Sample records for maximum transfer limits

  1. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T{ampersand}E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit.

  2. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    chargers do not perform the maximum power point tracking [2], [3] of the solar panel. We excludeMaximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones Abstract--Battery life poor capacity utilization during solar energy harvesting. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate

  3. Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations Rebecca H. Masel, Pennsylvania 18015, United States ABSTRACT: Maximum temperature limitations are encountered in distillation of the bottoms product fixes the column base pressure and, hence, the condenser pressure. The distillate

  4. Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited a theoretical limit for the maximum energy conversion efficiency of single junction photovoltaic cells for the efficiency variations observed for real photovoltaic devices today.4-6 Here, we show that the extractable

  5. Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safetyefficiency trade-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safety­efficiency trade.12126 Key words: hydraulic limitation, safety­ efficiency trade-off, soil­plant­atmosphere model, trait hydraulics constrain ecosystem productivity by setting physical limits to water transport and hence carbon

  6. Brayton Cycles: From the ...rst law, the maximum transfers for component SSSF control volumes are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For the simple reversible Brayton cycle of given pressure ratio rp $ (p2=p1) = (p3=p4) [compare Example 9.4, pp is higher than 1 r (2=7) . For the ideal regenerator, the thermal e¢ ciency approaches the Carnot-cycle eBrayton Cycles: From the ...rst law, the maximum transfers for component SSSF control volumes are w

  7. EFFECT OF REACTOR HEAT TRANSFER LIMITATIONS ON CO PREFERENTIAL OXIDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besser, Ronald S.

    and conventional packed-bed lab reactors (m-PBR's). Strong evidence has suggested that the reverse water-gas transport limitations of conventional lab reactors [3,4,5,6]: the fast surface chemistry of the exothermic1 EFFECT OF REACTOR HEAT TRANSFER LIMITATIONS ON CO PREFERENTIAL OXIDATION X. Ouyang, R.S. Besser

  8. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  9. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogaty, John M. (Lombard, IL); Clifft, Benny E. (Park Forest, IL); Bollinger, Lowell M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  10. Predicting Whole Forest Structure, Primary Productivity, and Biomass Density From Maximum Tree Size and Resource Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempes, Christopher P; Dooris, William; West, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the face of uncertain biological response to climate change and the many critiques concerning model complexity it is increasingly important to develop predictive mechanistic frameworks that capture the dominant features of ecological communities and their dependencies on environmental factors. This is particularly important for critical global processes such as biomass changes, carbon export, and biogenic climate feedback. Past efforts have successfully understood a broad spectrum of plant and community traits across a range of biological diversity and body size, including tree size distributions and maximum tree height, from mechanical, hydrodynamic, and resource constraints. Recently it was shown that global scaling relationships for net primary productivity are correlated with local meteorology and the overall biomass density within a forest. Along with previous efforts, this highlights the connection between widely observed allometric relationships and predictive ecology. An emerging goal of ecological...

  11. A study on the maximum power transfer condition in an inductively coupled plasma using transformer circuit model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations between the external discharge parameters (the driving frequency ? and the chamber dimension R) and plasma characteristics (the skin depth ? and the electron-neutral collision frequency ?{sub m}) are studied using the transformer circuit model [R. B. Piejak et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 1, 179 (1992)] when the absorbed power is maximized in an inductively coupled plasma. From the analysis of the transformer circuit model, the maximum power transfer conditions, which depend on the external discharge parameters and the internal plasma characteristics, were obtained. It was found that a maximum power transfer occurs when ??0.38R for the discharge condition at which ?{sub m}/??1, while it occurs when ???(2)?(?/?{sub m})R for the discharge condition at which ?{sub m}/??1. The results of this circuit analysis are consistent with the stable last inductive mode region of an inductive-to-capacitive mode transition [Lee and Chung, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063510 (2006)], which was theoretically derived from Maxwell's equations. Our results were also in agreement with the experimental results. From this work, we demonstrate that a simple circuit analysis can be applied to explain complex physical phenomena to a certain extent.

  12. Transfer Limit Enhancement Using Decentralized Robust STATCOM Control for Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Transfer Limit Enhancement Using Decentralized Robust STATCOM Control for Wind Farm M. J. Hossain wind farms (WFs) penetration on transfer capability. A decentralized minimax linear quadratic Gaussian is paid to the increased use of wind farms, a number of complex issues should be investigated in more

  13. A (Smart) Real-time PMU-assisted Power Transfer Limitation Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stability Analysis (DSA) Energy Management System (EMS) Real-Time Network Information DiagnosticA (Smart) Real-time PMU-assisted Power Transfer Limitation Monitoring and Enhancement System) · PJM's On-line Available transfer capability monitoring system and (smart) enhancements (i.e. increase

  14. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  15. Intramolecular Isotope Effects for the Study of Reactions with MassTransfer Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Joshua G.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented provides a method to use the comparison of intermolecular isotope effects vs. the intramolecular isotope effects for the study of reactions in which study of the rate limiting step is ambiguous due to interfering mass transfer...

  16. Shape-independent limits to near-field radiative heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Owen D; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive shape-independent limits to the spectral radiative heat-transfer rate between two closely spaced bodies, generalizing the concept of a black body to the case of near-field energy transfer. By conservation of energy, we show that each body of susceptibility $\\chi$ can emit and absorb radiation at enhanced rates bounded by $|\\chi|^2 / \\operatorname{Im} \\chi$, optimally mediated by near-field photon transfer proportional to $1/d^2$ across a separation distance $d$. Dipole--dipole and dipole--plate structures approach restricted versions of the limit, but common large-area structures do not exhibit the material enhancement factor and thus fall short of the general limit. By contrast, we find that particle arrays interacting in an idealized Born approximation exhibit both enhancement factors, suggesting the possibility of orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond previous designs and the potential for radiative heat transfer to be comparable to conductive heat transfer through air at room temperature, and s...

  17. Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The finite momentum transfer limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Bednyakov; F. Simkovic

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-dependent elastic scattering of weakly interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMP) off nuclei is reviewed. All available, within different nuclear models, structure functions S(q) for finite momentum transfer (q>0) are presented. These functions describe the recoil energy dependence of the differential event rate due to the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper, together with the previous paper ``Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The zero momentum transfer limit'', completes our review of the nuclear spin structure calculations involved in the problem of direct dark matter search.

  18. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free convection. In: Heat Transfer and Turbulent Buoyantof convection heat transfer and develop correlations.and radiation heat transfer and develop correlations for

  19. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Curcija, Charlie; Kohler, Christian

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows that incorporate very low-conductance glazing. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames. We conclude that the near-term priorities for improving the modeling of heat transfer through low-conductance frames are: (1) Add 2D view-factor radiation to standard modeling and examine the current practice of averaging surface emissivity based on area weighting and the process of making an equivalent rectangular frame cavity. (2) Asses 3D radiation effects in frame cavities and develop recommendation for inclusion into the design fenestration tools. (3) Assess existing correlations for convection in vertical cavities using CFD. (4) Study 2D and 3D natural convection heat transfer in frame cavities for cavities that are proven to be deficient from item 3 above. Recommend improved correlations or full CFD modeling into ISO standards and design fenestration tools, if appropriate. (5) Study 3D hardware short-circuits and propose methods to ensure that these effects are incorporated into ratings. (6) Study the heat transfer effects of ventilated frame cavities and propose updated correlations.

  20. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Design Tools Arild Gustavsen1,* , Dariush Arasteh2 , Bjørn Petter Jelle3,4 , Charlie Curcija5-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based and develop recommendation for inclusion into the design fenestration tools. 3. Assess existing correlations

  1. preprintof25August2009preprintof25August2009 Forster Transfer Outside the Weak-Excitation Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    used in molecular biophysics to deter- mine structures and dynamics of proteins, DNA, RNA approximation, F¨orster [15] calculated the rate constant for energy transfer between the donor-excited (D A lifetime observed in the absence of an acceptor, R is the separation of the dyes, and R0 Electronic

  2. An analytical basis for predicting the physiological limitations of mass transfer rates in hemodialysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vakamudi, Ashoak Kumar

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the solute remaining in the body. The dialyzer effiency in- turn depends on the design characteristics of the dialyzer. The solute removal process is limited in some instances by biological rather than dialyzer system processes. For example, erythrocytes...

  3. Dynamic Transfer Limits Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAnaDynamic Switching of the Spin

  4. Method of estimating maximum VOC concentration in void volume of vented waste drums using limited sampling data: Application in transuranic waste drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles as well as limited waste drum sampling data. The model consists of a series of material balance equations describing steady-state VOC transport from each distinct void volume in the drum. The primary model input is the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model parameters are determined or estimated based on available process knowledge. The model effectiveness in estimating VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement was examined for vented waste drums containing different waste types and configurations. This paper summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions in vented transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste.

  5. Calculations of Nonlinear Wave-Packet Interferometry Signals in the Pump-Probe Limit as Tests for Vibrational Control over Electronic Excitation Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The preceding paper describes a strategy for externally influencing the course of short-time electronic excitation transfer (EET) in molecular dimers and observing the process by nonlinear wave-packet interferometry (nl-WPI). Within a sample of isotropically oriented dimers having a specified internal geometry, a vibrational mode internal to the acceptor chromophore can be preferentially driven by electronically nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman (or resonant infrared) excitation with a short polarized control pulse. A subsequent electronically resonant polarized pump then preferentially excites the donor, and EET ensues. Here we test both the control strategy and its spectroscopic investigation-with some sacrifice of amplitude-level detail-by calculating the pump-probe difference signal. That signal is the limiting case of the control-influenced nl-WPI signal in which the two pulses in the pump pulse-pair coincide, as do the two pulses in the probe pulse-pair. We present calculated pump-probe difference signals for (1) a model excitation-transfer complex in which two equal-energy monomers each support one moderately Franck-Condon active intramolecular vibration; (2) a simplified model of the covalent dimer dithia-anthracenophane, representing its EET dynamics following selective impulsive excitation of the weakly Franck-Condon active anthracene vibration at 385 cm-1; and (3) a model complex featuring moderate electronic-vibrational coupling in which the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor.

  6. MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Quirino

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

  7. Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests Character Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests Character Reconstruction PHYLIP and T-REX Exercises Outline 1 Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood 2 Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests 3 Character

  8. Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Luis E.

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study maximum entropy correlated equilibria in (multi-player)games and provide two gradient-based algorithms that are guaranteedto converge to such equilibria. Although we do not provideconvergence rates for these ...

  9. Maximum entropy method and oscillations in the diffraction cone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Dumbrajs; J. Kontros; A. Lengyel

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy method has been applied to investigate the oscillating structure in the pbarp- and pp-elastic scattering differential cross-section at high energy and small momentum transfer. Oscillations satisfying quite realistic reliability criteria have been found.

  10. university-logo Maximum likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples REML and residual likelihood Peter McCullagh REML #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples JAN: Some personal remarks... IC #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples Outline 1 Maximum likelihood REML

  11. Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

  12. Achieve maximum application availability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Highlights Achieve maximum application availability and data protection using SQL Server AlwaysOn and other high availability features Reduce planned downtime significantly with SQL Server on Windows and management of high availability and disaster recovery using integrated tools Achieve maximum application

  13. The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J; /SLAC; Giustino, Di; /SLAC

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}). It is common practice to guess a physical scale {mu} = Q which is of order of a typical momentum transfer Q in the process, and then vary the scale over a range Q/2 and 2Q. This procedure is clearly problematic since the resulting fixed-order pQCD prediction will depend on the renormalization scheme, and it can even predict negative QCD cross sections at next-to-leading-order. Other heuristic methods to set the renormalization scale, such as the 'principle of minimal sensitivity', give unphysical results for jet physics, sum physics into the running coupling not associated with renormalization, and violate the transitivity property of the renormalization group. Such scale-setting methods also give incorrect results when applied to Abelian QED. Note that the factorization scale in QCD is introduced to match nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of the parton distributions in hadrons; it is present even in conformal theory and thus is a completely separate issue from renormalization scale setting. The PMC provides a consistent method for determining the renormalization scale in pQCD. The PMC scale-fixed prediction is independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC global scale can be derived efficiently at NLO from basic properties of the PQCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increases the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of colliders to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  14. Original article Restricted maximum likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Restricted maximum likelihood estimation of covariances in sparse linear models on the simplex algorithm of Nelder and Mead [40]. Kovac [29] made modifications that turned it into a stable

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption Mathew D. Penrose and Vadim;Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption M.D. Penrose, Department of the region. Keywords: cooperative sequential adsorption, space-time point pro- cess, maximum likelihood

  16. Estimating a mixed strategy employing maximum entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIXED STRATEGY EMPLOYING MAXIMUM ENTROPY by Amos Golan LarryMixed Strategy Employing Maximum Entropy Amos Golan Larry S.Abstract Generalized maximum entropy may be used to estimate

  17. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

  18. Automated Operating Procedures for Transfer Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions, and incomplete, as studies cannot analyze all combinations of equipment out a particular area. The required margins are generally mandated by the regional reliability organizations

  19. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  20. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  1. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  2. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  3. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  4. Optimization Online - Efficient Heuristic Algorithms for Maximum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. J. Myklebust

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 19, 2012 ... Efficient Heuristic Algorithms for Maximum Utility Product Pricing Problems. T. G. J. Myklebust(tmyklebu ***at*** csclub.uwaterloo.ca)

  5. How Is the Maximum Entropy of a Quantized Surface Related to Its Area?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich; R. V. Korkin

    2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The result is valid in loop quantum gravity, and in a somewhat more general class of approaches to surface quantization. The maximum entropy is calculated explicitly for some specific cases.

  6. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José, E-mail: jsdehesa@upv.es

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  7. Maximum entropy segmentation of broadcast news 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Heidi; Kolluru, BalaKrishna; Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    speech recognizer and subsequently segmenting the text into utterances and topics. A maximum entropy approach is used to build statistical models for both utterance and topic segmentation. The experimental work addresses the effect on performance...

  8. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is placed under the crust, back-dilution becomes limited by crust sinking at a 128 kgal transfer using the 96-inch injection point and at 160 kgal at 9 inches. The crust base remains well above the 295-inch minimum, and crust base elevation does not limit transfer volume. This result shows that top dilution is very beneficial in providing operational flexibility to the transfer and back-dilution process.

  9. Heisenberg-limited metrology with information recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Haine; Stuart S. Szigeti; Matthias D. Lang; Carlton M. Caves

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of atom interferometers by exploiting atom-light entanglement. In this paper, we apply information recycling to an interferometer where the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. We demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of number-correlated Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  10. Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

  11. Fast Determination of Simultaneous Available Transfer Capability (ATC) Ronghai Wang, Robert H. Lasseter, Jiangping Meng, Fernando L. Alvarado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the method are: line thermal limits, bus voltage limits, and generator reactive power limits. When combined system security, Power transmission reliability, Simultaneous power transfer, Available transfer power limit, and voltage collapse limit, etc. The line current limit usually is a line's thermal limit

  12. Maximum Likelihood Haplotyping for General Pedigrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    networks. The use of Bayesian networks enables efficient maximum likelihood haplotyping for more complex for the variables of the Bayesian network. The presented optimization algorithm also improves likelihood Analysis, Pedigree, superlink. Abstract Haplotype data is valuable in mapping disease-susceptibility genes

  13. Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kiyoharu Kawana

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

  14. Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

  15. Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

  16. Unification of Field Theory and Maximum Entropy Methods for Learning Probability Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Justin B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian field theory and maximum entropy are two methods for learning smooth probability distributions (a.k.a. probability densities) from finite sampled data. Both methods were inspired by statistical physics, but the relationship between them has remained unclear. Here I show that Bayesian field theory subsumes maximum entropy density estimation. In particular, the most common maximum entropy methods are shown to be limiting cases of Bayesian inference using field theory priors that impose no boundary conditions on candidate densities. This unification provides a natural way to test the validity of the maximum entropy assumption on one's data. It also provides a better-fitting nonparametric density estimate when the maximum entropy assumption is rejected.

  17. QCD Level Density from Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Ejiri; Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to calculate the QCD level density directly from the thermodynamic quantities obtained by lattice QCD simulations with the use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). Understanding QCD thermodynamics from QCD spectral properties has its own importance. Also it has a close connection to phenomenological analyses of the lattice data as well as experimental data on the basis of hadronic resonances. Our feasibility study shows that the MEM can provide a useful tool to study QCD level density.

  18. Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar [UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain) and University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba); University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  19. A global maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Joseph, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design, and validation of a maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter capable of following the true global maximum power point in the presence of other local maximum. It does this without the ...

  20. articulatorily constrained maximum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weight spanning forests. Amitabha Bagchi; Ankur Bhargava; Torsten Suel 2005-01-01 27 Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria MIT - DSpace Summary: We study maximum entropy...

  1. Mapping seasonal habitat suitability for the Gunnison sage-grouse in southwestern Colorado, USA: species distribution models using maximum entropy modelling and autoregression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Amanda

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    behavioural patterns or dispersal limitations. This research uses two methods which have recently been applied to ecological modelling to overcome these limitations: maximum entropy modelling (MaxEnt) and simultaneous autoregression (SAR). The study focuses...

  2. Transferring Data at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transfering data - whether over the wide area network...

  3. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  4. Improved Maximum Entropy Analysis with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) follows Bryan and deploys a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to limit the dimensionality of the underlying solution space apriori. Here we present arguments based on the shape of the SVD basis functions and numerical evidence from a mock data analysis, which show that the correct Bayesian solution is not in general recovered with this approach. As a remedy we propose to extend the search basis systematically, which will eventually recover the full solution space and the correct solution. In order to adequately approach problems where an exponentially damped kernel is used, we provide an open-source implementation, using the C/C++ language that utilizes high precision arithmetic adjustable at run-time. The LBFGS algorithm is included in the code in order to attack problems without the need to resort to a particular search space restriction.

  5. Quantum maximum entropy principle for a system of identical particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By introducing a functional of the reduced density matrix, we generalize the definition of a quantum entropy which incorporates the indistinguishability principle of a system of identical particles. With the present definition, the principle of quantum maximum entropy permits us to solve the closure problem for a quantum hydrodynamic set of balance equations corresponding to an arbitrary number of moments in the framework of extended thermodynamics. The determination of the reduced Wigner function for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions is found to become possible only by assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2}. Quantum contributions are expressed in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2} while classical results are recovered in the limit (Planck constant/2pi)->0.

  6. Extracting maximum petrophysical and geological information from a limited reservoir database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.; Chawathe, A.; Ouenes, A. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of old fields lacking sufficient core and log data is a challenging task. This paper describes a methodology that uses new and conventional tools to build a reliable reservoir model for the Sulimar Queen field. At the fine scale, permeability measured on a fine grid with a minipermeameter was used in conjunction with the petrographic data collected on multiple thin sections. The use of regression analysis and a newly developed fuzzy logic algorithm led to the identification of key petrographic elements which control permeability. At the log scale, old gamma ray logs were first rescaled/calibrated throughout the entire field for consistency and reliability using only four modem logs. Using data from one cored well and the rescaled gamma ray logs, correlations between core porosity, permeability, total water content and gamma ray were developed to complete the small scale characterization. At the reservoir scale, outcrop data and the rescaled gamma logs were used to define the reservoir structure over an area of ten square miles where only 36 wells were available. Given the structure, the rescaled gamma ray logs were used to build the reservoir volume by identifying the flow units and their continuity. Finally, history-matching results constrained to the primary production were used to estimate the dynamic reservoir properties such as relative permeabilities to complete the characterization. The obtained reservoir model was tested by forecasting the waterflood performance and which was in good agreement with the actual performance.

  7. Leveraging Limited Scope for Maximum Benefit in Occupied Renovation of Uninsulated Cold Climate Multifamily Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines a large-scale renovation project within a 500 unit, 1960's era subsidized urban housing community. This research focuses on the airflow control and window replacement measures implemented as part of the renovations to the low-rise apartment buildings. The window replacement reduced the nominal conductive loss of the apartment enclosure by approximately 15%; air sealing measures reduced measured air leakage by approximately 40% on average.

  8. Predicting Maximum Tree Heights and Other Traits from Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempes, Chris Poling

    Terrestrial vegetation plays a central role in regulating the carbon and water cycles, and adjusting planetary albedo. As such, a clear understanding and accurate characterization of vegetation dynamics is critical to ...

  9. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking for a Photovoltaic-Supercapacitor Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    that efficiency of the charger varies depending on the power output level of the energy generation source charger efficiency. More precisely, previous MPPT methods only maximize the power output of the energy the power comes from a renewable source such a solar cell (photovoltaic, or PV for short) or a windmill

  10. Information Transfer Fidelity in Networks of Spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmond Jonckheere; Frank Langbein; Sophie Schirmer

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks of spins, or spintronic networks, are given an Information Transfer Fidelity (ITF) derived from an upper bound on the probability of transmission of the excitation from one spin to another. It is shown that this theoretical bound can be reached asymptotically in time under certain conditions. The process of achieving maximum transfer probability is given a dynamical model, the translation on the torus, and the time to reach the maximum probability is estimated using the simultaneous Diophantine approximation computationally implemented using a variant of the Lenstra-Lenstra-Lov\\'asz (LLL) algorithm. The ITF induces a prametric on the network. For a ring with homogeneous couplings, it is shown that this prametric satisfies the triangle inequality, opening up the road to an ITF geometry, which turns out to be completely different from the geometry of the physical arrangement of the spin in the spintronic device. It is shown that transfer fidelities and transfer times can be improved by means of simple controls taking the form of strong localized magnetic fields, opening up the possibility for intelligent design of spintronic networks and dynamic routing of information encoded in such networks. The approach is much more flexible than engineering the couplings to favor some transfers.

  11. The Different Fates of a Low-Mass X-ray Binary. I: Conservative Mass Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lavagetto; L. Burderi; F. D'Antona; T. Di Salvo; R. Iaria; N. R. Robba

    2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of a low mass x-ray binary coupling a binary stellar evolution code with a general relativistic code that describes the behavior of the neutron star. We assume the neutron star to be low--magnetized (B~10^8 G). In the systems investigated in this paper, our computations show that during the binary evolution the companion transfers as much as 1 solar mass to the neutron star, with an accretion rate of 10^-9 solar masses/yr. This is sufficient to keep the inner rim of the accretion disc in contact with the neutron star surface, thus preventing the onset of a propeller phase capable of ejecting a significant fraction of the matter transferred by the companion. We find that, for neutron stars governed by equations of state from soft up to moderately stiff, an accretion induced collapse to a black hole is almost unavoidable. The collapse to a black hole can occur either during the accretion phase or after the end of the mass transfer when the neutron star is left in a supramassive sequence. In this last case the collapse is driven by energy losses of the fast spinning radio pulsar. For extremely supramassive neutron stars these energy losses cause a spin up. As a consequence the pulsar will have a much shorter lifetime than that of a canonical radio pulsar. This behavior depends on the equation of state for ultra-dense matter and therefore could be used to constrain the internal structure of the neutron star. If the r-modes of the neutron star are excited during the accretion process, the gravitational waves emisson limits the maximum spin attainable by a NS to roughly 2 ms. In this case the collapse during the accretion phase is even more common since the maximum mass achievable before the collapse to a black hole during accretion is smaller due to the limited spin frequency.

  12. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields $H_s$ of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness $\\sim 0.1\\; \\mu$m at the Nb surface could increase $H_s\\simeq 240$ mT of a clean Nb up to $H_s\\simeq 290$ mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  13. The Maximum Mass of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliki Kalogera; Gordon Baym

    1996-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational identification of black holes as members of binary systems requires the knowledge of the upper limit on the gravitational mass of a neutron star. We use modern equations of state for neutron star matter, fitted to experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and the properties of light nuclei, to calculate, within the framework of Rhoades & Ruffini (1974), the minimum upper limit on a neutron star mass. Regarding the equation of state as valid up to twice nuclear matter saturation density, rho_{nm}, we obtain a secure upper bound on the neutron star mass equal to 2.9 solar masses. We also find that in order to reach the lowest possible upper bound of 2.2 solar masses, we need understand the physical properties of neutron matter up to a density of about 4 times rho_{nm}.

  14. Maximum Entropy Method Approach to $?$ Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In Monte Carlo simulations of lattice field theory with a $\\theta$ term, one confronts the complex weight problem, or the sign problem. This is circumvented by performing the Fourier transform of the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. This procedure, however, causes flattening phenomenon of the free energy $f(\\theta)$, which makes study of the phase structure unfeasible. In order to treat this problem, we apply the maximum entropy method (MEM) to a Gaussian form of $P(Q)$, which serves as a good example to test whether the MEM can be applied effectively to the $\\theta$ term. We study the case with flattening as well as that without flattening. In the latter case, the results of the MEM agree with those obtained from the direct application of the Fourier transform. For the former, the MEM gives a smoother $f(\\theta)$ than that of the Fourier transform. Among various default models investigated, the images which yield the least error do not show flattening, although some others cannot be excluded given the uncertainty related to statistical error.

  15. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  16. Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks Anastasios Giannoulis Department introduce cross­layer, distributed power control algorithms that guarantee maximum possible data throughput performing dynamic routing and scheduling together with power control. The cross­layer interaction consists

  17. Process Limits on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

  18. GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

  19. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  20. Transfer information remotely via noise entangled coherent channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El Allati; N. Metwally; Y. Hassouni

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, a generalized protocol of quantum teleportation is suggested to investigate the possibility of remotely transfer unknown multiparities entangled coherent state. A theoretical technique is introduced to generate maximum entangled coherent states which are used as quantum channels. We show that the mean photon number plays a central role on the fidelity of the transferred information. The noise parameter can be considered as a control parameter only for small values of the mean photon number.

  1. Heat Transfer Guest Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

  2. Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

  3. Maximum gravitational-wave energy emissible in magnetar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; Benjamin J. Owen

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent searches of gravitational-wave (GW) data raise the question of what maximum GW energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies (\\sim 10^{49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001)] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10^{48}-10^{49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.

  4. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  5. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, J B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron ( PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with bett...

  6. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Escher; G. Bensky; J. Clausen; G. Kurizki; L. Davidovich

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  7. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, B M; Clausen, J; Kurizki, G; Davidovich, L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  8. Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletti, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.barletti@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica “Ulisse Dini”, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze (Italy)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

  9. Dynamic Transfer Capability Analysis with Wind Farms and Dynamic Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . An investigation on the effect of dynamics loads, wind farms and flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) devices capability unnecessarily limits the power transfers and is a costly and inefficient use of a network with increasing loads, the need to transfer power over long transmission lines increases. Deregulation

  10. Analyses of power system vulnerability and total transfer capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xingbin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    limits. Both steady state and dynamic security assessments are included in the process of obtaining total transfer capability. Particularly, the effect of FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission Systems) devices on TTC is examined. FACTS devices have been shown...

  11. A Near Maximum Likelihood Decoding Algorithm for MIMO Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Mobasher

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 3, 2005 ... A Near Maximum Likelihood Decoding Algorithm for MIMO Systems Based ... models are also used for soft output decoding in MIMO systems.

  12. Computing the Maximum Volume Inscribed Ellipsoid of a Polytopic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianzhe Zhen

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 23, 2015 ... Abstract: This paper introduces a method for computing the maximum volume inscribed ellipsoid and k-ball of a projected polytope. It is known ...

  13. Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using Factored Masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Burer

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 2, 2005 ... Abstract: We present a practical approach to Anstreicher and Lee's masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling, and we describe ...

  14. A masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Anstreicher

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 16, 2003 ... Abstract: We introduce a new masked spectral bound for the maximum-entropy sampling problem. This bound is a continuous generalization of ...

  15. Maximum entropy generation in open systems: the Fourth Law?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umberto Lucia

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops an analytical and rigorous formulation of the maximum entropy generation principle. The result is suggested as the Fourth Law of Thermodynamics.

  16. annual maximum extent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS2002) A Maximum Entropy Approach To Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  17. analog fixed maximum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state for given entanglement which can be viewed as an analogue of the Jaynes maximum entropy principle. Pawel Horodecki; Ryszard Horodecki; Michal Horodecki 1998-05-22...

  18. IBM Research Report Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 28, 2005 ... Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using. Factored Masks. Samuel Burer. Department of Management Sciences. University of Iowa.

  19. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  20. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  1. HIGEE Mass Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

  2. MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

  3. Tunable transfer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 29, 2013 Scientists gain first quantitative insights into electron transfer from minerals to microbes Scientists have gained the first quantitative insights into electron...

  4. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  5. Bus transfer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

  6. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  7. Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load for Flathead Lake, Montana. #12;11/01/01 DRAFT i October 30, 2001 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load..............................................................................................................................2-11 SECTION 3.0 APPLICABLE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

  8. FAST SPEAKER ADAPTION VIA MAXIMUM PENALIZED LIKELIHOOD KERNEL REGRESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

    of MLLR using non- linear regression. Specifically, kernel regression is applied with appropriate of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong ABSTRACT Maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) has], and transformation-based methods, most notably, maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) adap- tation [3]. However

  9. Digital tomosynthesis mammography using a parallel maximum likelihood reconstruction method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meleis, Waleed

    Digital tomosynthesis mammography using a parallel maximum likelihood reconstruction method Tao Wu , a Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 b Dept. of Electrical and Computer on an iterative maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm, is developed to provide fast reconstruction for digital

  10. NSF Workshop on Available Transfer Capability, Urbana IL, USA, June 1997 INITIAL CONCEPTS FOR APPLYING SENSITIVITY TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the experience in computing transfer ca- pabilities concerns line #ow limits and uses DC load #ow power system case with a loading and transfer schedule at which the power system is secure. The base transfer transfer is in- creased, the power system state evolves and eventually some security criterion is violated

  11. POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR TRANSFER MENTOR AS A STAFF MEMBER Thank you for your interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff

  12. 228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 6, NO. 3, JUNE 2012 Maximum Achievable Efficiency in Near-Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulak, P. Glenn

    the maximum possible power ef- ficiency under arbitrary input impedance conditions based on the general two are remotely powered by means of a power amplifier operating at a fixed carrier frequency. Additional or bidirectional command and data transfer. The power efficiency of the near-field link is a measure of: (i

  13. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992). J. Skilling, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,1989). S. F. Gull, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,with the classical maximum entropy (CME) technique (MEAC-

  14. Improved constraints on transit time distributions from argon 39: A maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzer, Mark; Primeau, Francois W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gull (1991), Bayesian maximum entropy image reconstruction,Atlantic venti- lated? Maximum entropy inversions of bottlefrom argon 39: A maximum entropy approach Mark Holzer 1,2

  15. Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

  16. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  17. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 46 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident Coverage y 24-Hour Business Travel y

  18. TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

  19. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  20. HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSFER THROUGH CLOTHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.between convective heat transfer and mass transferConvective and radiative heat transfer coefficients for

  1. Heat and moisture transfer through clothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients forbetween convective heat transfer and mass transfer

  2. Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Lang

    Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods LANG TONG, MEMBER, IEEE, AND SYLVIE PERREAU Invited Paper A review of recent blind channel estimation algorithms is pre-- Blind equalization, parameter estimation, system identification. I. INTRODUCTION A. What Is Blind

  3. Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

  4. On the maximum pressure rise rate in boosted HCCI operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildman, Craig B.

    This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with ...

  5. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  6. Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) charged a seven-person Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Task Force with: * examining approaches...

  7. Maximum Likelihood Decoding of Reed Solomon Codes Madhu Sudan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    Maximum Likelihood Decoding of Reed Solomon Codes Madhu Sudan Abstract We present a randomized and Welch [4] (see, for instance, Gem- mell and Sudan [9]). In this paper we present an algorithm which

  8. Multi-Class Classification with Maximum Margin Multiple Kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    (named OBSCURE and UFO-MKL, respectively) are used to optimize primal versions of equivalent problems), the OBSCURE and UFO-MKL algorithms are compared against MCMKL #12;Multi-Class Classification with Maximum

  9. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strobel, K; Strobel, Klaus; Weigel, Manfred K.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  10. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Strobel; Manfred K. Weigel

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  11. Maximum-Entropy Meshfree Method for Compressible and Near-Incompressible Elasticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, A; Puso, M A; Sukumar, N

    2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical integration errors and volumetric locking in the near-incompressible limit are two outstanding issues in Galerkin-based meshfree computations. In this paper, we present a modified Gaussian integration scheme on background cells for meshfree methods that alleviates errors in numerical integration and ensures patch test satisfaction to machine precision. Secondly, a locking-free small-strain elasticity formulation for meshfree methods is proposed, which draws on developments in assumed strain methods and nodal integration techniques. In this study, maximum-entropy basis functions are used; however, the generality of our approach permits the use of any meshfree approximation. Various benchmark problems in two-dimensional compressible and near-incompressible small strain elasticity are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and optimal convergence in the energy norm of the maximum-entropy meshfree formulation.

  12. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  13. Filtering Additive Measurement Noise with Maximum Entropy in the Mean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henryk Gzyl; Enrique ter Horst

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this note is to show how the method of maximum entropy in the mean (MEM) may be used to improve parametric estimation when the measurements are corrupted by large level of noise. The method is developed in the context on a concrete example: that of estimation of the parameter in an exponential distribution. We compare the performance of our method with the bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches.

  14. The maximum entropy tecniques and the statistical description of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Belashev; M. K. Suleymanov

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy technique (MENT) is used to determine the distribution functions of physical values. MENT naturally combines required maximum entropy, the properties of a system and connection conditions in the form of restrictions imposed on the system. It can, therefore, be employed to statistically describe closed and open systems. Examples in which MENT is used to describe equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, as well as steady states that are far from being in thermodynamic equilibrium, are discussed.

  15. Transfer reactions at ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    64 Ni+ 64 Ni Strong entrance-channel dependence of fusion enhancement Beckerman et al., PRL 45, 1472 (1980), PRC 25, 837 (1982) Coupling of transfer channels, in addition to...

  16. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  17. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  18. Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, David

    Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

  19. Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

  20. Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

  1. Maximum entropy analysis of hadron spectral functions and excited states in quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CP-PACS Collaboration; :; S. Aoki; R. Burkhalter; M. Fukugita; S. Hashimoto; N. Ishizuka; Y. Iwasaki; K. Kanaya; T. Kaneko; Y. Kuramashi; M. Okawa; Y. Taniguchi; A. Ukawa; T. Yamazaki; T. Yoshié

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing the maximum entropy method we extract the spectral functions from meson correlators at four lattice spacings in quenched QCD with the Wilson quark action. We confirm that the masses and decay constants, obtained from the position and the area of peaks, agree well with the results from the conventional exponential fit. For the first excited state, we obtain $m_{\\pi_1} = 660(590)$ MeV, $m_{\\rho_1} = 1540(570)$ MeV, and $f_{\\rho_1} = 0.085(36)$ in the continuum limit.

  2. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  3. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  4. Minimum Entangling Power is Close to Its Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianxin Chen; Zhengfeng Ji; David W Kribs; Bei Zeng

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum gate $U$ acting on a bipartite quantum system, its maximum (average, minimum) entangling power is the maximum (average, minimum) entanglement generation with respect to certain entanglement measure when the inputs are restricted to be product states. In this paper, we mainly focus on the 'weakest' one, i.e., the minimum entangling power, among all these entangling powers. We show that, by choosing von Neumann entropy of reduced density operator or Schmidt rank as entanglement measure, even the 'weakest' entangling power is generically very close to its maximal possible entanglement generation. In other words, maximum, average and minimum entangling powers are generically close. We then study minimum entangling power with respect to other Lipschitiz-continuous entanglement measures and generalize our results to multipartite quantum systems. As a straightforward application, a random quantum gate will almost surely be an intrinsically fault-tolerant entangling device that will always transform every low-entangled state to near-maximally entangled state.

  5. Apply early! Limited enrollment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

  6. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 155422 (2012) Near-field thermal radiation transfer controlled by plasmons in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in graphene Ognjen Ilic,1,* Marinko Jablan,2 John D. Joannopoulos,1 Ivan Celanovic,3 Hrvoje Buljan,2 and Marin-field radiation transfer between two closely separated graphene sheets. The dependence of near-field heat exchange interband or intraband processes. We predict maximum transfer at low doping and for plasmons in two graphene

  7. NGC2613, 3198, 6503, 7184: Case studies against `maximum' disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Decompositions of the rotation curves of NGC2613, 3198, 6505, and 7184 are analysed. For these galaxies the radial velocity dispersions of the stars have been measured and their morphology is clearly discernible. If the parameters of the decompositions are chosen according to the `maximum' disk hypothesis, the Toomre Q stability parameter is systematically less than one and the multiplicities of the spiral arms as expected from density wave theory are inconsitent with the observed morphologies of the galaxies. The apparent Q<1 instability, in particular, is a strong argument against the `maximum' disk hypothesis.

  8. When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods? Andrea K Barreiro1*, Eric T Shea-Brown1, Fred M Rieke2,3, Julijana Gjorgjieva4 From Nineteenth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2010 San... Antonio, TX, USA. 24-30 July 2010 Recent experiments in retina and cortex have demon- strated that pairwise maximum entropy (PME) methods can approximate observed spiking patterns to a high degree of accuracy [1,2]. In this paper we examine...

  9. Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

  10. MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

    2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

  11. Source storage and transfer cask: Users Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Speir, L.G.; Garcia, D.C.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage and shield cask for the dual californium source is designed to shield and transport up to 3.7 mg (2 Ci) of /sup 252/Cf. the cask meets Department of Transportation (DOT) license requirements for Type A materials (DOT-7A). The cask is designed to transfer sources to and from the Flourinel and Fuel Storage (FAST) facility delayed-neutron interrogator. Californium sources placed in the cask must be encapsulated in the SR-CF-100 package and attached to Teleflex cables. The cask contains two source locations. Each location contains a gear box that allows a Teleflex cable to be remotely moved by a hand crank into and out of the cask. This transfer procedure permits sources to be easily removed and inserted into the delayed-neutron interrogator and reduces personnel radiation exposure during transfer. The radiation dose rate with the maximum allowable quantity of californium (3.7 mg) in the cask is 30 mR/h at the surface and less than 2 mR/h 1 m from the cask surface. This manual contains information about the cask, californium sources, describes the method to ship the cask, and how to insert and remove sources from the cask. 28 figs.

  12. Applied heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

  13. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramov, A. A., E-mail: alabr54@mail.ru; Butkovskii, A. V., E-mail: albutkov@mail.ru [Zhukovski Central Aerohydrodynamics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  14. Spectral function and excited states in lattice QCD with maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CP-PACS Collaboration; :; T. Yamazaki; S. Aoki; R. Burkhalter; M. Fukugita; S. Hashimoto; N. Ishizuka; Y. Iwasaki; K. Kanaya; T. Kaneko; Y. Kuramashi; M. Okawa; Y. Taniguchi; A. Ukawa; T. Yoshié

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the maximum entropy method to extract the spectral functions for pseudoscalar and vector mesons from hadron correlators previously calculated at four different lattice spacings in quenched QCD with the Wilson quark action. We determine masses and decay constants for the ground and excited states of the pseudoscalar and vector channels from position and area of peaks in the spectral functions. We obtain the results, $m_{\\pi_1} = 660(590)$ MeV and $m_{\\rho_1} = 1540(570)$ MeV for the masses of the first excited state masses, in the continuum limit of quenched QCD. We also find unphysical states which have infinite mass in the continuum limit, and argue that they are bound states of two doublers of the Wilson quark action. If the interpretation is correct, this is the first time that the state of doublers is identified in lattice QCD numerical simulations.

  15. Theoretical analysis of perfect quantum state transfer with superconducting qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick W. Strauch; Carl J. Williams

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting quantum circuits, fabricated with multiple layers, are proposed to implement perfect quantum state transfer between nodes of a hypercube network. For tunable devices such as the phase qubit, each node can transmit quantum information to any other node at a constant rate independent of the distance between qubits. The physical limits of quantum state transfer in this network are theoretically analyzed, including the effects of disorder, decoherence, and higher-order couplings.

  16. Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

  17. Maximum likelihood estimation of the equity Efstathios Avdis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Michael J.

    premium is usually estimated by taking the sample mean of stock returns and subtracting a measure the expected return on the aggregate stock market less the government bill rate, is of central importance an alternative esti- mator, based on maximum likelihood, that takes into account informa- tion contained

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA MAXIMUM RATED TOTAL COOLING CAPACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-27-HERS Maximum Rated Total Cooling Capacity of the installed system (Btu/hr) 3b Sum of the ARI Rated Total Cooling Capacities of multiple systems installed Cooling Capacities of the installed cooling systems must be calculated and entered in row 3b. 4a MRTCC

  19. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  20. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  1. annual maximum water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual maximum water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ORIGINAL PAPER The distribution of...

  2. BRANCH-CUT-AND-PROPAGATE FOR THE MAXIMUM k ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    maximum k-colorable subgraph problem consists of selecting a k-color- able induced subgraph of ..... a symmetric subgroup Sp of Aut(G) acts on Vp for all p ? [s]. Let Vp = {vp. 1,...,vp qp. } ...... [9] J. Crawford, M. Ginsberg, E. Luks, and A. Roy.

  3. Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

  4. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Andrew-Category 4· Category 4 Hurricane - Winds 131-155 mph. Wall failures in homes and complete roofHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

  5. Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for Thermoelectric Generator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaltz, Erik

    of Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) systems a power converter is often inserted between the TEG system that the TEG system produces the maximum power. However, if the conditions, e.g. temperature, health, age, etc find the best compromise of all modules. In order to increase the power production of the TEG system

  6. Efficiency Improvement of an IPMSM using Maximum Efficiency Operating Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Efficiency Improvement of an IPMSM using Maximum Efficiency Operating Strategy Daniel Pohlenz. These are characterized by high efficiency and high torque as well as power density. The generation of reference currents that the MTPC method deviates considerably from the best efficiency under certain boundary conditions. The use

  7. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  8. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  9. MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Matteo

    MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE Abstract. There are several examples, the Reflection Princi- ple (RP) implies that if I is a tower of ideals which concentrates on the class GIC1 of 1 [16], shows that if PFA+ or MM holds and there is an inaccessible cardinal, then there is a tower

  10. Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

  11. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  12. The Shockley-Queisser limit for nanostructured solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yunlu; Munday, Jeremy N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shockley-Queisser limit describes the maximum solar energy conversion efficiency achievable for a particular material and is the standard by which new photovoltaic technologies are compared. This limit is based on the principle of detailed balance, which equates the photon flux into a device to the particle flux (photons or electrons) out of that device. Nanostructured solar cells represent a new class of photovoltaic devices, and questions have been raised about whether or not they can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. Here we show that single-junction nanostructured solar cells have a theoretical maximum efficiency of 42% under AM 1.5 solar illumination. While this exceeds the efficiency of a non- concentrating planar device, it does not exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit for a planar device with optical concentration. We conclude that nanostructured solar cells offer an important route towards higher efficiency photovoltaic devices through a built-in optical concentration.

  13. INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC LOSSES ON MAXIMUM POWER LIMITS OF SYNCHRONOUS PERMANENT MAGNET DRIVES IN FLUX-WEAKENING MODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .hoang@lesir.ens-cachan.fr Abstract : The aim of this paper is to present the structure of a new synchronous machine with stator for a synchro- nous polyphased (three-phase) machine with a stator concentrated flux and permanent magnets. According to the position of the mobile part, the magnetic flux-linkage in the arma- ture winding can

  14. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  15. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  16. Synchronization of Limit Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changpin Li; Weihua Deng

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we derive a sufficient condition of synchronizing limit sets (attractors and repellers) by using the linear feedback control technique proposed here. There examples are included. The numerical simulations and computer graphics show that our method work well.

  17. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  18. Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite-time thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Power and efficiency limits for internal combustion engines via methods of finite publication 17 June 1993) Analytical expressionsfor the upper bounds of power and efficiency of an internal and expensiveto compute and analyze.2If we are interestedin maximum power output or in maximum effi- ciency

  19. Rate constants for charge transfer across semiconductor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.M.; Lewis, N.S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacial charge-transfer rate constants have been measured for n-type Si electrodes in contact with a series of viologen-based redox couples in methanol through analyses of the behavior of these junctions with respect to their current density versus potential and differential capacitance versus potential properties. The data allow evaluation of the maximum rate constant (and therefore the electronic coupling) for majority carriers in the solid as well as of the dependence of the rate constant on the driving force for transfer of delocalized electrons from the n-Si semiconducting electrode into the localized molecular redox species in the solution phase. The data are in good agreement with existing models of this interfacial electron transfer process and provide insight into the fundamental kinetic events underlying the use of semiconducting photoelectrodes in applications such as solar energy conversion. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

  1. Analysis of radial fin assembly heat transfer with dehumidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosario, L.; Rahman, M.M. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is the analysis of heat transfer in a radial fin assembly during the process of dehumidification. An individual finned tube geometry is a reasonable representation of heat exchangers used in air conditioning. The condensation process involves both heat and mass transfer and the cooling takes place by the removal of sensible as well as latent heat. The ratio of sensible to total heat is an important quantity that defines the heat transfer process during a dehumidifier operation. A one-dimensional model for heat transfer in the fin and the heat exchanger block is developed to study the effects of condensation on the fin surface. The combined heat and mass transfer process is modeled by incorporating the ratio of sensible to total heat in the formulation. The augmentation of heat transfer due to fin was established by comparing heat transfer rate with and without fins under the same operating conditions. Numerical calculations were carried out to study the effects of relative humidity and dry bulb temperature of the incoming air, and cold fluid temperature inside the coil on the performance of the heat exchanger. Results were compared to those published for rectangular fin under humid condition showed excellent agreement when the present model was used to compute that limiting condition. It was found that the heat transfer rate increased with increment in both dry bulb temperature and relative humidity of the air. The augmentation factor, however, decreased with increment in relative humidity and the dry bulb temperature.

  2. QER- Comment of Energy Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Lee Hanse Executive Vice President Interstate Energy Transfer Mobile - 210 464 2929 Office - 210 403 6455

  3. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  4. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  5. Fluence-limited burnup as a function of fast reactor core parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kersting, Alyssa (Alyssa Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The limiting factor in current designs for fast reactors is not only the reactivity, but also the maximum permissible fast-neutron fluence in the cladding, especially for reduced uranium enrichment cores using high-albedo ...

  6. On the Eddington limit in accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Heinzeller; W. J. Duschl

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Eddington limit has originally been derived for stars, recently its relevance for the evolution of accretion discs has been realized. We discuss the question whether the classical Eddington limit - which has been applied globally for almost all calculations on accretion discs - is a good approximation if applied locally in the disc. For this purpose, a critical accretion rate corresponding to this type of modified classical Eddington limit is calculated from thin alpha-disc models and slim disc models. We account for the non-spherical symmetry of the disc models by computing the local upper limits on the accretion rate from vertical and radial force equilibria separately. It is shown that the results can differ considerably from the classical (global) value: The vertical radiation force limits the maximum accretion rate in the inner disc region to much less than the classical Eddington value in thin alpha-discs, while it allows for significantly higher accretion rates in slim discs. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of accretion discs and their central objects.

  7. Max '91: flare research at the next solar maximum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, B.; Canfield, R.; Bruner, M.; Emslie, G.; Hildner, E.; Hudson, H.; Hurford, G.; Lin, R.; Novick, R.; Tarbell, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the central scientific questions surrounding solar flares, coordinated observations of electromagnetic radiation and energetic particles must be made from spacecraft, balloons, rockets, and ground-based observatories. A program to enhance capabilities in these areas in preparation for the next solar maximum in 1991 is recommended. The major scientific issues are described, and required observations and coordination of observations and analyses are detailed. A program plan and conceptual budgets are provided.

  8. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, cancels DOE P 310.1.

  9. Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Bajkova

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

  10. Occam's Razor Cuts Away the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnicki, ?ukasz

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that the maximum entropy principle can be replaced by a more natural assumption, that there exists a phenomenological function of entropy consistent with the microscopic model. The requirement of existence provides then a unique construction of the related probability density. I conclude the letter with an axiomatic formulation of the notion of entropy, which is suitable for exploration of the non-equilibrium phenomena.

  11. PNNL: A Supervised Maximum Entropy Approach to Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tratz, Stephen C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Posse, Christian; Whitney, Paul D.

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we described the PNNL Word Sense Disambiguation system as applied to the English All-Word task in Se-mEval 2007. We use a supervised learning approach, employing a large number of features and using Information Gain for dimension reduction. Our Maximum Entropy approach combined with a rich set of features produced results that are significantly better than baseline and are the highest F-score for the fined-grained English All-Words subtask.

  12. Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martyushev, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Division (Russian Federation)], E-mail: mlm@ecko.uran.ru

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two nonequilibrium phase transitions (morphological and hydrodynamic) are analyzed by applying the maximum entropy production principle. Quantitative analysis is for the first time compared with experiment. Nonequilibrium crystallization of ice and laminar-turbulent flow transition in a circular pipe are examined as examples of morphological and hydrodynamic transitions, respectively. For the latter transition, a minimum critical Reynolds number of 1200 is predicted. A discussion of this important and interesting result is presented.

  13. Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out-of-equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1957). J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,45–52. J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,e C. C. Rodriguez, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,

  14. Deriving the continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions via variational analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumar, N.; Wets, R. J. -B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and V. J. DellaPietra, A maximum entropy approach to naturalJ. and R. K. Bryan, Maximum entropy image reconstruction:Heidelberg, Continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions p

  15. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  16. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    't be determined A correlation for Sherwood number (Sh) based on di i l l i b d l i Sh diff idimensional analysis for mass transfer with convection: I l f d fl d b (l b l )­ Internal forced flow: inside a tube (laminar A in fluid medium B in a flow with characteristic velocity and size characteristic d: kA = f(d, w, (= fluid

  17. Torque limit of PM motors for field-weakening region operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royak, Semyon (Beachwood, OH); Harbaugh, Mark M. (Richfield, OH)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a motor controller and technique for controlling a permanent magnet motor. In accordance with one aspect of the present technique, a permanent magnet motor is controlled by receiving a torque command, determining a physical torque limit based on a stator frequency, determining a theoretical torque limit based on a maximum available voltage and motor inductance ratio, and limiting the torque command to the smaller of the physical torque limit and the theoretical torque limit. Receiving the torque command may include normalizing the torque command to obtain a normalized torque command, determining the physical torque limit may include determining a normalized physical torque limit, determining a theoretical torque limit may include determining a normalized theoretical torque limit, and limiting the torque command may include limiting the normalized torque command to the smaller of the normalized physical torque limit and the normalized theoretical torque limit.

  18. Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon Freid, et al.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of a multi-kilowatt wireless radio frequency (RF) power system to transfer power between lunar base facilities. Initial analyses, show that wireless power transfer (WPT) systems can be more efficient and less expensive than traditional wired approaches for certain lunar and terrestrial applications. The study includes evaluations of the fundamental limitations of lunar WPT systems, the interrelationships of possible operational parameters, and a baseline design approach for a notionial system that could be used in the near future to power remote facilities at a lunar base. Our notional system includes state-of-the-art photovoltaics (PVs), high-efficiency microwave transmitters, low-mass large-aperture high-power transmit antennas, high-efficiency large-area rectenna receiving arrays, and reconfigurable DC combining circuitry.

  19. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce. Their achievements and recognized capabilities are what make the accomplishments cataloged here possible. Without them, none of these transactions would occur.

  20. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  1. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  2. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, James C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoover, Mark A. (Idaho Falls, ID); May, Kay W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  3. Data Transfer and Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  4. Technology Transfer Reporting Form

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon |1999Energy-Technology TransferThis

  5. Better Nonlinear Models from Noisy Data: Attractors with Maximum Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to nonlinear modelling is presented which, by incorporating the global behaviour of the model, lifts shortcomings of both least squares and total least squares parameter estimates. Although ubiquitous in practice, a least squares approach is fundamentally flawed in that it assumes independent, normally distributed (IND) forecast errors: nonlinear models will not yield IND errors even if the noise is IND. A new cost function is obtained via the maximum likelihood principle; superior results are illustrated both for small data sets and infinitely long data streams.

  6. Application of Maximum Entropy Method to Dynamical Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Clowser; Costas Strouthos

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maximum Entropy Method is applied to dynamical fermion simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This model is particularly interesting because at T=0 it has a broken phase with a rich spectrum of mesonic bound states and a symmetric phase where there are resonances, and hence the simple pole assumption of traditional fitting procedures breaks down. We present results extracted from simulations on large lattices for the spectral functions of the elementary fermion, the pion, the sigma, the massive pseudoscalar meson and the symmetric phase resonances.

  7. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Chliamovitch; Alexandre Dupuis; Bastien Chopard; Anton Golub

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  8. Reducing Degeneracy in Maximum Entropy Models of Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvát, Szabolcs; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on Jaynes's maximum entropy principle, exponential random graphs provide a family of principled models that allow the prediction of network properties as constrained by empirical data. However, their use is often hindered by the degeneracy problem characterized by spontaneous symmetry-breaking, where predictions simply fail. Here we show that degeneracy appears when the corresponding density of states function is not log-concave. We propose a solution to the degeneracy problem for a large class of models by exploiting the nonlinear relationships between the constrained measures to convexify the domain of the density of states. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method on examples, including on Zachary's karate club network data.

  9. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chliamovitch, Gregor; Chopard, Bastien; Golub, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  10. Excited nucleon spectrum from lattice QCD with maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sasaki; S. Sasaki; T. Hatsuda; M. Asakawa

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study excited states of the nucleon in quenched lattice QCD with the spectral analysis using the maximum entropy method. Our simulations are performed on three lattice sizes $16^3\\times 32$, $24^3\\times 32$ and $32^3\\times 32$, at $\\beta=6.0$ to address the finite volume issue. We find a significant finite volume effect on the mass of the Roper resonance for light quark masses. After removing this systematic error, its mass becomes considerably reduced toward the direction to solve the level order puzzle between the Roper resonance $N'(1440)$ and the negative-parity nucleon $N^*(1535)$.

  11. Waste Not, Want Not: Heisenberg-Limited Metrology With Information Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Simon A; Lang, Matthias D; Caves, Carlton M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information recycling has been shown to improve the sensitivity of interferometers when the input quantum state has been partially transferred from some donor system. In this paper we demonstrate that when the quantum state of this donor system is from a particular class of Heisenberg-limited states, information recycling yields a Heisenberg-limited phase measurement. Crucially, this result holds irrespective of the fraction of the quantum state transferred to the interferometer input and also for a general class of number-conserving quantum-state-transfer processes, including ones that destroy the first-order phase coherence between the branches of the interferometer. This result could have significant applications in Heisenberg-limited atom interferometry, where the quantum state is transferred from a Heisenberg-limited photon source, and in optical interferometry where the loss can be monitored.

  12. Quantum maximum-entropy principle for closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By introducing a quantum entropy functional of the reduced density matrix, the principle of quantum maximum entropy is asserted as fundamental principle of quantum statistical mechanics. Accordingly, we develop a comprehensive theoretical formalism to construct rigorously a closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function approach. The theoretical formalism is formulated in both thermodynamic equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions, and the quantum contributions are obtained by only assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of ({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}. In particular, by using an arbitrary number of moments, we prove that (1) on a macroscopic scale all nonlocal effects, compatible with the uncertainty principle, are imputable to high-order spatial derivatives, both of the numerical density n and of the effective temperature T; (2) the results available from the literature in the framework of both a quantum Boltzmann gas and a degenerate quantum Fermi gas are recovered as a particular case; (3) the statistics for the quantum Fermi and Bose gases at different levels of degeneracy are explicitly incorporated; (4) a set of relevant applications admitting exact analytical equations are explicitly given and discussed; (5) the quantum maximum entropy principle keeps full validity in the classical limit, when ({h_bar}/2{pi}){yields}0.

  13. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  14. Application of the Maximum Entropy Method to the (2+1)d Four-Fermion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Allton; J. E. Clowser; S. J. Hands; J. B. Kogut; C. G. Strouthos

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate spectral functions extracted using the Maximum Entropy Method from correlators measured in lattice simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional four-fermion model. This model is particularly interesting because it has both a chirally broken phase with a rich spectrum of mesonic bound states and a symmetric phase where there are only resonances. In the broken phase we study the elementary fermion, pion, sigma and massive pseudoscalar meson; our results confirm the Goldstone nature of the pi and permit an estimate of the meson binding energy. We have, however, seen no signal of sigma -> pi pi decay as the chiral limit is approached. In the symmetric phase we observe a resonance of non-zero width in qualitative agreement with analytic expectations; in addition the ultra-violet behaviour of the spectral functions is consistent with the large non-perturbative anomalous dimension for fermion composite operators expected in this model.

  15. CP$^{N-1}$ model with the theta term and maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A $\\theta$ term in lattice field theory causes the sign problem in Monte Carlo simulations. This problem can be circumvented by Fourier-transforming the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. This strategy, however, has a limitation, because errors of $P(Q)$ prevent one from calculating the partition function ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$ properly for large volumes. This is called flattening. As an alternative approach to the Fourier method, we utilize the maximum entropy method (MEM) to calculate ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$. We apply the MEM to Monte Carlo data of the CP$^3$ model. It is found that in the non-flattening case, the result of the MEM agrees with that of the Fourier transform, while in the flattening case, the MEM gives smooth ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$.

  16. A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion Asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudon, Thierry

    A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion. The interaction terms take into account both scattering and absorption/emission phenomena, as well as Doppler-diffusion equations. Key words. Hydrodynamic limits. Diffusion approximation. Radiative transfer. Doppler correction

  17. Charge transfer from TiO2 into adsorbed benzene diazonium compounds Tel-Aviv University, School of Electrical Engineering, Ramat-Aviv 69978, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoram

    Charge transfer from TiO2 into adsorbed benzene diazonium compounds A. Merson Tel-Aviv University benzene diazonium compounds has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, x-ray photoelectron that the potential of maximum electron transfer depends strongly on the dipole moment of the benzene compound. Two

  18. Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology transfer Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne Read more about Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne New Director to lead Technology...

  19. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  20. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  1. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  2. Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

  3. Maximum Margin Clustering for State Decomposition of Metastable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying a metastable dynamical system, a prime concern is how to decompose the phase space into a set of metastable states. Unfortunately, the metastable state decomposition based on simulation or experimental data is still a challenge. The most popular and simplest approach is geometric clustering which is developed based on the classical clustering technique. However, the prerequisites of this approach are: (1) data are obtained from simulations or experiments which are in global equilibrium and (2) the coordinate system is appropriately selected. Recently, the kinetic clustering approach based on phase space discretization and transition probability estimation has drawn much attention due to its applicability to more general cases, but the choice of discretization policy is a difficult task. In this paper, a new decomposition method designated as maximum margin metastable clustering is proposed, which converts the problem of metastable state decomposition to a semi-supervised learning problem so that...

  4. Efficiency at maximum power of a chemical engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooyberghs, Hans; Salazar, Alberto; Indekeu, Joseph O; Broeck, Christian Van den

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclically operating chemical engine is considered that converts chemical energy into mechanical work. The working fluid is a gas of finite-sized spherical particles interacting through elastic hard collisions. For a generic transport law for particle uptake and release, the efficiency at maximum power $\\eta$ takes the form 1/2+c\\Delta \\mu + O(\\Delta \\mu^2), with 1/2 a universal constant and $\\Delta \\mu$ the chemical potential difference between the particle reservoirs. The linear coefficient c is zero for engines featuring a so-called left/right symmetry or particle fluxes that are antisymmetric in the applied chemical potential difference. Remarkably, the leading constant in $\\eta$ is non-universal with respect to an exceptional modification of the transport law. For a nonlinear transport model we obtain \\eta = 1/(\\theta +1), with \\theta >0 the power of $\\Delta \\mu$ in the transport equation

  5. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  6. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  7. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  8. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  9. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  10. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  11. Thermomechanical aspects of the liquid metal cooled limiter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid, A.; Abdou, M.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis has been performed to evaluate the possibility of using liquid lithium as a coolant for the limiter. A global analysis was carried out to determine limiter's shape and configuration, and then detailed MHD, heat transfer, and structural analysis, were performed to determine limiting coolant velocities, operating pressures, Nusselt number, and allowable heat fluxes. For one of the most suitable choices of materials i.e. vanadium structure, lithium coolant, and Be coating (10 mm), the limiting heat flux has been found to be 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/. For High, Z coating of tungsten the limiting heat flux has been found to be 5.7 MW/m/sup 2/. In both cases the operating pressure was maintained at 10 MPa.

  12. The Limits of Quintessence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.R.; Linder, Eric V.

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the simplest particle-physics scalar-field models of dynamical dark energy can be separated into distinct behaviors based on the acceleration or deceleration of the field as it evolves down its potential towards a zero minimum. We show that these models occupy narrow regions in the phase-plane of w and w', the dark energy equation-of-state and its time-derivative in units of the Hubble time. Restricting an energy scale of the dark energy microphysics limits how closely a scalar field can resemble a cosmological constant. These results, indicating a desired measurement resolution of order \\sigma(w')\\approx (1+w), define firm targets for observational tests of the physics of dark energy.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  15. adoptively transferred indium-111: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Afshin J. 140 Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: eknik Mass transfer andMass transfer and arationste Mass...

  16. Heat Transfer Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefevre, M. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crossflow and counterflow plume. 3) COMBINATION OF HET AND DRY TOWERS When there is not enough water available to provide the makeup for a conventional wet cooling tower, the only solution is to use "DRY" cooling to dissipate part of the heat load. a... 11. The water is cooled first in the DRY section because DRY cooling is much more expensive than WET cooling and this arrangement leads to the smallest DRY tower. It must also be kept in mind that the DRY tower has a physical cooling limit equal...

  17. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  18. Maximum Entropy Analysis of the Spectral Functions in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asakawa; T. Hatsuda; Y. Nakahara

    2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    First principle calculation of the QCD spectral functions (SPFs) based on the lattice QCD simulations is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the Bayesian inference theory and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), which is a useful tool to extract SPFs from the imaginary-time correlation functions numerically obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Three important aspects of MEM are (i) it does not require a priori assumptions or parametrizations of SPFs, (ii) for given data, a unique solution is obtained if it exists, and (iii) the statistical significance of the solution can be quantitatively analyzed. The ability of MEM is explicitly demonstrated by using mock data as well as lattice QCD data. When applied to lattice data, MEM correctly reproduces the low-energy resonances and shows the existence of high-energy continuum in hadronic correlation functions. This opens up various possibilities for studying hadronic properties in QCD beyond the conventional way of analyzing the lattice data. Future problems to be studied by MEM in lattice QCD are also summarized.

  19. Improved Maximum Entropy Method with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an improvement to the implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). It amounts to departing from the search space obtained through a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Kernel. Based on the shape of the SVD basis functions we argue that the MEM spectrum for given $N_\\tau$ data-points $D(\\tau)$ and prior information $m(\\omega)$ does not in general lie in this $N_\\tau$ dimensional singular subspace. Systematically extending the search basis will eventually recover the full search space and the correct extremum. We illustrate this idea through a mock data analysis inspired by actual lattice spectra, to show where our improvement becomes essential for the success of the MEM. To remedy the shortcomings of Bryan's SVD prescription we propose to use the real Fourier basis, which consists of trigonometric functions. Not only does our approach lead to more stable numerical behavior, as the SVD is not required for the determination of the basis functions, but also the resolution of the MEM becomes independent from the position of the reconstructed peaks.

  20. Maximum entropy detection of planets around active stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, P; Hébrard, E; Morin, J; Folsom, C P; Böhm, T; Boisse, I; Borgniet, S; Bouvier, J; Delfosse, X; Hussain, G; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Barnes, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (shortened for arXiv) We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler Imaging in radial velocity measurements. We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Using a simulated time-series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km/s, we are able in most cases to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase and o...

  1. Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro- Fuzzy "ANFIS energy demand. The mathematical modeling and simulation of the photovoltaic system is implemented) like ANFIS. This paper presents Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using

  2. 422 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 2, MAY 2003 Converting System Limits to Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limits, LMP, locational marginal pricing, nomograms, stability limits, transfer limits, transmission nodal) marginal price, the cost of delivering one additional MW of elec- tricity to a given location, the right to receive compensation for the price difference resulting from congestion between two points

  3. A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns Christopher James Langmead C. Robertson McClung Bruce Randall Donald ,,,§,¶ Abstract We introduce a maximum entropy-based spectral analysis, maximum entropy spectral reconstruction is well suited to signals of the type generated

  4. 1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION 3 4 Chi Xie 5, maximum entropy, linearization 36 algorithm, column generation 37 #12;C. Xie, K.M. Kockelman and S is the trip matrix of the simplified network. This paper discusses a5 maximum entropy method

  5. Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen* Jeffrey M. Perloff** January 2001 Abstract Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches provide superior estimates of a ratio extra information in the supports for the underlying parameters for generalized maximum entropy (GME

  6. Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff** ABSTRACT We show that the generalized maximum entropy (GME) is the only estimation method- classes of estimators may outperform the GME estimation rule. Keywords: generalized entropy, maximum

  7. A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin-destination trip matrix estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin- destination trip matrix estimation propose a combined maximum entropy-least squares (ME-LS) estimator, by which O- D flows are distributed-destination trip table; elastic demand; maximum entropy; least squares; subnetwork analysis; convex combination

  8. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to...

  9. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  10. Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is working with Heads of Departmental Elements, DOE senior leaders and subject-matter-experts to capture and transfer the knowledge and experiences...

  11. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  12. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

  13. MHD Effects on Heat Transfer in a Molten Salt Blanket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Miraghaie, Reza; Abdou, Mohamed [University of California (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer in closed channel flows of molten salts (MS)s, such as FLiBe or FLiNaBe, has been considered under specific reactor conditions. MHD effects have been accessed for two blanket concepts: self-cooled MS blanket, and dual-coolant MS blanket. The effect of heat transfer degradation due to turbulence reduction by a magnetic field in the First Wall channels of the self-cooled blanket was analyzed with the K-{epsilon} model of turbulence. In the dual-coolant blanket, the MS flow is laminar. A 2-D MHD code was used to calculate the laminar velocity profile first. Then, the temperature field was calculated using a 3-D temperature code. Reasonable interface temperatures below the material limit of 550 deg. C, and low heat escape from the breeder zone have been demonstrated. Model limitations and the ways of their improvement are also discussed.

  14. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  15. Description of TASHA: Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Chen, N.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the code used to perform Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat-Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor (TASHA). More specifically, the code is designed for thermal analysis of the fuel elements. The new code reflects changes to the High Flux Isotope Reactor steady-state thermal-hydraulics code. These changes were aimed at both improving the code`s predictive ability and allowing statistical thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis to be performed. A significant portion of the changes were aimed at improving the correlation package in the code. This involved incorporating more recent correlations for both single-phase flow and two-phase flow thermal limits, including the addition of correlations to predict the phenomenon of flow excursion. Since the code was to be used in the design of the ANS, changes were made to allow the code to predict limiting powers for a variety of thermal limits, including critical heat flux, flow excursion, incipient boiling, oxide spallation, maximum centerline temperature, and surface temperature equal to the saturation temperature. Statistical uncertainty analysis also required several changes to the code itself as well as changes to the code input format. This report describes these changes in enough detail to allow the reader to interpret code results and also to understand where the changes were made in the code programming. This report is not intended to be a stand alone report for running the code, however, and should be used in concert with the two previous reports published on the original code. Sample input and output files are also included to help accomplish these goals. In addition, a section is included that describes requirements for a new, more modem code that the project planned to develop.

  16. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore »result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  17. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy analytic continuation (MEAC) method is used to extend the range of accuracy of the linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR)/classical Wigner approximation for real time correlation functions. The LSC-IVR provides a very effective 'prior' for the MEAC procedure since it is very good for short times, exact for all time and temperature for harmonic potentials (even for correlation functions of nonlinear operators), and becomes exact in the classical high temperature limit. This combined MEAC+LSC/IVR approach is applied here to two highly nonlinear dynamical systems, a pure quartic potential in one dimensional and liquid para-hydrogen at two thermal state points (25K and 14K under nearly zero external pressure). The former example shows the MEAC procedure to be a very significant enhancement of the LSC-IVR, for correlation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators, and especially at low temperature where semiclassical approximations are least accurate. For liquid para-hydrogen, the LSC-IVR is seen already to be excellent at T = 25K, but the MEAC procedure produces a significant correction at the lower temperature (T = 14K). Comparisons are also made to how the MEAC procedure is able to provide corrections for other trajectory-based dynamical approximations when used as priors.

  18. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  19. Canister Transfer System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane/hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  20. CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  1. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hamilton

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  2. Wavelength limits for InGaN quantum wells on GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pristovsek, Markus, E-mail: markus@pristovsek.de [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission wavelength of coherently strained InGaN quantum wells (QW) is limited by the maximum thickness before relaxation starts. For high indium contents x>40% the resulting wavelength decreases because quantum confinement dominates. For low indium content x<40% the electron hole wave function overlap (and hence radiative emission) is strongly reduced with increasing QW thickness due to the quantum confined Stark effect and imposes another limit. This results in a maximum usable emission wavelength at around 600?nm for QWs with 40%-50% indium content. Relaxed InGaN buffer layers could help to push this further, especially on non- and semi-polar orientations.

  3. A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

  4. The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Transition to Experiencing: I. Limited Learning and Limited Experiencing Simona Ginsburg route for the transition from sensory processing to unlimited experiencing, or basic consciousness. We the transition. We believe that the raw mate- rial from which feelings were molded by natural selection

  5. Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery Department of Mechanical 8. Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery S. M. You Department of Mechanical 8 Transfer Visualization Committee organized two photo gallery sessions in 1998. The International Heat Transfer Photo Gallery was held at the l la' International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC) in Kyongju

  6. Limit theory for overfit models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Grayson Ford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Asymptotic Theory and Main Results . . . . . . . . .Chapter 2 Limit theory for comparing over?t models out-of-

  7. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Scharf; Robert Klanner

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons and holes in high-ohmic silicon on crystal orientation, electric field and temperature. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  8. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  9. Energy Transfer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 at Iowa WindUnion7Transfer Energy Transfer Below

  10. A resonant load circuit to develop electrical power transfer of thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, G.; Estrada, C.A.; Jimenez, A.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low internal impedance of thermionic converters requires a low impedance load in the DC mode to obtain optimal power transfer. An internal resistance near 0.1 W for thermionic converters is common. According to the maximum power theorem [Desoer,1969], a similar magnitude for the resistance load must be fixed. Due to temperature changes, the internal plasma resistance and the resistance of the leads is modified [Houston,1959], for this reason, it is difficult to maintain maximum power transfer to the load. This paper presents a resonant load circuit for thermionic converters in the AC mode, to develop impedance coupling. The circuit employs an electrical transformer and positive feedback; by this way, oscillations are themselves maintained. It is used an electrical circuit model [Perez et al, 1997], to simulate the electrical behavior of the thermionic converter.

  11. Simulation of a Wireless Power Transfer System for Electric Vehicles with Power Factor Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickelsimer, Michael C [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless power transfer has been a popular topic of recent research. Most research has been done to address the limitations of coil-to-coil efficiency. However, little has been done to address the problem associated with the low input power factor with which the systems operate. This paper details the steps taken to analyze a wireless power transfer system from the view of the power grid under a variety of loading conditions with and without power factor correction.

  12. Heat Transfer Analysis and Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Receiver Implemented in Engineering Equation Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forristall, R.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development, validation, and use of a heat transfer model implemented in Engineering Equation Solver. The model determines the performance of a parabolic trough solar collector's linear receiver, also called a heat collector element. All heat transfer and thermodynamic equations, optical properties, and parameters used in the model are discussed. The modeling assumptions and limitations are also discussed, along with recommendations for model improvement.

  13. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  14. Performance Limits for Cherenkov Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hofmann

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Cherenkov instruments for the detection of very high energy gamma rays is ultimately limited by the fluctuations in the development of air showers. With particular emphasis on the angular resolution, the ultimate performance limits are investigated on the basis of simulations.

  15. Congressional Request Limiting the Magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as goals? Target: limit U.S. GHG emissions (e.g., national emission budget, or percent reduction) What is a reasonable share of U.S. emission reductions relative to the global targets? What is the implied emissions on atmospheric GHG concentrations? Target: limit atmospheric GHG concentrations (e.g., 450, 550 ppm CO2,eq) How

  16. Mass Transfer from Giant Donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovskii, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

  17. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df the fuel rod, and the volumetric generation rate is known to vary sinusoidally with distance along the rod to exist between the surface of the rod and the water. Axial conduction can be neglected in rod and fluid

  18. Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, Richard R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

  19. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  20. Effects of Initial Pressure on the Flammability Limit of OX-Air Mixture with 20-L-Appartus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    information on the reaction behaviors of the specific substance and possible fire and explosion hazards hazards may be encountered within the flammability limits. A fire or an explosion might occur if a flame limits, minimum oxygen concentration, maximum explosion overpressure, flammability zone), which were

  1. Eliminating the Renormalization Scale Ambiguity for Top-Pair Production Using the Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /Chongqing U.

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty in setting the renormalization scale in finite-order perturbative QCD predictions using standard methods substantially reduces the precision of tests of the Standard Model in collider experiments. It is conventional to choose a typical momentum transfer of the process as the renormalization scale and take an arbitrary range to estimate the uncertainty in the QCD prediction. However, predictions using this procedure depend on the choice of renormalization scheme, leave a non-convergent renormalon perturbative series, and moreover, one obtains incorrect results when applied to QED processes. In contrast, if one fixes the renormalization scale using the Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC), all non-conformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling, and one obtains a unique, scale-fixed, scheme-independent prediction at any finite order. The PMC renormalization scale {mu}{sub R}{sup PMC} and the resulting finite-order PMC prediction are both to high accuracy independent of choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub R}{sup init}, consistent with renormalization group invariance. Moreover, after PMC scale-setting, the n!-growth of the pQCD expansion is eliminated. Even the residual scale-dependence at fixed order due to unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms is substantially suppressed. As an application, we apply the PMC procedure to obtain NNLO predictions for the t{bar t}-pair hadroproduction cross-section at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. There are no renormalization scale or scheme uncertainties, thus greatly improving the precision of the QCD prediction. The PMC prediction for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is larger in magnitude in comparison with the conventional scale-setting method, and it agrees well with the present Tevatron and LHC data. We also verify that the initial scale-independence of the PMC prediction is satisfied to high accuracy at the NNLO level: the total cross-section remains almost unchanged even when taking very disparate initial scales {mu}{sub R}{sup init} equal to m{sub t}, 20 m{sub t}, {radical}s.

  2. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  3. The number e^{(1/2)} is the ratio between the time of maximum value and the time of maximum growth rate for restricted growth phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Niu Wu

    2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    For many natural process of growth, with the growth rate independent of size due to Gibrat law and with the growth process following a log-normal distribution, the ratio between the time (D) for maximum value and the time (L) for maximum growth rate (inflexion point) is then equal to the square root of the base of the natural logarithm (e^{1/2}). On the logarithm scale this ratio becomes one half ((1/2)). It remains an open question, due to lack of complete data for various cases with restricted growth, whether this e^{1/2} ratio can be stated as e^{1/2}-Law. Two established examples already published, one for an epidemic spreading and one for droplet production, support however this ratio. Another example appears to be the height of humain body. For boys the maximum height occurs near 23 years old while the maximum growth rate is at the age near 14, and there ratio is close to e^{1/2}. The main theoretical base to obtain this conclusion is problem independent, provided the growth process is restricted, such as public intervention to control the spreading of communicable epidemics, so that an entropy is associated with the process and the role of dissipation, representing the mechanism of intervention, is maximized. Under this formulation the principle of maximum rate of entropy production is used to make the production process problem independent.

  4. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  5. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  6. Group transfer and electron transfer reactions of organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, J.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1994, despite the disruptions, the authors have made progress in several aspects of their research on electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes. This summary covers three areas that are relatively complete: (1) reactions between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl halides, (2) reactions of hydrido- and alkyl-containing anions (RFe(CO){sup {minus}}{sub 4} and RW (CO){sub 5}{sup {minus}}) with metal carbonyl cations and (3) reactions of a seventeen-electron complex (Cp{asterisk}Cr(CO){sub 3}{lg_bullet}) with metal carbonyl derivatives. Two areas of examination that have just begun (possible carbene transfer and the possible role of metal carbonyl anions in carbon-hydrogen bond activation) will also be described.

  7. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  8. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  9. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  10. Efficiency at maximum power of low dissipation Carnot engines Massimiliano Esposito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawai, Ryoichi

    Efficiency at maximum power of low dissipation Carnot engines Massimiliano Esposito Center the efficiency at maximum power, , of engines performing finite-time Carnot cycles between a hot and a cold reservoir at temperatures Th and Tc, respectively. For engines reaching Carnot efficiency C = 1 - Tc

  11. Maximum-Power-Point Tracking Method of Photovoltaic Using Only Single Current Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    » «Solar cell systems» Abstract This paper describes a novel strategy of maximum-power-point tracking point using only a single current sensor, i.e., a Hall-effect CT. Output power of the photovoltaic can-climbing method is employed to seek the maximum power point, using the output power obtained from only the current

  12. An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram Ranade and Srinivas Aluru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, Abhiram G.

    An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram maximum likelihood method for genome assembly. We formulate the problem as one of direct convex estimate of the length of the genome or the need to use further expectation minimization to predict

  13. Setting the Renormalization Scale in QCD: The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; Di Giustino, Leonardo; /SLAC

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale {mu} of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}): The purpose of the running coupling in any gauge theory is to sum all terms involving the {beta} function; in fact, when the renormalization scale is set properly, all non-conformal {beta} {ne} 0 terms in a perturbative expansion arising from renormalization are summed into the running coupling. The remaining terms in the perturbative series are then identical to that of a conformal theory; i.e., the corresponding theory with {beta} = 0. The resulting scale-fixed predictions using the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme - a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC is also the theoretical principle underlying the BLM procedure, commensurate scale relations between observables, and the scale-setting method used in lattice gauge theory. The number of active flavors nf in the QCD {beta} function is also correctly determined. We discuss several methods for determining the PMC/BLM scale for QCD processes. We show that a single global PMC scale, valid at leading order, can be derived from basic properties of the perturbative QCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increase the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of collider experiments to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  14. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

  15. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  16. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  17. Analyticity, Convergence and Convergence Rate of Recursive Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadi?, Vladislav B

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers the asymptotic properties of the recursive maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models. The paper is focused on the asymptotic behavior of the log-likelihood function and on the point-convergence and convergence rate of the recursive maximum likelihood estimator. Using the principle of analytical continuation, the analyticity of the asymptotic log-likelihood function is shown for analytically parameterized hidden Markov models. Relying on this fact and some results from differential geometry (Lojasiewicz inequality), the almost sure point-convergence of the recursive maximum likelihood algorithm is demonstrated, and relatively tight bounds on the convergence rate are derived. As opposed to the existing result on the asymptotic behavior of maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models, the results of this paper are obtained without assuming that the log-likelihood function has an isolated maximum at which the Hessian is strictly negative definite.

  18. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contours for one of the PVC frames studied by Gustavsen etframe with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC ) thermal breakand a PVC frame] were examined with air leakage rates of

  19. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Spike Generator Limits Efficiency of Information Transfer in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    .Theganglioncellconvertsgradedpotentialsintoaspiketrainwithaselectivefilterbutintheprocessaddsnoise.Toexplorehow efficientlyinformationistransferredtospikes,wemeasuredcontrastdetectionthresholdandincrementthresholdfromgradedpotential and spike responses

  20. Liquidus temperature limited waste loading maximization for vitrified HLW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, P.; Vienna, J.D.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquidus temperature often limits the loading of vitrified high-level waste in the glass. For spinel primary crystallization phase, the maximum achievable waste loading is determined analytically using first-order models, and then calculated for a Hanford nominal blend waste. The results show that the glass volume can be reduced if the glass melting temperature is not constrained and no restrictions are imposed on minimum B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and U{sub 2}O concentrations in the glass.

  1. Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt From: eschaput esandc@prodigy.net Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 10:31 PM To: GC-62 Subject: Attn: Technology Transfer Questions We have...

  2. Data Communication Principles Reliable Data Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer Data Communication Basics Mahalingam Ramkumar Mississippi State University, MS September 8, 2014 Ramkumar CSE 4153 / 6153 #12;Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer 1 Data Communication Principles Data Rate of a Communication

  3. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, P. T.

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate ...

  4. Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurs, André

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

  5. Engineering nanocarbon interfaces for electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilmer, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-transfer reactions at nanometer-scale interfaces, such as those presented by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), are important for emerging optoelectronic and photovoltaic technologies. Electron transfer also ...

  6. Heat Transfer Analysis for a Fixed CST Column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.Y.

    2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, a transient two-dimensional heat transfer model that includes the conduction process neglecting the convection cooling mechanism inside the crystalline silicotitanate (CST) column has been constructed and heat transfer calculations made for the present design configurations. For this situation, a no process flow condition through the column was assumed as one of the reference conditions for the simulation of a loss-of-flow accident. A series of the modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. Results for the baseline model indicate that transit times to reach 130 degrees Celsius maximum temperature of the CST-salt solution column are about 96 hours when the 20-in CST column with 300 Ci/liter heat generation source and 25 degrees Celsius initial column temperature is cooled by natural convection of external air as a primary heat transfer mechanism. The modeling results for the 28-in column equipped with water jacket systems on the external wall surface of the column and water coolant pipe at the center of the CST column demonstrate that the column loaded with 300 Ci/liter heat source can be maintained non-boiling indefinitely. Sensitivity calculations for several alternate column sizes, heat loads of the packed column, engineered cooling systems, and various ambient conditions at the exterior wall of the column have been performed under the reference conditions of the CST-salt solution to assess the impact of those parameters on the peak temperatures of the packed column for a given transient time. The results indicate that a water-coolant pipe at the center of the CST column filled with salt solution is the most effective one among the potential design parameters related to the thermal energy dissipation of decay heat load. It is noted that the cooling mechanism at the wall boundary of the column has significant impact on maximum and wall temperatures of the column. In addition, the results computed by the present model were verified by the theoretical results. The analysis results will provide quantitative information associated with the process heat control and management of the CST base design. For example, transient responses of the CST system under a loss-of-flow accident condition will provide safety design information for an emergency cooling system of the column.

  7. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  8. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  9. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. D. Apel; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; L. Bähren; K. Bekk; M. Bertaina; P. L. Biermann; J. Blümer; H. Bozdog; I. M. Brancus; E. Cantoni; A. Chiavassa; K. Daumiller; V. de Souza; F. Di Pierro; P. Doll; R. Engel; H. Falcke; B. Fuchs; D. Fuhrmann; H. Gemmeke; C. Grupen; A. Haungs; D. Heck; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; D. Huber; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; K. -H. Kampert; D. Kang; O. Krömer; J. Kuijpers; K. Link; P. ?uczak; M. Ludwig; H. J. Mathes; M. Melissas; C. Morello; J. Oehlschläger; N. Palmieri; T. Pierog; J. Rautenberg; H. Rebel; M. Roth; C. Rühle; A. Saftoiu; H. Schieler; A. Schmidt; F. G. Schröder; O. Sima; G. Toma; G. C. Trinchero; A. Weindl; J. Wochele; J. Zabierowski; J. A. Zensus

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  10. An Optimal Wake-Up Scheduling Algorithm for Minimizing Energy Consumption while Limiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Reuven

    are not within each other's transmission range. However, in large mesh networks, global synchronization1 An Optimal Wake-Up Scheduling Algorithm for Minimizing Energy Consumption while Limiting Maximum Delay in a Mesh Sensor Network Reuven Cohen and Boris Kapchits Department of Computer Science Technion

  11. Contrast limitations of dual electrochromic systems J. Padilla *, T.F. Otero *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otero, Toribio Fernández

    Contrast limitations of dual electrochromic systems J. Padilla *, T.F. Otero * Center characterize any combination of a dual electrochromic system as a function of the redox charge of its reserved. Keywords: Conducting polymer; Electrochromism; Maximum contrast; Dual system; PEDOT; ProDOT 1

  12. Computing flux upper-limits for non-detections F. Masci, 10/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    to "real" detections (e.g., in a spectrum), the quoted upper limits often lack probabilistic power. One in the first place, i.e., has flux measurement > some threshold set according to some maximum tolerable interval) that probably contains the true flux can then be assigned using the uncertainties. If a source

  13. TO APPEAR IN IEEE TRANSACTION ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Effect of Reactive Power Limit Modeling on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    TO APPEAR IN IEEE TRANSACTION ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Effect of Reactive Power Limit Modeling on Maximum System Loading and Active and Reactive Power Markets Behnam Tamimi, Student Member, IEEE, Claudio A. Ca- active power in electric power systems. Although there are other important reactive power sources

  14. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  15. Academic Knowledge Transfer in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, Mark David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3 Digital Library Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43.1.1 Digital Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . .A Prototype Personal Digital Library Knowledge Transfer

  16. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER FROM A BUOYANT GAS PLUME TO A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Temperature E. Heat Transfer Model 1. Determining the Ceiling Heat Transfer 2. Ceiling Heat Transfer

  17. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

  18. Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

  19. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  20. Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Stephen U. S. (Lisle, IL); Eastman, Jeffrey A. (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

  1. Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students 8/11/14 EE Program #12;Transfer with the roadmap · NEXT STEP: ­ Share this with all other transfer students and make 1 (LACKING ES220) SEE THE ROADMAP: h`p://www.sonoma.edu/engineering/bsee/bsee_roadmap

  2. Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford www.isis-innovation.com #12;Isis Innovation Ltd Oxford Technology Transfer IP, Patents, Licences, Spin-outs, Material Sales, Seed Funds, Isis Angels Network Oxford Expertise Consulting, Services Isis Consulting Business Technology Transfer and Innovation

  3. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2007 ­ 2009 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  4. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2009 ­ 2011 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  5. Geometrical effects on energy transfer in disordered open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mohseni; A. Shabani; S. Lloyd; Y. Omar; H. Rabitz

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore various design principles for efficient excitation energy transport in complex quantum systems. We investigate energy transfer efficiency in randomly disordered geometries consisting of up to 20 chromophores to explore spatial and spectral properties of small natural/artificial Light-Harvesting Complexes (LHC). We find significant statistical correlations among highly efficient random structures with respect to ground state properties, excitonic energy gaps, multichromophoric spatial connectivity, and path strengths. These correlations can even exist beyond the optimal regime of environment-assisted quantum transport. For random configurations embedded in spatial dimensions of 30 A and 50 A, we observe that the transport efficiency saturates to its maximum value if the systems contain 7 and 14 chromophores respectively. Remarkably, these optimum values coincide with the number of chlorophylls in (Fenna-Matthews-Olson) FMO protein complex and LHC II monomers, respectively, suggesting a potential natural optimization with respect to chromophoric density.

  6. Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    AU TH O R PR O O F Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies in Rotating Research Facilities CENGIZ CAMCI Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department The present paper deals with the experimental aero-heat transfer studies performed in rotating turbine

  7. Page 1 of 14 UNSW Foundation Limited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , Coca-Cola Amatil Limited and Ingeus Limited. David is Chairman of the National E-Health Transition

  8. Limits to the power density of very large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

  9. Single nanowire solar cells beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krogstrup, Peter; Heiss, Martin; Demichel, Olivier; Holm, Jeppe V; Aagesen, Martin; Nygard, Jesper; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light management is of great importance to photovoltaic cells, as it determines the fraction of incident light entering the device. An optimal pn-junction combined with an optimal light absorption can lead to a solar cell efficiency above the Shockley-Queisser limit. Here, we show how this is possible by studying photocurrent generation for a single core-shell p-i-n junction GaAs nanowire solar cell grown on a silicon substrate. At one sun illumination a short circuit current of 180 mA/cm^2 is obtained, which is more than one order of magnitude higher than what would be predicted from Lambert-Beer law. The enhanced light absorption is shown to be due to a light concentrating property of the standing nanowire as shown by photocurrent maps of the device. The results imply new limits for the maximum efficiency obtainable with III-V based nanowire solar cells under one sun illumination.

  10. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  11. Source Recertification, Refurbishment, and Transfer Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Duckworth, Leesa L.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Doll, Stephanie R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 Gap Analysis of Department of Energy Radiological Sealed Sources, Standards, and Materials for Safeguards Technology Development [1] report, and the subsequent Reconciliation of Source Needs and Surpluses across the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Complex [2] report, resulted in the identification of 33 requests for nuclear or radiological sealed sources for which there was potentially available, suitable material from within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to fill the source need. Available, suitable material was defined by DOE laboratories as material slated for excess, or that required recertification or refurbishment before being used for safeguards technology development. This report begins by outlining the logistical considerations required for the shipment of nuclear and radiological materials between DOE laboratories. Then, because of the limited need for transfer of matching sources, the report also offers considerations for an alternative approach – the shipment of safeguards equipment between DOE laboratories or technology testing centers. Finally, this report addresses repackaging needs for the two source requests for which there was available, suitable material within the DOE complex.

  12. Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Bing Wu; Constantin Brif; Matthew R. James; Herschel Rabitz

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum optimal control theory, kinematic bounds are the minimum and maximum values of the control objective achievable for any physically realizable system dynamics. For a given initial state of the system, these bounds depend on the nature and state of the controller. We consider a general situation where the controlled quantum system is coupled to both an external classical field (referred to as a classical controller) and an auxiliary quantum system (referred to as a quantum controller). In this general situation, the kinematic bound is between the classical kinematic bound (CKB), corresponding to the case when only the classical controller is available, and the quantum kinematic bound (QKB), corresponding to the ultimate physical limit of the objective's value. Specifically, when the control objective is the expectation value of a quantum observable (a Hermitian operator on the system's Hilbert space), the QKBs are the minimum and maximum eigenvalues of this operator. We present, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the necessary and sufficient conditions for surpassing the CKB and reaching the QKB, through the use of a quantum controller. The general conditions are illustrated by examples in which the system and controller are initially in thermal states. The obtained results provide a basis for the design of quantum controllers capable of maximizing the control yield and reaching the ultimate physical limit.

  13. Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dail, Holly Janine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

  14. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  15. Investigating the angle or response and maximum stability of a cohesive granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Sara Alice, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the static and dynamic properties of a granular heap made cohesive by an interstitial fluid. I present the results of experimental work measuring the maximum angle of stability and the angle ...

  16. Dynamical Reconstruction of Upper-Ocean Conditions in the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Proxies indicate that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Atlantic Ocean was marked by increased meridional and zonal near sea surface temperature gradients relative to today. Using a least squares fit of a full general circulation ...

  17. Achieving Consistent Maximum Brake Torque with Varied Injection Timing in a DI Diesel Engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Timothy H

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , revealing the premixed and diffusion burn fractions as well as important engine and exhaust design criteria such as maximum in-cylinder pressure and exhaust composition. These results are significant in diesel engine design because cheaper, lighter engines...

  18. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency ...

  19. Submodule Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.

    This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use of submodule integrated maximum power point trackers (MPPT). We propose a system architecture that provides ...

  20. Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

  1. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency and reduces the solar cell...

  2. Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    1 Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges Mihaela problem in wireless sensor networks with adjustable sensing range. Communication and sensing consume Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) constitute the foundation of a broad range of applications related

  3. Parameterization of Maximum Wave Heights Forced by Hurricanes: Application to Corpus Christi, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Sym 1978-

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity based on the investigation of several hurricane parameters. Also presented is the development of parameterized maximum significant wave height models. These are determined by incorporating three forms of an equivalent fetch into (1) dimensionless...

  4. A more efficient formulation for computation of the maximum loading points in electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Electrical Engineering; Jean-Jumeau, R. [Electricite d`Haita, Port-au-Prince (Haiti)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a more efficient formulation for computation of the maximum loading points. A distinguishing feature of the new formulation is that it is of dimension (n + 1), instead of the existing formulation of dimension (2n + 1), for n-dimensional load flow equations. This feature makes computation of the maximum loading points very inexpensive in comparison with those required in the existing formulation. A theoretical basis for the new formulation is provided. The new problem formulation is derived by using a simple reparameterization scheme and exploiting the special properties of the power flow model. Moreover, the proposed test function is shown to be monotonic in the vicinity of a maximum loading point. Therefore, it allows one to monitor the approach to maximum loading points during the solution search process. Simulation results on a 234-bus system are presented.

  5. Acoustic Space Dimensionality Selection and Combination using the Maximum Entropy Principle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Haleem, Yasser H; Renals, Steve; Lawrence, Neil D

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose a discriminative approach to acoustic space dimensionality selection based on maximum entropy modelling. We form a set of constraints by composing the acoustic space with the space of phone classes, and use a continuous...

  6. An Analysis of Maximum Residential Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems in Hot and Humid Climates, Orlando, Florida, July 24-26, 2006 Methodology 1. Development of the Basecase Simulation Model 2. Analysis of Energy Saving Measures 3. Development of the Maximum Energy-Efficient House 4. Economic Analysis DOE-2 Input...AN ANALYSIS OF MAXIMUM RESIDENTIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Mini Malhotra Graduate Research Assistant Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Associate Director Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College...

  7. ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomerance, Carl

    ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND E. Rodney Say that an integer n is exceptional if the maximum Stirling number of the second kind S(n, k) occurs or equal to x is O(x3/5+ ), for any > 0. 1. Introduction Let S(n, k) be the Stirling number of the second

  8. A stochastic model for sediment yield using the Principle of Maximum Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, V. P.; Krstanovic, P. F.

    WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 23, NO. 5, PAGES 781-793, MAY 1987 A Stochastic Model for Sediment Yield Using the Principle of Maximum Entropy V. P. SINGH AND P. F. KRSTANOVIC Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton... Rouge The principle of maximum entropy was applied to derive a stochastic model for sediment yield from upland watersheds. By maximizing the conditional entropy subject to certain constraints, a probability distribution of sediment yield conditioned...

  9. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  10. Scattering resonances as viscosity limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Zworski

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the method of complex scaling we show that scattering resonances of $ - \\Delta + V $, $ V \\in L^\\infty_{\\rm{c}} ( \\mathbb R^n ) $, are limits of eigenvalues of $ - \\Delta + V - i \\epsilon x^2 $ as $ \\epsilon \\to 0+ $. That justifies a method proposed in computational chemistry and reflects a general principle for resonances in other settings.

  11. Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

  12. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer SimulationsConcentrating SolarAboutTransfers

  13. Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  14. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers Historical

  15. Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers

  16. Calculation of the effects of pumping, divertor configuration and fueling on density limit in a tokamak model problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several series of model problem calculations have been performed to investigate the predicted effect of pumping, divertor configuration and fueling on the maximum achievable density in diverted tokamaks. Density limitations due to thermal instabilities (confinement degradation and multifaceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge) and to divertor choking are considered. For gas fueling the maximum achievable density is relatively insensitive to pumping (on or off), to the divertor configuration (open or closed), or to the location of the gas injection, although the gas fueling rate required to achieve this maximum achievable density is quite sensitive to these choices. Thermal instabilities are predicted to limit the density at lower values than divertor choking. Higher-density limits are predicted for pellet injection than for gas fueling.

  17. A Green's function formalism of energy and momentum transfer in fluctuational electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind Narayanaswamy; Yi Zheng

    2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative energy and momentum transfer due to fluctuations of electromagnetic fields arising due to temperature difference between objects is described in terms of the cross-spectral densities of the electromagnetic fields. We derive relations between thermal non-equilibrium contributions to energy and momentum transfer and surface integrals of tangential components of the dyadic Green's functions of the vector Helmholtz equation. The expressions derived here are applicable to objects of arbitrary shapes, dielectric functions, as well as magnetic permeabilities. For the case of radiative transfer, we derive expressions for the generalized transmissivity and generalized conductance that are shown to obey reciprocity and agree with theory of black body radiative transfer in the appropriate limit.

  18. OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.F. SAROFIM; BROWN UNIVERSITY. R.A. LISAUSKAS; D.B. RILEY, INC.; E.G. EDDINGS; J. BROUWER; J.P. KLEWICKI; K.A. DAVIS; M.J. BOCKELIE; M.P. HEAP; REACTION ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL. D.W. PERSHING; UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. R.H. HURT

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers, ?in-furnace NO x control,? which includes: staged low-NO x burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of ?in-furnace? NO x control processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum ?in-furnace? NO x control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NO x burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NO x burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NO x burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NO x control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NO x burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI?s coal combustion code to take account of recently obtained fundamental data on char reactivity during the late stages of burnout. This will improve our ability to predict carbon burnout with low-NO x firing systems.

  19. Axion Stars in the Infrared Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua Eby; Peter Suranyi; Cenalo Vaz; L. C. R. Wijewardhana

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Following Ruffini and Bonazzola, we use a quantized boson field to describe condensates of axions forming compact objects. Without substantial modifications, the method can only be applied to axions with decay constant, $f_a$, satisfying $\\delta=(f_a\\,/\\,M_P)^2\\ll 1$, where $M_P$ is the Planck mass. Similarly, the applicability of the Ruffini-Bonazzola method to axion stars also requires that the relative binding energy of axions satisfies $\\Delta=\\sqrt{1-(E_a\\,/\\,m_a)^2}\\ll1$, where $E_a$ and $m_a$ are the energy and mass of the axion. The simultaneous expansion of the equations of motion in $\\delta$ and $\\Delta$ leads to a simplified set of equations, depending only on the parameter, $\\lambda=\\sqrt{\\delta}\\,/\\,\\Delta$ in leading order of the expansions. Keeping leading order in $\\Delta$ is equivalent to the infrared limit, in which only relevant and marginal terms contribute to the equations of motion. The number of axions in the star is uniquely determined by $\\lambda$. Numerical solutions are found in a wide range of $\\lambda$. At small $\\lambda$ the mass and radius of the axion star rise linearly with $\\lambda$. While at larger $\\lambda$ the radius of the star continues to rise, the mass of the star, $M$, attains a maximum at $\\lambda_{\\rm max}\\simeq 0.58$. All stars are unstable for $\\lambda>\\lambda_{\\rm max}$ . We discuss the relationship of our results to current observational constraints on dark matter and the phenomenology of Fast Radio Bursts.

  20. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  1. Technical Challenges of Computing Available Transfer Capability (ATC) in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Challenges of Computing Available Transfer Capability (ATC) in Electric Power Systems-Champaign Urbana, IL sauer@ece.uiuc.edu Abstract A key concept in the restructuring of the electric power industry limitation (either MW, MVA, or SIL). As such, ATC for a given transmission line at a given time could

  2. Adopted by Accounting Services, University Budgets, Office of Development Designated Fund 23 and 24 Transfer Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    . For designated dollars in fund 23 or gifts in fund 24 received by the University for a specific purpose or giftsAdopted by Accounting Services, University Budgets, Office of Development 11/29/2010 Designated Fund 23 and 24 Transfer Policy: Funds with no Limitations, Stipulations, or Donor Restrictions

  3. Modeling the free energy surfaces of electron transfer in condensed phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    PROOF COPY 509037JCP Modeling the free energy surfaces of electron transfer in condensed phases analytical solution for the ET free energy surfaces demonstrates the following features: i the range of ET reaction coordinates is limited by a one-sided fluctuation band, ii the ET free energies are infinite

  4. Molecular dynamics of excited state intramolecular proton transfer: 3-hydroxyflavone in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, Michael A.; Coker, David F. [Department of Chemistry, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrafast enol-keto photoisomerization in the lowest singlet excited state of 3-hydroxyflavone is investigated using classical molecular dynamics in conjunction with empirical valence bond (EVB) potentials for the description of intramolecular interactions, and a molecular mechanics and variable partial charge model, dependent on transferring proton position, for the description of solute-solvent interactions. A parallel multi-level genetic program was used to accurately fit the EVB potential energy surfaces to high level ab initio data. We have studied the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in three different solvent environments: methylcyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol. The effects of the environment on the proton transfer time and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the varied time scales of the ESIPT reaction rates are analyzed. We find that simulations with our EVB potential energy surfaces accurately reproduce experimentally determined reaction rates, fluorescence spectra, and vibrational frequency spectra in all three solvents. Furthermore, we find that the ultrafast ESIPT process results from a combination of ballistic transfer, and intramolecular vibrational redistribution, which leads to the excitation of a set of low frequency promoting vibrational modes. From this set of promoting modes, we find that an O-O in plane bend and a C-H out of plane bend are present in all three solvents, indicating that they are fundamental to the ultrafast proton transfer. Analysis of the slow proton transfer trajectories reveals a solvent mediated proton transfer mechanism, which is diffusion limited.

  5. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  6. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  7. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  8. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tardy, D.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermolecular energy transfer of highly excited polyatomic molecules plays an important role in many complex chemical systems: combustion, high temperature and atmospheric chemistry. By monitoring the relaxation of internal energy we have observed trends in the collisional efficiency ({beta}) for energy transfer as a function of the substrate's excitation energy and the complexities of substrate and deactivator. For a given substrate {beta} increases as the deactivator's mass increase to {approximately}30 amu and then exhibits a nearly constant value; this is due to a mass mismatch between the atoms of the colliders. In a homologous series of substrate molecules (C{sub 3}{minus}C{sub 8}) {beta} decreases as the number of atoms in the substrate increases; replacing F with H increases {beta}. All substrates, except for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CF{sub 2}HCl below 10,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, exhibited that {beta} is independent of energy, i.e. <{Delta}E>{sub all} is linear with energy. The results are interpreted with a simple model which considers that {beta} is a function of the ocillators energy and its vibrational frequency. Limitations of current approximations used in high temperature unimolecular reactions were evaluated and better approximations were developed. The importance of energy transfer in product yields was observed for the photoactivation of perfluorocyclopropene and the photoproduction of difluoroethyne. 3 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. A literature Review on Radioactivity Transfer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as possible. Suggestions for further research have also been given. INIS descriptors; CESIUM 137; DEPOSITION be exposed by ingestion of contaminated terrestial foodstuffs. Even though the intermediate transfer

  10. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for "Outstanding Commercialization Success" from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer. On October 4, 2012, the NETL team who developed this alloy received...

  11. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal increase in...

  12. Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

    1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

  13. HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

  14. On the maximum value of the cosmic abundance of oxygen and the oxygen yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

    2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the maximum oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies. Because this maximum value is expected to occur in the centers of the most luminous galaxies, we have constructed the luminosity - central metallicity diagram for spiral galaxies, based on a large compilation of existing data on oxygen abundances of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We found that this diagram shows a plateau at high luminosities (-22.3 oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.87. This provides strong evidence that the oxygen abundance in the centers of the most luminous metal-rich galaxies reaches the maximum attainable value of oxygen abundance. Since some fraction of the oxygen (about 0.08 dex) is expected to be locked into dust grains, the maximum value of the true gas+dust oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.95. This value is a factor of ~ 2 higher than the recently estimated solar value. Based on the derived maximum oxygen abundance in galaxies, we found the oxygen yield to be about 0.0035, depending on the fraction of oxygen incorporated into dust grains.

  15. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  16. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  17. The transfer from nuclear development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s task of cleaning up the extensive nuclear weapons complex is of such enormous proportions that there can be no definitive solution that can be adjusted to a predictable cost. The cleanup and disposition of hazardous wastes in many cases will take thirty or more years. In the near term, the economic impact affecting the communities and large number of displaced workers is a significant concern to the Department and the nation. However, before a useful transfer of DOE land, facilities, and sites to the public for economic development can be realized, a consistent and comprehensive process of compliance with regulatory requirements needs to be established. The simultaneous pursuit of these goals creates an unprecedented challenge to the Department of Energy and the US.

  18. A comparative study on a non-linear turbulent heat transfer model for separating and reattaching flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, S.; Chung, B.T.F. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a previously proposed non-linear turbulence model, a turbulent heat transfer model is formulated in the present study using the concept of Generalized Gradient Diffusion (GGD) hypothesis. Under this hypothesis, an anisotropic thermal diffusivity can be obtained through the proposed non-linear turbulent model which is applied to the turbulent flow and heat transfer in a sudden expansion pipe with a constant heat flux through the pipe wall. The numerical results are compared with the available experimental data for both turbulent and thermal quantities, with an emphasis on the non-linear heat transfer predictions. The improved results are obtained for the bulk temperature distribution showing that the present non-linear heat transfer model is capable of predicting the anisotropic turbulent heat transfer for the pipe expansion flow. Some limits of the proposed model are also identified and discussed.

  19. MassMass transfer andtransfer and MassMass transfer andtransfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Heat conductivity T'1 Heat flux h" (W/m2), local and overall heat transfer coeffients h1 Heat transfer coefficientcoefficient /1/1 Mass flow species A:interface a p A = A mol/s M f1 (L) 2 (G) Mass transfer rate per area: A = A/a = "A mol/(m2·s) 1 (L) 2 (G) xi C1.i M t f ffi i t k x C y 1.i AA !!! Mass transfer coefficients

  20. Gradient limits and SCRF performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Pellin, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting rf gradients are limited by a number of mechanisms, among them are field emission, multipactor, Lorentz detuning, global and local heating, quench fields, Q-Slope, assembly defects, and overall power use. We describe how each of these mechanisms interacts with the cavity fields and show how significant improvements may be possible assuming improvements in control over the cavity surface. New techniques such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), the use of layered composites, Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) smoothing and Dry Ice Cleaning (DIC) have been proposed as ways to control the surface.

  1. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonna Friend Donna FriendLimits

  2. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th DayANVAblamp Limited Jump

  3. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwest Rural PubNova AlincaNovacem Limited

  4. Bioethanol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass FacilityBioethanol Limited

  5. Lysanda Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme, NewLyonLysanda Limited

  6. Spectral Modeling of SNe Ia Near Maximum Light: Probing the Characteristics of Hydro Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Baron; S. Bongard; David Branch; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed detailed NLTE spectral synthesis modeling of 2 types of 1-D hydro models: the very highly parameterized deflagration model W7, and two delayed detonation models. We find that overall both models do about equally well at fitting well observed SNe Ia near to maximum light. However, the Si II 6150 feature of W7 is systematically too fast, whereas for the delayed detonation models it is also somewhat too fast, but significantly better than that of W7. We find that a parameterized mixed model does the best job of reproducing the Si II 6150 line near maximum light and we study the differences in the models that lead to better fits to normal SNe Ia. We discuss what is required of a hydro model to fit the spectra of observed SNe Ia near maximum light.

  7. Fast singular value decomposition combined maximum entropy method for plasma tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghee; Choe, W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701(Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy method (MEM) is a widely used reconstruction algorithm in plasma physics. Drawbacks of the conventional MEM are its heavy time-consuming process and possible generation of noisy reconstruction results. In this article, a modified maximum entropy algorithm is described which speeds up the calculation and shows better noise handling capability. Similar to the rapid minimum Fisher information method, the modified maximum entropy algorithm uses simple matrix operations instead of treating a fully nonlinear problem. The preprocess for rapid tomographic calculation is based on the vector operations and the singular value decomposition (SVD). The initial guess of the sought-for emissivity is calculated by SVD and this helped reconstruction about ten times faster than the conventional MEM. Therefore, the developed fast MEM can be used for intershot tomographic analyses of fusion plasmas.

  8. Transfer operators and topological field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Ovchinnikov

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer operator (TO) formalism of the dynamical systems (DS) theory is reformulated here in terms of the recently proposed cohomological theory (ChT) of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It turns out that the stochastically generalized TO (GTO) of the DS theory is the finite-time ChT Fokker-Planck evolution operator. As a result comes the supersymmetric trivialization of the so-called sharp trace and sharp determinant of the GTO, with the former being the Witten index of the ChT. Moreover, the Witten index is also the stochastic generalization of the Lefschetz index so that it equals the Euler characteristic of the (closed) phase space for any flow vector field, noise metric, and temperature. The enabled possibility to apply the spectral theorems of the DS theory to the ChT Fokker-Planck operators allows to extend the previous picture of the spontaneous topological supersymmetry (Q-symmetry) breaking onto the situations with negative ground state's attenuation rate. The later signifies the exponential growth of the number of periodic solutions/orbits in the large time limit, which is the unique feature of chaotic behavior proving that the spontaneous breakdown of Q-symmetry is indeed the field-theoretic definition and stochastic generalization of the concept of deterministic chaos. In addition, the previously proposed low-temperature classification of SDE's, i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium / noise-induced chaos ((anti-)instanton condensation) / ordinary chaos (non-integrability), is complemented by the discussion of the high-temperature regime where the sharp boundary between the noise-induced and ordinary chaotic phases must smear out into a crossover, and at even higher temperatures the Q-symmetry is restored. An unambiguous resolution of the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma in favor of the Stratonovich approach and/or Weyl quantization is also presented.

  9. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

  10. Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award expenditure 2012/13 by value On 1 October 2013 we were funding 125 active awards through our Technology

  11. Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor of transpiration). The boundary layer conductance to heat transfer is small enough that leaf temperature can become diffusion, the boundary layer around a leaf also provides resistance to the transfer of heat between a leaf

  12. Transfer Guide: Forest Management -1 -Revised: 10 August 2012 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Guide: Forest Management - 1 - Revised: 10 August 2012 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING management concentration This planning worksheet represents a guide for community college students-Hrs Grade MAT 125 Survey of Calculus 4 #12;Transfer Guide: Forest Management - 2 - Revised: 10 August 2012

  13. What is the maximum rate at which entropy of a string can increase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ropotenko, Kostyantyn [State Administration of Communications, Ministry of Transport and Communications of Ukraine 22, Khreschatyk, 01001, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to Susskind, a string falling toward a black hole spreads exponentially over the stretched horizon due to repulsive interactions of the string bits. In this paper such a string is modeled as a self-avoiding walk and the string entropy is found. It is shown that the rate at which information/entropy contained in the string spreads is the maximum rate allowed by quantum theory. The maximum rate at which the black hole entropy can increase when a string falls into a black hole is also discussed.

  14. Hydrodynamic Relaxation of an Electron Plasma to a Near-Maximum Entropy State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D. J.; Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Mitchell, T. B.; Aziz, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Montgomery, D. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in a Malmberg-Penning trap is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly dissipative two-dimensional (2D) turbulence. Simulations confirm that the dynamics are approximated well by a 2D hydrodynamic model. Statistical analysis favors a theoretical picture of relaxation to a near-maximum entropy state with constrained energy, circulation, and angular momentum. This provides evidence that 2D electron fluid relaxation in a turbulent regime is governed by principles of maximum entropy.

  15. Maximum-Entropy Closures for Kinetic Theories of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangan, Aaditya V.; Cai, David [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze (1+1)D kinetic equations for neuronal network dynamics, which are derived via an intuitive closure from a Boltzmann-like equation governing the evolution of a one-particle (i.e., one-neuron) probability density function. We demonstrate that this intuitive closure is a generalization of moment closures based on the maximum-entropy principle. By invoking maximum-entropy closures, we show how to systematically extend this kinetic theory to obtain higher-order (1+1)D kinetic equations and to include coupled networks of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

  16. Maximum Entropy Models of Shortest Path and Outbreak Distributions in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hadiji, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of networks are often characterized in terms of features such as node degree distributions, average path lengths, diameters, or clustering coefficients. Here, we study shortest path length distributions. On the one hand, average as well as maximum distances can be determined therefrom; on the other hand, they are closely related to the dynamics of network spreading processes. Because of the combinatorial nature of networks, we apply maximum entropy arguments to derive a general, physically plausible model. In particular, we establish the generalized Gamma distribution as a continuous characterization of shortest path length histograms of networks or arbitrary topology. Experimental evaluations corroborate our theoretical results.

  17. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Daddy, E-mail: d.setyawan@bapeten.go.id [Center for Assessment of Regulatory System and Technology for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia); Rohman, Budi [Licensing Directorate for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  18. Bioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    fluid and molecular transport Cornell Datta Ugrad heat and mass fundamentals Datta fluid mechBioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for ASME K-17 Committee Ken Diller University of Texas #12;Outline of Presentation · Summary of submitted bioheat and mass transfer syllabi from K-17

  19. MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahey, Richard T.

    MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL AND CHAOS THEORY" RICHARD T. LAHEY, JR. Center for Multiphase Research Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

  20. BRYANT UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT TRANSFER FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    BRYANT UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT TRANSFER FORM Bryant University requires this form at __________________________________to provide the information requested below in order to complete my transfer to Bryant University for International Admission Bryant University Office of Admission 1150 Douglas Pike Smithfield, RI 02917 (401) 232

  1. "Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    become an increasingly popular technology for waste heat recovery in the last few years. The efficiency"Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems." Patrick Hopkins Assistant Professor Young Investigator Award for heat transfer across solid/fluid interfaces · 2013 AFOSR Young Investigator

  2. Ventura College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Ventura College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet If you are taking classes that are part of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at Ventura College (VC), you) #12;Ventura College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority of majors at PSU

  3. WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech.genet@grenoble-em.com Website: www.nanoeconomics.eu Abstract. Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing

  4. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN), Blocksome; Michael A. (Rochester, MN), Parker; Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  5. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  6. Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.C.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

  7. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

  8. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  9. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  10. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  11. Limits to the lunar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, T.H. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C. (USA)); Shemansky, D.E. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of sodium and potassium on the Moon implies that other more abundant species should be present. Volatile molecules like H{sub 2}O are significantly more abundant than sodium in any of the proposed external atmospheric sources. Source mechanisms which derive atoms from the surface should favor abundant elements in the regolith. It is therefore puzzling that the Apollo ultraviolet spectrometer experiment set limits on the density of oxygen of N{sub O} < 5 {times} 10{sup 2} cm{sup {minus}3}, and that the Apollo Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment data imply N{sub O} < 50 cm{sup {minus}3} above the subsolar point. These limits are surprisingly small relative to the measured value for sodium. A simple consideration of sources and sinks predicts significantly greater densities of oxygen. It is possible but doubtful that the Apollo measurements occur ed during an epoch in which source rates were small. A preferential loss process for oxygen on the darkside of the Moon is considered in which ionization by electron capture in surface collisions leads to escape through acceleration in the local electric field. Cold trapping in permanently shadowed regions as a net sink is considered and discounted, but the episodic nature of cometary insertion may allow formation of ice layers which act as a stablized source of OH. On the basis of an assumed meteoroid impact source, the authors predict a possible emission brightness of {approximately} 50 R in the OH(A {minus} X)(0,0) band above the lunar bright limb. A very uncertain small comet source of H{sub 2}O could raise this value by more than two orders of magnitude.

  12. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  13. Analysis and Optimization of Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    , Charles R. Sullivan, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper analyzes the effect of noise on sev- eral maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems. Noise is an essential of the signals, mitigating the noise. The effect of noise and other parameters on tracking performance

  14. Maximum Output Amplitude of Linear Systems for certain Input Constraints1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    of this input and calculates the maximum amplitude of the output. The solution of this problem is a necessary, Linear Sys- tems. 1 Introduction and Motivation Most practical control problems are dominated by hard bounds. Valves can only be operated between fully open and fully closed, pumps and compressors have

  15. Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Seungjin CHOI x1 and Andrzej CICHOCKI y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungjin

    Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation Seungjin CHOI x1, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi Saitama 351-0198, JAPAN Abstract Blind equalization of single input multiple output (SIMO) FIR channels can be refor- mulated as the problem of blind source separation

  16. Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

  17. Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating CHRISTOPHER M. HARTMAN AND JERRY Y. HARRINGTON Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania November 2004) ABSTRACT The effects of solar heating and infrared cooling on the vapor depositional growth

  18. Maximum principle and bang-bang property of time optimal controls for Schrodinger type systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Maximum principle and bang-bang property of time optimal controls for Schr¨odinger type systems J conditions for the bang- bang property of optimal controls. The results are then applied to some systems-Bang property, Schr¨odinger equation 1 Introduction Time optimal control is a classical problem for linear

  19. Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle filter implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle by a likelihood approach. In a first part the structural health monitoring problem is written in term of recursive al [6] in a more simple framework. Particle approximation for health monitoring was already proposed

  20. Maximum-Power-Point Tracking Method of Photovoltaic Power System Using Single Transducer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    Maximum-Power-Point Tracking Method of Photovoltaic Power System Using Single Transducer Toshihiko) method of a photovoltaic power system with less transducer count. A unique feature of this method concern on an environmental issue since 1990's. Above all, a photovoltaic power generation system is one

  1. Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song Intelligent Accepted 24 August 2009 Available online 22 September 2009 Keywords: Wind farm Wind turbine Layout design Optimization Evolutionary algorithms Operations research a b s t r a c t Wind is one of the most promising

  2. Electrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweck, John

    Xi, T¨ulay Adali, and John Zweck Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering UniversityElectrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation Wenze probability density functions in the presence of both all-order PMD and ASE noise are estimated electronically

  3. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Mixture Densities for Binned and Truncated Multivariate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Padhraic

    Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Mixture Densities for Binned and Truncated Multivariate Data in data analysis and machine learning. This paper addresses the problem of fitting mixture densities to multivariate binned and truncated data. The EM approach proposed by McLachlan and Jones (1988

  4. EXTENSION OF THE MAXIMUM POWER REGION OF DOUBLY-SALIENT VARIABLE RELUCTANCE MOTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Salient Variable Reluctance Motors (DSVRM) has been investigated and developed for variable-speed drives during, variable-frequency generators, wind wheels, machine tools, etc.). In these applications, it is generally necessary to operate in a regime of a high speed ux-weakening (zone of maximum constant power), for a better

  5. Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy, And Comparison with C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy of Chemistry, New York UniVersity, New York, New York 10003, Department of Chemistry, Brown UniVersity, ProVidence, Rhode Island 02912, and Department of Chemistry, Columbia UniVersity, New York, New York 10027 Received

  6. Vision Research 40 (2000) 11571165 Local luminance factors that determine the maximum disparity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vision Research 40 (2000) 1157­1165 Local luminance factors that determine the maximum disparity dense arrays of micropatterns, whose luminance characteristics were manipulated. In Experiment 1, we with luminance spatial frequency and with Gabor size, but was constant for a constant bandwidth (frequency times

  7. Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed innovations, Brisbane QLD 4001, Australia Abstract We are interested in the parametric class of Bilinear GARCH (BL-GARCH examine, in this paper, the BL-GARCH model in a general setting under some non-normal distributions. We

  8. Learning with MaximumEntropy Distributions \\Lambda Yishay Mansour Mariano Schain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansour, Yishay

    Learning with Maximum­Entropy Distributions \\Lambda Yishay Mansour Mariano Schain Computer Science Dept. Tel­Aviv University fmansour,marianog@math.tau.ac.il Abstract We are interested in distributions which are de­ rived as a maximumentropy distribution given a set of constraints. More specifically, we

  9. A Global Maximum Power Point Tracking Method for PV Module Integrated Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    with large arrays of series-connected PV mod- ules connected to a central inverter. Figure 1(a) depicts, it is conceivable that these systems do not extract the maximum possible power from the PV array when individual PV to partial shading. In such systems, power electronics circuits are integrated directly with PV modules

  10. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Maximum Allowable Gasket Seating Surface Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Degradation Overview Westinghouse applies a conservative approach when evaluating degradation on a gasket evaluation. The team was tasked with collecting this data to determine when degradation endangers the pressure seal. Objectives The team's objectives were to determine the maximum degradation which the gasket

  11. Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis...

  12. Bayesian Data and Channel Joint Maximum-Likelihood Based Error Correction in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    in wireless sensor networks (WSN). The proposed algo- rithm employs the temporal correlation of the narrowband Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), Likelihood, Sphere De- coder 1. INTRODUCTION Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNBayesian Data and Channel Joint Maximum-Likelihood Based Error Correction in Wireless Sensor

  13. Maximum-Lifetime Multi-Channel Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    Maximum-Lifetime Multi-Channel Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal and Asis Nasipuri and routing problem in multi-channel wireless sensor networks for maximizing the worst case network lifetime solution for the problem. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, multi-channel rout- ing, distributed

  14. The chronology of the Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial events in central Argentine Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The chronology of the Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial events in central Argentine Patagonia and deglaciation in the Lago Pueyrredo´n valley of central Patagonia, 47.5 S, Argentina. The valley was a major and the onset of deglaciation occurred broadly synchronously throughout Patagonia. Deglaciation resulted

  15. Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

  16. THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    to absorption of solar radiation in the climate system is found to be irrelevant to the maximized prop- erties from hot to cold places, thereby producing the kinetic energy of the fluid itself. His generalTHE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY

  17. Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems, including how noise affects both tracking speed-performance photovoltaic sys- tems. An intelligent controller adjusts the voltage, current, or impedance seen by a solar

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 86, 041144 (2012) Efficiency at maximum power for classical particle transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 86, 041144 (2012) Efficiency at maximum power for classical particle transport transport. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.041144 PACS number(s): 05.70.Ln, 05.40.-a, 05.20.-y I. INTRODUCTION Over, operating between a hot and cold bath at temperatures T (1) and T (2) , respectively, possesses universal

  19. Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture Stefano Accepted 26 September 2013 Available online 9 October 2013 Keywords: Optimization Photosynthesis Soil moisture Stomatal conductance Transpiration a b s t r a c t Optimization theories explain a variety

  20. A Distributed Approach to Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic Sub-Module Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    of the proposed distributed algorithm. I. INTRODUCTION IN photovoltaic (PV) energy systems, PV modules are often of the system, small size and low power ratings of the power electronics circuit components. Due1 A Distributed Approach to Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic Sub-Module Differential

  1. An Analysis of the Maximum Drawdown Risk Malik Magdon-Ismail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdon-Ismail, Malik

    Engineering Cairo University Giza, Egypt. amir@alumni.caltech.edu Introduction. The maximum cumulative loss to the Calmar ratio is the Sterling ratio, Sterling(T) = Return over [0,T ] MDD over [0,T ]-10% , and our discussion applies equally well to the Sterling ratio. 1 #12;primarily due to a lack of an analytical

  2. An Analysis of the Maximum Drawdown Risk Malik MagdonIsmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdon-Ismail, Malik

    Engineering Cairo University Giza, Egypt. amir@alumni.caltech.edu Introduction. The maximum cumulative loss is not prevalent 1 Similar to the Calmar ratio is the Sterling ratio, Sterling(T ) = Return over [0,T ] MDD over [0,T ]-10% , and our discussion applies equally well to the Sterling ratio. 1 #12; primarily due

  3. Extraction of Spectral Functions from Dyson-Schwinger Studies via the Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Nickel

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown how to apply the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to numerical Dyson-Schwinger studies for the extraction of spectral functions of correlators from their corresponding Euclidean propagators. Differences to the application in lattice QCD are emphasized and, as an example, the spectral functions of massless quarks in cold and dense matter are presented.

  4. Parameters estimation for spatio-temporal maximum entropy distributions: application to neural spike trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasser, Hassan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a numerical method to learn Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) distributions with spatio-temporal constraints from experimental spike trains. This is an extension of two papers [10] and [4] who proposed the estimation of parameters where only spatial constraints were taken into account. The extension we propose allows to properly handle memory effects in spike statistics, for large sized neural networks.

  5. Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out of equilibrium Gavin E. Crooks*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out of equilibrium Gavin E at equilibrium? Here, we argue the most appropriate additional parameter is the nonequilibrium entropy of ways that the same system can be out of equilibrium. That the equilibrium entropy is maximized given

  6. Extraction of spectral functions from Dyson-Schwinger studies via the maximum entropy method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickel, Dominik [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: dominik.nickel@physik.tu-darmstadt.de

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown how to apply the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to numerical Dyson-Schwinger studies for the extraction of spectral functions of correlators from their corresponding Euclidean propagators. Differences to the application in lattice QCD are emphasized and, as an example, the spectral functions of massless quarks in cold and dense matter are presented.

  7. Lattice Field Theory with the Sign Problem and the Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Although numerical simulation in lattice field theory is one of the most effective tools to study non-perturbative properties of field theories, it faces serious obstacles coming from the sign problem in some theories such as finite density QCD and lattice field theory with the $\\theta$ term. We reconsider this problem from the point of view of the maximum entropy method.

  8. Relating maximum airway dilation and subsequent reconstriction to reactivity in human lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Relating maximum airway dilation and subsequent reconstriction to reactivity in human lungs Lauren in human lungs. J Appl Physiol 96: 1808­1814, 2004. First published February 6, 2004; 10.1152/japplphysiol reactivity in healthy lungs by prohibiting DI for an extended period. The present study had two goals. First

  9. SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY: DETERMINATION OF THE PROBABLE MAXIMUM WATER TABLE ELEVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coverage depicting the configuration of the probable maximum water table elevation in the vicinity of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was developed to support the Saltstone program. This coverage is needed to support the construction of saltstone vaults to assure that they remain above the maximum elevation of the water table during the Performance Assessment (PA) period of compliance. A previous investigation to calculate the historical high water table beneath the SDF (Cook, 1983) was built upon to incorporate new data that has since become available to refine that estimate and develop a coverage that could be extended to the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. This investigation incorporated the method used in the Cook, 1983 report to develop an estimate of the probable maximum water table for a group of wells that either existed at one time at or near the SDF or which currently exist. Estimates of the probable maximum water table at these wells were used to construct 2D contour lines depicting this surface beneath the SDF and extend them to the nearby hydrologic boundaries at the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. Although certain measures were implemented to assure that the contour lines depict a surface above which the water table will not rise, the exact elevation of this surface cannot be known with complete certainty. It is therefore recommended that the construction of saltstone vaults incorporate a vertical buffer of at least 5-feet between the base of the vaults and the depicted probable maximum water table elevation. This should provide assurance that the water table under the wet extreme climatic condition will never rise to intercept the base of a vault.

  10. Fourier methods for estimating power system stability limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, R.J.; Galiana, F.D. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Mailhot, R.; Denomme, F.; McGillis, D.T. (Hydro Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows how the use of new generation tools such as a generalized shell for dynamic security analysis can help improve the understanding of fundamental power systems behavior. Using the ELISA prototype shell as a laboratory tool, it is shown that the signal energy of the network impulse response acts as a barometer to define the relative severity of a contingency with respect to some parameter, for instance power generation or power transfer. In addition, for a given contingency, as the parameter is varied and a network approaches instability, signal energy increases smoothly and predictably towards an asymptote which defines the network's stability limit: this, in turn, permits comparison of the severity of different contingencies. Using a Fourier transform approach, it is shown that this behavior can be explained in terms of the effect of increasing power on the damping component of a power system's dominant poles. A simple function is derived which estimates network stability limits with surprising accuracy from two or three simulations, provided that at least one of these is within 5% of the limit. These results hold notwithstanding the presence of many active, nonlinear voltage-support elements (i.e. generators, synchronous condensers, SVCs, static excitation systems, etc.) in the network.

  11. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  12. A STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY EVALUATION OF THE TANK FARM WASTE TRANSFER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.

    2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive supernate, salt, and/or sludge wastes (i.e., high level wastes) are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The waste is transported between tanks within and between the F and H area tank farms and other facilities on site via underground and a limited number of aboveground transfer lines. The Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) performed a comprehensive assessment of the structural integrity program for the Tank Farm waste transfer system at the SRS. This document addresses the following issues raised during the DOE assessment: (1) Inspections of failed or replaced transfer lines indicated that the wall thickness of some core and jacket piping is less than nominal; (2) No corrosion allowance is utilized in the transfer line structural qualification calculations. No basis for neglecting corrosion was provided in the calculations; (3) Wall loss due to erosion is not addressed in the transfer line structural qualification calculations; and (4) No basis is provided for neglecting intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the transfer line structural qualification calculations. The common theme in most of these issues is the need to assess the potential for occurrence of material degradation of the transfer line piping. The approach used to resolve these issues involved: (1) Review the design and specifications utilized to construct and fabricate the piping system; (2) Review degradation mechanisms for stainless steel and carbon steel and determine their relevance to the transfer line piping; (3) Review the transfer piping inspection data; (4) Life estimation calculations for the transfer lines; and (5) A Fitness-For-Service evaluation for one of the transfer line jackets. The evaluation concluded that the transfer line system piping has performed well for over fifty years. Although there have been instances of failures of the stainless steel core pipe during off-normal service, no significant degradation is anticipated during normal operations for the planned service life. General corrosion of stainless steel in high level waste environments was shown to be insignificant (i.e., little or no wall loss is expected for a time on the order of 180 years or more). Erosion is also not expected to limit the life of the pipes due to the low usage of the transfer lines and low fluid velocity during transfers. Quality controls on the material (e.g., corrosion evaluation testing) and procedures/specifications that limit contact with chloride bearing materials or liquids minimize the potential for the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of the core pipe. General corrosion of the carbon steel jacket is not expected to be significant for a reasonable intended service life (e.g., on the order of 170 years). However, the carbon steel jackets are expected to continue to fail in local areas due to pitting corrosion. Life prediction estimates project that a significant increase in the number of jacket failures (i.e., through-wall penetrations) may occur after an additional 30 to 60 years of service life (i.e., between 2035 and 2065). A Fitness-For-Service evaluation was performed for a recently inspected jacket that showed evidence of pitting within a locally thinned area. The evaluation concluded that the line is still able to perform its intended function and can remain in service.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  14. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  15. Proton Gradient Regulation 5-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow under ATP-or Redox-Limited Conditions: A Study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proton Gradient Regulation 5-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow under ATP- or Redox-Limited Conditions.K.N.) The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii proton gradient regulation5 (Crpgr5) mutant shows phenotypic and functional traits discriminate two pathways for CEF and determine their maximum electron flow rates. The PGR5/proton gradient

  16. Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University & Lake Michigan students who have transferred to Michigan State University (MSU) in completing an associate's degree at Lake Michigan College (LMC). This initiative is an extension of the transfer agreements already

  17. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste Disposal, C'.heat transfer processes associated with underground nuclear wasteheat transfer and related processes in an un­ derground environment similar to that expected in a mined nuclear waste

  18. Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is little radiative heat transfer and little impact on thereturn air extrac- tion and heat transfer to the plenum. ItUFAD is often used and heat transfer out of the room through

  19. Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

  20. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  1. Photon and graviton mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

  2. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  3. HEAT TRANSFER DURING THE SHOCK-INDUCED IGNITION OF AN EXPOLSIVE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heperkan, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings of the 1963 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanicsto the Journal of Heat Transfer HEAT TRANSFER DURING THETechniques for Heat Transfer and Force Measurements in a

  4. Enhanced optical limiting effects of graphene materials in polyimide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yao; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing, E-mail: hbzhan@fzu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different graphene nanostructure suspensions of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) are prepared and characterized. Using a typical two-step method, the GONSs, GONRs, and GOQDs are incorporated into a polyimide (PI) matrix to synthesize graphene/PI composite films, whose nonlinear optical (NLO) and optical limiting (OL) properties are investigated at 532?nm in the nanosecond regime. The GONR suspension exhibits superior NLO and OL effects compared with those of GONSs and GOQDs because of its stronger nonlinear scattering and excited-state absorption. The graphene/PI composite films exhibit NLO and OL performance superior to that of their corresponding suspensions, which is attributed primarily to a combination of nonlinear mechanisms, charge transfer between graphene materials and PI, and the matrix effect.

  5. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case...

  6. NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

  7. Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Develop and maintain a...

  8. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution: Calculation of the pH Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution:...

  9. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  10. Redox-linked conformation change and electron transfer between...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes, including electron transfer from dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria to minerals. One of the pathways that could trigger electron transfer between proteins and...

  11. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  12. ENERGY TRANSFER Shelley Corman Executive Vice President, Interstate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    depiction of Energy Transfer assets 2 More than 72,000 miles of natural gas, NGL, crude, and refined products pipelines ENERGY TRANSFER INTERSTATES CONNECTING SUPPLY AND...

  13. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solvation. Abstract: The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used...

  14. Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility October...

  15. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics. Abstract: We report on single molecule...

  16. Analysis of Heat Transfer in Metal Hydride Based Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, W.H. Jr.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a transient heat transfer analysis to model the heat transfer in the Pd/k packed column, and the impact of adding metallic foam.

  17. Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced...

  18. SciTech Connect: Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in Green Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in Green Bacteria In this paper we...

  19. Quantum dynamics in light-harvesting complexes: Beyond the single-exciton limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Cui; X. Y. Zhang; X. X. Yi

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Primitive photosynthetic cells appear over three billion years prior to any other more complex life-forms, thus it is reasonable to assume that Nature has designed a photosynthetic mechanism using minimal resources but honed to perfection under the action of evolution. A number of different quantum models have been proposed to understand the high degree of efficient energy transport, most of them are limited to the scenario of single-exciton. Here we present a study on the dynamics in light-harvesting complexes beyond the single exciton limit, and show how this model describes the energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex. We find that the energy transfer efficiency above 90% under realistic conditions is achievable.

  20. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  1. Business Plan Competitions and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, C.M.; Perry, T.D., IV

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of business plan competitions, with a focus on the NREL-hosted Industry Growth Forum, and how it helps cleantech startups secure funding and transfer their technology to market.

  2. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  3. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division by the University of California Pavement Research Center. The University of California Pavement Research Center Using innovative research and sound engineering principles to improve pavement structures, materials

  4. Energetics of protein charge transfer and photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    Energetics of protein charge transfer and photosynthesis Dmitry Matyushov Arizona State scheme is to snap a proton from solution! #12; Bacterial photosynthesis e 0.25 eV lost in two

  5. Evaluating Water Transfers in Irrigation Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Narishwar

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The participation of irrigation districts (IDs) in surface water transfers from agriculture-to-municipal uses is studied by examining IDs’ economic and political behavior, comparing their performance with non-districts (non-IDs), and analyzing...

  6. Environment assisted energy transfer in dimer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Salman, E-mail: sksafi@comsats.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ibrahim, M.; Khan, M.K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of collective and multilocal environments on the energy transfer between the levels of a dimer is studied. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated by considering coupling of collective environment with the levels of the dimer in the presence of both two individuals and mutually correlated multilocal environments. It is shown that every way of coupling we consider assists, though differently, the probability of transition between the levels of dimer. The probability of transition is strongly enhanced when the two local environments are mutually correlated. -- Highlights: • The dynamics of energy transfer between the levels of a dimer are studied. • Coupling of collective as well as individual environments are considered. • The environments are in spin star configurations. • The environment assists the energy transfer between the levels. • For correlated multilocal environments, the transition probability is almost 100%.

  7. Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, R. E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT-TRACED FLUID TRANSFER LINES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either steam or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat...

  8. Dynamics of heat transfer between nano systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical theory of heat transfer between two nano systems. In particular, we consider the resonant heat transfer between two nanoparticles due to the coupling of localized surface modes having a finite spectral width. We model the coupled nanosystem by two coupled quantum mechanical oscillators, each interacting with its own heat bath, and obtain a master equation for the dynamics of heat transfer. The damping rates in the master equation are related to the lifetimes of localized plasmons in the nanoparticles. We study the dynamics towards the steady state and establish connection with the standard theory of heat transfer in steady state. For strongly coupled nano particles we predict Rabi oscillations in the mean occupation number of surface plasmons in each nano particle.

  9. Radiative transfer for the FIRST era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Trujillo Bueno

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a brief overview of some recent advances in numerical radiative transfer, which may help the molecular astrophysics community to achieve new breakthroughs in the interpretation of spectro-(polarimetric) observations.

  10. Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  11. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  12. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Terry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental, and Climate Sciences Dept.

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y?¹. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; (c) Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and (d) Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  13. How multiplicity determines entropy and the derivation of the maximum entropy principle for complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanel, Rudolf; Gell-Mann, Murray

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy principle (MEP) is a method for obtaining the most likely distribution functions of observables from statistical systems, by maximizing entropy under constraints. The MEP has found hundreds of applications in ergodic and Markovian systems in statistical mechanics, information theory, and statistics. For several decades there exists an ongoing controversy whether the notion of the maximum entropy principle can be extended in a meaningful way to non-extensive, non-ergodic, and complex statistical systems and processes. In this paper we start by reviewing how Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is related to multiplicities of independent random processes. We then show how the relaxation of independence naturally leads to the most general entropies that are compatible with the first three Shannon-Khinchin axioms, the (c,d)-entropies. We demonstrate that the MEP is a perfectly consistent concept for non-ergodic and complex statistical systems if their relative entropy can be factored into a general...

  14. Exact computation of the Maximum Entropy Potential of spiking neural networks models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cofre, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how stimuli and synaptic connectivity in uence the statistics of spike patterns in neural networks is a central question in computational neuroscience. Maximum Entropy approach has been successfully used to characterize the statistical response of simultaneously recorded spiking neurons responding to stimuli. But, in spite of good performance in terms of prediction, the ?tting parameters do not explain the underlying mechanistic causes of the observed correlations. On the other hand, mathematical models of spiking neurons (neuro-mimetic models) provide a probabilistic mapping between stimulus, network architecture and spike patterns in terms of conditional proba- bilities. In this paper we build an exact analytical mapping between neuro-mimetic and Maximum Entropy models.

  15. Maximum-entropy principle for static and dynamic high-field transport in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione e Nanotechnology National Laboratory of CNR-INFM, Universita di Lecce, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the maximum entropy principle we present a general theory able to provide, in a dynamical context, the macroscopic relevant variables for carrier transport under electric fields of arbitrary strength. For the macroscopic variables the linearized maximum entropy approach is developed including full-band effects within a total energy scheme. Under spatially homogeneous conditions, we construct a closed set of hydrodynamic equations for the small-signal (dynamic) response of the macroscopic variables. The coupling between the driving field and the energy dissipation is analyzed quantitatively by using an arbitrary number of moments of the distribution function. The theoretical approach is applied to n-Si at 300 K and is validated by comparing numerical calculations with ensemble Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data.

  16. Evolution of technology transfer in Latin America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahl, L.F. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (USA))

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses how Latin American countries have grown up buying technology, transferring technology from more developed nations, and attempting to adapt it to their own countries for their own environment. Although this is the approach that was and is necessary, there are still some shortfalls that have occurred in the process of licensing and acquisition of technology. Governments around the world also have had powerful impacts on technology transfer. Those in Latin America are no exception.

  17. Mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomaa, H.G. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Landau, J. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Tawell, A.M.A. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces is presented. It takes into account the interaction between forced and natural convection and can be used under conditions where the fluid velocity outside the boundary layer changes direction. Because of the good agreement with experimental data, the model can explain the multi-fold increase in mass transfer coefficient obtained under oscillatory conditions. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  19. Infrared limit in external field scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Herdegen

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of electrons/positrons by external classical electromagnetic wave packet is considered in infrared limit. In this limit the scattering operator exists and produces physical effects, although the scattering cross-section is trivial.

  20. Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    1 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 djh@fractalgraphics.com.au 2 Fractal Graphics Proprietary Limited 39 Fairway, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia 6009 nja