,455 1,850 2,436 1,126 195 143 389 396 2,707 3,074 1995 723 2,101 128 -1,538 -2,661 -1,884 -1,303 -1,135 -665 -416 -680 -807 1996 -1,225 -2,881 -2,568 -1,148 1,099 1,302 1,744 832 -482 -1,417 -3,593 -5,063

127

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -72 452 283 -1,858 -801 699 -1,353 41 108 1,167 -1,339 1991 -2,326 1,196 205 3,977 26,799 5,575 4,775 1,778 703 1,958 2,917 5,687 1992 6,208 3,332 5,695 1,986 1,815 275 -839 679 1,880 -138 -1,840 -5,179 1993 -6,689 -7,057 -5,245 -3,367 -188 -497 627 -212 975 -626 -3,745 1,760 1994 3,597 2,471 806 1,906 -20 879 539 371 -878 1,499 4,890 1,609 1995 1,078 3,321 3,503 1,633 1,599 1,386 990 268 1,628 1,312 1,767 -15 1996 -4,203 -3,033 -3,595 -3,720 -4,328 -2,562 -2,690 1,336 -2,014 -3,767 -4,591 -3,144

128

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 705 2,167 1,643 1,813 -2,403 355 272 -26 131 59 561 542 1991 -4,514 -2,633 -2,648 -1,702 -3,097 151 -280 -908 -3,437 -6,076 -7,308 -6,042 1992 -68,442 -68,852 -67,958 -67,769 -67,999 -68,527 -69,209 -69,883 -70,428 -70,404 -71,019 -73,067 1993 -14,437 -17,034 -19,377 -21,219 -23,373 -24,811 -24,628 -25,093 -24,213 -22,944 -22,384 -19,989 1994 -18,713 -19,954 -18,358 -17,429 -15,333 -12,802 -12,658 -11,874 -10,555 -9,434 -8,353 -7,819 1995 -7,494 -3,827 -3,353 -1,774 -1,433 -1,101 464 2,584 1,908 321 -1,020 -3,599

129

Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 21,315 40,513 43,111 18,628 12,189 2,033 47 -10,549 -21,072 -9,288 -13,355 -8,946 1991 -42,316 -43,449 -37,554 -58,118 -54,100 -46,988 -56,199 -48,651 -34,294 -48,087 -70,444 -48,747 1992 5,209 -1,207 -6,517 -21,448 -17,577 -24,644 -6,465 9,218 -3,044 -2,525 -6,948 -28,550 1993 -119,345 -120,895 -123,412 -110,528 -102,328 -100,860 -113,541 -118,288 -125,086 -122,661 -114,692 -94,084 1994 -21,524 -45,478 -29,527 -21,615 -15,311 -16,358 -113 6,609 32,786 38,411 56,777 41,703 1995 71,748 88,600 72,969 70,544 59,709 56,910 31,618 8,138 5,482 4,572 -18,623 -35,336

130

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -10,362 -8,989 -8,480 -6,853 -3,138 -3,221 -2,686 -2,091 824 166 -307 3,561 1991 -6,300 -645 -100 -132 5,625 8,255 -439 -9,003 -13,999 -9,506 -35,041 -11,017 1992 16,928 8,288 4,215 1,589 -2,700 -7,788 -6,391 1,723 1,181 -7,206 -7,569 -20,817 1993 -31,418 -30,129 -26,038 -22,202 -4,247 4,828 6,211 5,963 10,199 10,284 14,158 14,727 1994 8,105 8,620 12,116 13,982 2,713 -3,469 465 1,613 -3,134 -1,516 -2,683 -1,820 1995 6,294 5,619 -1,798 -1,708 -758 5,090 429 -12,148 -5,167 2,571 6,337 -382

131

Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,533 1999 210 227 211 187 147 49 88 -64 30 8 -80 -189 2000 -521 -228 69 134 440 435 425 385 -24 236 67 -179 2001 -7 -19 -282 -100 -165 21 46 202 453 58 469 975 2002 1,038 533 436 127 151 30 68 -94 -46 187 -153 -439 2003 -987 -810 -600 -430 -520 -317 -187 388 616 443 608 557 2004 528 649 498 364 599 408 194 216 6 834 916 456 2005 201 391 -60 22 -116 -186 -62 -780 -679 -910 1,097 1,608 2006 3,081 2,559 3,389 3,163 2,744 2,220 2,009 2,014 2,869 2,415 531 784

132

Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -862 -85 724 658 416 -1,091 -1,477 -807 2,724 -222 -1,505 5,333 1991 4,470 4,339 1,613 1,801 727 1,324 628 202 -123 -686 1,727 2,620 1992 900 -745 -1,784 -3,603 -1,779 -745 -328 -176 -219 356 579 -1,431 1993 153 742 1,488 1,891 777 -736 -1,464 -2,133 -1,700 -270 -379 -1,170 1994 -4,444 -2,565 -113 1,629 1,482 1,771 2,779 2,519 1,569 658 -517 1,249 1995 5,583 3,808 3,166 1,674 1,629 2,195 -93 -369 129 -488 -247 -2,056 1996 -3,630 -2,064 -3,459 -3,286 -3,097 -2,473 -372 315 -34 394 -346 1,808

133

U.S. Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 305,000 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 16,000 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 196,000 NA 162,000 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 182,000 65,000 -133,000 -286,000 1977 -361,000 -281,000 -111,000 4,000 94,000 122,000 156,000 152,000 174,000 265,000 413,000 549,000 1978 532,000 147,000 -92,000 -196,000 -240,000 -194,000 -184,000 -98,000 -11,000 29,000 106,000 72,000 1979 71,000 39,000 113,000 104,000 128,000 114,000 120,000 127,000 107,000 121,000 118,000 207,000

134

Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 1,596 507 381 -2,931 -46 -596 -311 -234 178 167 7,030 9,898 1991 19,571 17,816 10,871 17,001 13,713 16,734 12,252 11,416 8,857 5,742 -6,023 -8,607 1992 -14,527 -26,506 -45,308 -51,996 -46,282 -36,996 -26,224 -22,672 -22,086 -18,888 -11,177 -16,353 1993 -11,967 -21,375 -21,809 -21,634 -20,069 -20,488 -16,719 -11,806 -1,499 -5,717 -13,058 -21,422 1994 -39,036 -30,048 -9,070 4,162 7,033 5,081 8,939 7,976 3,961 7,543 16,019 30,397 1995 36,925 34,571 29,611 9,077 7,499 9,345 6,077 2,682 -942 -2,597 -22,632 -39,593

135

Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 -67 -133 -30 123 233 669 826 998 743 933 994 633 1997 156 40 226 203 337 -48 -197 -301 -376 -242 -356 405 1998 185 181 -92 24 -103 427 374 288 -376 -14 230 91 1999 29 103 39 -69 257 -156 88 -31 772 82 214 164 2000 63 175 802 599 219 615 462 381 -131 -196 -533 -430 2001 155 398 -521 -260 -395 -413 -352 -239 -111 -89 1,403 1,499 2002 1,415 858 1,192 1,255 1,399 692 788 772 755 314 -578 -731 2003 -2,107 -1,207 -476 304 1,194 2,067 2,346 2,392 3,132 4,421 4,005 3,823

136

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 31.9 17.1 14.2 15.5 11.1 7.9 -1.1 -5.7 -3.6 -2.3 -15.3 -16.4 1992 -6.8 1.1 -4.7 -16.9 -14.3 -8.0 -2.7 -5.4 -2.8 -7.0 5.6 3.5 1993 13.6 -2.2 -12.3 -6.0 1.7 0.0 0.9 6.3 4.6 1.9 -35.2 -40.7 1994 -53.0 -55.0 -36.7 -28.8 -29.8 -34.1 -28.0 -22.8 -26.7 -21.5 26.7 39.2 1995 50.8 54.7 11.0 10.5 16.3 17.9 8.4 -3.2 6.2 5.2 -16.1 -25.5 1996 -25.7 -20.7 -31.6 -29.8 -36.9 -21.2 -9.3 8.1 9.4 9.4 21.0 38.5 1997 33.4 39.7 105.3 64.1 71.0 44.2 10.9 -1.2 -5.3 -6.4 1.9 -7.4 1998 6.1 2.0 -13.3 -3.6 -8.6 -10.1 5.8 7.1 -4.2 10.9 11.9 23.7

137

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 11.0 5.4 -3.6 -8.8 -7.2 -9.9 -4.3 -0.2 0.9 13.4 2.4 -1.7 1992 -6.0 -4.2 -10.1 -9.5 -13.2 -4.2 4.7 1.9 3.9 -7.0 -6.5 -3.1 1993 1.6 -1.2 8.3 19.7 17.1 12.0 6.3 7.0 2.7 -1.9 -0.1 3.1 1994 -0.3 7.7 13.2 1.4 -4.7 -2.3 0.9 -0.1 -0.7 3.7 11.3 11.2 1995 17.4 9.6 8.0 8.6 11.8 7.0 -3.4 -5.3 -3.3 0.8 0.7 -4.8 1996 -10.1 -4.2 -10.5 -12.2 -13.6 -9.6 -2.1 7.3 4.7 0.0 0.8 5.7 1997 5.1 6.0 13.3 1.9 2.2 -0.6 -6.1 -12.4 -8.9 -7.0 -6.5 -9.3 1998 0.6 3.3 -5.1 6.1 8.3 -0.3 -0.9 -0.2 -0.4 -0.8 2.9 3.4

138

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 13,690 18,121 8,849 5,853 7,132 14,219 18,130 10,561 13,390 31,974 19,181 9,703 1991 6,425 26,360 4,734 4,680 6,001 17,198 26,493 26,589 17,703 3,011 -3,286 14,947 1992 -6,546 -23,935 -22,706 -29,553 -29,442 -31,729 -31,331 -21,662 -2,945 7,561 4,600 -28,127 1993 -18,888 -21,388 7,592 2,646 4,145 -4,114 5,805 2,657 2,580 3,170 1,004 23,856 1994 14,332 -10,557 -24,707 -14,896 -15,082 -8,607 -14,837 -14,903 -8,310 -6,861 -11,874 -3,316 1995 9,020 48,536 41,487 19,773 18,032 23,794 20,147 9,074 3,393 9,305 28,072 27,725

139

Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Maryland Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 103.9 379.8 71.8 60.5 13.1 20.1 7.2 1.8 -0.9 -4.6 13.4 22.0 1992 10.3 -13.6 -46.2 -75.4 -28.4 -9.4 -3.5 -1.5 -1.6 2.5 4.0 -9.9 1993 1.6 15.7 71.7 160.6 17.3 -10.3 -16.3 -18.7 -12.6 -1.8 -2.5 -8.9 1994 -45.2 -46.8 -3.2 53.1 28.2 27.5 36.9 27.2 13.4 4.6 -3.5 10.5 1995 103.8 130.7 91.8 35.6 24.2 26.7 -0.9 -3.1 1.0 -3.2 -1.7 -15.6 1996 -33.1 -30.7 -52.3 -51.6 -37.0 -23.8 0.0 0.0 -0.3 2.7 -2.5 16.3 1997 -3.8 -5.7 -21.1 -23.6 -25.2 -29.3 -27.9 -19.8 -9.3 -3.7 4.9 1.1 1998 39.5 61.5 119.5 179.6 87.5 54.4 63.0 38.2 13.2 4.1 3.6 -1.8

140

U.S. Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) U.S. Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 17.6 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.8 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 8.2 NA 7.9 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 7.4 2.5 -5.2 -12.9 1977 -21.9 -19.5 -8.4 0.3 5.7 6.4 7.1 6.2 6.6 9.9 17.2 28.5 1978 41.3 12.6 -7.6 -13.7 -13.9 -9.6 -7.8 -3.8 -0.4 1.0 3.8 2.9 1979 3.9 3.0 10.1 8.4 8.6 6.2 5.5 5.1 3.8 4.1 4.0 8.1 1980 23.0 37.3 29.0 26.7 23.4 17.9 13.3 8.6 6.1 3.5 -0.6 -3.6 1981 -7.4 -1.5 2.3 4.3 -1.1 -2.0 -1.1 1.0 1.7 1.9 5.8 6.1 1982 1.4 -2.0 -1.7 -5.0 2.9 5.2 5.7 4.0 3.1 3.6 3.4 9.0

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141

Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1998 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999 16.1 26.9 39.6 25.2 13.9 3.6 5.7 -3.4 1.3 0.3 -3.5 -10.0 2000 -34.3 -21.3 9.2 14.4 36.6 30.7 25.9 21.0 -1.1 10.0 3.1 -10.5 2001 -0.7 -2.3 -34.6 -9.4 -10.1 1.1 2.2 9.1 20.4 2.2 20.9 63.8 2002 104.8 64.7 81.8 13.2 10.2 1.6 3.2 -3.9 -1.7 7.0 -5.6 -17.5 2003 -48.6 -59.7 -62.0 -39.4 -32.0 -16.7 -8.6 16.7 23.4 15.6 23.8 27.0 2004 50.7 118.7 135.4 55.0 54.1 25.8 9.7 8.0 0.2 25.4 28.9 17.4

142

Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -9.2 15.0 -0.3 -19.3 -19.7 -9.3 -1.7 -4.1 -2.7 -5.2 -8.5 6.3 1992 8.7 18.6 1.8 -25.1 -13.0 -11.2 -9.4 -1.0 0.5 1.8 5.3 -1.4 1993 1.3 -17.1 -29.0 -19.2 -19.0 -13.4 -5.9 -7.8 -2.5 1.2 -1.7 -7.0 1994 -16.3 -4.2 19.8 7.9 8.4 10.5 6.2 9.4 4.5 0.7 3.9 16.7 1995 23.8 4.8 -0.7 11.5 6.8 -3.5 -6.0 -4.1 0.0 0.3 0.4 -7.6 1996 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -2.8 -1.7 -2.9 -1.9 1997 11.5 27.8 39.0 29.2 13.8 12.4 12.3 7.6 3.7 2.3 3.5 14.6 1998 30.1 26.3 11.2 -4.8 -22.3 -26.4 -23.9 -19.0 -11.9 -4.1 -0.3 -18.6

143

Arkansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Arkansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -4.4 -8.3 -11.6 -14.2 -13.7 -14.5 -14.1 -18.0 -20.2 -20.4 -25.8 -30.6 1992 -22.4 -25.3 -26.8 -25.8 -27.1 -23.8 -18.0 -10.3 -5.1 -6.0 -1.3 1.0 1993 1.6 -2.9 -4.6 -5.4 -14.6 -17.3 -27.6 -34.0 -37.6 -37.9 -42.3 -48.2 1994 -63.6 -74.6 -86.5 -87.0 -71.6 -60.3 -47.2 -35.4 -31.0 -29.2 -21.3 -6.6 1995 17.7 53.9 163.4 177.6 64.0 80.9 96.0 105.5 99.3 96.9 80.2 20.9 1996 -23.6 -51.7 -97.8 -92.0 -31.2 -23.8 -31.6 -36.6 -21.2 -16.7 -17.7 8.9 1997 22.6 54.8 3,707.8 830.5 36.2 47.9 57.3 62.7 46.5 34.5 36.1 21.2

144

Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.8 1.8 3.0 2.5 2.0 -0.2 -1.8 -2.5 -2.7 1992 -43.8 -46.9 -48.5 -48.7 -48.6 -49.4 -49.4 -50.6 -50.1 -51.9 -53.3 -58.2 1993 -32.4 -36.0 -35.5 -33.5 -30.9 -25.0 -21.0 -16.0 -14.5 -8.3 -12.5 -8.1 1994 4.1 2.9 8.2 10.1 12.7 5.3 0.8 0.6 1.5 1.5 11.2 14.0 1995 3.4 11.3 0.7 -7.6 -12.3 -8.4 -5.5 -4.5 -2.5 -1.5 -2.5 -3.2 1996 -5.5 -13.9 -13.3 -6.2 5.8 6.3 7.8 3.5 -1.9 -5.2 -13.7 -20.9 1997 -28.6 -33.1 -34.9 -38.1 -41.3 -35.8 -27.4 -18.7 -11.1 -9.6 -6.5 -5.2 1998 -4.6 1.6 0.9 -10.6 -7.1 2.5 -1.3 -4.6 -3.6 0.4 12.4 16.6

145

Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -13.2 -13.8 -12.2 -16.7 -15.1 -12.7 -14.7 -12.9 -9.1 -12.1 -17.5 -13.3 1992 1.9 -0.4 -2.4 -7.4 -5.8 -7.6 -2.0 2.8 -0.9 -0.7 -2.1 -9.0 1993 -41.9 -44.7 -46.6 -41.3 -35.7 -33.7 -35.4 -35.0 -36.7 -35.5 -35.3 -32.7 1994 -13.0 -30.4 -20.9 -13.7 -8.3 -8.3 -0.1 3.0 15.2 17.2 27.0 21.5 1995 49.9 85.3 65.2 52.0 35.4 31.3 15.3 3.6 2.2 1.8 -7.0 -15.0 1996 -39.6 -55.6 -63.2 -60.9 -56.4 -52.4 -54.0 -45.4 -36.2 -30.4 -29.0 -23.9 1997 -22.9 -11.1 43.9 42.6 36.6 44.1 39.4 29.5 14.7 19.6 15.0 -3.0 1998 10.4 54.6 29.7 45.6 40.4 30.3 52.1 51.3 37.5 31.2 44.1 72.7

146

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 12.0 12.8 14.6 30.2 17.0 11.7 5.0 -0.7 -6.8 -2.6 -11.4 -14.2 1992 -8.1 -14.1 -31.6 -37.7 -28.9 -21.6 -14.9 -8.9 1.2 -1.2 1.1 -2.0 1993 -7.5 -20.7 -25.8 -17.2 -1.0 3.7 5.2 7.6 6.1 6.7 6.2 7.4 1994 -4.8 -0.4 22.1 37.4 24.6 15.8 10.2 7.2 6.2 5.4 12.3 21.2 1995 45.7 54.3 51.8 20.6 8.0 3.8 3.1 -2.0 -4.1 -3.7 -11.8 -24.0 1996 -36.3 -39.8 -47.6 -41.4 -32.3 -22.7 -17.5 -9.7 -4.1 -0.9 -0.2 9.0 1997 16.9 31.2 41.0 40.5 23.5 15.4 11.0 6.8 3.1 0.2 1.9 3.7 1998 17.4 33.0 41.3 43.7 44.2 36.0 22.0 14.2 6.0 4.5 11.4 17.1

147

Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Ohio Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 19.5 22.4 15.4 23.1 14.3 14.4 9.1 7.4 5.2 3.1 -3.3 -5.5 1992 -12.1 -27.3 -55.6 -57.4 -42.1 -27.9 -17.8 -13.7 -12.2 -10.0 -6.4 -11.0 1993 -11.3 -30.2 -60.3 -56.1 -31.6 -21.4 -13.8 -8.2 -0.9 -3.4 -7.9 -16.2 1994 -41.7 -61.0 -63.3 24.5 16.2 6.8 8.5 6.1 2.5 4.6 10.6 27.3 1995 67.7 179.6 562.8 43.0 14.8 11.6 5.3 1.9 -0.6 -1.5 -13.5 -28.0 1996 -36.6 -54.9 -83.2 -46.6 -20.6 -7.3 -0.6 4.2 6.7 8.8 9.2 20.8 1997 11.5 50.2 163.8 -2.8 8.0 4.9 2.0 2.8 2.3 -0.2 6.1 3.3 1998 43.1 60.2 92.8 193.9 65.5 24.3 15.1 8.6 5.6 7.5 12.7 20.9

148

Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Iowa Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -3.6 -8.4 -6.6 -4.0 -3.7 4.9 4.5 4.9 13.7 21.6 15.1 18.2 1992 -5.9 -10.5 -11.0 -8.6 -1.7 -4.7 3.2 7.9 6.2 3.3 2.5 -4.3 1993 -73.0 -85.1 -88.4 -81.1 -72.8 -64.5 -56.2 -50.3 -43.2 -42.8 -44.2 -51.6 1994 21.3 54.4 61.3 12.0 -0.1 -6.4 -6.3 -3.5 -4.3 1.5 5.3 7.2 1995 3.0 -5.8 -21.7 -39.9 -37.4 -20.3 -14.5 -2.2 -1.7 -4.5 -14.9 -14.6 1996 -11.5 0.0 -26.6 -32.1 -52.8 -35.7 -14.9 -13.5 -9.0 -1.9 7.0 0.4 1997 5.1 11.2 76.8 72.4 129.0 65.0 16.6 4.6 3.7 -1.1 8.3 16.8 1998 15.2 41.6 15.6 34.6 25.3 14.9 48.5 17.4 12.0 8.3 9.4 4.7

149

Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -13.9 -10.0 -6.5 8.1 7.3 7.8 0.7 -1.3 0.5 -0.6 -20.1 -13.6 1992 4.0 1.0 -7.0 -12.9 -16.3 -14.6 -3.6 -1.4 0.4 2.5 6.8 -7.7 1993 -59.8 -75.3 -81.3 -71.8 -58.1 -47.8 -43.7 -38.0 -33.1 -31.7 -34.3 -29.9 1994 20.6 33.2 68.7 60.2 49.2 29.1 25.2 21.3 11.9 8.6 24.6 27.3 1995 54.1 106.0 91.5 35.8 13.9 11.2 0.6 -12.2 -8.9 -2.2 -7.8 -15.8 1996 -31.5 -51.7 -63.0 -57.6 -49.9 -45.9 -42.1 -26.5 -18.0 -15.4 -23.0 -27.6 1997 -28.4 -3.5 62.3 59.0 49.7 32.7 17.2 5.5 0.1 6.6 12.9 11.8 1998 34.3 61.5 15.9 41.1 37.9 45.5 53.2 46.9 37.6 31.0 46.7 62.1

150

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -9.6 -1.2 -0.2 -0.3 11.7 15.5 -0.7 -11.7 -15.1 -9.6 -30.3 -11.8 1992 28.5 15.1 8.5 3.4 -5.0 -12.7 -9.9 2.5 1.5 -8.0 -9.4 -25.3 1993 -41.2 -47.7 -48.5 -45.3 -8.3 9.0 10.7 8.6 12.8 12.5 19.4 24.0 1994 18.1 26.1 43.8 52.2 5.8 -5.9 0.7 2.1 -3.5 -1.6 -3.1 -2.4 1995 11.9 13.5 -4.5 -4.2 -1.5 9.2 0.7 -15.7 -6.0 2.8 7.5 -0.5 1996 -22.8 -19.2 -23.4 -13.2 -16.5 -13.8 -4.8 7.7 -4.5 -10.7 -22.9 -23.0 1997 -0.9 -1.0 19.1 6.4 12.1 9.5 -2.4 2.6 9.6 12.4 23.3 28.2 1998 26.0 30.6 4.0 18.0 34.9 19.3 33.7 29.6 20.8 18.7 25.3 28.3

151

Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1998 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1999 43.0 55.3 41.7 61.2 59.6 131.5 70.6 38.1 29.2 25.1 16.0 8.6 2000 5.3 -3.2 12.8 21.0 16.7 -19.5 -34.7 -42.4 -50.4 -50.8 -41.4 -27.6 2001 -9.8 9.3 8.4 8.3 41.3 71.7 80.1 97.0 109.6 99.9 12.1 -3.5 2002 3.9 15.1 32.5 54.2 19.0 -2.5 -9.0 -17.3 -22.6 -28.6 -14.4 -14.2 2003 -37.6 -54.6 -65.2 -72.4 -65.7 -53.4 -40.1 -24.0 -23.2 -15.3 -0.8 -12.8 2004 -15.0 -0.5 24.1 74.4 61.1 82.6 24.4 10.6 11.2 6.1 3.7 8.9

152

Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 221.1 244.8 179.6 64.8 86.8 112.2 130.5 1997 36.2 10.9 111.7 57.1 68.4 -5.0 -17.0 -19.4 -19.9 -12.1 -19.0 36.2 1998 31.5 45.0 -21.4 4.3 -12.4 46.2 38.7 23.0 -24.8 -0.8 15.1 6.0 1999 3.8 17.6 11.5 -11.9 35.3 -11.6 6.5 -2.0 67.7 4.7 12.2 10.2 2000 7.9 25.4 213.4 116.8 22.2 51.5 32.4 25.3 -6.9 -10.7 -27.1 -24.2 2001 17.9 46.2 -44.2 -23.4 -32.8 -23.0 -18.6 -12.6 -6.3 -5.4 97.8 111.1 2002 138.8 68.1 181.5 147.4 173.3 50.0 51.2 46.8 45.2 20.3 -20.4 -25.7 2003 -86.5 -57.0 -25.7 14.4 54.1 99.5 100.8 98.7 129.2 237.3 177.3 180.6

153

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -2.5 -1.5 -1.5 -1.0 -1.7 0.1 -0.2 -0.5 -1.8 -3.2 -3.9 -3.3 1992 -38.1 -38.6 -38.4 -38.3 -38.2 -38.2 -38.2 -38.3 -38.6 -38.8 -39.8 -41.8 1993 -13.0 -15.6 -17.8 -19.4 -21.2 -22.4 -22.0 -22.3 -21.6 -20.7 -20.8 -19.6 1994 -19.3 -21.6 -20.5 -19.8 -17.7 -14.9 -14.5 -13.6 -12.0 -10.7 -9.8 -9.5 1995 -9.6 -5.3 -4.7 -2.5 -2.0 -1.5 0.6 3.4 2.5 0.4 -1.3 -4.9 1996 -9.0 -11.4 -16.2 -18.1 -20.7 -19.2 -18.0 -16.9 -13.6 -13.4 -16.2 -17.7 1997 -18.5 -20.5 -19.6 -21.9 -19.3 -20.3 -20.1 -20.8 -22.7 -23.8 -22.5 -20.6

154

Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 6,258 1,922 -2,167 -243 10 2,672 -2,738 -4,873 -6,032 -7,692 -923 338 1992 -6,698 -535 4,172 3,577 4,237 4,004 2,095 84 -3,541 -5,140 1,162 1,110 1993 -850 -4,870 -7,443 -9,206 -6,521 -660 270 742 2,661 8,010 4,211 6,489 1994 7,656 4,514 6,002 8,910 9,109 5,722 6,012 6,934 10,321 7,849 7,551 8,609 1995 5,458 10,271 8,870 8,362 6,546 8,164 11,552 10,230 4,613 2,012 5,484 -708 1996 -5,185 -10,201 -9,074 -10,256 -8,313 -7,322 -7,566 -7,192 -6,606 -8,327 -14,146 -13,483 1997 -10,123 -4,260 296 2,223 969 2,109 3,330 4,725 5,811 8,139 10,145 6,148

155

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -4.5 8.0 0.2 18.3 29.2 20.6 7.1 5.5 3.8 4.6 8.4 6.4 1992 25.9 21.0 30.9 16.6 7.3 -3.4 -3.4 1.0 4.3 5.7 -5.5 -10.4 1993 -13.5 -20.7 -8.5 -6.4 10.0 22.0 14.3 3.5 -1.4 -12.0 -15.0 -11.5 1994 -15.3 -17.8 -21.0 -34.7 -16.3 -25.8 -16.1 -9.6 -6.1 0.2 7.4 0.2 1995 2.9 10.9 -0.8 5.3 -17.3 7.8 9.2 3.0 -4.5 -1.7 8.4 2.6 1996 -14.4 -6.8 -9.6 10.7 13.0 4.5 0.0 0.0 2.6 -1.0 -6.1 0.6 1997 15.7 -0.6 19.6 -8.7 10.6 9.4 9.1 10.7 13.9 12.4 3.0 -2.1 1998 1.5 1.9 -7.3 5.5 7.3 -0.1 -5.5 -0.6 1.5 8.0 23.7 18.0

156

New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -484 -13 300 294 -712 -349 -288 393 1,101 972 1,011 1,114 1991 3,318 2,144 1,258 2,592 3,476 1,343 977 614 2,324 4,252 -55 2,063 1992 11,224 5,214 -1,963 -2,306 527 2,182 5,330 6,430 3,719 2,374 3,894 -4,958 1993 -6,762 -8,650 -7,154 -6,031 -5,432 -3,859 -5,235 -12,631 -8,772 -10,235 -10,273 -3,149 1994 -2,517 -470 1,289 6,015 4,590 5,915 4,963 11,457 6,824 6,269 6,981 7,667 1995 6,381 6,272 8,818 437 309 -648 -2,521 -3,178 786 1,081 -5,984 -14,997 1996 -14,592 -13,733 -14,382 -13,026 -10,421 -9,742 -4,162 368 -1,791 -848 2,368 11,761

157

Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Illinois Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -4.2 -4.0 0.3 4.2 3.5 1.7 1.1 0.4 0.0 2.4 -3.8 -3.3 1992 -4.2 -4.8 -6.4 -12.6 -9.2 -7.2 -5.6 -3.3 -2.3 -2.3 -2.2 -6.6 1993 -24.0 -31.6 -36.3 -30.7 -24.7 -20.2 -17.4 -16.7 -14.3 -13.7 -11.6 -12.9 1994 -3.7 -1.1 10.0 6.3 -2.8 -4.3 -2.6 -1.9 -1.2 -0.2 0.0 4.9 1995 13.3 6.3 -0.8 -4.1 -24.0 -19.8 -17.7 -16.0 -15.8 -12.9 -15.3 -22.1 1996 -32.4 -34.1 -42.5 -37.1 -6.6 -2.1 2.0 3.5 5.3 3.1 3.2 8.3 1997 15.3 24.7 33.5 27.3 14.8 7.4 3.9 3.6 2.9 2.4 8.6 5.5 1998 12.9 22.3 23.5 24.2 18.8 14.7 8.2 4.3 2.2 2.3 -0.8 0.8

158

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 22.5 -6.7 -11.5 -6.1 4.7 11.3 9.9 6.6 10.0 12.0 -0.1 -13.0 1992 -15.0 -16.6 -17.6 -16.9 -13.0 -14.5 -14.2 -9.8 -8.6 -8.0 -5.3 -9.7 1993 -14.1 -27.1 -40.9 -42.3 -18.5 -3.2 9.0 15.5 21.5 17.1 14.1 13.8 1994 8.5 40.4 69.8 104.5 54.4 28.4 23.9 17.6 8.8 5.4 10.4 15.6 1995 29.7 13.7 22.0 6.1 -6.0 -0.8 -5.4 -15.2 -13.6 -11.0 -19.9 -28.2 1996 -31.0 -28.8 -47.1 -50.7 -48.5 -47.6 -37.5 -19.6 -12.8 -11.9 -14.6 -6.4 1997 -14.5 -14.9 61.5 61.3 62.8 54.4 24.7 7.8 3.7 7.4 13.1 7.3 1998 40.7 86.3 35.5 55.9 46.9 35.0 42.0 40.1 22.5 26.5 40.7 56.9

159

New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 65.7 60.7 45.6 -31.6 30.6 8.4 -8.1 -32.2 -25.0 -34.9 -38.4 -27.6 1992 -25.3 -20.9 -14.7 37.0 1.7 -15.5 -34.5 -11.1 -18.1 -1.8 -6.8 -9.6 1993 -15.1 -40.1 -37.8 -54.0 -30.7 -23.9 -5.7 -39.7 -37.7 -34.0 -47.6 -48.4 1994 -61.0 -53.5 -57.4 -40.7 -50.9 -49.9 -47.5 -28.0 4.2 2.7 31.2 23.0 1995 53.3 91.0 123.6 153.3 135.3 124.2 108.2 79.1 15.1 -7.1 -12.6 -23.1 1996 -18.6 -34.9 -47.0 -53.1 -55.5 -60.1 -60.4 -54.7 -45.7 -41.7 -44.0 -38.5 1997 -33.5 -29.5 0.6 10.4 4.4 10.4 13.4 27.8 18.1 14.5 24.1 19.8

160

New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9.4 7.6 5.1 9.8 10.8 3.2 1.9 1.0 3.5 6.1 -0.1 3.5 1992 29.1 17.2 -7.6 -7.9 1.5 5.0 10.3 10.6 5.4 3.2 5.6 -8.1 1993 -13.6 -24.4 -30.1 -22.5 -15.0 -8.4 -9.2 -18.9 -12.1 -13.4 -14.1 -5.6 1994 -5.8 -1.8 7.8 29.0 14.9 14.1 9.6 21.1 10.7 9.5 11.2 14.4 1995 15.8 23.8 49.4 1.6 0.9 -1.4 -4.4 -4.8 1.1 1.5 -8.6 -24.7 1996 -31.2 -42.1 -53.7 -47.7 -29.0 -20.4 -7.4 0.8 -1.8 -1.2 3.8 25.9 1997 23.3 57.3 67.6 58.2 25.1 3.5 -0.3 -3.1 -5.1 -5.3 -2.6 -2.0 1998 13.7 23.0 38.5 46.2 37.9 33.6 18.6 6.4 6.6 9.4 15.5 25.9

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161

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -26.2 22.8 6.2 168.1 -141.5 111.4 60.1 16.3 5.9 16.1 23.8 63.1 1992 94.7 51.6 162.3 31.3 23.1 2.6 -6.6 5.4 14.9 -1.0 -12.1 -35.2 1993 -52.4 -72.1 -57.0 -40.4 -1.9 -4.6 5.3 -1.6 6.7 -4.5 -28.1 18.5 1994 59.2 90.5 20.4 38.4 -0.2 8.5 4.3 2.8 -5.7 11.2 51.1 14.3 1995 11.1 63.9 73.5 23.8 16.9 12.3 7.6 2.0 11.1 8.8 12.2 -0.1 1996 -39.1 -35.6 -43.5 -43.8 -39.1 -20.3 -19.2 9.7 -12.4 -23.3 -28.3 -24.4 1997 25.9 17.4 -31.4 -31.5 35.7 28.4 19.3 -17.0 3.9 13.8 20.4 11.4 1998 30.6 2.6 2.4 -47.6 -38.3 -33.5 -34.2 0.1 -2.9 -3.1 3.0 3.4

162

Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -5.7 -5.8 -6.6 -6.0 -2.9 -1.8 0.4 -0.5 -0.8 -1.8 -1.9 0.3 1992 0.9 1.0 2.4 1.3 -1.4 -0.5 3.6 5.9 6.3 6.3 2.5 0.6 1993 -2.8 -4.7 -6.6 -5.9 -3.3 -1.9 -0.9 0.2 0.7 -82.3 -84.6 -88.0 1994 -93.2 -98.5 -98.2 -96.2 -92.3 -91.2 -88.8 -88.5 -85.3 -7.5 12.8 23.1 1995 74.4 582.5 367.3 113.6 15.1 11.6 -40.3 -40.8 -50.5 -62.9 -79.4 -94.0 1996 -100.0 -100.0 -100.0 -100.0 -100.0 -85.2 -50.1 -20.8 -10.9 -7.8 41.1 301.9 1997 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 193.8 26.0 6.0 13.6 34.7 51.4 79.3 1998 188.1 377.6 104.3 6.6 14.8 -1.5 28.0 9.9 2.4 8.9 -0.1 -7.9

163

Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 36.3 23.0 19.6 25.2 19.8 15.5 10.9 5.6 1.2 -2.7 -5.1 -1.7 1992 5.7 8.9 7.7 -0.9 -5.4 -7.3 -8.9 -10.3 -9.2 2.6 8.5 8.4 1993 3.5 -8.1 -14.7 -13.7 -3.8 4.4 9.2 12.9 14.8 3.2 -1.2 -9.6 1994 -25.7 -31.2 -28.1 -20.1 -13.8 -10.6 -7.3 -4.7 -7.2 -4.8 1.4 4.5 1995 14.0 16.7 18.3 14.2 16.8 12.2 7.3 3.3 6.6 5.5 -4.6 -8.7 1996 -14.5 -16.8 -24.3 -29.4 -33.2 -22.0 -13.0 -5.9 -3.8 -3.6 0.9 5.3 1997 5.8 15.5 27.1 28.5 28.0 13.5 3.6 -0.7 -1.1 -0.7 0.2 -3.1 1998 7.5 5.2 -1.0 3.5 9.7 9.1 12.7 12.8 7.3 9.4 12.3 14.5

164

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 -5.1 1.4 -20.3 -2.8 6.8 8.3 12.5 12.3 7.8 7.6 9.9 13.8 1992 -2.8 6.5 23.0 7.8 3.7 4.3 3.8 2.6 2.5 2.2 -0.2 -0.1 1993 5.3 -3.5 -16.4 -13.3 -4.7 -0.9 -2.8 -1.6 -1.6 -1.3 -2.5 -0.8 1994 -3.1 17.2 37.2 -28.6 -19.3 -6.9 -4.2 -4.1 -3.3 -3.3 0.7 -1.0 1995 7.9 12.0 16.0 64.0 35.0 10.4 5.7 6.0 8.2 7.0 6.1 2.2 1996 -7.8 0.0 -8.3 -8.9 0.0 0.0 6.6 0.0 1.6 2.5 -2.6 0.1 1997 4.1 6.0 -3.9 -0.6 -2.0 -3.7 -1.4 0.6 1.0 1.0 6.7 5.0 1998 14.2 10.6 23.2 23.5 10.9 7.6 2.1 0.1 2.0 1.8 1.8 -1.8 1999 1.3 -2.4 0.6 1.5 4.1 5.7 5.7 4.0 3.8 3.7 3.3 6.0

165

Climate Response at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum to Greenhouse Gas Forcing—A Model Study with CCSM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55 Ma) is of particular interest since it is regarded as a suitable analog to future climate change. In this study, the PETM climate is investigated using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) with ...

A. Winguth; C. Shellito; C. Shields; C. Winguth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ecological Optimization Performance of An Irreversible Quantum Otto Cycle Working with an Ideal Fermi Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The model of an irreversible Otto cycle using an ideal Fermi gas as the working fluid, which is called as the irreversible Fermi Otto cycle, is established in this paper. Based on the equation of state of an ideal Fermi gas, the ecological optimization ...

Feng Wu; Lingen Chen; Fengrui Sun; Chih Wu; Fangzhong Guo; Qing Li

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity for underground storage in the lower 48 states rose 3%, or 136 billion cubic feet (Bcf), to 4,239 Bcf in ...

168

Experimental study of work exchange with a granular gas: the viewpoint of the Fluctuation Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article reports on an experimental study of the fluctuations of energy flux between a granular gas and a small driven harmonic oscillator. The DC-motor driving this system is used simultaneously as actuator and probe. The statistics of work fluctuations at controlled forcing, between the motor and the gas are examined from the viewpoint of the Fluctuation Theorem. A characteristic energy $E_c$ of the granular gas, is obtained from this relation between the probabilities of an event and its reversal.

Antoine Naert

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for Deregulating UK Gas and Electricity Markets: How is Competition Working for Residential Consumers? Speaker(s): Catherine Waddams Date: April 15, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay Retail gas and electricity prices were deregulated in the UK in April 2002, following introduction of retail choice for residential consumers between 1996 and 1999. We use information from consumer surveys, including a panel survey over three years, to analyse consumer attitudes and behaviour. In particular we explore how awareness changed, whether those who were actively considering switching in one wave of the survey had actually done so by the next round, whether individuals become willing to switch for smaller price gains as the markets matured, and how expectations

170

Gas Explosion Tests on East Jordan Iron Works Rectangular Composite Secondary Box Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of continuing research by Con Edison and EPRI to address issues related to manhole events caused by the accumulation of gases in underground structures. It summarizes the results of gas explosion tests performed in June 2008 on rectangular composite vented covers produced by East Jordan Iron Works Company.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Method and apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid in a binary power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid utilized in a thermodynamic system comprises a membrane having an upstream side operatively connected to the thermodynamic system so that the upstream side of the membrane receives a portion of the working fluid. The first membrane separates the non-condensible gas from the working fluid. A pump operatively associated with the membrane causes the portion of the working fluid to contact the membrane and to be returned to the thermodynamic system.

Mohr, Charles M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mines, Gregory L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bloomfield, K. Kit (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

173

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

174

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwa_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

175

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacw0_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

176

Natural gas storage working capacity grows 2% in 2012 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... This lack of growth in natural gas storage capacity may be partly ...

177

work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S WORKING CAPITAL FUND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES OCTOBER 1998 AUDIT REPORT CR-B-99-01 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, BUSINESS MANAGEMENT STAFF FROM: William S. Maharay Acting Manager, Capital Regional Audit Office, Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on the Department's Working Capital Fund BACKGROUND The Department established the Working Capital Fund (Fund) in January 1996 as a financial management tool for charging the costs of common services provided at Headquarters to Departmental program offices. The objectives in establishing the Fund were to increase efficiency of the Department's operations, improve management of administrative services

178

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 393,598 297,240 289,617 356,360 461,202 516,155 604,504 678,168 747,928 783,414 775,741 673,670 1995 156,161 158,351 126,677 101,609 72,294 83,427 33,855 -43,870 -34,609 -17,003 -75,285 -121,212 1996 -180,213 -191,939 -220,847 -233,967 -253,766 -260,320 -246,398 -159,895 -134,327 -127,911 -138,359 -86,091 1997 -55,406 -14,740 101,915 102,564 121,784 132,561 86,965 58,580 38,741 67,379 80,157 28,119 1998 77,255 135,784 65,355 130,979 148,718 138,540 205,160 215,060 166,834 187,302 246,104 273,754

179

Huge natural gas reserves central to capacity work, construction plans in Iran  

SciTech Connect

Questions about oil production capacity in Iran tend to mask the country's huge potential as a producer of natural gas. Iran is second only to Russia in gas reserves, which National Iranian Gas Co. estimates at 20.7 trillion cu m. Among hurdles to Iran's making greater use of its rich endowment of natural gas are where and how to sell gas not used inside the country. The marketing logistics problem is common to other Middle East holders of gas reserves and a reason behind the recent proliferation of proposals for pipeline and liquefied natural gas schemes targeting Europe and India. But Iran's challenges are greater than most in the region. Political uncertainties and Islamic rules complicate long-term financing of transportation projects and raise questions about security of supply. As a result, Iran has remained mostly in the background of discussions about international trade of Middle Eastern gas. The country's huge gas reserves, strategic location, and existing transport infrastructure nevertheless give it the potential to be a major gas trader if the other issues can be resolved. The paper discusses oil capacity plans, gas development, gas injection for enhanced oil recovery, proposals for exports of gas, and gas pipeline plans.

Not Available

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 -32.80 -42.10 -53.10 -51.10 -47.60 -43.40 -38.60 -25.20 -18.80 -16.70 -19.80 -15.60 1997 -15.00 -5.60 52.10 45.80 43.50 39.10 22.20 12.30 6.70 10.60 14.30 6.00 1998 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 38.30 55.40 1999 56.40 52.20 46.30 24.20 18.80 19.30 8.80 0.30 5.30 -3.80 0.00 0.00 2000 -14.80 -32.50 -28.30 -30.80 -35.70 -34.40 -30.70 -30.60 -28.40 -22.30 -28.90 -46.70 2001 -38.30 -35.20 -37.70 -12.80 9.80 25.20 31.70 43.40 46.40 30.90 52.60 127.30 2002 127.50 140.90 136.10 82.90 59.20 34.80 18.30 10.40 3.10 -0.50 -14.40 -23.90

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

How the GAS Program Works with a Note on Simulating Turtles with Touch Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The GAS program is a display simulation of a 2 dimensional ideal gas. Barriers, or walls, are line segments, and molecules, alias particles or balls, are circles. Collisions occur between balls and other balls as well ...

Speciner, Michael

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Use of a Maximum Entropy Method as a Regularization Technique during the Retrieval of Trace Gas Profiles from Limb Sounding Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of trace gas profiles from radiance measurements of limb sounding instruments represents an inverse problem: vertical profiles of mixing ratios have to be extracted from sequences of horizontally measured radiances recorded by a ...

J. Steinwagner; G. Schwarz; S. Hilgers

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year | U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas storage. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site. Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article?

184

Climate Change Standards Working Group, SUDS Policy and Planning Committee Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transit Abstract: This Recommended Practice provides guidance to transit agencies for quantifying their greenhouse gas emissions, including both emissions generated by transit and the potential reduction of emissions through efficiency and displacement by laying out a standard methodology for transit agencies to report their greenhouse gas emissions in a transparent, consistent and cost-effective manner.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gas dynamic aspects of silicon thin layers deposition using excitation of a free jet of the working gas mixture by an electron beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A film of microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) deposited at low temperature is a promising material for thin-film silicon solar cells with high efficiency and high stability. To deposit silicon thin films with high deposition rate and high quality, a novel gas-jet deposition method has been developed. The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the method from the gas dynamic point of view. A numerical model of the flow field of the working gas mixture in the device was developed that provides predictions of the film thickness distribution over the substrate surface and was found to describe the measured data satisfactory. The model may be used to optimize the operating parameters of the device.

Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.; Shchukin, V. G.; Konstantinov, V. O. [CJSC Institute of Plasma Chemical Technologies, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

188

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Total Working Gas Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 4,211,193 4,327,844 4,410,224 4,483,650 4,576,356 2008-2012 Alabama 20,900 20,900 25,150 27,350 27,350 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 296,318 303,761 303,500 302,385 302,962 2008-2012 Indiana 32,769 32,157 32,982 33,024 33,024 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 119,260 119,339 123,190 123,225 123,343 2008-2012 Kentucky

190

MAXIMUM HUMIDITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

Moisture-sensitive systems to measure and indicate the maximum level of humidity exposure are discussed. A chemical indicator utilizing deliquescent salts and water-soluble dyes provides an irreversible color change at discrete levels of relative humidity. To provide indication of the time at which the exposure occurs, a circuit employing a resistive-type sensor was developed. A small, commercially available sensor is used in a portable probe to detect humidity leaks into controlled areas.

Abel, W B

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents current data on the consumption, disposition, production, prices, storage, import and export of natural gas in the United States. Also included are operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies plus data on fillings, ceiling prices, and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. A feature article, entitled Main Line Natural Gas Sales to Industrial Users, 1981, is included. Highlights of this month's publication are: Marketed production of natural gas during 1982 continued its downward trend compared to 1981, with November production of 1511 Bcf compared to 1583 Bcf for November 1981; total natural gas consumption also declined when compared to 1981; as of November 1982, working gas in underground storage was running ahead of a similar period in 1981 by 109 Bcf (3.4 percent); the average wellhead price of natural gas continued to rise in 1982; and applications for determination of maximum lawful prices under the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) showed a decrease from October to November, principally for Section 103 classification wells (new onshore production wells).

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

193

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Maximum Let-Through Currents in the APS Storage Ring Quadrupole, Sextupole, and Corrector Magnets J. Carwardine, D. McGhee, G. Markovich May 18, 1999 Abstract Limits are described for the maximum magnet currents, under specified fault conditions, for the storage ring quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets. Introduction In computing the maximum let-through current for the magnets for the storage ring, several factors must be considered. In general, the maximum current likely to occur even under fault conditions is less than the maximum theoretical DC current given the magnet resistance and the maximum available DC voltage. The first level of protection against magnet current overloads is the over-current interlock that is built into the converter electronics package. The threshold is set to approximately 110% of

194

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

195

Underwater robotic work systems for Russian arctic offshore oil/gas industry: Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study was performed in association with Rosshelf, a shelf developing company located in Moscow. This volume involves developing an underwater robotic work system for oil exploration in Russia`s Arctic waters, Sea of Okhotsk and the Caspian Sea. The contents include: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Study Background; (3) Study Outline and Results; (4) Conclusions; (5) Separately Published Elements; (6) List of Subcontractors.

NONE

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Maximum entropy principal for transportation  

SciTech Connect

In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

198

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

199

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

200

The Maximum Intensity of Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact equation governing the maximum possible pressure fall in steady tropical cyclones is developed, accounting for the full effects of gaseous and condensed water on density and thermodynamics. The equation is also derived from Carnot's ...

Kerry A. Emanuel

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hardness of Maximum Constraint Satisfaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We show optimal (up to a constant factor) NP-hardness for maximum constraint satisfaction problem with k variables per constraint (Max-k-CSP), whenever k is larger than… (more)

Chan, Siu On

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Maximum order of planar digraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the degree/diameter problem for directed planar graphs. We show that planar digraphs with diameter 2 and maximum out-degree and in-degree d, d ? 41, cannot have more than 2d vertices. We show that 2d ...

Rinovia Simanjuntak; Mirka Miller

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°–70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

206

Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 96,950 396,092 364,228 363,521 367,108 2008-2012 Alabama 0 2012-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 0 2009-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 244,900 252,344 216,132 215,017 215,594 2008-2012 Indiana 19,978 19,367 19,437 19,479 19,215 2008-2012 Iowa 87,350 87,414 90,613 91,113 90,313 2008-2012 Kansas 0 2012-2012 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 2008-2012 Louisiana 0 2012-2012 Michigan 0 2012-2012 Minnesota 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2012 Mississippi 0 2012-2012 Missouri 11,276 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 0 2012-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 31 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 942 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 0 2012-2012 Utah 948 948 939 939 948 2008-2012

207

A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Network - Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures LEED Gold July 01, 2013 The recently completed 14.3m Maximum Building Energy Efficiency...

209

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Maximum Error Modeling for Fault-Tolerant Computation using Maximum a posteriori (MAP) Hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of current generation computing machines in safety-centric applications like implantable biomedical chips and automobile safety has immensely increased the need for reviewing the worst-case error behavior of computing devices for fault-tolerant computation. In this work, we propose an exact probabilistic error model that can compute the maximum error over all possible input space in a circuit specific manner and can handle various types of structural dependencies in the circuit. We also provide the worst-case input vector, which has the highest probability to generate an erroneous output, for any given logic circuit. We also present a study of circuit-specific error bounds for fault-tolerant computation in heterogeneous circuits using the maximum error computed for each circuit. We model the error estimation problem as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, over the joint error probability function of the entire circuit, calculated efficiently through an intelligent search of the entire input space using probabilistic traversal of a binary join tree using Shenoy-Shafer algorithm. We demonstrate this model using MCNC and ISCAS benchmark circuits and validate it using an equivalent HSpice model. Both results yield the same worst-case input vectors and the highest % difference of our error model over HSpice is just 1.23%. We observe that the maximum error probabilities are significantly larger than the average error probabilities, and provides a much tighter error bounds for fault-tolerant computation. We also find that the error estimates depend on the specific circuit structure and the maximum error probabilities are sensitive to the individual gate failure probabilities.

Karthikeyan Lingasubramanian; Syed M. Alam; Sanjukta Bhanja

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

214

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

O. A. Marina; L. R. Pederson; R. Gemmen; K. Gerdes; H. Finklea; I. B. Celik

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Finklea, Harry; Celik, Ismail B.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

217

Carbon dioxide laser with an e-beam-initiated discharge produced in the working gas mixture at a pressure up to 5 atm  

SciTech Connect

A high-pressure CO{sub 2} laser with a discharge initiated by an electron beam of sub-nanosecond duration in the laser gas mixture at a pressure up to 5 atm is fabricated. For the 20-ns pulses the energy from the active volume {approx} 4 cm{sup 3} amounted to 40 mJ. The laser operation at a pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz is demonstrated. In the gas mixture CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2}:He = 1:1:6 at a pressure 5 atm, the specific energy deposition of {approx} 0.07 J cm{sup -3} atm{sup -1} is obtained in the process of a non-self-sustained discharge with ionisation amplification.

Orlovskii, Viktor M; Alekseev, S B; Tarasenko, Viktor F [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Maximum Urban Heat Island Intensity in Seoul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum urban heat island (UHI) intensity in Seoul, Korea, is investigated using data measured at two meteorological observatories (an urban site and a rural site) during the period of 1973–96. The average maximum UHI is weakest in summer and ...

Yeon-Hee Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

220

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

222

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

223

The Energy Transformation Limit Theorem for Gas Flow Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The limit energy theorem which determines the possibility of transformation the energy flow in power systems in the absence of technical work is investigated and proved for such systems as gas lasers and plasmatrons, chemical gas reactors, vortex tubes, gas-acoustic and other systems, as well as a system of close stars. In the case of the same name ideal gas in the system the maximum ratio of energy conversion effectiveness is linked to the Carnot theorem, which in its turn is connected with the Nernst theorem. However, numerical analyses show that the class of flow energy systems is non-carnot one. The ratio of energy conversion effectiveness depends on the properties of the working medium; a conventional cycle in open-circuit is essentially irreversible. The proved theorem gives a more strongly worded II law of thermodynamics for the selected class of flow energy systems. Implications for astrophysical thermodynamic systems and the theory of a strong shock wave are discussed.

Volov, V T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor speed measurements as control variable inputs. The dependence on the accuracy of the measurement devices makes the controller less reliable. The proposed control scheme is based on the stiff system concept and provides a fast response and a dynamic solution to the complicated aerodynamic system. This control scheme provides a response to the wind changes without the knowledge of wind speed and turbine parameters. The system consists of a permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM), a passive rectifier, a dc/dc boost converter, a current controlled voltage source inverter, and a microcontroller that commands the dc/dc converter to control the generator for maximum power extraction. The microcontroller will also be able to control the current output of the three-phase inverter. In this work, the aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbines and the power conversion system topology are explained. The maximum power tracking control algorithm with a variable step estimator is introduced and the modeling and simulation of the wind turbine generator system using the MATLAB/SIMULINK® software is presented and its results show, at least in principle, that the maximum power tracking algorithm developed is suitable for wind turbine generation systems.

Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Recent Natural Gas Market Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sectors U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Volumes and prices for pipeline and LNG imports and exports Underground Natural Gas Storage - Stocks of working and base gas...

226

The Maximum Potential Intensity of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic approach to estimating maximum potential intensity (MPI) of tropical cyclones is described and compared with observations and previous studies. The approach requires an atmospheric temperature sounding, SST, and surface pressure; ...

Greg J. Holland

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Filter: Theoretical Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble-based data assimilation method, named the maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF), is presented. The analysis solution maximizes the likelihood of the posterior probability distribution, obtained by minimization of a cost ...

Milija Zupanski

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56756 Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment of Renewable Energy-AC03-76SF00098. #12;#12;Easing the Natural Gas Crisis Acknowledgments The work described in this report

229

Breathable gas distribution apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for safely supplying breathable gas or air through individual respirators to personnel working in a contaminated area.

Garcia, Elmer D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

231

US National Work Group (USNWG) for the Development of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a uniform and comprehensive set of (1) design, accuracy, installation, use, and ... maximum fast fill pressure of the gas-fuelled vehicle, Pv, ? if critical ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

Work Breakdown Structure and Plant/Equipment Designation System Numbering Scheme for the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)  

SciTech Connect

This white paper investigates the potential integration of the CTC work breakdown structure numbering scheme with a plant/equipment numbering system (PNS), or alternatively referred to in industry as a reference designation system (RDS). Ideally, the goal of such integration would be a single, common referencing system for the life cycle of the CTC that supports all the various processes (e.g., information, execution, and control) that necessitate plant and equipment numbers be assigned. This white paper focuses on discovering the full scope of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) processes to which this goal might be applied as well as the factors likely to affect decisions about implementation. Later, a procedure for assigning these numbers will be developed using this white paper as a starting point and that reflects the resolved scope and outcome of associated decisions.

Jeffrey D Bryan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling Maximum Hail Size in Alberta Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional steady-state cloud model was combined with a time-dependent hail growth model to predict the maximum hailstone size on the ground. Model runs were based on 160 proximity soundings recorded within the Alberta Hail Project area ...

Julian C. Brimelow; Gerhard W. Reuter; Eugene R. Poolman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Maximum Entropy Production in Climate Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R. D. Lorenz et al. claim that recent data on Mars and Titan show that planetary atmospheres are in unconstrained states of maximum entropy production (MEP). Their model as it applies to Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan is reexamined, and it is ...

Richard Goody

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

238

Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate $450 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Natural Gas Savings Program The Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Natural Gas Savings Programs are offering the following bonus rebates (in addition to the joint utilities bonus rebate). For both offers below, installation must occur from February 1 through May 31, 2013. All paperwork must be received on or before May 31,

239

Mildly Context Sensitive Grammars For Estimating Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The maximum-entropy framework provides great flexibility in specifying what features a model may take into account, making it e#ective for a wide range of natural language processing tasks. But because parameter estimation in this framework involves computations over the whole space of possible labelings, it is unwieldy for the parsing problem, where this space is very large. Researchers have tried several strategies for e#ciently training parsing models in the maximum-entropy framework. Ratnaparkhi's parser (1997) models the probabilities of actions of a pushdown automaton instead of the probabilities of entire parses, but for this reason is susceptible to the label-bias problem (La#erty et al. 2001). Abney (1997) proposes random sampling of the parse space. Johnson et al. (1999) propose using conditional estimation instead of joint estimation. This reduces the space to the possible parses of a single sentence, which is much smaller but can still be unmanageably large f

David Chiang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Discontinuities in the Maximum-Entropy Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the maximum-entropy inference of the state of a finite-level quantum system under linear constraints. The constraints are specified by the expected values of a set of fixed observables. We point out the existence of discontinuities in this inference method. This is a pure quantum phenomenon since the maximum-entropy inference is continuous for mutually commuting observables. The question arises why some sets of observables are distinguished by a discontinuity in an inference method which is still discussed as a universal inference method. In this paper we make an example of a discontinuity and we explain a characterization of the discontinuities in terms of the openness of the (restricted) linear map that assigns expected values to states.

Stephan Weis

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

WNGSR provides insight into natural gas markets and the broader ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR) measures how much natural gas is available for withdrawal–working natural gas–in the Nation's underground storage ...

242

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

243

Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

-753,656 -616,126 -473,386 -308,388 -195,536 -128,134 1973-2013 -753,656 -616,126 -473,386 -308,388 -195,536 -128,134 1973-2013 Alaska 14,007 15,277 16,187 17,087 18,569 20,455 2013-2013 Lower 48 States -767,663 -631,403 -489,573 -325,475 -214,105 -148,588 2011-2013 Alabama 131 998 -1,015 -975 -35 2,852 1996-2013 Arkansas -1,386 -1,403 -1,240 -1,239 -1,024 -1,050 1990-2013 California -6,702 -5,997 -10,684 274 24,044 28,854 1990-2013 Colorado -2,531 537 892 1,473 1,528 1,179 1990-2013 Illinois -11,767 -14,974 -8,820 -7,918 -12,002 -6,916 1990-2013 Indiana -4,126 -2,948 -2,927 -2,773 -1,025 -212 1990-2013 Iowa -6,614 -1,173 3,389 6,425 6,747 3,169 1991-2013 Kansas -38,081 -31,497 -26,449 -17,344 -10,369 -9,217 1990-2013 Kentucky -26,238 -26,922 -21,826 -15,927 -14,959 -12,801 1990-2013

244

Working Gas % Change from Year Ago  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21.3 -15.2 -9.5 -5.7 -3.5 -2.9 1973-2013 21.3 -15.2 -9.5 -5.7 -3.5 -2.9 1973-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 2013-2013 Lower 48 States -21.9 -15.7 -10.0 -6.3 -4.0 -3.5 2011-2013 Alabama 5.0 -4.8 -4.5 -0.2 15.5 -12.0 1996-2013 Arkansas -42.1 -34.7 -31.2 -24.4 -23.7 -23.0 1991-2013 California -2.0 -3.3 0.1 7.9 9.3 3.4 1991-2013 Colorado 2.8 3.6 4.7 3.9 2.6 3.0 1991-2013 Illinois -16.5 -7.4 -5.2 -6.3 -3.1 -3.2 1991-2013 Indiana -21.2 -17.8 -14.8 -5.0 -0.9 -5.2 1991-2013 Iowa -6.2 16.6 24.3 16.6 5.2 -1.8 1991-2013 Kansas -38.9 -29.7 -17.9 -10.2 -8.3 -7.6 1991-2013 Kentucky -30.6 -24.1 -17.7 -15.8 -12.7 -10.5 1991-2013 Louisiana -26.6 -21.0 -10.2 -4.3 -2.3 1.0 1991-2013 Maryland -40.2 -26.0 -17.1 -4.8 1.5 0.8 1991-2013 Michigan -35.7 -26.7 -19.2 -13.9 -9.7 -6.9 1991-2013

245

Working Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,857,570 2,270,934 2,642,060 2,936,813 3,210,598 3,564,920 1,857,570 2,270,934 2,642,060 2,936,813 3,210,598 3,564,920 1973-2013 Alabama 20,405 20,908 20,110 20,532 19,968 21,262 1995-2013 Alaska 14,007 15,277 16,187 17,087 18,569 20,455 2013-2013 Arkansas 1,486 1,928 2,330 2,735 3,168 3,372 1990-2013 California 255,453 287,757 309,448 326,906 329,024 338,271 1990-2013 Colorado 15,625 19,489 25,833 32,642 40,240 46,136 1990-2013 Illinois 50,160 75,951 110,815 142,938 177,700 218,245 1990-2013 Indiana 8,965 10,955 13,533 15,951 19,622 22,817 1990-2013 Iowa 11,615 17,696 23,768 32,853 47,421 64,102 1990-2013 Kansas 35,397 49,412 62,747 79,590 91,430 101,169 1990-2013 Kentucky 52,985 61,078 68,847 74,285 79,656 88,369 1990-2013 Louisiana 212,975 235,835 263,701 296,375 315,517 342,981 1990-2013

246

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 16,150 2008-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 2012-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 0 2012-2012 Indiana 0 2012-2012 Kansas 375 375 375 375 375 2008-2012 Kentucky 0 2012-2012 Louisiana 57,630 84,487 100,320 111,849 200,702 2008-2012 Maryland 0 2012-2012 Michigan 2,154 2,150 2,159 2,159 2,159 2008-2012 Mississippi 43,292 43,758 56,928 62,932 100,443 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 Nebraska 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 1,450 1,450 1,450 1,450 0 2008-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 0 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 0 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 109,655 123,664 130,621 152,102 164,439 2008-2012 Utah 0 2012-2012 Virginia

247

Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,583,786 3,659,968 3,733,993 3,769,113 3,720,980 2008-2012 ,583,786 3,659,968 3,733,993 3,769,113 3,720,980 2008-2012 Alabama 9,000 9,000 9,000 11,200 11,200 2008-2012 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 12,178 2008-2012 California 283,796 296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 2008-2012 Colorado 42,579 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 2008-2012 Illinois 51,418 51,418 87,368 87,368 87,368 2008-2012 Indiana 12,791 12,791 13,545 13,545 13,809 2008-2012 Iowa 0 2012-2012 Kansas 118,885 118,964 122,814 122,850 122,968 2008-2012 Kentucky 94,598 96,855 100,971 100,971 100,971 2008-2012 Louisiana 284,544 284,544 284,544 285,779 211,780 2008-2012 Maryland 17,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 18,300 2008-2012 Michigan 660,693 664,486 664,906 670,473 671,041 2008-2012 Mississippi 53,140 65,220 70,320 68,159 68,159 2008-2012

248

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 2008-2011 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 2008-2011 Arkansas 0 2011-2011 California 0 2011-2011 Colorado 0 2011-2011 Illinois 0 2011-2011...

249

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

available to all PGW commercial and industrial customers installing high efficiency boilers or eligible commercial food service equipment. All equipment must meet program...

250

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an incentive of 13MMBtu, 24MMBtu or 40MMBtu in first year energy savings. Commercial incentives are capped at 60,000 per project. Projects may use a variety of...

251

Philadelphia Gas Works – Home Rebates Program (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PGW’s Home Rebates program is available for residential customers within the PGW service territory. See the web site above for complete program details.

252

Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: This table tracks U ...

253

Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

,583,786 3,659,968 3,733,993 3,769,113 2008-2011 Alabama 9,000 9,000 9,000 11,200 2008-2011 Arkansas 14,500 13,898 13,898 12,036 2008-2011 California 283,796 296,096 311,096...

254

Total Working Gas Capacity - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Existing fields ...

255

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

256

Xcel Energy (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Xcel Energy (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Traps, Dampers, Tune-ups: $250/unit Steam Traps: $10,000/facility Modular Burner Control: $2,000/unit Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Hot Water Boilers (New/Non-Working Replacement): $750 - $3500/MMBTUh Hot Water Boilers (Working Replacement): $7000/MMBTUh Boiler Tune-ups: $250/MMBTUh Modular Burner Controls: $750/MMBTUh

257

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NWP subcontractor personnel work at a number of DOE generator sites where NWP has no direct contractual authority for overall site operations. NWP has therefore negotiated...

258

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

259

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

260

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

End of Month Working  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The level of gas in storage at the end of the last heating season (March The level of gas in storage at the end of the last heating season (March 31, 2000) was 1,150 billion cubic feet (Bcf), just above the 1995-1999 average of 1,139 Bcf. Underground working gas storage levels are currently about 8-9 percent below year-ago levels. In large part, this is because injection rates since April 1 have been below average. Storage injections picked up recently due to warm weather in the last half of October. The month of November is generally the last month available in the year for injections into storage. A cold November would curtail net injections into storage. If net injections continue at average levels this winter, we project that storage levels will be low all winter, reaching a level of 818 Bcf at the end of March, the lowest level since 1996

262

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

266

Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

Murphy, T W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Molecular simulation of adsorbed natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed natural gas is being investigated as a substitute for gasoline., The most important factor in engineering studies is the maximum storage capacity of adsorbents for natural gas. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the adsorption of natural gas on activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms, storage capacities, and isoteric heats were determined from simulations and compared with experimental data. Simulations predict a maximum storage capacity of 244 V/V at 35 atm.

Matranga, K.R.; Stella, A.; Myers, A.L.; Glandt, E.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Work Manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time control system has been developed and deployed nationally to support BT‘s work management programme. This paper traces the history, system architecture, development, deployment and service aspects of this very large programme. Many ...

G. J. Garwood

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers is 80%. The maximum standby loss is specified usingrate. 8 There is no maximum standby loss specified for gas-of hot water use, standby losses are not a significant part

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

was 70 percent below the level reported last year at this time. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage increased to 2,337 Bcf as of...

271

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

supply disruptions during the remainder of the hurricane season. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage was 2,461 Bcf as of Friday,...

272

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

MMBtu lower than the final price of the November 2009 contract. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage As of Friday, September 24, working natural gas in...

273

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per MMBtu, 22 cents or 4.3 percent lower than last Wednesday. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 1,615 Bcf as of...

274

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

were more moderate than the price increases for this summer. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,456...

275

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas capacity, which is the sum of the highest observed working natural gas storage inventory level in each facility over the prior 5-year period; and working gas design...

276

Property Libraries for Working Fluids for Calculating Heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... properties of working fluids can be used for the daily work of an engineer who calculates heat cycles, steam or gas turbines, boilers, heat pumps or ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Working crude oil storage capacity at Cushing, Oklahoma rises ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, ... as reported in EIA's recently released report on Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity. Utilization of working storage capacity ...

278

Vermont Gas- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vermont Gas (VGS) offers two energy efficiency programs for commercial customers: the WorkPlace New Construction Program and the WorkPlace Equipment Replacement and Retrofit Program.

279

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives including Combined Heat and Power: 250,000 Large Industrial Gas Incentives: 250,000 Energy Efficiency...

280

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/WIPP-99-2286 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Notification or Reporting Implementation Plan Revision 7 U.S. Department of Energy December 2013 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP-99-2286, Rev. 6. Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Notification or Reporting Implementation Plan DOE/WIPP-99-2286, Rev. 7 2 TABLE OF CONTENTSCHANGE HISTORY SUMMARY .............................................. 3 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................ 4 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 6 2.0 NOTIFICATION OR REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND COMMITMENTS ..... 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Working Copy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Effective Date: 11/05/13 WP 12-IS.01-6 Revision 10 Industrial Safety Program - Visitor, Vendor, User, Tenant, and Subcontractor Safety Controls Cognizant Section: Industrial Safety/Industrial Hygiene Approved By: Tom Ferguson Working Copy Industrial Safety Program - Visitor, Vendor, User, Tenant, and Subcontractor Safety Controls WP 12-IS.01-6, Rev. 10 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHANGE HISTORY SUMMARY ..................................................................................... 7 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................. 8 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 ............................................................................................... 10 2.0 VISITORS ........................................................................................................... 11

282

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $500 Furnace with ECM Fan: $700 - $900 Water Boiler: $800 - $1,200 Steam Boiler: $800 Boiler Reset Control: $100 Indirect Water Heater: $300 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric The Business Energy SavingsCentral program is for non-residential gas customers of Central Hudson. This includes businesses, local governments,

283

CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

285

Work Address:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BO SAULSBURY BO SAULSBURY Work Address: Home Address: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 12952 Buckley Road National Transportation Research Center Knoxville, TN 37934 Building NTRC-2, Room 118 (865) 288-0750 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6479 (865) 574-4694 saulsburyjw@ornl.gov Technical Specialties: Land use planning Environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project management Vehicle fuel economy Education: 1986 B. A., History (minors in English and Business), The University of Tennessee 1989 M. S., Planning, The University of Tennessee (Thesis title: Land Use Compatibility Planning for Airfield Environs: Intergovernmental Cooperation to Protect Land Users From the Effects of Aircraft Operations)

286

Profitability Comparison Between Gas Turbines and Gas Engine in Biomass-Based Power Plants Using Binary Particle Swarm Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper employs a binary discrete version of the classical Particle Swarm Optimization to compare the maximum net present value achieved by a gas turbines biomass plant and a gas engine biomass plant. The proposed algorithm determines the optimal ...

P. Reche López; M. Gómez González; N. Ruiz Reyes; F. Jurado

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

289

Marine gas turbine programs at AlliedSignal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work has been continuing at AlliedSignal Turbines, located in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., on the integration of their gas turbine programs with those of Textron Lycoming since the merger of the Lycoming gas turbine operations into the AlliedSignal Turbines Group about a year and a half ago. Although much of the gas turbine business and development programs are aimed at the aircraft markets, the industrial and marine gas turbine product area is also receiving significant attention in this combined organization. Of particular importance is the marine market, where the TF40 marine gas turbine is a key element. The TF40 is based on a tested turbine core engine with over ten million hours of operating experience. The compact TF40 gas turbine offers one of the highest power-to-weight ratios in its class. With a length of 1422 mm and a weight of 600 kg without a gearbox, the TF40 can produce 3432 kW boost rating for yachts and military craft and 2984 kW at maximum continuous rating for fast ferries. This paper describes the specifications and variations of the different versions being offered by the company.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... almost every region consumed less gas for power generation, ... History Table; Working Gas in Underground Storage;

292

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: February 6, 0: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on AddThis.com...

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Gas Tax to Liquefied Gas Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Liquefied Gas Tax A use tax of $0.14 per gallon is imposed on liquefied gas used for operating motor vehicles on public highways in addition to a pre-paid annual vehicle tax according to the following: Maximum Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Tax

294

LNG delivery system for gas powered vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a natural gas delivery system. It comprises a first vehicle mounted tank for storing liquid natural gas and natural gas vapor; a second vehicle mounted tank for storing liquid natural gas and natural gas vapor; a use line connected to the first and second tanks for receiving natural gas from the first and second tanks and delivering natural gas vapor to the use device on the vehicle and means for pressurizing the natural gas in the use line; means for selecting one of the first or second tanks to deliver natural gas to the use line; and means for overriding the selecting means to deliver natural gas vapor to the use line from either of the tanks in response to detecting a pressure rise therein which exceeds a preselected maximum.

Nesser, T.A.; Hedegard, K.W.

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Market for Natural Gas,” 2008, working paper. [of Electricity and Natural Gas,” Journal of IndustrialPrices: Evidence from Natural Gas Distribution Utilities,”

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

297

Multithreaded Algorithms for Maximum Matching in Bipartite Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract—We design, implement, and evaluate algorithms for computing a matching of maximum cardinality in a bipartite graph on multi-core and massively multithreaded computers. As computers with larger number of slower cores dominate the commodity processor market, the design of multithreaded algorithms to solve large matching problems becomes a necessity. Recent work on serial algorithms based on searching for augmenting paths for this problem have shown that their performance is sensitive to the order in which the vertices are processed for matching. In a multithreaded environment, imposing a serial order in which vertices are considered for matching would lead to loss of concurrency and performance. But this raises the question: Would parallel matching algorithms on multithreaded machines improve performance over a serial algorithm? We answer this question in the affirmative. We report efficient multithreaded implementations of two key algorithms (Hopcroft- Karp based on breadth-first-search, and Pothen-Fan based on depth-first-search) and their variants, combined with the Karp- Sipser initialization algorithm. We report extensive results and insights using three shared-memory platforms (a 48-core AMD Opteron, a 32-core Intel Nehalem, and a 128-processor Cray XMT) on a representative set of real-world and synthetic graphs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first extensive study of augmentation-based parallel algorithms for bipartite cardinality matching.

Azad, Md Ariful; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Rajamanickam, Siva; Boman, Erik G.; Khan, Arif; Pothen, Alex

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

The evaporative gas turbine (EGT) cycle  

SciTech Connect

Humidification of the flow through a gas turbine has been proposed in a variety of forms. The STIG plant involves the generation of steam by the gas turbine exhaust in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and its injection into or downstream of the combustion chamber. This increases the mass flow through the turbine and the power output from the plant, with a small increase in efficiency. In the evaporative gas turbine (or EGT) cycle, water is injected in the compressor discharge in a regenerative gas turbine cycle (a so-called CBTX plant--compressor [C], burner [B], turbine [T], heat exchanger [X]); the air is evaporatively cooled before it enters the heat exchanger. While the addition of water increases the turbine mass flow and power output, there is also apparent benefit in reducing the temperature drop in the exhaust stack. In one variation of the basic EGT cycle, water is also added downstream of the evaporative aftercooler, even continuously in the heat exchanger. There are several other variations on the basic cycle (e.g., the cascaded humidified advanced turbine [CHAT]). The present paper analyzes the performance of the EGT cycle. The basic thermodynamics are first discussed, and related to the cycle analysis of a dry regenerative gas turbine plant. Subsequently some detailed calculations of EGT cycles are presented. The main purpose of the work is to seek the optimum pressure ratio in the EGT cycle for given constraints (e.g., fixed maximum to minimum temperature). It is argued that this optimum has a relatively low value.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Condition based management of gas turbine engine using neural networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research work is focused on the development of the hybrid neural network model to asses the gas turbine’s compressor health. Effects of various gas… (more)

Muthukumar, Krishnan.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Quasi-hydrostatic intracluster gas under radiative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasi-hydrostatic cooling of the intracluster gas is studied. In the quasi-hydrostatic model, work done by gravity on the inflow gas with dP \

Kuniaki Masai; Tetsu Kitayama

2004-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enhanced Gas Recovery Using Pressure and Displacement Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work contained in this thesis combines two previous enhanced gas recovery techniques; coproduction of water and gas from water-drive reservoirs and waterflooding of low… (more)

Walker, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... U.S. inventories of working natural gas in storage hit new records ...

303

Spreadsheets for Geothermal Water and Gas Geochemistry | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and plots four common ternaries, three3 "YT" gas geothermometer grids and two gas ratio geothermometer grids, mainly derived from the work of Werner Giggenbach. Typical...

304

EIA publishes historical data series on natural gas storage in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the January 17, 2013 Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report, EIA published historical data back to 2007 showing the breakout of working gas storage in salt caverns ...

305

Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 29, 2008 ... Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem. Diogo V. Andrade (diogo ***at*** google.com) Mauricio G. C. Resende (mgcr ...

306

THE MAXIMUM k-COLORABLE SUBGRAPH PROBLEM AND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to investigate the polyhedral con- .... The resulting graph with a maximum (black,white,crossed)-colorable ...... Due to the ad-.

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

309

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

310

Gas quantitative analysis with support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas sensor array is an important part of electronic nose. The gas analysis performance of electronic nose is affected badly by the cross sensitivity of gas sensor array. In order to solve the problem of the cross sensitivity, in this work a new method ... Keywords: electronic nose, gas mixture, quantitative analysis, support vector machine

Liang Xie; Xiaodong Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

312

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

313

Phase transition or Maxwell's demon in Granular gas?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of vibro-fluidised granular gas is investigated experimentally using the transfer of grains from a compartment through a horizontal slit at a given height h . It is demonstrated that the transfer rate j varies linearly with the grain number N in the box when N remains small; however j(N) becomes strongly non linear as soon as the number n of layers is larger than 0.3; dj/dN becomes negative for n>0.4.It is found also that the maximum of j(N) increases slightly with the acceleration af_ of the vibration which excites the granular gas. Using dynamical system theory, dynamics equations are written, and a critical bifurcation is found, which explains the existence of a condensation and of a phase transition. This explains how the pseudo " Maxwell's demon" works in granular gases. This experiments contradicts recent modeling . Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

P. Jean; H. Bellenger; P. Burban; L. Ponson; P. Evesque

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

315

Maximum a posteriori based kernel classifier trained by linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new approach for classification problem based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. The necessary and sufficient condition for the cost function to estimate a posteriori probability was obtained. It was clarified by the condition ... Keywords: cost function, kernel function, linear programming, maximum a posteriori

Nopriadi Nopriadi; Yukihiko Yamashita

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Estimating Maximum Surface Winds from Hurricane Reconnaissance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radial profiles of surface winds measured by the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) are compared to radial profiles of flight-level winds to determine the slant ratio of the maximum surface wind speed to the maximum flight-level wind ...

Mark D. Powell; Eric W. Uhlhorn; Jeffrey D. Kepert

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Maximum likelihood estimation of Gaussian mixture models using stochastic search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian mixture models (GMM), commonly used in pattern recognition and machine learning, provide a flexible probabilistic model for the data. The conventional expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters ... Keywords: Covariance parametrization, Expectation-maximization, Gaussian mixture models, Identifiability, Maximum likelihood estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Stochastic search

Ça?lar Ar?; Selim Aksoy; Orhan Ar?kan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart VAMSI K. MOOTHA, ANDREW E. ARAI, AND ROBERT S. BALABAN Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart. Am. J. Physiol. 272 (Heart Circ

Mootha, Vamsi K.

319

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gas Turbine World performance specs 1984  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed: working insights into the performance specifications; performance and design characteristics of electric power plants, mechanical drive gas turbines, and marine propulsion gas turbines; and performance calculations.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Work Management Improvement at Burlington Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Coordination Process (WCP), developed in an EPRI tailored collaboration effort to upgrade the maintenance program at Burlington Generating Station, is an organized methodology to prepare for and perform preventative and corrective maintenance during both outages and running periods. The coordinating process supports both the need of operational personnel for maximum equipment availability and the need of maintenance personnel for access to plant equipment to ensure maximum reliability.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gas from Veggies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas from Veggies Gas from Veggies Name: Julie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Im doing my science experiment to see if the processing of food produces gas. I was told that you do this by getting the vegitables, grounding them up, mixing them with vinegar and putting it in a test tube and then place a balloon over it to see if gas is produced. First I tried mixing the foods (Im using canned, frozen and fresh broccoli first to see if it works) with the vinegar and put it in a test tube and I placed a balloon over it but no gas was produced. I then tried it again in heat and again in the cold and it still wouldnt work. I tried the experiment again and pureed the broccoli and mixed it with the vinegar, put the balloon over it and still no gas was produced. What could I be doing wrong? Im using 5% acidity vineger because that's the only kind I could find. Do I need a stronger one? Where can I get a stronger one? How much vinegar should I be using? How much of the broccoli should I be using? Do I have to do something to the broccoli first? Please try to answer my questions I really need help.

324

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

325

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

326

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

327

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

328

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

329

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

330

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

331

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

332

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

333

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

334

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional/State Underground Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Underground Natural Gas Storage, Close of 2007 Depleted-Reservoir Storage Aquifer Storage Salt-Cavern Storage Total Region/ State # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) Central Region Colorado 8 42 1,088 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 42 1,088 Iowa 0 0 0 4 77 1,060 0 0 0 4 77 1,060

335

Natural gas monthly, August 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential sector (50% of the electricity consumption and 80% of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings...

337

Trends of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in Northern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of testing the homogeneity of the basic data used in this study, that is, the mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature (as derived from daily observations) of several long-term climatological stations of ...

Ramon A. Quintana-Gomez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A maximum likelihood approach towards aggregating partial orders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the possible applications as well as the theoretical models of computational social choice, the agents' preferences are represented as partial orders. In this paper, we extend the maximum likelihood approach for defining "optimal" voting rules ...

Lirong Xia; Vincent Conitzer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

On Determinations of Maximum Hailstone Sizes from Hallpad Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports of hailstones larger than those indicated by hailpad observations being found on the ground around the hailpad sites raise questions about the validity of maximum-size determinations. Data from the Grossversuch IV hailpad network ...

Paul L. Smith; Albert Waldvogel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Characteristics of Maximum Concentrations from Multiple Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple quasi-Newton numerical scheme is applied to determine the hypothetical worst-case meteorology that will result in the maximum combined concentrations at any receptor location in air quality modeling over short distances for multiple ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synoptic Reorganization of Atmospheric Flow during the Last Glacial Maximum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global atmosphere–ocean model of intermediate complexity is used to study the influence of glacial boundary conditions on the atmospheric circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum in a systematical manner. A web of atmospheric ...

Flávio Justino; Axel Timmermann; Ute Merkel; Enio P. Souza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Humidity Profile Retrieval Using a Maximum Entropy Principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite data inversion method based on a maximum entropy principle is presented. The method is both physical since a radiative transfer model with its adjoint is needed, and also statistical since errors of the observed radiances and of a ...

Bernard Urban

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Maximum Likelihood Estimation Using Parallel Computing: An Introduction to MPI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational difficulty of econometric problems has increased dramatically in recent years as econometricians examine more complicated models and utilize more sophisticated estimation techniques. Many problems in econometrics are `embarrassingly ... Keywords: MPI, maximum likelihood estimation, parallel computing, parallel programming

Christopher A. Swann

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Maximum likelihood sequence estimation from the lattice viewpoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considers the problem of data detection in multilevel lattice-type modulation systems in the presence of intersymbol interference and additive white Gaussian noise. The conventional maximum likelihood sequence estimator using the Viterbi algorithm has ...

Wai Ho Mow

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Computing maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider computing a maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs. For a convex bipartite graph of n vertices and m edges, we present an O (n logn ...

Danny Z. Chen; Xiaomin Liu; Haitao Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effects of Tides on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights: Probability Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical study was carried out to understand how the probability distribution for maximum wave heights (?m) during tsunamis depends on the initial tsunami amplitude (A) and the tides. It was assumed that the total wave height is the linear ...

Harold O. Mofjeld; Frank I. González; Vasily V. Titov; Angie J. Venturato; Jean C. Newman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

354

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 24, 2010) Natural gas prices declined across the board, continuing a downward trend from the previous week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price closed at $4.91 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 24, a decline of about 10 percent from $5.47 per MMBtu on February 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March 2010 delivery, which expired yesterday, fell 11 percent on the week, from $5.386 per MMBtu to $4.816 per MMBtu. With an implied net withdrawal of 172 billion cubic feet (Bcf), working gas in storage decreased to 1,853 Bcf as of Friday, February 19,

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

357

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

358

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

363

U. S. landfill gas research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys US landfill gas RandD programs and presents some technical details of work being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois) through the support of the US Department of Energy. The two projects at Argonne include (1) a study of bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials and (2) development of standardized techniques to assay gas production from landfilled refuse (including qualitative microbiology of refuse assays).

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.; Rose, C.; Hsu, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage was 3,294 Bcf, which is 8.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

365

NSLS Work Planning & Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Planning & Controls NSLS Work Planning and Control Procedure Lead Working Guidelines Information on Working in Areas Subject to Radiation from VUV Injection Procedure for...

366

Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)  

SciTech Connect

The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Non-isothermal, compressible gas flow for the simulation of an enhanced gas recovery application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present a framework for numerical modeling of CO"2 injection into porous media for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted reservoirs. Physically, we have to deal with non-isothermal, compressible gas flows resulting in a system of ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Enhanced gas recovery, Equation of state, Finite element method, Numerical simulation, Real gas behavior

N. BöTtcher; A. -K. Singh; O. Kolditz; R. Liedl

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

GasSense: appliance-level, single-point sensing of gas activity in the home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents GasSense, a low-cost, single-point sensing solution for automatically identifying gas use down to its source (e.g., water heater, furnace, fireplace). This work adds a complementary sensing solution to the growing body of work in ... Keywords: gas, sensing, sustainability, ubiquitous computing

Gabe Cohn; Sidhant Gupta; Jon Froehlich; Eric Larson; Shwetak N. Patel

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

With the arrival of snow, modes of travel, working, and living are transformed. Oil and gas exploration operations restricted to winter months use ice roads and ice pads in arctic...

370

Submitted Work & Work in Preparation - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 23, 2001 ... Submitted Work & Work in Preparation. I. G. Lisle and G. J. Reid, Symmetry Classification Using Invariant Moving Frames, to be submitted.

371

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Morgantown Ordnance Works...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(NETL). NETL historically has focused on the development of advanced technologies related to coal and natural gas. Also see Documents Related to Morgantown Ordnance Works...

372

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

373

Estimating the Observed Atmospheric Response to SST Anomalies: Maximum Covariance Analysis, Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment, and Maximum Response Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three multivariate statistical methods to estimate the influence of SST or boundary forcing on the atmosphere are discussed. Lagged maximum covariance analysis (MCA) maximizes the covariance between the atmosphere and prior SST, thus favoring ...

Claude Frankignoul; Nadine Chouaib; Zhengyu Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

375

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies greater than 50 percent (higher heating value) have been projected for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems fueled with gasified coal, even with carbon sequestration. Multiple minor and trace components are present in coal that could affect fuel cell performance, however, which vary widely depending on coal origin and type. Minor and trace components have been classified into three groups: elements with low volatility that are likely to remain in the ash, elements that will partition between solid and gas phases, and highly volatile elements that are unlikely to condense. Those in the second group are of most concern. In the following, an overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic coal gas. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Finklea, Harry; Celik, Ismail B.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

378

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Use of Alloy 718 and 725 in Oil and Gas Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

maximum ID and minimum OD to increase oil and gas production at a lower completion cost. 718 has also been used in downhole measurement tools, ...

380

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.6 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Small Flume + 0.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.3 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.6 +

382

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

383

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

384

Natural Gas Monthly, August 1984  

SciTech Connect

Dry gas production during August 1984 was estimated at 1441 billion cubic feet (Bcf), 8.4% above August 1983 dry gas production. Consumption of natural gas during August 1984 was an estimated 1182 Bcf, 3.7% above the August 1983 level. Compared to the previous July, residential and commercial consumption was down 4.6 and 6.2%, respectively, industrial consumption was up 13.2%, and electric utility consumption was up 11.1% during July 1984. The volume of working gas in underground storage reservoirs at the end of August 1984 was 5.8% below the August 31, 1983 level. The average wellhead price of natural gas in June 1984 was $2.61 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). In June 1983, the average was $2.62 per Mcf. In August 1984, the average residential price of natural gas was $6.17 per Mcf. The comparable price in August 1983 was $6.16 per Mcf. The average wellhead (first sale) price for natural gas purchases projected for September 1984 by selected interstate pipeline companies was $2.67 per Mcf. In September 1983, the average price was $2.64 per Mcf. The average price projected for Old Gas (NGPA Sections 104, 105, and 106) in September 1984 was $1.23 per Mcf; for New Gas (NGPA Sections 102, 103, 108, and 109), $3.66 per Mcf; and for High Cost Gas (NGPA Section 107), $5.18 per Mcf. In September 1983, the prices projected for Old Gas, New Gas, and High Cost Gas averaged $1.35, $3.47, and $5.66 per Mcf, respectively. On September 26, 1984 the FERC approved extension of the authorized natural gas producer and pipeline special marketing programs (SMP) for another year. The North Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota begun producing gas in July of this year.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Generalized Relativistic Wave Equations with Intrinsic Maximum Momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nonperturbative effect of maximum momentum on the relativistic wave equations. In momentum representation, we obtain the exact eigen-energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional Klein-Gordon and Dirac equation with linear confining potentials, and the Dirac oscillator. Bound state solutions are only possible when the strength of scalar potential are stronger than vector potential. The energy spectrum of the systems studied are bounded from above, whereby classical characteristics are observed in the uncertainties of position and momentum operators. Also, there is a truncation in the maximum number of bound states that is allowed. Some of these quantum-gravitational features may have future applications.

Chee Leong Ching; Wei Khim Ng

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Piedmont Natural Gas - Residential Equipment Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Piedmont Natural Gas - Residential Equipment Efficiency Program Piedmont Natural Gas - Residential Equipment Efficiency Program Piedmont Natural Gas - Residential Equipment Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate 2 rebates per household Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High-Efficiency Furnace: $175 Tankless Water Heater: $150 Tank Water Heater: $50 Provider Gas Technology and Energy Services Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 101-Residential Service rate are eligible for these rebates. Rebates are only provided for qualifying natural gas equipment that is installed to

387

Method for mapping a natural gas leak  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate Commercial Incentive: Contact Laclede Gas for general program incentive maximum Gas Boilers: 1,000,000 BTU/hr ($3,000) Continuous Modulating Burner: $15,000 cap per burner Gas-fired Boiler Tune Up: $750 per building (non-profit), $500 per boiler (C&I) High Efficiency Air-Forced Furnaces: $200-$250 Vent Dampers: $500 per boiler Steam Trap Replacements: $2,500 Primary Air Dampers: $500 Food Service Gas Steamer: $475 Food Service Gas Fryer: $350

389

Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Heating System: 2 maximum Programmable Thermostats: 2 maximum Multi-Family Property Owners: 50 thermostat rebates, 50 furnace rebates over the life of the program Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $150 - $200 Gas Boiler: $150 Programmable Setback Thermostat: $25 Gas Water Heater: $50 - $200 Provider Laclede Gas Company Laclede Gas Company offers various rebates to residential customers for investing in energy efficient equipment and appliances. Residential

390

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

An investigation of lean combustion in a natural gas-fueled spark-ignited engine  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of natural gas in an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), light-duty, spark-ignited engine being operated in the lean fueling regime and compare the operation with gasoline fueling cases. Data were acquired for several operating conditions of speed, throttle position, air-fuel equivalence ratio, and spark timing for both fuels. Results showed that for stoichiometric fueling, with a naturally aspirated engine, a power loss of 10 to 15 percent can be expected for natural gas over gasoline fueling. For lean operation, however, power increases can be expected for equivalence ratios below about {phi} = 0.80 with natural gas fueling as compared to gasoline. Higher brake thermal efficiencies can also be expected with natural gas fueling with maximum brake torque (MBT) timings over the range of equivalence ratios investigated in this work. Coefficient of variation (COV) data based on the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) demonstrated that the engine is much less sensitive to equivalence ratio leaning for natural gas fueling as compared to gasoline cases. The lean limit for a COV of 10 percent was about {phi} = 0.72 for gasoline and {phi} = 0.63 for natural gas. Lean fueling resulted in significantly reduced NO{sub x} levels where a lower plateau for NO{sub x} concentrations was reached at {phi} near or below 0.70, which corresponded to about 220 ppm. For natural gas fueling, this corresponded to about 1.21 gm/kW-h. Finally, with MBT timings, relatively short heat release durations were obtained for lean fueling with natural gas compared to gasoline.

Gupta, M.; Bell, S.R.; Tillman, S.T. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An effective heuristic algorithm for the maximum satisfiability problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic local search algorithms (SLS) have been increasingly applied to approximate solutions of the weighted maximum satisfiability problem (MAXSAT), a model for solutions of major problems in AI and combinatorial optimization. While MAXSAT instances ... Keywords: Bose-Einstein distribution, Extremal Optimization, Heuristic search, MAXSAT, Problem solving

Mohamed El Menaï; Mohamed Batouche

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mixed Integer Linear Programming for Maximum-Parsimony Phylogeny Inference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees is a fundamental problem in computational biology. While excellent heuristic methods are available for many variants of this problem, new advances in phylogeny inference will be required if we are to be able to continue ... Keywords: Computational Biology, Algorithms, Integer Linear Programming, Steiner tree problem, Phylogenetic tree reconstruction, Maximum parsimony

Srinath Sridhar; Fumei Lam; Guy E. Blelloch; R. Ravi; Russell Schwartz

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Global Increasing Trends in Annual Maximum Daily Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the presence of trends in annual maximum daily precipitation time series obtained from a global dataset of 8326 high-quality land-based observing stations with more than 30 years of record over the period from 1900 to 2009. ...

Seth Westra; Lisa V. Alexander; Francis W. Zwiers

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Maximum Potential Intensities of Tropical Cyclones near Isla Socorro, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum potential intensity (MPI) of a tropical cyclone represents a theoretical upper limit to the strength of the storm imposed by the laws of physics and the energy available to the system in the atmosphere and the ocean. The MPI in this ...

Jay S. Hobgood

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An electromagnetism metaheuristic for solving the Maximum Betweenness Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an electromagnetism (EM) metaheuristic for solving NP hard Maximum Betweenness Problem (MBP). A new encoding scheme with appropriate objective functions is implemented. Specific representation of the individuals enables the EM ... Keywords: Betweenness problem, Combinatorial optimization, Electromagnetism-like mechanism

Vladimir Filipovi?; Aleksandar Kartelj; Dragan Mati?

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Maximum Fuel Energy Saving of a Brayton Cogeneration Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An endoreversible Joule-Brayton cogeneration cycle has been optimized with fuel energy saving as an assessment criterion. The effects of power-to-heat ratio, cycle temperature ratio, and user temperature ratio on maximum fuel energy saving and efficiency ... Keywords: cogeneration cycle, fuel energy saving, thermodynamic optimization

Xiaoli Hao; Guoqiang Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Summer Cyclone Maximum over the Central Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fascinating feature of the northern high-latitude circulation is a prominent summer maximum in cyclone activity over the Arctic Ocean, centered near the North Pole in the long-term mean. This pattern is associated with the influx of lows ...

Mark C. Serreze; Andrew P. Barrett

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene Climate in CCSM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) is studied for two past climate forcings, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the mid-Holocene. The LGM, approximately 21 000 yr ago, is a glacial period with large ...

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Esther C. Brady; Gabriel Clauzet; Robert Tomas; Samuel Levis; Zav Kothavala

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Probable Maximum Precipitation Study for Wisconsin and Michigan: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study provides maps and supporting information on the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) for Wisconsin and Michigan. The refinement of PMP for the study area has typically lowered the PMP from the generalized values in Hydrometeorological Report (HMR) 51. The study followed HMR 51 procedures with some minor changes that apply to other regions.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Feature Extraction Based on Maximum Nearest Subspace Margin Criterion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the classification rule of sparse representation-based classification (SRC) and linear regression classification (LRC), we propose the maximum nearest subspace margin criterion for feature extraction. The proposed method can be seen as a preprocessing ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Face recognition, Feature extraction, Finger knuckle print recognition, Linear regression classification

Yi Chen; Zhenzhen Li; Zhong Jin

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical The employment of the renewable energy source has grown from long-established concepts into devices for powering--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel

Greenberg, Albert

403

MCMR: Maximum coverage and minimum redundant text summarization model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In paper, we propose an unsupervised text summarization model which generates a summary by extracting salient sentences in given document(s). In particular, we model text summarization as an integer linear programming problem. One of the advantages of ... Keywords: Branch-and-bound, Integer linear programming, Less redundancy, Maximum coverage, Particle swarm optimization, Text summarization

Rasim M. Alguliev; Ramiz M. Aliguliyev; Makrufa S. Hajirahimova; Chingiz A. Mehdiyev

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Work Force Retention Work Group Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Work force Retention Work Group is established to support the Department’s critical focus on maintaining a high-performing work force at a time when a significant number of the workers needed to support DOE’s national security mission are reaching retirement age.

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 11, 2009) With little impact on production in the Gulf of Mexico from Hurricane Ida and moderate temperatures in many parts of the country, natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this report week (November 4-11). The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.90 to $3.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also moved lower as the threat of an interruption in supplies from the hurricane passed. The futures contract for December delivery decreased by $0.22 on the report week to $4.503 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (November 6) is

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 31, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell almost across the board, as mild weather moved into most areas in the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub price fell by 9 cents, from $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 24, to $3.93 per MMBtu yesterday (March 31). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2010 contract expired on Monday, March 29, at $3.842 per MMBtu. The May 2010 contract ended trading yesterday at $3.869 per MMBtu, a decline of about 29 cents from its closing price of $4.154 per MMBtu on March 24. Inventories of working natural gas in storage rose to 1,638 billion

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 13, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their $4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of generally unsupportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed down 25 cents for the week to $3.63 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 5. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract dropped nearly 23 cents per MMBtu to close at $3.570 per MMBtu over the week. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,409 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 30, according to the U.S. Energy

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 6, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell at most pricing point locations across the board in the lower 48 States as demand fell. The price at the Henry Hub fell 25 cents, or about 7 percent, since last Wednesday, September 29, from $3.81 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.56 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $83.21 per barrel, or $14.35 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, October 6. This represents an increase of $5.36 per barrel, or $0.92 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,499 billion cubic feet

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 9, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 1, 2011) The past week was marked by two distinct trading markets — “before” and “after” the Memorial Day holiday. Cash markets were listless going into the holiday weekend but escalated Tuesday following an early heat wave that drifted into the East. The Henry Hub price advanced 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.2 percent) to close at $4.63 per MMBtu on June 1. Just prior to the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,107 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 27, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 19, 2011) Natural gas prices posted modest net gains at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price increased from $3.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 12, to $3.58 per MMBtu yesterday, October 19. Intra-week trading showed strong rallies followed by quick retreats. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) gained about 10 cents on the week from $3.489 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.586 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 14, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: July 30, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 22, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose this report week, as prices for energy products generally increased and the economic outlook improved. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased significantly. The price of the futures contract for August delivery closed yesterday, July 22, at $3.793 per MMBtu, more than 50 cents higher than the closing price the previous Wednesday. Working gas in underground storage as of Friday, July 17, is estimated to have been 2,952 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 18.4

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier weekÂ’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

420

Live Working Resource Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of work performed in 2008 on the EPRI Live Working Resource Center (LWRC) web site.

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances found in the subsurface. Since gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and moderate pressures, gas hydrates are found either near the surface in arctic regions or in deep water marine environments where the ambient seafloor temperature is less than 10°C. This work addresses the important issue of geomechanical stability in hydrate bearing sediments during different perturbations. I analyzed extensive data collected from the literature on the types of sediments where hydrates have been found during various offshore expeditions. To better understand the hydrate bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy, and sediment physical properties. I used the database to determine the types of sediments that should be evaluated in laboratory tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The TOUGH+Hydrate reservoir simulator was used to simulate the gas production behavior from hydrate bearing sediments. To address some important gas production issues from gas hydrates, I first simulated the production performance from the Messsoyakha Gas Field in Siberia. The field has been described as a free gas reservoir overlain by a gas hydrate layer and underlain by an aquifer of unknown strength. From a parametric study conducted to delineate important parameters that affect gas production at the Messoyakha, I found effective gas permeability in the hydrate layer, the location of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed that the hydraulic fracture gets plugged by the formation of secondary hydrates during gas production. I used the coupled fluid flow and geomechanical model "TOUGH+Hydrate- FLAC3D" to model geomechanical performance during gas production from hydrates in an offshore hydrate deposit. I modeled geomechanical failures associated with gas production using a horizontal well and a vertical well for two different types of sediments, sand and clay. The simulation results showed that the sediment and failures can be a serious issue during the gas production from weaker sediments such as clays.

Grover, Tarun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

423

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

424

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

425

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

426

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

427

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

428

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

429

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

430

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

431

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

432

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

433

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

434

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

435

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

436

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

437

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

439

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time limits The length of participation in the undergraduate program is limited to a maximum of six years for students pursuing a bachelor's degree and three years for students pursuing an associate's degree. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in some special undergraduate programs, post-baccalaureate appointments, post-master's appointments, and GRA students working on a thesis or dissertation are excluded from the 30-hour per week work restriction.

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas spot prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, March 16, was 1,533 Bcf, which is 18.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.17 per barrel on the week to $56.98, or $9.82 per MMBtu.

442

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.77 per barrel on the week to $72.58 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now nearly double the price of natural gas at $12.51 per MMBtu. The relative difference in pricing can have a large effect on demand (mostly in the industrial sector and power plants).

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) 14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents per MMBtu, or 2.9 percent, to $7.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for July delivery decreased 47.2 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.608 yesterday (June 13). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,255 Bcf as of Friday, June 8, reflecting an implied net injection of 92 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 19.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.20 per barrel on the week to $66.17 per barrel, or $11.41 per MMBtu.

446

Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

Alleman, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US); Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

LITERATURE REVIEW ON MAXIMUM LOADING OF RADIONUCLIDES ON CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE  

SciTech Connect

Plans are underway to use small column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions at Savannah River Site. The ion exchange material slated for the SCIX project is engineered or granular crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Information on the maximum loading of radionuclides on CST is needed by Savannah River Remediation for safety evaluations. A literature review has been conducted that culminated in the estimation of the maximum loading of all but one of the radionuclides of interest (Cs-137, Sr-90, Ba-137m, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Am-241, and Cm-244). No data was found for Cm-244.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

448

Minimum/maximum excitation limiter performance goals for small generation  

SciTech Connect

Small generators connected to the utility system often act as followers as they tend to follow system bus voltage variations. For the lack of kVA capacity, small machines tend to be susceptible to becoming over or under excited (excessive Vars in or Vars out of the generator) as the voltage regulator tries to maintain its setpoint with variations in system bus voltage. Minimum and maximum excitation limiters are utilized to limit the voltage regulator characteristic response to system bus voltage changes, that can otherwise result in machine overheating and/or pulling out of synchronization. This paper reviews the operating performance of minimum and maximum excitation limiters used on small machines, and provides the user typical performance expectations. The examples will highlight both main field and exciter field applications. Lastly, conditions will be reviewed that may occur during excitation limiter initial startup that can affect their ability to be initially tuned.

Eberly, T.W.; Schaefer, R.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity(m/s) Velocity(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Large Flume + 0.9 + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 2.7 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 7.2 + Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank + 25.8 + Carderock Tow Tank 1 + 9.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 10.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 25.8 + Chase Tow Tank + 2.5 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 18.3 + H Haynes Tow Tank + 1.8 + I Ice Towing Tank + 0.5 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 2.7 + M MHL Free Surface Channel + 2 + MHL High Speed Cavitation + 25.9 + MHL Tow Tank + 6.7 + MIT Tow Tank + 1.5 + MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel + 5.1 + Maine Tow Tank + 3 +

450

Unification of Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Inference via Plausible Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper modifies Jaynes's axioms of plausible reasoning and derives the minimum relative entropy principle as well as Bayes's rule from first principles. The new axioms, which I call the Optimum Information Principle, is applicable whenever the decision maker is given the data and the relevant background information. Given that the maximum entropy principle and Bayesian inference are useful methods, the Optimum Information Principle is at least as useful.

Toda, Alexis Akira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Chemical maximum humidity indicator update report. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Raw materials and manufactured parts sometimes must be kept in a controlled-humidity environment. The use of moisture-sensitive systems to indicate the maximum level of humidity exposure is discussed. A chemical indicator made from deliquescent salts and water-soluble dyes provides an irreversible color change at discrete levels of relative humidity. The performance and long-term-stability characteristics of the indicator are described.

Abel, W.B.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Structural and Kinetic Studies of Structure I Gas Hydrates via Low Temperature X-Ray Diffraction and High Resolution Neutron Diffraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas hydrates are materials of interest as sources for clean energy, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas mitigation, and gas storage. This body of work presents two… (more)

Everett, Susan Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Property:Maximum Wave Length(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Length(m) Wave Length(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Length(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Length(m)" Showing 18 pages using this property. A Alden Small Flume + Variable + Alden Wave Basin + 1.8 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 12.2 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 15.2 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 64 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 30 + H Haynes Wave Basin + 10.7 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 22 + M MIT Tow Tank + 4.6 + O OTRC Wave Basin + 25 + Ohmsett Tow Tank + 18 + R Richmond Field Station Tow Tank + 2 + S SAFL Channel + 6.6 + Sandia Lake Facility + 4.57 + Sheets Wave Basin + 10 + Ship Towing Tank + 6 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Maximum_Wave_Length(m)&oldid=597351

456

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the NationÂ’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

457

Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maximum Rebate Maximum Rebate Limit of two rebates per appliance type Program Info Start Date 3/1/2011 State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $200 - $400 Gas Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing Water Heater: $350 Gas Boiler: $400 -$600 Tankless Gas Water Heater: $350 Clothes Washer: $50 Windows: $0.95/sq. ft. Insulation (Wall): $0.30/sq. ft. Insulation (Floor): $0.20/sq. ft. Insulation (Attic): $0.07 - $0.25/sq. ft. Duct Sealing/Insulation: $100 + $5.25/ln. ft. Air Sealing: $100 + $.20/sq. ft. Programmable Thermostat: $30 In-Home Energy Audit: Discounted to $25 Provider Questar Gas Questar Gas provides rebates for energy efficient appliances and heating equipment, and certain weatherization measures through the ThermWise program. This equipment includes clothes washers, water heaters, furnaces,

458

A maximum-entropy approach to the adiabatic freezing of a supercooled liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I employ the van der Waals theory of Baus and coworkers to analyze the fast, adiabatic decay of a supercooled liquid in a closed vessel with which the solidification process usually starts. By imposing a further constraint on either the system volume or pressure, I use the maximum-entropy method to quantify the fraction of liquid that is transformed into solid as a function of undercooling and of the amount of a foreign gas that could possibly be also present in the test tube. Upon looking at the implications of thermal and mechanical insulation for the energy cost of forming a solid droplet within the liquid, I identify one situation where the onset of solidification inevitably occurs near the wall in contact with the bath.

Santi Prestipino

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium. Part I: Maximum Work and Frictional Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entropy budget of an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium is analyzed here. The differential heating of the atmosphere, resulting from surface heat fluxes and tropospheric radiative cooling, corresponds to a net entropy sink. In ...

Olivier Pauluis; Isaac M. Held

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum working gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

ORISE: Work for Others  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Science Education Work for Others The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Work for Others (WFO) program allows the performance of work for non-DOE entities when the...

463

Figure 6.6 Natural Gas Underground Storage, End of Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954-2011 Base Gas and Working Gas in Underground Storage, 1954-2011 188 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011

464

Construction of a Simulator for the Siemens Gas Turbine SGT-600.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis covers the development of a simulator for the Siemens Gas Tur-bine SGT-600. An explanation on how a gas turbine works is also… (more)

Nordström, Lisa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 23, 2013 May 23, 2013 Secretary Moniz on Natural Gas and Renewables May 17, 2013 Energy Department Authorizes Second Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Freeport LNG Terminal on Quintana Island, Texas Authorized to Export Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free Trade Agreement Countries May 17, 2013 FE DOCKET NO. 10-161-LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE FREEPORT LNG TERMINAL ON QUINTANA ISLAND, TEXAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS April 24, 2013 The new hybrid solar-natural gas system from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) works through concentrating solar power, which uses a reflecting surface to concentrate the sun's rays like a magnifying glass. In the case of the new system from PNNL, a mirrored parabolic dish directs sunbeams to a central point, where a device absorbs the solar heat to make syngas.| Photo courtesy of PNNL.

466

U.S. Natural Gas -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Working gas in storage is estimated to have been about 2,425 billion cubic feet at the end of November, 14% below the previous 5-year average. The current outlook for winter demand and supply suggests that storage is headed for record lows this winter if weather is normal or colder than normal. In the base case, we project that gas storage will fall to about 640 billion cubic feet at the end of the heating season (March 31, 2001). The previous record low was 758 billion cubic feet at the end of the winter of 1995-1996. If summer gas demand next year is as strong as we currently expect it to be, the low end-winter storage levels will present a strong challenge to the North American gas supply system to maintain flexibility and provide additional gas in preparation for the subsequent winter season.

467

Natural Gas Monthly, October 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents recent data and current estimates on the consumption, disposition, prices, storage, import, and export of natural gas in the USA for October 1984. Also included are operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies plus data on filings, ceiling prices and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Featured articles entitled Main Line Natural Gas Sales to Industrial Users, 1983, and Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers, 1983 (Preliminary) are included. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus extraction loss) during October 1984 was estimated at 1437 billion cubic feet (Bcf), 4.7% above October 1983 dry gas production. Consumption of natural gas during October 1984 was an estimated 1279 Bcf, 0.4% above the October 1983 level. Compared to the previous September, residential consumption was up 3.2%, commercial consumption down 6.8%, industrial consumption up 11.5%, and electric utility consumption down 2.7%. The volume of working gas in underground storage reservoirs at the end of October 1984 was 2.8% below the October 1983 level. The average wellhead price of natural gas in August 1984 was $2.60 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). In August 1983, the average was $2.58 per Mcf. In October 1984, the average residential price of natural gas was $6.25 per Mcf. The comparable price in October 1983 was $6.10 per Mcf. The average wellhead (first sale) price for natural gas purchases projected for November 1984 by selected interstate pipeline companies was $2.82 per Mcf. 5 figures, 21 tables. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

469

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

470

The exhaust gas refrigeration and the pollutants variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the exhaust gas temperature influence in CO2, CO, HC emissions in a fourstroke gasoline engine. The experiments have shown that the reduction of exhaust gas temperature has as a result the reduction of CO2, CO, ... Keywords: CO, CO2, HC, gas emissions, gas temperature

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Anastasios Karkanis; Stella Maria Strofylla

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

An experimental study of heat transfer in the rectangular coolant passages of a gas turbine rotor blade.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Modern gas turbines have high inlet temperatures to harness maximum power output, which causes different components to experience severe thermal stresses and fatigue. To achieve… (more)

Uddin, Mohammed Jalal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

473

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

474

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

475

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

476

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

477

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

478

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

479

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

480

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

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481

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

482

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

483

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

484

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

485

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

486

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

487

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

488

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

489

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

490

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

491

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

492

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

493

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 (existing facilities); $250,000 (new construction) Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2500 Programmable Thermostats: up to five units Boiler Reset Controls: up to two units Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount

494

An integrated maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- This paper proposes a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) for a photovoltaic panel, that is to be integrated with the panel during manufacturing. The MPPT is inexpensive, efficient and has few components that serve to increase the MPPT’s mean time between failures (MTBF). The MPPT uses an inexpensive micro-controller to perform all of its functions. This includes maximum power point tracking, series battery voltage regulation, sensorless short circuit protection of the MPPT’s converter and intelligent shutdown and wakeup at dusk and dawn. The MPPT can source 10 A to a 6 V- 36 V lead-acid storage battery and can be connected in parallel or series with other MPPTs. The MPPT may be easily configured to perform output voltage regulation on passive and water pumping loads. It could also control the actuation of a diesel generator in a hybrid remote area power supply (RAPS). Energy transfer enhancements of up to 26%, compared to solar panels without MPPTs, have been measured. The complete component and materials cost of the MPPT is approximately 2’8 % of the cost of photovoltaic panels with a peak power rating of 154 W. The integrated MPPT also consumes no stored energy at night. 1.

Wernher Swiegers

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Predicting the solar maximum with the rising rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth rate of solar activity in the early phase of a solar cycle has been known to be well correlated with the subsequent amplitude (solar maximum). It provides very useful information for a new solar cycle as its variation reflects the temporal evolution of the dynamic process of solar magnetic activities from the initial phase to the peak phase of the cycle. The correlation coefficient between the solar maximum (Rmax) and the rising rate ({\\beta}a) at {\\Delta}m months after the solar minimum (Rmin) is studied and shown to increase as the cycle progresses with an inflection point (r = 0.83) at about {\\Delta}m = 20 months. The prediction error of Rmax based on {\\beta}a is found within estimation at the 90% level of confidence and the relative prediction error will be less than 20% when {\\Delta}m \\geq 20. From the above relationship, the current cycle (24) is preliminarily predicted to peak around October 2013 with a size of Rmax =84 \\pm 33 at the 90% level of confidence.

Du, Z L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Live Working Resource Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI created the Live Working Resource Center web site to provide utilities the critical information they need to conduct live work safely and efficiently. This report is a summary of work performed in 2007 on the web site. See EPRI's Live Working Resource Center.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

497

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

498

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last weekÂ’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

499

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

500

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 17-24), as moderate weather prevailed across much of the Lower 48 States. Although tropical storms entering the Gulf of Mexico production region-evidenced by a system currently moving through the Caribbean-could still disrupt supplies, the passing of at least the most active part of the hurricane season may help explain the price declines. On the week the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.01 per MMBtu to $6.10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant decreases. The futures contract for November delivery declined about 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.972. Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture ahead of the winter heating season. As of Friday, October 19, working gas in storage was 3,443 Bcf, which is 7.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.11 per barrel, ending trading yesterday at $88.30, or $15.22 per MMBtu.