National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for maximum severity rating

  1. Heat rate and maximum load capability improvements through cycle isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coons, K. [Coronado Generating Station, Saint Johns, AZ (United States); Dimmick, J.G. [Leak Detection Services, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Major improvements in maximum load capability and gross turbine heat rate were obtained at Salt River Project`s Coronado Unit 1, resulting from work done during the Spring 1993 overhaul. Corrected maximum load increased by 13.1 MW -- from 403.8 MW prior to the overhaul compared to 416.9 MW after the overhaul. Corrected gross turbine heat rate was reduced 270 BTU/kWH -- from 7,920 BTU/kWH before the overhaul to 7,650 BTU/kWH after the overhaul. Of the work done, the repair of leaking valves had the largest impact on cycle performance. The reduction of cycle leakage accounted for an increase of 9.9 MW in maximum load capability and a reduction to gross turbine heat rate of 190 BTU. Weekly maximum load tests, which started in August 1992 with the installation of an on-line monitoring system, show that maximum load had decreased approximately 4 MW during the six months prior to the overhaul. During this time there were no significant changes in HP or IP efficiencies, or any other directly-measured cycle parameters. Therefore, this degradation was attributed to cycle isolation valve leakage. Acoustic emission leak detection methods were used to identify leaking valves prior to the outage. Of the 138 valves tested for leakage, 31 valves had medium to very large leaks. Of these 31 leaking valves identified, 30 were repaired or replaced.

  2. Laboratory-Based Maximum Slip Rates in Earthquake Rupture Zones and Radiated Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Laboratory-Based Maximum Slip Rates in Earthquake Rupture Zones and Radiated Energy by A. McGarr, J. B. Fletcher, M. Boettcher, N. Beeler, and J. Boatwright Abstract Laboratory stick-slip friction and the maximum slip rate. From laboratory results, the maximum slip rate for any crustal earthquake, as well

  3. Analyticity, Convergence and Convergence Rate of Recursive Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadi?, Vladislav B

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the asymptotic properties of the recursive maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models. The paper is focused on the asymptotic behavior of the log-likelihood function and on the point-convergence and convergence rate of the recursive maximum likelihood estimator. Using the principle of analytical continuation, the analyticity of the asymptotic log-likelihood function is shown for analytically parameterized hidden Markov models. Relying on this fact and some results from differential geometry (Lojasiewicz inequality), the almost sure point-convergence of the recursive maximum likelihood algorithm is demonstrated, and relatively tight bounds on the convergence rate are derived. As opposed to the existing result on the asymptotic behavior of maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models, the results of this paper are obtained without assuming that the log-likelihood function has an isolated maximum at which the Hessian is strictly negative definite.

  4. A simplified psoriasis area severity index (SPASI) for rating psoriasis severity in clinic patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louden, B Asher; Pearce, Daniel J MD; Lang, Wei PhD; Feldman, Steven R MD PhD

    2004-01-01

    T, Pettersson U. Severe psoriasis--oral therapy with a newof disease progress in psoriasis. Arch Dermatol 1989; 125(the limitations of the psoriasis area and severity index (

  5. Is there a maximum star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies? , , ,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, A. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Owen, F. N. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Wang, W.-H. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-20

    We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 ?m rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 ?m source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4? level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 ?Jy at 5?) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9' radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio-flux-dependent K – z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter fluxes and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} to z ? 6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ?6000 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} over the redshift range z = 1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  6. EIS-0158: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the 1979 Petroleum Production at Maximum Efficient Rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1(Elk Hills), Kern County, California (1993)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the potential environmental impacts of the continued operation of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at the Maximum Efficient Rate authorized by Public Law 94-258. This EIS supplements DOE/EIS-0012.

  7. Ramp Rate Sensitivities of Several Superconducting Dipole Magnets Operated in He I and Superfluid He II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, S.

    2011-01-01

    heat removal capabil ities of He [I result In a reduced ramp-rate sensitivity for magnetsmagnet decreases from its slow-ramp value as the cur- rent ramp-rate is increased, due to heat

  8. 3798 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 6, JUNE 2012 On the Maximum Achievable Sum-Rate With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yue

    Symposium on Information Theory. Y. Zhao was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University3798 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 6, JUNE 2012 On the Maximum Achievable of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA. He is now with the Department of Electrical

  9. and new production rates from several locations in the coastal and open Pacific Ocean. They also demonstrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    and new production rates from several locations in the coastal and open Pacific Ocean. They also approximated the large-scale rate of new production. In 1967, Richard Dugdale and John Goering had defined new production as the fraction of the overall net primary production that was supported by external, or "new

  10. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

  11. Fragile-to-fragile Liquid Transition at Tg and Stable-Glass Phase Nucleation Rate Maximum at the Kauzmann Temperature TK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Felix Tournier

    2015-02-23

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Dp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm *Dp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at temperatures smaller than Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atoms, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  12. Petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Draft Supplement to the 1979 Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The proposed action involves the continued operation of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) through the year approximately 2025 in accordance with the requirements of the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-258). NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field comprising 74 square miles. MER production primarily includes continued operation and maintenance of existing facilities; a well drilling and abandonment program; construction and operation of future gas processing, gas compression, and steamflood, waterflood, cogeneration, and butane isomerization facilities; and continued implementation of a comprehensive environmental protection program. The basis for the draft environment impact statement (DSEIS) proposed action is the April 1989 NPR-1 Long Range Plan which describes a myriad of planned operational, maintenance, and development activities over the next 25--30 years. These activities include the continued operation of existing facilities; additional well drilling; expanded steamflood operations; expanded waterflood programs; expanded gas compression, gas lift, gas processing and gas injection; construction of a new cogeneration facility; construction of a new isobutane facility; and a comprehensive environmental program designed to minimize environmental impacts.

  13. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet traveled too far from their birth sites, the poor resolution of the radio data compared to the physical sizes of the clusters results in measured{Sigma} that are likely quite diluted compared to the actual densities relevant for the formation of the clusters.

  14. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and PACI Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-139 - Notice of Order Temporarily Extending Formula Rates for Power, Transmission and Ancillary Services (PDF - 49K) Final FRN for Rate...

  15. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 392K) Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-139 - Notice of Order Temporarily Extending Formula Rates for Power, Transmission and Ancillary Services (PDF - 49K) Final FRN for Rate...

  16. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Washoe Project, Stampede Division FERC Order Approving Extension of Non-Firm Power Formula Rate - Rate Order No. WAPA-160 (Sept. 5, 2013) (PDF - 22K) Notice of Extension of...

  17. 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

  18. Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.

    1994-11-01

    Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

  19. Maximum-likelihood

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By Sarah Schlieder *8MatthewMaximum-likelihood fitting

  20. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-03-13

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T{ampersand}E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit.

  1. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California, on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Harris, C.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.

    1986-06-01

    Between 1980 and 1986 DOE sponsored field studies to gather sufficient information to determine the status of the species on Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 and to evaluate the possible effects of MER. Transect surveys were conducted in 1979 and 1984 to document the distribution and relative density of fox dens. Radiotelemetry studies were initiated to provide information on reproductive success, den use patterns, responses to petroleum field activities, food habits, movement patterns and home ranges, and sources and rates of mortality. Techniques for conducting preconstruction surveys to minimize possible negative effects of MER activities on foxes plus a habitat restoration program were developed and implemented. DOE determined during this biological assessment that the construction projects and operational activities necessary to achieve and sustain MER may have adversely affected the San Joaquin kit fox and its habitat. However, the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of MER will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species because: (1) results of the extensive field studies did not provide evidence that MER effected negative changes in relative abundance, reproductive success, and dispersal of the species; (2) a successful policy of conducting preconstruction surveys to protect kit fox, their dens, and portions of their habitat was initiated; (3) the Secretary of the Interior did not designate critical habitat; (4) a habitat restoration plan was developed and implemented; (5) a monitoring program was implemented to periodically assess the status of kit fox; (6) a coyote control program was established with FWS to reduce predation on fox; and (7) administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil spills, restrict off-road vehicle (ORV) travel, and to prohibit hunting, trapping, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities, were maintained to protect kit fox.

  2. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Gamesa G90-2.0 MW #12;Maximum output at minimum cost per kWh for low wind sites ®® Class IIIA mast and the electrical substation. This innovative modular design based on TCP/IP architecture has

  3. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

  4. Objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. The upper bound is attained if and only if the object is transparent for fields of one handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e. helicity preservation upon scattering, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal scatterers to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal scatterers. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar scatterers or as material constitutive relations. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: A twofold resonantly enhanced and background free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle independent helicity filtering glasses.

  5. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  6. Maximum likelihood estimation of the equity Efstathios Avdis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Michael J.

    premium is usually estimated by taking the sample mean of stock returns and subtracting a measure the expected return on the aggregate stock market less the government bill rate, is of central importance an alternative esti- mator, based on maximum likelihood, that takes into account informa- tion contained

  7. The maximum multiflow problems with bounded fractionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirai, Hiroshi

    (Karzanov 98) frac(| ) = frac(K2 + Kn) = 4 (Lomonsov 04) frac( ) =? Hiroshi Hirai The maximum multiflow

  8. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    metabolism was not a major energy source during running in hypoxia. We combined these data with values taken and source are credited. Funding: The project was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: l

  9. Maximum-Entropy Inference with a Programmable Annealer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Vinci, Walter; Aeppli, Gabriel; Warburton, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Optimisation problems in science and engineering typically involve finding the ground state (i.e. the minimum energy configuration) of a cost function with respect to many variables. If the variables are corrupted by noise then this approach maximises the likelihood that the solution found is correct. An alternative approach is to make use of prior statistical information about the noise in conjunction with Bayes's theorem. The maximum entropy solution to the problem then takes the form of a Boltzmann distribution over the ground and excited states of the cost function. Here we use a programmable Josephson junction array for the information decoding problem which we simulate as a random Ising model in a field. We show experimentally that maximum entropy decoding at finite temperature can in certain cases give competitive and even slightly better bit-error-rates than the maximum likelihood approach at zero temperature, confirming that useful information can be extracted from the excited states of the annealing...

  10. Maximum-Likelihood Stereo Correspondence using Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, W. James

    Maximum-Likelihood Stereo Correspondence using Field Programmable Gate Arrays Siraj Sabihuddin & W. James MacLean Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario be performed using a maximum- likelihood formulation. One such formulation has been presented by Cox [1], who

  11. MAXIMUM ENTROPY APPROACH TO OPTIMAL SENSOR PLACEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    MAXIMUM ENTROPY APPROACH TO OPTIMAL SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR AEROSPACE NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING R discussed for space struc- tures. Key words: Non-destructive testing, maximum entropy, aerospace structures not have a sufficient number of them, so additional sensors must be placed to test the structural integrity

  12. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while intensifies. When the dissipation rate eventually reaches the production rate, the TC has no excess energy

  13. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while intensifies. When the dissipation rate eventually reaches the production rate, the TC has no excess energy

  14. Temperature requirements and corrosion rates in combustion driven hydrogen fluoride supersonic diffusion lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordine, P.C.

    1983-08-01

    A maximum F-atom yield from F2 occurs in a combustion driven hydrogen fluoride supersonic diffusion laser (HFSDL) because the amount of fluorine reacted with hydrogen (or deuterium) continues to increase with temperature after most of the unreacted fluorine has been thermally dissociated. A small decease from the maximum combustor F-atom yield allows a significant decease in the required temperature and in the corrosion rates that uncooled laser nozzles would display. The temperatures that give F-atom yields equal to 95 percent of the maximum values were calculated for typical HFSDL combustor pressures and F-atom mole fractions and the corrosion rates of uncooled nozzles were evaluated at these temperatures. The corrosion rates of materials resistant to fluorine attack at the highest temperatures would allow HFSDL applications or test experiments up to several hours duration.

  15. The Death Effect of Severe Climate Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compeán, Roberto Guerrero

    Using data for all 2,454 municipalities of Mexico for the period 1980-2010, this paper analyzes the relationship between exposure to extreme temperatures and mortality rates. I find that severe heat increases mortality, ...

  16. The Prediction of the Maximum Modes of Decay of Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanna, R

    1999-01-01

    In an earlier work, several properties of fundamental particles were brought together by a simple equation based on continuity and discreteness. It is shown here, that the maximum modes of decay of all fundamental particles can also be predicted without any arbitrary parameters. The method used is to break up the mean lifetimes of particles to obtain the maximum modes of decay. This is done by using a binary expansion of $\\hbar/MT$ where M is the mass of the particle and T is the mean lifetime. The agreements between that obtained from theory and experiment are remarkable. The ordering of the flavours plays an important part in understanding the reasons for this agreement. It is shown that the Zeno effect in Quantum mechanics is connected with use of the binary series.

  17. The Prediction of the Maximum Modes of Decay of Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja Ramanna

    1999-04-27

    In an earlier work, several properties of fundamental particles were brought together by a simple equation based on continuity and discreteness. It is shown here, that the maximum modes of decay of all fundamental particles can also be predicted without any arbitrary parameters. The method used is to break up the mean lifetimes of particles to obtain the maximum modes of decay. This is done by using a binary expansion of $\\hbar/MT$ where M is the mass of the particle and T is the mean lifetime. The agreements between that obtained from theory and experiment are remarkable. The ordering of the flavours plays an important part in understanding the reasons for this agreement. It is shown that the Zeno effect in Quantum mechanics is connected with use of the binary series.

  18. Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

    2014-04-29

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

  19. Management of severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery management concentrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk, and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management.

  20. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Neural Networks Finn A ffi rup Nielsen Section for Digital Signal, linear output, Gaussian distribution ] \\Gamma 1;+1[ ffl Binary (binary classification), tanh on output, bino­ mial distribution. ] \\Gamma 1; +1[ ffl Classification, softmax function on outputs [Bridle, 1990

  1. Partitioned algorithms for maximum likelihood and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Partitioned algorithms for maximum likelihood and other nonlinear estimation Gordon K. Smyth There are a variety of methods in the literature which seek to make iterative estimation algorithms more manageable by breaking the iterations into a greater number of simpler or faster steps. Those algorithms which deal

  2. On maximum matching width Jisu Jeong (KAIST)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    ;Graph width parameters · tree-width (Halin 1976, Robertson and Seymour 1984) · branch-width (Robertson and Seymour 1991) · carving-width (Seymour and Thomas 1994) · clique-width (Courcelle and Olariu 2000) · rank-width (Oum and Seymour 2006) · maximum matching-width (Vatshelle 2012) #12;a b c d e fg hi j A tree

  3. Maximum size of drops levitated by an air cushion Jacco H. Snoeijer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggers, Jens

    , kept aloft by a stream of water vapor. We investigate the limit of small flow rates, for which the size for the manipulation of corrosive sub- stances 10 or the frictionless displacement of drops 6 . Of particular interest is the maximum drop size that can be sus- tained, and the limit of very small flow rates. The drop con- tinues

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570 ESTIMATION OF EFFORT, MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD, AND MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER KEITHLY, JR YIELD, AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER in the shrimp fishery of the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570, 71P. Copies may

  5. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  6. Maximum-Entropy Inference with a Programmable Annealer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Chancellor; Szilard Szoke; Walter Vinci; Gabriel Aeppli; Paul A. Warburton

    2015-06-26

    Optimisation problems in science and engineering typically involve finding the ground state (i.e. the minimum energy configuration) of a cost function with respect to many variables. If the variables are corrupted by noise then this approach maximises the likelihood that the solution found is correct. An alternative approach is to make use of prior statistical information about the noise in conjunction with Bayes's theorem. The maximum entropy solution to the problem then takes the form of a Boltzmann distribution over the ground and excited states of the cost function. Here we use a programmable Josephson junction array for the information decoding problem which we simulate as a random Ising model in a field. We show experimentally that maximum entropy decoding at finite temperature can in certain cases give competitive and even slightly better bit-error-rates than the maximum likelihood approach at zero temperature, confirming that useful information can be extracted from the excited states of the annealing device. Furthermore we introduce a microscopic bit-by-bit analytical method which is agnostic to the specific application and use it to show that the annealing device samples from a highly Boltzmann-like distribution. Machines of this kind are therefore candidates for use in a wide variety of machine learning applications which exploit maximum entropy inference, including natural language processing and image recognition. We further show that the limiting factor for performance in our experiments is likely to be control errors rather than failure to reach equilibrium. Our work also provides a method for determining if a system is in equilibrium which can be easily generalized. We discuss possible applications of this method to spin glasses and probing the performance of the quantum annealing algorithm.

  7. Zipf's law, power laws, and maximum entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines - from astronomy to demographics to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation [RGF] attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present article I argue that the cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  8. Maximum Estrada Index of Bicyclic Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Long; Wang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Let $G$ be a simple graph of order $n$, let $\\lambda_1(G),\\lambda_2(G),...,\\lambda_n(G)$ be the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of $G$. The Esrada index of $G$ is defined as $EE(G)=\\sum_{i=1}^{n}e^{\\lambda_i(G)}$. In this paper we determine the unique graph with maximum Estrada index among bicyclic graphs with fixed order.

  9. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nosek, Dalibor; Vícha, Jakub; Trávní?ek, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the sup...

  10. Oxidation State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber Catalysts Oxidation State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber Catalysts Presentation given at the 16th...

  11. Maximum Performance Group MPG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, searchScotland JumpPlantation Elec Co JumpIAEAOpenMaximum

  12. Thermodynamics of Maximum Transition Entropy for Quantum Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Rogers

    2015-03-27

    This work presents a general unifying theoretical framework for quantum non-equilibrium systems. It is based on a re-statement of the dynamical problem as one of inferring the distribution of collision events that move a system toward thermal equilibrium from an arbitrary starting distribution. Using a form based on maximum entropy for this transition distribution leads to a statistical description of open quantum systems with strong parallels to the conventional, maximum-entropy, equilibrium thermostatics. A precise form of the second law of thermodynamics can be stated for this dynamics at every time-point in a trajectory. Numerical results are presented for low-dimensional systems interacting with cavity fields. The dynamics and stationary state are compared to a reference model of a weakly coupled oscillator plus cavity supersystem thermostatted by periodic partial measurements. Despite the absence of an explicit cavity in the present model of open quantum dynamics, both the relaxation rates and stationary state properties closely match the reference. Additionally, the time-course of energy exchange and entropy increase is given throughout an entire measurement process for a single spin system. The results show the process to be capable of initially absorbing heat when starting from a superposition state, but not from an isotropic distribution. Based on these results, it is argued that logical inference in the presence of environmental noise is sufficient to resolve the paradox of wavefunction collapse.

  13. What if CLIQUE were fast? Maximum Cliques in Information Networks and Strong Components in Temporal Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Ryan A; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H; Patwary, Md Mostofa Ali

    2012-01-01

    Exact maximum clique finders have progressed to the point where we can investigate cliques in million-node social and information networks, as well as find strongly connected components in temporal networks. We use one such finder to study a large collection of modern networks emanating from biological, social, and technological domains. We show inter-relationships between maximum cliques and several other common network properties, including network density, maximum core, and number of triangles. In temporal networks, we find that the largest temporal strong components have around 20-30% of the vertices of the entire network. These components represent groups of highly communicative individuals. In addition, we discuss and improve the performance and utility of the maximum clique finder itself.

  14. The use of maximum rate of dissipation criterion to model beams with internal dissipation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Min Seok

    2004-09-30

    of deformation of materials in sandwich beam. The boundary conditions for displacements and forces for the cantilever beam are imposed and the frequency equation is obtained. The expressions for the amplitude of displacements are also derived in explicit...

  15. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMO PeerServices6ProgramAA Path toA

  16. Statistical optimization for passive scalar transport: maximum entropy production vs maximum Kolmogorov-Sinay entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Mihelich; Berengere Dubrulle; Didier Paillard; Davide Faranda

    2015-05-26

    We derive rigorous results on the link between the principle of maximum entropy production and the principle of maximum Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy using a Markov model of the passive scalar diffusion called the Zero Range Process. We show analytically that both the entropy production and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy seen as functions of f admit a unique maximum denoted fmaxEP and fmaxKS. The behavior of these two maxima is explored as a function of the system disequilibrium and the system resolution N. The main result of this article is that fmaxEP and fmaxKS have the same Taylor expansion at _rst order in the deviation of equilibrium. We find that fmaxEP hardly depends on N whereas fmaxKS depends strongly on N. In particular, for a fixed difference of potential between the reservoirs, fmaxEP (N) tends towards a non-zero value, while fmaxKS (N) tends to 0 when N goes to infinity. For values of N typical of that adopted by Paltridge and climatologists we show that fmaxEP and fmaxKS coincide even far from equilibrium. Finally, we show that one can find an optimal resolution N_ such that fmaxEP and fmaxKS coincide, at least up to a second order parameter proportional to the non-equilibrium uxes imposed to the boundaries.

  17. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  18. Accident management for severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J.; Leonard, M.; Disalvo, R.; Sheron, B.

    1988-01-01

    The management of severe accidents in light water reactors is receiving much attention in several countries. The reduction of risk by measures and/or actions that would affect the behavior of a severe accident is discussed. The research program that is being conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on both in-vessel accident management and containment and release accident management. The key issues and approaches taken in this program are summarized. 6 refs.

  19. On the "viscosity maximum" during the uniaxial extension of a low density polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodor I. Burghelea; Zdenek Stary; Helmut Muenstedt

    2010-01-13

    An experimental investigation of the viscosity overshoot phenomenon observed during uniaxial extension of a low density polyethylene is pre- sented. For this purpose, traditional integral viscosity measurements on a Muenstedt type extensional rheometer are combined with local mea- surements based on the in-situ visualization of the sample under exten- sion. For elongational experiments at constant strain rates within a wide range of Weissenberg numbers (Wi), three distinct deformation regimes are identified. Corresponding to low values of Wi (regime I), the tensile stress displays a broad maximum. This maximum can be explained by simple mathematical arguments as a result of low deformation rates and it should not be confused with the viscosity overshoot phenomenon. Corre- sponding to intermediate values of Wi (regime II), a local maximum of the integral extensional viscosity is systematically observed. However, within this regime, the local viscosity measurements reveal no maximum, but a plateau. Careful inspection of the images of samples within this regime shows that, corresponding to the maximum of the integral viscosity, sec- ondary necks develop along the sample. The emergence of a maximum of the integral elongational viscosity is thus related to the distinct in- homogeneity of deformation states and is not related to the rheological properties of the material. In the fast stretching limit (high Wi, regime III), the overall geometric uniformity of the sample is well preserved, no secondary necks are observed and both the integral and the local transient elongational viscosity show no maximum. A detailed comparison of the experimental findings with results from literature is presented.

  20. Sandia Energy - Severe Accident Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear energy efforts by developing risk margins, creating risk assessments, sequencing nuclear reactor accident progression, and performing reactor consequence modeling. Severe...

  1. Dynamics of multi-modes maximum entangled coherent state over amplitude damping channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El Allati; Y. Hassouni; N. Metwally

    2012-02-18

    The dynamics of maximum entangled coherent state travels through an amplitude damping channel is investigated. For small values of the transmissivity rate the travelling state is very fragile to this noise channel, where it suffers from the phase flip error with high probability. The entanglement decays smoothly for larger values of the transmissivity rate and speedily for smaller values of this rate. As the number of modes increases, the travelling state over this noise channel loses its entanglement hastily. The odd and even states vanish at the same value of the field intensity.

  2. High-precision geochronology confirms voluminous magmatism before, during, and after Earth's most severe extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Seth

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe in the Phanerozoic, extinguishing more than 90% of marine and 75% of terrestrial species in a maximum of 61 ± 48 ky. Because of broad temporal coincidence between the ...

  3. Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

    2006-10-30

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe ...

  4. Severe Accident Test Station Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing safety margins in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents is currently the focus of a number of international R&D programs. The current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system is particularly susceptible since the Zr-based cladding experiences rapid oxidation kinetics in steam at elevated temperatures. Therefore, alternative cladding materials that offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012. This report summarizes the capabilities of the SATS and provides an overview of the oxidation kinetics of several candidate cladding materials. A suggested baseline for evaluating ATF candidates is a two order of magnitude reduction in the steam oxidation resistance above 1000ºC compared to Zr-based alloys. The ATF candidates are categorized based on the protective external oxide or scale that forms during exposure to steam at high temperature: chromia, alumina, and silica. Comparisons are made to literature and SATS data for Zr-based alloys and other less-protective materials.

  5. Maximum entropy generation in open systems: the Fourth Law?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umberto Lucia

    2010-11-17

    This paper develops an analytical and rigorous formulation of the maximum entropy generation principle. The result is suggested as the Fourth Law of Thermodynamics.

  6. Maximum-principle-satisfying second order discontinuous Galerkin ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-05

    Notice that the CFL conditions in Table 2.1 are sufficient but not necessary to achieve maximum principle. A more efficient implementation would be enforcing

  7. EERE Takes Important Steps to Ensure Maximum Impact of Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in wind, solar and other programs is essential to achieve maximum return for taxpayer investment. | Photos courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tracking...

  8. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-31

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of {approx}10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate.

  9. REMARKS ON THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD APPLIED TO FINITE TEMPERATURE LATTICE QCD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UMEDA, T.; MATSUFURU, H.

    2005-07-25

    We make remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) for studies of the spectral function of hadronic correlators in finite temperature lattice QCD. We discuss the virtues and subtlety of MEM in the cases that one does not have enough number of data points such as at finite temperature. Taking these points into account, we suggest several tests which one should examine to keep the reliability for the results, and also apply them using mock and lattice QCD data.

  10. Predicting Customer Behavior using Naive Bayes and Maximum Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keysers, Daniel

    of returned goods, we additionally generated two binary features for zero and missing values. The remaining Naive Bayes, Maximum Entropy, Neural Networks and Logistic Regression for classification of cus- tomer classifiers won the Data-Mining-Cup in 2004. Combining Logistic Regression, Neural Networks, and Maximum

  11. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart VAMSI K. MOOTHA, ANDREW E. ARAI, AND ROBERT S. BALABAN Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart. Am. J. Physiol. 272 (Heart Circ

  12. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

  13. Sandia Energy - Severe Accident Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser HeatingSeminars &SensingSevere

  14. Maximum Instantaneous Power Estimation by Subgraph Coloring UCSD CSE Dept.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bao

    cycle helps in building a maximum envelope currents waveform for each net and providing a MIP upper process technology advancement integrates millions of gates on a single chip and introduces increasing

  15. Multi-Class Classification with Maximum Margin Multiple Kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    (named OBSCURE and UFO-MKL, respectively) are used to optimize primal versions of equivalent problems), the OBSCURE and UFO-MKL algorithms are compared against MCMKL #12;Multi-Class Classification with Maximum

  16. A magmatic trigger for the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubin, Andrea Rose

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-six million years ago Earth experienced rapid global warming (~6°C) that was caused by the release of large amounts of carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. This Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is often ...

  17. Maximum likelihood analysis of low energy CDMS II germanium data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnese, R.

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is ...

  18. Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

  19. Filtering Additive Measurement Noise with Maximum Entropy in the Mean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henryk Gzyl; Enrique ter Horst

    2007-09-04

    The purpose of this note is to show how the method of maximum entropy in the mean (MEM) may be used to improve parametric estimation when the measurements are corrupted by large level of noise. The method is developed in the context on a concrete example: that of estimation of the parameter in an exponential distribution. We compare the performance of our method with the bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches.

  20. NGC2613, 3198, 6503, 7184: Case studies against `maximum' disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    1998-12-02

    Decompositions of the rotation curves of NGC2613, 3198, 6505, and 7184 are analysed. For these galaxies the radial velocity dispersions of the stars have been measured and their morphology is clearly discernible. If the parameters of the decompositions are chosen according to the `maximum' disk hypothesis, the Toomre Q stability parameter is systematically less than one and the multiplicities of the spiral arms as expected from density wave theory are inconsitent with the observed morphologies of the galaxies. The apparent Q<1 instability, in particular, is a strong argument against the `maximum' disk hypothesis.

  1. Efficiency of autonomous soft nano-machines at maximum power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udo Seifert

    2010-11-11

    We consider nano-sized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing non-equilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall in three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient", "strong and inefficient", and "balanced". For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

  2. Cluster Analysis of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS): Symptom Dimensions and Clinical Correlates in an Outpatient Youth Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kircanski, Katharina; Woods, Douglas W.; Chang, Susanna W.; Ricketts, Emily J.; Piacentini, John C.

    2010-01-01

    correlated with the severity of tic synptoms. The Australianet al. (1989). The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale: initialof a clinician-rated scale of tic severity. Journal of the

  3. FRN and Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-16 Rate Case OS-14 Rate Case FRN...

  4. FRN & Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-16 Rate Case OS-14 Rate Case FRN...

  5. Distributed Computation of Maximum Lifetime Spanning Subgraphs in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 5400, FI-02015 TKK, Finland Harri.Haanpaa@tkk.fi, Andre levels to the battery-operated nodes so that under a uniform traffic load the net- work remains connected for a maximum length of time [2]. We consider the case where the nodes are non-mobile and the power levels, once

  6. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  7. Tree-ring reconstruction of maximum and minimum temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -width (RW) and maximum density (MXD) series from treeline sites across Interior British Columbia. Multi- ple at these temperature-limited sites may be more closely related to Tmax than Tmean or Tmin; (3) recently reported in the relationships between ring-width (RW), maxi- mum latewood density (MXD) and May-August Tmean were observed

  8. Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach Wahid FAIDI LAMSIN, ENIT for a class of robust utility function introduced in Bordigoni, Matoussi et Schweizer (2005). Our method-investment strategy which is characterized as the unique solution of a forward-backward system. Key words : Utility

  9. The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals Felisa A. Smith,1 * Alison G. Boyer,2 the primary driver for the evolution of giant mammals was diversification to fill ecological niches extracted from the Paleobiology Database (12), using the range- through option for each interval of time. We

  10. Multiresolution Maximum Intensity Volume Rendering by Morphological Pyramids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    to wavelet splatting, the main differences being that (i) linear summation of voxel values is replaced by maximum computation, and (ii) linear wavelet filters are replaced by (nonlinear) morphological filters. 1 on wavelets [4, 12, 18]. Recent methods for X-ray rendering include wavelet splatting [7, 8], which extends

  11. Multiresolution Maximum Intensity Volume Rendering by Morphological Adjunction Pyramids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    to wavelet splatting, the main differences being that (i) linear summation of voxel values is replaced by maximum computation, and (ii) linear wavelet filters are replaced by (nonlinear) morphological filters wavelet splatting [11,12], which extends splatting [27] by using wavelets as reconstruction filters

  12. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  13. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. #12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill1 "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling" "A Sustainable Solution" Håkan in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse

  14. Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

  15. The Entropy of the Universe and the Maximum Entropy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    Chapter 22 The Entropy of the Universe and the Maximum Entropy Production Principle Charles H. Lineweaver Abstract If the universe had been born in a high entropy, equilibrium state, there would be no stars, no planets and no life. Thus, the initial low entropy of the universe is the fundamental reason

  16. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Hurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known as a tropical cyclone. #12;Hurricanes in Florida · 1851-2004 Florida's Hurricane Total: 110 Southwest Florida

  17. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

  18. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  19. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  20. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  1. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

    2014-11-18

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  2. Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Bajkova

    2002-05-21

    We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

  3. Max '91: flare research at the next solar maximum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, B.; Canfield, R.; Bruner, M.; Emslie, G.; Hildner, E.; Hudson, H.; Hurford, G.; Lin, R.; Novick, R.; Tarbell, T.

    1988-01-01

    To address the central scientific questions surrounding solar flares, coordinated observations of electromagnetic radiation and energetic particles must be made from spacecraft, balloons, rockets, and ground-based observatories. A program to enhance capabilities in these areas in preparation for the next solar maximum in 1991 is recommended. The major scientific issues are described, and required observations and coordination of observations and analyses are detailed. A program plan and conceptual budgets are provided.

  4. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, supersedes DOE P 310.1.

  5. Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

  6. Maximum entanglement in squeezed boson and fermion states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santos, E. S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, 40030-010, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2007-08-15

    A class of squeezed boson and fermion states is studied with particular emphasis on the nature of entanglement. We first investigate the case of bosons, considering two-mode squeezed states. Then we construct the fermion version to show that such states are maximum entangled, for both bosons and fermions. To achieve these results, we demonstrate some relations involving squeezed boson states. The generalization to the case of fermions is made by using Grassmann variables.

  7. PNNL: A Supervised Maximum Entropy Approach to Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tratz, Stephen C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Posse, Christian; Whitney, Paul D.

    2007-06-23

    In this paper, we described the PNNL Word Sense Disambiguation system as applied to the English All-Word task in Se-mEval 2007. We use a supervised learning approach, employing a large number of features and using Information Gain for dimension reduction. Our Maximum Entropy approach combined with a rich set of features produced results that are significantly better than baseline and are the highest F-score for the fined-grained English All-Words subtask.

  8. Constant Sustainable Consumption Rate in Optimal Growth with Exhaustible Resources*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    ;48 Frederic Y. M. Wan resources which are essential to the production of consumption goods. To those concernedConstant Sustainable Consumption Rate in Optimal Growth with Exhaustible Resources* By Frederic Y's criterion of maximum sustainable consumption rate, previously formulated as a minimum

  9. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking for a Photovoltaic-Supercapacitor Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Maximum Power Transfer Tracking for a Photovoltaic-Supercapacitor Energy System Younghyun KimPconverter Ppv Pcharge Varying Pleak PV array Supercapacitor Figure 1: Photovoltaic-supercapacitor energy system Keywords Maximum power transfer tracking, Photovoltaic, Supercapacitor 1. INTRODUCTION Maximum energy

  10. Maximum likelihood method for cross-correlations with astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R, E-mail: rj486@nyu.edu, E-mail: gf25@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We generalize the maximum likelihood-type method used to study cross-correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. The new method is applicable to any sparse dataset such as UHE gamma rays or astrophysical neutrinos. Performance of the original and generalized techniques is evaluated in simulations of various scenarios. Applying the new technique to data, we find an excess correlation of about nine events between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  11. Generalized Maximum Likelihood Method for Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    2008-10-01

    The Maximum Likelihood Method is generalized to include effects important for UHECR applications. The new approach can incorporate source distance constraints implied by the observed CR energy and can allow for energy uncertainties, possible deflection in magnetic fields, multiple source types, and a spectrum of CR composition. It can be efficiently implemented and does not require the unphysical "isotropic" assumption for unidentified sources. The approach optimizes the utility of UHECR data to discriminate between source classes and can help constrain galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. Aspects of the method are directly applicable in other contexts, such as TeV gamma ray astrophysics.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Method for Cross Correlations with Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Jansson; Glennys R. Farrar

    2008-06-18

    We generalize the Maximum Likelihood-type method used to study cross correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. The new method is applicable to any sparse data set such as UHE gamma rays or astrophysical neutrinos. Performance of the original and generalized techniques is evaluated in simulations of various scenarios. Applying the new technique to data, we find an excess correlation of about 9 events between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6*10^-5 probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  13. Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info TR-341 Bacteria TMDL Task Force Report Draft Four 6.4.07.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 344770 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name TR-341 Bacteria TMDL Task Force Report Draft Four 6....4.07.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 TR-341 2009 Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report By C. Allan Jones and Kevin Wagner, Texas Water Resources...

  14. Maximum Tension: with and without a cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrow, John D.; Gibbons, G. W.

    2014-12-04

    and the absence of any speed limit for information transmission. This unusual Newtonian behaviour has no general relativistic counterpart: two particles of mass M whose centres approach closer than d = 4GM=c2 will ?nd themselves inside a black hole horizon... , Ann. d Physik 11, 69 (1900); English translation in M. Planck, 1959, The Theory of Heat Radiation, transl. M. Masius, Dover, New York (1959). 11 Schiller C., 1997-2004, Maximum force a simple principle encompassing general relativity in C. Schiller...

  15. Better Nonlinear Models from Noisy Data: Attractors with Maximum Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    1999-11-30

    A new approach to nonlinear modelling is presented which, by incorporating the global behaviour of the model, lifts shortcomings of both least squares and total least squares parameter estimates. Although ubiquitous in practice, a least squares approach is fundamentally flawed in that it assumes independent, normally distributed (IND) forecast errors: nonlinear models will not yield IND errors even if the noise is IND. A new cost function is obtained via the maximum likelihood principle; superior results are illustrated both for small data sets and infinitely long data streams.

  16. The Maximum Value Method. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe Maximum Value Method. Citation Details

  17. 2004 Rate Adjustments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Transmission and Ancillary Services Federal Register Notice -- Rate Order WAPA-141: Notice of Extension of Formula Rates for Transmission and Ancillary Services If you have any...

  18. Rate Schedule CPP-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    points established by contract, in accordance with approved policies and procedures. Formula Rate: The formula rate for CPP includes three components: Component 1: The customer...

  19. An Assessment of Areal Coverage of Severe Weather Parameters for Severe Weather Outbreak Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    An Assessment of Areal Coverage of Severe Weather Parameters for Severe Weather Outbreak Diagnosis 2011, in final form 9 March 2012) ABSTRACT The areal extent of severe weather parameters favorable for significant severe weather is evaluated as a means of identifying major severe weather outbreaks. The first

  20. Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacity seems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. The report presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

  1. State Energy Severance Taxes, 1985-1993

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes changes in aggregate and state level energy severance taxes for 1985 through 1993. Data are presented for crude oil, natural gas, and coal.

  2. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  3. Improved Maximum Entropy Analysis with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2013-01-07

    The standard implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) follows Bryan and deploys a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to limit the dimensionality of the underlying solution space apriori. Here we present arguments based on the shape of the SVD basis functions and numerical evidence from a mock data analysis, which show that the correct Bayesian solution is not in general recovered with this approach. As a remedy we propose to extend the search basis systematically, which will eventually recover the full solution space and the correct solution. In order to adequately approach problems where an exponentially damped kernel is used, we provide an open-source implementation, using the C/C++ language that utilizes high precision arithmetic adjustable at run-time. The LBFGS algorithm is included in the code in order to attack problems without the need to resort to a particular search space restriction.

  4. Efficiency at maximum power of a chemical engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooyberghs, Hans; Salazar, Alberto; Indekeu, Joseph O; Broeck, Christian Van den

    2013-01-01

    A cyclically operating chemical engine is considered that converts chemical energy into mechanical work. The working fluid is a gas of finite-sized spherical particles interacting through elastic hard collisions. For a generic transport law for particle uptake and release, the efficiency at maximum power $\\eta$ takes the form 1/2+c\\Delta \\mu + O(\\Delta \\mu^2), with 1/2 a universal constant and $\\Delta \\mu$ the chemical potential difference between the particle reservoirs. The linear coefficient c is zero for engines featuring a so-called left/right symmetry or particle fluxes that are antisymmetric in the applied chemical potential difference. Remarkably, the leading constant in $\\eta$ is non-universal with respect to an exceptional modification of the transport law. For a nonlinear transport model we obtain \\eta = 1/(\\theta +1), with \\theta >0 the power of $\\Delta \\mu$ in the transport equation

  5. Fracture Toughness and Maximum Stress in a Disordered Lattice System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiyori Urabe; Shinji Takesue

    2008-12-29

    Fracture in a disordered lattice system is studied. In our system, particles are initially arranged on the triangular lattice and each nearest-neighbor pair is connected with a randomly chosen soft or hard Hookean spring. Every spring has the common threshold of stress at which it is cut. We make an initial crack and expand the system perpendicularly to the crack. We find that the maximum stress in the stress-strain curve is larger than those in the systems with soft or hard springs only (uniform systems). Energy required to advance fracture is also larger in some disordered systems, which indicates that the fracture toughness improves. The increase of the energy is caused by the following two factors. One is that the soft spring is able to hold larger energy than the hard one. The other is that the number of cut springs increases as the fracture surface becomes tortuous in disordered systems.

  6. Speech processing using conditional observable maximum likelihood continuity mapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hogden, John; Nix, David

    2004-01-13

    A computer implemented method enables the recognition of speech and speech characteristics. Parameters are initialized of first probability density functions that map between the symbols in the vocabulary of one or more sequences of speech codes that represent speech sounds and a continuity map. Parameters are also initialized of second probability density functions that map between the elements in the vocabulary of one or more desired sequences of speech transcription symbols and the continuity map. The parameters of the probability density functions are then trained to maximize the probabilities of the desired sequences of speech-transcription symbols. A new sequence of speech codes is then input to the continuity map having the trained first and second probability function parameters. A smooth path is identified on the continuity map that has the maximum probability for the new sequence of speech codes. The probability of each speech transcription symbol for each input speech code can then be output.

  7. RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document # 04 to LBNL #12;RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document.03.001.000, Rev. 3 Issue Management Program Application 11-30-13 IMPACT Impact is determined by considering what

  8. Dynamically Close Galaxy Pairs and Merger Rate Evolution in the CNOC2 Redshift Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Patton; C. J. Pritchet; R. G. Carlberg; R. O. Marzke; H. K. C. Yee; P. B. Hall; H. Lin; S. L. Morris; M. Sawicki; C. W. Shepherd; G. D. Wirth

    2001-09-24

    We investigate redshift evolution in the galaxy merger and accretion rates, using a well-defined sample of 4184 galaxies with 0.12 < z < 0.55 and R_C < 21.5. We identify 88 galaxies in close (5 < r_p < 20 h^{-1} kpc) dynamical (delta v < 500 km/s) pairs. These galaxies are used to compute global pair statistics, after accounting for selection effects resulting from the flux limit, k-corrections, luminosity evolution, and spectroscopic incompleteness. We find that the number of companions per galaxy (for -21 < M_B^{k,e} < -18) is Nc = 0.0321 +/- 0.0077 at z=0.3. The luminosity in companions, per galaxy, is Lc = 0.0294 +/- 0.0084 x 10^10 h^2 L_sun. We assume that Nc is proportional to the galaxy merger rate, while Lc is directly related to the mass accretion rate. After increasing the maximum pair separation to 50 h^{-1} kpc, and comparing with the low redshift SSRS2 pairs sample, we infer evolution in the galaxy merger and accretion rates of (1+z)^{2.3 +/- 0.7} and (1+z)^{2.3 +/- 0.9} respectively. These are the first such estimates to be made using only confirmed dynamical pairs. When combined with several additional assumptions, this implies that approximately 15% of present epoch galaxies with -21 < M_B < -18 have undergone a major merger since z=1.

  9. Lesson 22 Related Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-11

    Oct 11, 2013 ... A spherical weather balloon is being inflated with helium at a rate of 82 cubic meters per minute. Find the rate at which its radius is increasing.

  10. Naughton's related rates problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dominic

    2013-02-25

    Related rates (1). (1) Oil spills from a rupture container in a circular pattern whose radius increases at a rate of 2 ft/s. How fast is the area of the oil spill increasing ...

  11. Maximum Entropy Analysis of the Spectral Functions in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asakawa; T. Hatsuda; Y. Nakahara

    2001-02-26

    First principle calculation of the QCD spectral functions (SPFs) based on the lattice QCD simulations is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the Bayesian inference theory and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), which is a useful tool to extract SPFs from the imaginary-time correlation functions numerically obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Three important aspects of MEM are (i) it does not require a priori assumptions or parametrizations of SPFs, (ii) for given data, a unique solution is obtained if it exists, and (iii) the statistical significance of the solution can be quantitatively analyzed. The ability of MEM is explicitly demonstrated by using mock data as well as lattice QCD data. When applied to lattice data, MEM correctly reproduces the low-energy resonances and shows the existence of high-energy continuum in hadronic correlation functions. This opens up various possibilities for studying hadronic properties in QCD beyond the conventional way of analyzing the lattice data. Future problems to be studied by MEM in lattice QCD are also summarized.

  12. Improved Maximum Entropy Method with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2012-08-25

    We report on an improvement to the implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). It amounts to departing from the search space obtained through a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Kernel. Based on the shape of the SVD basis functions we argue that the MEM spectrum for given $N_\\tau$ data-points $D(\\tau)$ and prior information $m(\\omega)$ does not in general lie in this $N_\\tau$ dimensional singular subspace. Systematically extending the search basis will eventually recover the full search space and the correct extremum. We illustrate this idea through a mock data analysis inspired by actual lattice spectra, to show where our improvement becomes essential for the success of the MEM. To remedy the shortcomings of Bryan's SVD prescription we propose to use the real Fourier basis, which consists of trigonometric functions. Not only does our approach lead to more stable numerical behavior, as the SVD is not required for the determination of the basis functions, but also the resolution of the MEM becomes independent from the position of the reconstructed peaks.

  13. The Multi-Mission Maximum Likelihood framework (3ML)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vianello, Giacomo; Younk, Patrick; Tibaldo, Luigi; Burgess, James M; Ayala, Hugo; Harding, Patrick; Hui, Michelle; Omodei, Nicola; Zhou, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are now observed by many different instruments at different wavelengths, from radio to high-energy gamma-rays, with an unprecedented quality. Putting all these data together to form a coherent view, however, is a very difficult task. Each instrument has its own data format, software and analysis procedure, which are difficult to combine. It is for example very challenging to perform a broadband fit of the energy spectrum of the source. The Multi-Mission Maximum Likelihood framework (3ML) aims to solve this issue, providing a common framework which allows for a coherent modeling of sources using all the available data, independent of their origin. At the same time, thanks to its architecture based on plug-ins, 3ML uses the existing official software of each instrument for the corresponding data in a way which is transparent to the user. 3ML is based on the likelihood formalism, in which a model summarizing our knowledge about a particular region of the sky is convolved with the instrument...

  14. Maximum gravitational-wave energy emissible in magnetar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; Benjamin J. Owen

    2011-02-16

    Recent searches of gravitational-wave (GW) data raise the question of what maximum GW energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies (\\sim 10^{49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001)] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10^{48}-10^{49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.

  15. Large deviations of the maximum of independent and identically distributed random variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierpaolo Vivo

    2015-07-20

    A pedagogical account of some aspects of Extreme Value Statistics (EVS) is presented from the somewhat non-standard viewpoint of Large Deviation Theory. We address the following problem: given a set of $N$ i.i.d. random variables $\\{X_1,\\ldots,X_N\\}$ drawn from a parent probability density function (pdf) $p(x)$, what is the probability that the maximum value of the set $X_{\\mathrm{max}}=\\max_i X_i$ is "atypically larger" than expected? The cases of exponential and Gaussian distributed variables are worked out in detail, and the right rate function for a general pdf in the Gumbel basin of attraction is derived. The Gaussian case convincingly demonstrates that the full rate function cannot be determined from the knowledge of the limiting distribution (Gumbel) alone, thus implying that it indeed carries additional information. Given the simplicity and richness of the result and its derivation, its absence from textbooks, tutorials and lecture notes on EVS for physicists appears inexplicable.

  16. The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power by the theoretical maximum energy production if the generator were running at its rated power all the year turbine Rated Power per turbine: assumption 1,500 kW C Availability assumption 97% D 8,760 hrs/year E

  17. 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" The intent of this recommendation is to...

  18. Comparisons of the SCDAP computer code with bundle data under severe accident conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.; Beers, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The SCDAP computer code, which is being developed under the sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, models the progression of light water reactor core damage including core heatup, core disruption and debris formation, debris heatup, and debris melting. SCDAP is being used to help identify and understand the phenomena that control core behavior during a severe accident, to help quantify uncertainties in risk assessment analysis, and to support planning and interpretation of severe fuel damage experiments and data. Comparisons between SCDAP calculations and the experimental data showed good agreement. Calculated and measured bundle temperatures for SFD-ST were within 200 K for the entire bundle and within 20 K for maximum cladding temperatures. For ESSI-2, calculated and measured maximum cladding temperatures were within 50 K, and the extensive liquefaction and relocation that was calculated was in agreement with experimental results.

  19. Uncertainties and severe-accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Severe-accident management can be defined as the use of existing and or alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. Together with risk management (e.g., changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-indepth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments have been completed, which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities, and can be categorized as (a) dominant sequences with respect to core-melt frequency, (b) dominant sequences with respect to various risk measures, (c) dominant threats that challenge safety functions, and (d) dominant threats with respect to failure of safety systems. Severe-accident management strategies can be generically classified as (a) use of alternative resources, (b) use of alternative equipment, and (c) use of alternative actions. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These include (a) uncertainty in key phenomena, (b) uncertainty in operator behavior, (c) uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and (d) uncertainty in information availability (i.e., instrumentation). This paper focuses on phenomenological uncertainties associated with severe-accident management strategies.

  20. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

  1. Intraclass Price Elasticity & Electric Rate Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gresham, K. E.

    1987-01-01

    beyond this becomes more elastic as usage increases. In the book "Innovative Electric, Rates," John Chamberlin and Charles Dickson utilize an economic model to test conservation programs. This model utilizes intrac1ass price elasticities and has a.... Utilities must rely on customer data and intuition to estimate customer response to rate changes. These methods have several downfalls. First, the customer data may not reflect customer behavior in an economic downturn. Second, the data may not exactly...

  2. Effect of mono- and dichromatic light quality on growth rates and photosynthetic performance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Konopka, Allan; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Zhang, Shuyi; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2014-09-19

    Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was grown to steady state in optically thin turbidostat cultures under conditions for which light quantity and quality was systematically varied by modulating the output of narrow-band LEDs. Cells were provided photons absorbed primarily by chlorophyll (680 nm) or phycocyanin (630 nm) as the organism was subjected to four distinct mono- and dichromatic regimes. During cultivation with dichromatic light, growth rates displayed by Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 were generally proportional to the total incident irradiance at values < 275 µmol photons m-2 s-1 and were not affected by the ratio of 630:680 nm wavelengths. Notably, under monochromatic light conditions, cultures exhibited similar growth rates only when they were irradiated with 630 nm light; cultures irradiated with only 680 nm light grew at rates that were 60 – 70% of those under other light quality regimes at equivalent irradiances. The functionality of photosystem II and associated processes such as maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport, rate of cyclic electron flow, and rate of dark respiration generally increased as a function of growth rate. Nonetheless, some of the photophysiological parameters measured here displayed distinct patterns with respect to growth rate of cultures adapted to a single wavelength including phycobiliprotein content, which increased under severely light-limited growth conditions. Additionally, the ratio of photosystem II to photosystem I increased approximately 40% over the range of growth rates, although cells grown with 680 nm light only had the highest ratios. These results suggest the presence of effective mechanisms which allow acclimation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 acclimation to different irradiance conditions.

  3. Fuel performance during severe accidents. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. This program is underway in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In preparation for the first test, predictions have been performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer. This paper presents the calculated results showing a slow heatup to 2400 K over 5 hours, and the analysis includes accelerated oxidation of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1850 K.

  4. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-08-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-italic-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-italic-function is discussed in physical terms.

  5. LCC Guidance Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

  6. NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-16

    NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

  7. Climatological assessment of recent severe weather events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Changnon, S.A.

    1997-11-01

    A climatological assessment of a series of exceptionally severe and damaging storms during 1991-1994 was pursued to put these events and their frequency and intensity/severity into a temporal perspective. The severe weather events were assessed according to the damage they caused. Insurance-derived measures of property and crop losses due to weather were used in this study; these measures adjust individual storm losses to changing socioeconomic conditions. Two methods were used to assess the events: (1) a comparative analysis of event frequency, losses and intensity with those in the preceding 40 years, and (2) a comparison of temporal variations of the 1949-1994 events with fluctuations in population, cyclonic activity, and temperatures. The results showed that the 1991-1994 property losses ranked high in number and amount of loss. However, storm intensity was found to be higher in the 1950s. The temporal distributions of the catastrophes and crop losses were well related to North American cyclonic activity, and when cyclonic activity, U.S. mean temperatures, and population were combined, they explained 865 of the variability found in the frequency of catastrophes during 1949-1994. The results suggest that, although the severe weather events in 1991-1994 were exceptionally high in frequency and losses, much of the loss was a result of the ever increasing target at risk. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. OTHER SEVERE WEATHER CONDITIONS THUNDERSTORMS, LIGHTNING, FLOODING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    to drain accumulated water. In flood areas, it is difficult to judge water depth. Water only inches deep can be next to water that is several feet deep. As little as one foot of water can move most cars off doors, windows and electrical appliances. STAY OFF the phone. AVOID water, high ground, open spaces

  9. OTHER SEVERE WEATHER CONDITIONS THUNDERSTORMS, LIGHTNING, FLOODING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    . · Water only inches deep can be next to water that is several feet deep. · As little as one foot of water. · STAY AWAY from doors, windows and electrical appliances. · STAY OFF the phone. · AVOID water, high more difficult to drain accumulated water. · In flood areas, it is difficult to judge water depth

  10. Sisl: Several Interfaces, Single Logic Thomas Ballz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Läufer, Konstantin

    Sisl: Several Interfaces, Single Logic Thomas Ballz Christopher Colby+ Peter Danielseny Lalita such as information and e-commerce services are becoming increasingly more flexible in the types of user interfaces they support. These interfaces incorporate automatic speech recognition and natural language understanding

  11. The Silicon and Calcium High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xulin; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., SiII 5972 and SiII 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., dm15(B)<1.4 mag), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. (2014) for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in fast-expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that the Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia having slower SiII 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., Vsi). This difference can be due to that the HVFs in fast-expanding SNe Ia usually disappear more rapidly and are easily blended with the photospheric components when approaching the maximum light. Mor...

  12. Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w w w.pv - te ch.orgPower PlantRates >

  13. Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w w w.pv - te ch.orgPower PlantRates >

  14. Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | FY

  15. Previous Power Rates (rates/current)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal PlumesPress1,Previous EventsRates

  16. Specific topics in severe accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, J.F.; Chung, D.T.; Panciera, V.W.; Traver, L.E.; Humphries, D.S. (SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This report examines five topical areas of concern to severe accident management. These areas are as follows: Human Factors, Accident Management During Shutdown, Information Needs, Long-term Implications, and Uncertainties. The objective of this report is to assist the NRC in performing its research function and to provide guidance to the industry on accident management strategies, as well as to accident management programs in general. 47 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Method of assessing severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.; Jae, M.; Lim, H.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Swider, J.; Xing, L.; Yu, D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Accident management can be defined as the innovative use of existing and or alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a severe accident. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) have been completed that yield the principal plant vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities can be categorized as (1) dominant sequences with respect to core-melt frequency. (2) dominant sequences with respect to various risk measures. (3) dominant threats that challenge safety functions. (4) dominant threats with respect to failure of safety systems. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These considerations include uncertainties in key phenomena, operator behavior, system availability and behavior, and available information. This paper presents a methodology for assessing severe accident management strategies given the key uncertainties delineated at two workshops held at the University of California, Los Angeles. Based on decision trees and influence diagrams, the methodology is currently being applied to two case studies: cavity flooding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) to prevent vessel penetration or failure, and drywell flooding in a boiling water reactor to prevent vessel and/or containment failure.

  18. CYP3A Mediated Ketamine Metabolism is Severely Impaired in Liver S9 Fractions from Aging Sprague Dawley Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Santamaria; Marie-Chantal Giroux; Pascal Vachon; Francis Beaudry

    2015-09-25

    Ketamine is widely used in veterinary medicine and in medicine. Ketamine is metabolized to its active metabolite norketamine principally by liver CYP3A. Drug metabolism alterations during aging have severe consequences particularly in anesthesiology and very few studies on older animals were conducted for ketamine. The objective of the present study is to assess the influence of aging on CYP3A metabolism of ketamine. Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6, 12 and 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were prepared and Michaelis-Menten parameters were determined for primary metabolic pathways. The derived maximum enzyme velocity (i.e. Vmax) suggests a rapid saturation of the CYP3A enzyme active sites in liver S9 fractions of 18-month old rats. Observed Vmax for Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6 and 12 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were 2.39 (+-0.23), 2.61 (+-0.18), and 2.07 (+-0.07) respectively compared to 0.68 (+-0.02) for Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, we observed a 6 to 7 fold change in the derived Km when comparing Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats with Liver S9 fractions from younger rats. Our results suggest that rat CYP3A enzyme undergoes conformational changes with age particularly in our geriatric group (e.g. 18 month rats) leading significant decrease in the rate of formation of norketamine. Moreover, our results strongly suggest a severe impairment of CYP3A ketamine mediated metabolism.

  19. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore »result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  20. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  1. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulation and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  2. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 3.98 4.17 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  3. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.17 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  4. 2012 Transmission Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for HLH and LLH. 2. OTHER RATE PROVISIONS a. BPA Incremental Cost BPA's incremental cost will be based on an hourly energy index in the Pacific Northwest. If no adequate...

  5. Severe Weather on the Web: Computer Lab for WEST Severe Weather Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    Severe Weather on the Web: Computer Lab for WEST Severe Weather Module Summary: Students Weather Service-- National Weather Hazards Website: http://www.weather.gov/view/largemap.php --This termforecasts in the lower 48 USstates. Definitions Forecast--The prediction of what the weather

  6. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  7. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA...

  8. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy, SCHEDULE FOR CHIEF...

  9. Severe Accident Studies | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to theDepartmentWorkalong ColumbiaSevere

  10. Maximum allowable hydraulic ram force for heel jet removal Tank 241-C-106

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAULSEN, S.S.

    2003-01-10

    This document contains an evaluation of the maximum force that can be used to actuate the hydraulic ram assembly without causing permanent damage to the riser or pit.

  11. Regularization of Tunneling Rates with Quantum Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pecora, Louis M; Wu, Dong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We study tunneling in various shaped, closed, two-dimensional, flat potential, double wells by calculating the energy splitting between symmetric and anti-symmetric state pairs. For shapes that have regular or nearly regular classical behavior (e.g. rectangular or circular) the tunneling rates vary greatly over wide ranges often by several orders of magnitude. However, for well shapes that admit more classically chaotic behavior (e.g. the stadium, the Sinai billiard) the range of tunneling rates narrows, often by orders of magnitude. This dramatic narrowing appears to come from destabilization of periodic orbits in the regular wells that produce the largest and smallest tunneling rates and causes the splitting vs. energy relation to take on a possibly universal shape. It is in this sense that we say the quantum chaos regularizes the tunneling rates.

  12. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  13. INEL BWR severe accidnet ATWS study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jouse, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The subject of this study is a postulate Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) at unit one of the Browns Ferry nuclear plant, a boiling water reactor (BWR). The development work is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It has long been recognized that the dominant ATWS transient in BWRs is the main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure pressurization type of event. The analytic tool used in this study is RELAP5/MOD1.6. This version of RELAP5 has the capability to simulate BWR plants in that several special process models, such as a jet pump momentum mixer model, have been installed.

  14. Nuclear astrophysical plasmas: ion distribution functions and fusion rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Lissia; Piero Quarati

    2005-11-15

    This article illustrates how very small deviations from the Maxwellian exponential tail, while leaving unchanged bulk quantities, can yield dramatic effects on fusion reaction rates and discuss several mechanisms that can cause such deviations.

  15. Tsallis distribution as a standard maximum entropy solution with `tail' constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bercher, Jean-François

    Tsallis distribution as a standard maximum entropy solution with `tail' constraint J.-F. Bercher 1 that Tsallis' distributions can be derived from the standard (Shannon) maximum entropy setting, by incorporating a con- straint on the divergence between the distribution and another distribution imagined as its

  16. MAXIMUM POWER ESTIMATION OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES ACCOUNTING FOR THERMAL AND ELECTRICAL CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    MAXIMUM POWER ESTIMATION OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES ACCOUNTING FOR THERMAL AND ELECTRICAL CONSTRAINTS on the maximum deliverable power is essential to protect lithium-ion batteries from over- charge Terminal voltage Voc Open circuit voltage of a battery 1 INTRODUCTION Lithium-ion batteries have been used

  17. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones Abstract--Battery life of commercial chargers using solar power have been developed. They focus on correct functionality, but system chargers do not perform the maximum power point tracking [2], [3] of the solar panel. We exclude

  18. Maximum Weight Matching Dispatching Scheme in Buffered Clos-Network Packet Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    Maximum Weight Matching Dispatching Scheme in Buffered Clos-Network Packet Switches Roberto Rojas of Clos-network switches make them an alternative to single-stages switches for implementing large- size packet switches. This paper introduces a cell dispatching scheme, called maximum weight matching

  19. Analysis and Optimization of Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    characteristic. This perturbation reduces the power obtained from the solar panel because the panel is no longerAnalysis and Optimization of Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems. Noise is an essential

  20. GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR MAXIMUM (2000)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR during solar minimum (1995-1996) and solar maximum (2000) periods are obtained. It is observed that solar significant correlations during both solar maximum and solar minimum. The dynamic pressure variation, however

  1. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  2. Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Dylan

    Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain- posphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument. Enhanced CO is observed over the Zagros mountains of Iran), Carbon monoxide (CO) maximum over the Zagros mountains in the Middle East: Signature of mountain venting

  3. Second Order Phase Transition in Neural Rate Coding: Binary Encoding is Optimal for Rapid Signal Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreiter, Andreas K.

    Second Order Phase Transition in Neural Rate Coding: Binary Encoding is Optimal for Rapid Signal firing rate. A phase transition towards pure binary encoding occurs if the maximum mean spike count of a second-order phase transition. The analytically derived critical decoding time window length

  4. Maximal heart rates of 130140beats min-1 have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) (Brill, 1987;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Barbara A.

    Maximal heart rates of 130­140beats min-1 have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) (Brill, 1987; Farrell et al., 1992; Keen et al., 1995). These heart rates slightly exceed the suggested, skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154­191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell et

  5. Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

    2010-03-01

    An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

  6. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  7. Maximum Likelihood Signal Extraction Method Applied to 3.4 years of CoGeNT Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Aalseth; P. S. Barbeau; J. Diaz Leon; J. E. Fast; T. W. Hossbach; A. Knecht; M. S. Kos; M. G. Marino; H. S. Miley; M. L. Miller; J. L. Orrell

    2015-02-05

    CoGeNT has taken data for over 3 years, with 1136 live days of data accumulated as of April 23, 2013. We report on the results of a maximum likelihood analysis to extract any possible dark matter signal present in the collected data. The maximum likelihood signal extraction uses 2-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) to characterize the anticipated variations in dark matter interaction rates for given observable nuclear recoil energies during differing periods of the Earth's annual orbit around the Sun. Cosmogenic and primordial radioactivity backgrounds are characterized by their energy signatures and in some cases decay half-lives. A third parameterizing variable -- pulse rise-time -- is added to the likelihood analysis to characterize slow rising pulses described in prior analyses. The contribution to each event category is analyzed for various dark matter signal hypotheses including a dark matter standard halo model and a case with free oscillation parameters (i.e., amplitude, period, and phase). The best-fit dark matter signal is in close proximity to previously reported results. We find that the significance of the extracted dark matter signal remains well below evidentiary at 1.7 $\\sigma$.

  8. Joint Optimization of Communication Rates and Linear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint Optimization of Communication Rates and Linear Systems L. Xiao M. Johansson H. Hindi S. Boyd system, such as a controller or estimator, in which several signals are transmitted over communication in the design of networked controllers and the associated communication systems, including bit rate limitations

  9. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01

    below the header pressure have the added advantage of reducing the air consumption of equipment, as well as reducing the leak rate. Turn Off the Air to Idle Equipment In most plants, when production equipment operators shut off their equipment... of the reason why plant personnel often find leak repair unproductive. The other reason relates to the compressor controls. If the plant had several lubricated rotary screw compressors operating in modulation, repairing 2,000 cfm in leaks may only reduce...

  10. The maximum efficiency of nano heat engines depends on more than temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mischa P. Woods; Nelly Ng; Stephanie Wehner

    2015-06-07

    Sadi Carnot's theorem regarding the maximum efficiency of heat engines is considered to be of fundamental importance in the theory of heat engines and thermodynamics. Here, we show that at the nano and quantum scale, this law needs to be revised in the sense that more information about the bath other than its temperature is required to decide whether maximum efficiency can be achieved. In particular, we derive new fundamental limitations of the efficiency of heat engines at the nano and quantum scale that show that the Carnot efficiency can only be achieved under special circumstances, and we derive a new maximum efficiency for others.

  11. A low-dimensional dynamic model of severe slugging for control design and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    . The prerequisites for this to occur are relatively low pipeline pressure and flow rates. Gravity induced slugs the topside (or wellhead) choke valve. However, the increased pressure drop will lower oil recoveryA low-dimensional dynamic model of severe slugging for control design and analysis Espen Storkaas

  12. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  13. Current Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in ActinideRail betweenProtectionCurrentJobPower-Rates

  14. Rate Case Elements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | Careers |

  15. Rate Design and Renewables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | Careers

  16. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists...

  17. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electricity assessment + NEP, nepdg95019750.pdf Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy More Documents & Publications Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable...

  18. Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12,...

  19. CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 3, 2013 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - January 3, 2013 January 3, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events for...

  20. CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 21, 2012 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 August 21, 2012 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the...

  1. MA 222 - Exam 3 Statistics (scores are out of 100 points maximum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-12-04

    Statistics (scores are out of 100 points maximum): Section. 031. 061. # Entered. 30. 29. Average. 64.46 60.55. Max. 94. 91. Min. 39. 21. Standard Deviation 15.3.

  2. MA 222 - Exam 1 Statistics (scores are out of 100 points maximum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26

    Statistics (scores are out of 100 points maximum): Section. 031. 061. # Entered. 30. 34. Average. 64.47 66.74. Max. 99. 94. Min. 18. 14. Standard Deviation 19.65

  3. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  4. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency ...

  5. Computation of the maximum loadability of a power system using nonlinear optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khabirov, Abdufarrukh

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, power systems have undergone radical changes by becoming deregulated. Many electric companies have met new requirements and found ways to keep up with the changes in power systems. Issues of transfer capability and maximum...

  6. Submodule Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.

    This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use of submodule integrated maximum power point trackers (MPPT). We propose a system architecture that provides ...

  7. Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dail, Holly Janine

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

  8. Maximum a Posteriori Models for Cortical Modeling: Feature Detectors, Topography and Modularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Cornelius

    Maximum a Posteriori Models for Cortical Modeling: Feature Detectors, Topography and Modularity Modeling: Feature Detectors, Topography and Modularity PhD Thesis by Cornelius Weber, Berlin, July 31, 2000

  9. Models for estimating saturation flow and maximum demand at closely spaced intersections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanduri, Sreelata

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes models for saturation flow and maximum demand at closely spaced intersections. The effects of queue interaction between these two intersections are taken into account in both models. The saturation flow model is based...

  10. Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

  11. Maximum Likelihood Estimation for the Proportional Odds Model with Random Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Donglin

    Maximum Likelihood Estimation for the Proportional Odds Model with Random Effects DONGLIN ZENG, D. Y. LIN, and GUOSHENG YIN In this article, we study the semiparametric proportional odds model; Frailty model; Linear transformation model; Proportional hazards; Semiparametric efficiency; Survival data

  12. A Maximum Likelihood Method with Penalty to Estimate Link Travel Time Based on Trip Itinerary Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Chujun

    2014-12-15

    Travel time is an important network performance measure. It is a challenging subject due to the fluctuations in traffic characteristics, such as traffic flow. This study proposes a maximum likelihood method with penalty ...

  13. World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2007, p. 19 Craig A. Severance, CPA is co-author of The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to serve. High electric rates may seriously impact utility customers and make nuclear utilities' service as deficient in renewable energy resources. These utilities are now exploring new nuclear power. Estimates of New Nuclear Power Craig A. Severance Several U.S. utilities are now advancing proposals for a new

  14. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  15. Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    , 1982), the dose-response relationship (Zellner and Rossi, 1984), the Keynesian savings rate in Haavelmo

  16. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  17. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology Estimating Spatially Varying Severity Thresholds of the Forest Fire Danger Rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Brian J.

    State University, University Park, PA 16802, U.S.A. 5 Brian J. Reich Dept of Statistics, North Carolina meteorological elements. It combines information on wind speed, temperature, relative humidity and recent. Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation #12;Response

  18. Bubble growth rates in boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1956-01-01

    The conditions determining the growth rate of a bubble on a surface in boiling are considered and a mathematical model framed in the light of these conditions. The growth rate is then calculated for bubbles growing under ...

  19. Spectral Modeling of SNe Ia Near Maximum Light: Probing the Characteristics of Hydro Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Baron; S. Bongard; David Branch; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2006-03-03

    We have performed detailed NLTE spectral synthesis modeling of 2 types of 1-D hydro models: the very highly parameterized deflagration model W7, and two delayed detonation models. We find that overall both models do about equally well at fitting well observed SNe Ia near to maximum light. However, the Si II 6150 feature of W7 is systematically too fast, whereas for the delayed detonation models it is also somewhat too fast, but significantly better than that of W7. We find that a parameterized mixed model does the best job of reproducing the Si II 6150 line near maximum light and we study the differences in the models that lead to better fits to normal SNe Ia. We discuss what is required of a hydro model to fit the spectra of observed SNe Ia near maximum light.

  20. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels for the 9977 shipping package using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum for each isotope generated using the ORIGEN-S and RASTA computer codes was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits contained in 10 CFR 71.47 for dose rate at the surface of the package is determined. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

  1. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  2. Commercial Building Asset Rating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

  3. Methane oxidation rates by AMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pack, M; Heintz, M; ReeburGh, WS; Trumbore, SE; Valentine, DL; Xu, X

    2009-01-01

    second case. Number of cases Methane oxidation rates by AMSIn the marine environment methane (CH 4 ) oxidation consumes

  4. Evaluation of surfactants as steam diverters/mobility control agents in light oil steamfloods: Effect of oil composition, rates and experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1991-12-01

    A series of experiments was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercially available surfactants for steam-foam EOR applications in light oil reservoirs. The experiments were performed in a 3-ft long, 1-1/2 in.-diameter cylindrical sandpack of about 1 darcy permeability. The sandpack and injected fluids were preheated to 430{degree}F at 155 psi. The main objective of these tests was to investigate the effectiveness of several surfactants in providing mobility control under a variety of conditions expected in light-oil steamfloods. Thus, maximum pressure-rise and foam-bank buildup/decay were noted as operating conditions were changed in a test or in various tests. Tests were performed with various oil types, sacrificial salts, injection rates, injection strategies, vapor-to-liquid fractions (VLF), and steam/N{sub 2} ratios (SNR).

  5. Severe plastic deformation of difficult-to-work alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapici, Guney Guven

    2004-09-30

    The present work aims to reveal the microstructural evolution and post-processing mechanical behavior of difficult-to-work alloys upon severe plastic deformation. Severe plastic deformation is applied using equal channel ...

  6. Intelligent weather agent for aircraft severe weather avoidance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokadia, Sangeeta

    2002-01-01

    Severe weather conditions pose a large threat to the safety of aircraft, since they are responsible for a large percentage of aviation related accidents. With the advent of the free flight environment, the exigency for an autonomous severe weather...

  7. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donde, Vaibhav; Lopez, Vanessa; Lesieutre, Bernard; Pinar, Ali; Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan

    2008-01-01

    desired severity of the blackout. P 1 X 2 =j0.33 X 3 =j0.14to dramatic and costly blackouts. Plan- ning and operatingavoid a potentially severe blackout, such that this minimal

  8. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donde, Vaibhav

    2010-01-01

    desired severity of the blackout. P 1 X 2 =j0.33 X 3 =j0.14to dramatic and costly blackouts. Plan- ning and operatingavoid a potentially severe blackout, such that this minimal

  9. EM Receives Several Honors in 2011 DOE Sustainability Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several EM employees, projects and teams were honored as part of the 2011 DOE Sustainability Awards announced this week.

  10. Severe tempering of bainite generated at low transformation temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    ]. This is because unlike martensite, the strength of bainitic steels depends less on solid­ solution strengtheningUniversity of Cambridge, Materials Science and Metallurgy, U.K. The response of a strong bainitic­steel to tempering. Thermodynamic calculations conducted to determine the maximum temperature at which the steel could be annealed

  11. Toward the Long-range Prediction of Severe Convective Windstorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Toward the Long-range Prediction of Severe Convective Windstorms Ken Pryor Department review pertaining to severe convective windstorm (SCW) structure and evolution. · Identify potential for the development of a long-range SCW prediction technique. #12;Background · Severe windstorms resulting from large

  12. Air pollution and asthma severity in adults Rage Estelle 1 *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Air pollution and asthma severity in adults Rage Estelle 1 * , Siroux Val rieé 2 , K nzliü Nino 3 4 that exposure to air pollution affects asthma, but the effect of air pollution on asthma severity has not been outdoor concentrations of air pollution. Methods Asthma severity over the last 12 months was assessed

  13. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGovern, Amy

    UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY, JEFFREY BASARA5, AND JOHN K. WILLIAMS6 Abstract. Major severe weather events can cause a significant loss through the mining of severe weather data. Because weather is inherently a spatiotemporal phenomenon

  14. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan Srinivasan (PI); Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

    2006-06-30

    Metals with grain sizes smaller than 1-micrometer have received much attention in the past decade. These materials have been classified as ultra fine grain (UFG) materials (grain sizes in the range of 100 to 1000-nm) and nano-materials (grain size <100-nm) depending on the grain size. This report addresses the production of bulk UFG metals through the use of severe plastic deformation processing, and their subsequent use as stock material for further thermomechanical processing, such as forging. A number of severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods for producing bulk UFG metals have been developed since the early 1990s. The most promising of these processes for producing large size stock that is suitable for forging is the equal channel angular extrusion or pressing (ECAE/P) process. This process involves introducing large shear strain in the work-piece by pushing it through a die that consists of two channels with the same cross-sectional shape that meet at an angle to each other. Since the cross-sections of the two channels are the same, the extruded product can be re-inserted into the entrance channel and pushed again through the die. Repeated extrusion through the ECAE/P die accumulates sufficient strain to breakdown the microstructure and produce ultra fine grain size. It is well known that metals with very fine grain sizes (< 10-micrometer) have higher strain rate sensitivity and greater elongation to failure at elevated temperature, exhibiting superplastic behavior. However, this superplastic behavior is usually manifest at high temperature (> half the melting temperature on the absolute scale) and very low strain rates (< 0.0001/s). UFG metals have been shown to exhibit superplastic characteristics at lower temperature and higher strain rates, making this phenomenon more practical for manufacturing. This enables part unitization and forging more complex and net shape parts. Laboratory studies have shown that this is particularly true for UFG metals produced by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging temperatures can also be reduced by over 150ºC, resulting in energy savings in the ope

  15. Wholesale Power Rate Schedules | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rate Schedules Wholesale Power Rate Schedules Wholesale Power Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System:...

  16. Optimal measurements for the discrimination of quantum states with a fixed rate of inconclusive results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrike Herzog

    2015-04-30

    We study the discrimination of N mixed quantum states in an optimal measurement that maximizes the probability of correct results while the probability of inconclusive results is fixed at a given value. After considering the discrimination of N states in a d-dimensional Hilbert space, we focus on the discrimination of qubit states. We develop a method to determine an optimal measurement for discriminating arbitrary qubit states, taking into account that often the optimal measurement is not unique and the maximum probability of correct results can be achieved by several different measurements. Analytical results are derived for a number of examples, mostly for the discrimination between qubit states which possess a partial symmetry, but also for discriminating N equiprobable qubit states and for the dicrimination between a pure and a uniformly mixed state in d dimensions. In the special case where the fixed rate of inconclusive results is equal to zero, our method provides a treatment for the minimum-error discrimination of arbitrary qubit states which differs from previous approaches.

  17. Is the Use of a Surrogate Urethra an Option in Prostate High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Josef Kaelkner, Karl Mikael; Berg, Lars; Levitt, Seymour; Holmberg, Carina; Nilsson, Sten; Lundell, Marie

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and the dosimetric consequences of substituting a surrogate urethra assumed to be at the geometric center of the prostate, in place of the true urethra when using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred prostate cancer patients treated with HDR brachytherapy constituted the study group. A pre-plan was made with the urethra visualized. The true urethra was defined, and a surrogate urethra was placed at the geometric center of the prostate. The distance between the two urethras was measured. The deviation was evaluated at the base, middle, and apex. To evaluate the dosimetric consequences for the true urethra when using a surrogate urethra, two different dose plans were made: one based on the true urethra and one based on the surrogate urethra. The dose-volume histograms for the true urethra were analyzed. Results: The deviation between the true urethra and the surrogate urethra was greatest at the base of the prostate. A statistically significant difference was seen between the dosimetric parameters for the true and the surrogate urethra when the dose plan was made using the surrogate urethra. In this situation the dose to the true urethra was increased above our defined maximum tolerance limit. Conclusions: When using dose plans made according to a surrogate urethra the dose to the true urethra might be too high to be acceptable. If the true urethra is not visualized, severe damage could easily develop in a significant number of patients.

  18. Basic Theory in Construction of Boolean Functions with Maximum Possible Annihilator Immunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Basic Theory in Construction of Boolean Functions with Maximum Possible Annihilator Immunity #3. In this paper we present a construction keeping in mind the basic theory of annihilator immunity the basic theory. Most importantly, the cryptographic properties of our constructions, such as nonlinearity

  19. Basic Theory in Construction of Boolean Functions with Maximum Possible Annihilator Immunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Basic Theory in Construction of Boolean Functions with Maximum Possible Annihilator Immunity Deepak present a construction keeping in mind the basic theory of annihilator immunity. This construction immunity that comes from the basic theory. Most importantly, the cryptographic properties of our

  20. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic procedure to be a very significant enhancement of the LSC-IVR for correlation functions of both linear method is used to extend the range of accuracy of the linearized semiclassical initial value

  1. Regression Model for Daily Maximum Stream Temperature David W. Neumann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    Regression Model for Daily Maximum Stream Temperature David W. Neumann1 ; Balaji Rajagopalan2 for the summer period. The model is created using a stepwise linear regression procedure to select significant-9372 2003 129:7 667 CE Database subject headings: Decision support systems; Regression models; California

  2. Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Dave

    Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use, interest in renewable energy sources has in- creased. Among these, solar photovoltaic (PV) energy has seen

  3. Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Dave

    Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications 2012. Abstract--This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic, interest in renewable energy sources has in- creased. Among these, solar photovoltaic (PV) energy has seen

  4. Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamhane, Ajit C.

    Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

  5. On the Stochastic Maximum Principle in Optimal Control of Degenerate Diffusions with Lipschitz Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahlali, Khaled Djehiche, Boualem Mezerdi, Brahim

    2007-12-15

    We establish a stochastic maximum principle in optimal control of a general class of degenerate diffusion processes with global Lipschitz coefficients, generalizing the existing results on stochastic control of diffusion processes. We use distributional derivatives of the coefficients and the Bouleau Hirsh flow property, in order to define the adjoint process on an extension of the initial probability space.

  6. Maximum CME speed as an indicator of solar and geomagnetic activities , V.B. Yurchyshyn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relationships with one another. Although the relationship between the solar and geomagnetic activity indices hasMaximum CME speed as an indicator of solar and geomagnetic activities A. Kilcik1 , V.B. Yurchyshyn1 , V. Abramenko1 , P.R. Goode1 , N. Gopalswamy2 , A. Ozguc3 , J.P. Rozelot4 1 Big Bear Solar

  7. Extraction of Spectral Functions from Dyson-Schwinger Studies via the Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Nickel

    2006-07-20

    It is shown how to apply the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to numerical Dyson-Schwinger studies for the extraction of spectral functions of correlators from their corresponding Euclidean propagators. Differences to the application in lattice QCD are emphasized and, as an example, the spectral functions of massless quarks in cold and dense matter are presented.

  8. Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    of reducing the cost of producing wind power: for example, the site selection, site layout design, predictiveDesign of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song Intelligent Accepted 24 August 2009 Available online 22 September 2009 Keywords: Wind farm Wind turbine Layout design

  9. Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems, including how noise affects both tracking speed-performance photovoltaic sys- tems. An intelligent controller adjusts the voltage, current, or impedance seen by a solar

  10. Experimental evaluation of algorithmic solutions for the maximum generalised network ow problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radzik, Tomasz

    ; Tomasz Radzik y King's College London Shengxiang Yang z University of Leicester Department of Computer Science, King's College London Technical Report TR-01-09 December 2001 Abstract The maximum generalised problem models some optimisation problems arising in manufacturing, transportation and #12;nancial

  11. Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage D, New Mexico, USA T. R. Sanderson Research and Scientific Support Department of European Space Agency 2001), Ulysses remained immersed in polar coronal hole solar wind flow and observed five intense solar

  12. Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle filter implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle by a likelihood approach. In a first part the structural health monitoring problem is written in term of recursive al [6] in a more simple framework. Particle approximation for health monitoring was already proposed

  13. Operations Research Letters 21 (1997) 211217 An algorithm for nding a maximum clique in a graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David R.

    1997-01-01

    . We denote the set of vertices adjacent to vV by NG(v) and the subgraph of G induced by S V by G a vertex vS with maximum degree in G, and set Q := Q {v} and S := S NG(v). We now turn our attention

  14. An Analysis of the Maximum Drawdown Risk Malik Magdon-Ismail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdon-Ismail, Malik

    Engineering Cairo University Giza, Egypt. amir@alumni.caltech.edu Introduction. The maximum cumulative loss to the Calmar ratio is the Sterling ratio, Sterling(T) = Return over [0,T ] MDD over [0,T ]-10% , and our discussion applies equally well to the Sterling ratio. 1 #12;primarily due to a lack of an analytical

  15. An Analysis of the Maximum Drawdown Risk Malik MagdonIsmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdon-Ismail, Malik

    Engineering Cairo University Giza, Egypt. amir@alumni.caltech.edu Introduction. The maximum cumulative loss is not prevalent 1 Similar to the Calmar ratio is the Sterling ratio, Sterling(T ) = Return over [0,T ] MDD over [0,T ]-10% , and our discussion applies equally well to the Sterling ratio. 1 #12; primarily due

  16. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1998 A Bootstrap Test Using Maximum Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Snigdhansu

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1998 A Bootstrap Test Using Maximum Likelihood Ratio 24 January 1997; revised 10 May 1997. 2Geological Studies Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B-8121/98/0400-0275$15.00/1 © 1998 International Association for Mathematical Geology KEY WORDS: polar coordinates, joint frequency

  17. Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safetyefficiency trade-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safety­efficiency trade.12126 Key words: hydraulic limitation, safety­ efficiency trade-off, soil­plant­atmosphere model, trait hydraulics constrain ecosystem productivity by setting physical limits to water transport and hence carbon

  18. MAximum Multicore POwer (MAMPO) -An Automatic Multithreaded Synthetic Power Virus Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    and cooling issues along with a world-wide initiative towards green computing, power consump- tion is a firstMAximum Multicore POwer (MAMPO) - An Automatic Multithreaded Synthetic Power Virus Generation worst case power consumption for a com- puter system is a significant design parameter and it is a very

  19. STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD JONGCHUL CHAE1 June 1998; accepted 17 July 1998) Abstract. We have developed a method of stray-light correction which is applicable to filter-based magnetograph observations. Stray-light-corrected Stokes images are obtained

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  1. Relating maximum airway dilation and subsequent reconstriction to reactivity in human lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Relating maximum airway dilation and subsequent reconstriction to reactivity in human lungs Lauren in human lungs. J Appl Physiol 96: 1808­1814, 2004. First published February 6, 2004; 10.1152/japplphysiol reactivity in healthy lungs by prohibiting DI for an extended period. The present study had two goals. First

  2. Study of Different Implementation Approaches for a Maximum Power Point Florent Boico Brad Lehman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    of solar panels has limited their use. As the efficiency is limited, harvesting the maximum amount no other source is available. However, these solar panels have lower efficiency than average solar cells in suddenly changing illumination conditions. Solar Panels have been used for decades to generate electricity

  3. Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaltz, Erik

    Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Systems. Poster session presented at The 31st International & 10th Generator Systems Casper Vadstrup (cvdst08@student.aau.dk), Min Chen (mch@et.aau.dk), Erik Schaltz (esc

  4. The probable value of the Lovasz-Schrijver relaxations for maximum independent set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauthgamer, Robert

    Introduction Let G(V, E) be a graph on n vertices. An independent set (a.k.a. stable set) in G is a subset an independent set of maximum size in an input graph G. The independence number (a.k.a. stability number) of G

  5. The probable value of the LovaszSchrijver relaxations for maximum independent set #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauthgamer, Robert

    Introduction Let G(V, E) be a graph on n vertices. An independent set (a.k.a. stable set) in G is a subset an independent set of maximum size in an input graph G. The independence number (a.k.a. stability number) of G

  6. Sufficient Stochastic Maximum Principle in a Regime-Switching Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Catherine, E-mail: C.Donnelly@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Department of Actuarial Mathematics and Statistics (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    We prove a sufficient stochastic maximum principle for the optimal control of a regime-switching diffusion model. We show the connection to dynamic programming and we apply the result to a quadratic loss minimization problem, which can be used to solve a mean-variance portfolio selection problem.

  7. On Finding the Maximum Number of Disjoint Cuts in Seymour Graphs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ageev, Alexandr

    On Finding the Maximum Number of Disjoint Cuts in Seymour Graphs ? Alexander A. Ageev Sobolev. In this paper we prove that the problem is polynomially solvable on Seymour graphs which include both all bipar is polynomially solvable when restricted to the family of Seymour graphs. To present a rigorous definition

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 86, 041144 (2012) Efficiency at maximum power for classical particle transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindenberg, Katja

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 86, 041144 (2012) Efficiency at maximum power for classical particle transport transport. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.041144 PACS number(s): 05.70.Ln, 05.40.-a, 05.20.-y I. INTRODUCTION Over, operating between a hot and cold bath at temperatures T (1) and T (2) , respectively, possesses universal

  9. Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating CHRISTOPHER M. HARTMAN AND JERRY Y. HARRINGTON Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania November 2004) ABSTRACT The effects of solar heating and infrared cooling on the vapor depositional growth

  10. EIS-0012: Petroleum Production at Maximum Efficient Rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve #1, Elk Hills, Kern County, California (also see EA-0261, EA-0334, and EIS-0158-S)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of increasing petroleum production, and of additional or expanded operational facilities, at Elk Hills from 160,000 barrels per day up to 240,000 barrels per day.

  11. Acceleration Rates and Injection Efficiencies in Oblique Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Ellison; M. G. Baring; F. C. Jones

    1995-06-12

    The rate at which particles are accelerated by the first-order Fermi mechanism in shocks depends on the angle, \\teq{\\Tbone}, that the upstream magnetic field makes with the shock normal. The greater the obliquity the greater the rate, and in quasi-perpendicular shocks rates can be hundreds of times higher than those seen in parallel shocks. In many circumstances pertaining to evolving shocks (\\eg, supernova blast waves and interplanetary traveling shocks), high acceleration rates imply high maximum particle energies and obliquity effects may have important astrophysical consequences. However, as is demonstrated here, the efficiency for injecting thermal particles into the acceleration mechanism also depends strongly on obliquity and, in general, varies inversely with \\teq{\\Tbone}. The degree of turbulence and the resulting cross-field diffusion strongly influences both injection efficiency and acceleration rates. The test particle \\mc simulation of shock acceleration used here assumes large-angle scattering, computes particle orbits exactly in shocked, laminar, non-relativistic flows, and calculates the injection efficiency as a function of obliquity, Mach number, and degree of turbulence. We find that turbulence must be quite strong for high Mach number, highly oblique shocks to inject significant numbers of thermal particles and that only modest gains in acceleration rates can be expected for strong oblique shocks over parallel ones if the only source of seed particles is the thermal background.

  12. LMS SUBSCRIPTION RATES & NOTES 2014/15 SUBSCRIPTION RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LMS SUBSCRIPTION RATES & NOTES 2014/15 SUBSCRIPTION RATES LMS membership subscription: £ US.00 Associate membership 16.00 32.00 Free membership (see note 2) Print only Online only Print & online* LMS, or are unemployed or otherwise in hardship. Contact membership@lms.ac.uk to enquire further. #12;LMS PUBLICATIONS 4

  13. LMS SUBSCRIPTION RATES & NOTES 2013/14 SUBSCRIPTION RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LMS SUBSCRIPTION RATES & NOTES 2013/14 SUBSCRIPTION RATES LMS membership subscription: £ US.00 Associate membership 15.00 30.00 Free membership (see note 2) Print only Online only Print & online* LMS, or are unemployed or otherwise in hardship. Contact membership@lms.ac.uk to enquire further. #12;LMS PUBLICATIONS 4

  14. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  15. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 (112 KB .pdf) FRN Notice of Proposed Transmission and Ancillary Services Formula Rates November 3, 2014 (93 KB .pdf) SPP Membership Information Integrated System (IS)...

  16. Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

  17. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric PowerSystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donde, Vaibhav; Lopez, Vanessa; Lesieutre, Bernard; Pinar, Ali; Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan

    2006-06-14

    In this work, we propose a computationally feasible approachtodetect severe multiple contingencies. We pose a contingency analysisproblem using a nonlinear optimization framework, which enables ustodetect the fewest possible transmission line outages resulting ina systemfailure of specified severity, and the most severe system failure causedby removing a specified number of transmission lines from service.Illustrations using a three bus system and the IEEE ~;30 bus system aimto exhibit the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  18. Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe Drought in an Ozark Forest in Missouri, USA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Environmental Controls on Water...

  19. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska Citation...

  20. Response to seve.ral FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy.United States Department of the Interior, nepdg80018250.pdf October 25, 2001 Response to seve.ral FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. More Documents & Publications...

  1. Adherence to Adalimumab in Patients with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis Cameron West 1 , MD;and relapsing course of psoriasis is often associated withenrolled patients with psoriasis. J Dermatolog Treatment.

  2. Response to several FOIA requests- Renewable Energy pages 4001- 4250

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_4001_4250.pdf R.eport Statement/Recommendation Background Pros/Cons discussion

  3. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A review of the current energy policy debate from a taxpayer and consumer perspective Contents Page, Executive Summary. June 21, 2001 . nepdg70017250.pdf Response to several FOIA...

  4. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling Citation Details In-Document...

  5. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-02

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y?¹. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; (c) Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and (d) Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  6. Algorithms for optimized maximum entropy and diagnostic tools for analytic continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergeron, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Analytic continuation of numerical data obtained in imaginary time or frequency has become an essential part of many branches of quantum computational physics. The maximum-entropy approach is the most widely used method whenever the data contains some numerical uncertainties, especially in Monte-Carlo based calculations. Here we present a highly optimized approach to maximum-entropy implemented in a freely available software that is both fast and accurate and offers quality-of-fit diagnostic tools. It can handle fermionic and bosonic input Green functions, self-energies, or correlation functions, both in Matsubara frequency or imaginary time, and with arbitrary covariance. All aspects of the implementation critical for accuracy and speed are optimized using specific numerical methods. A new way of choosing the optimal value of the entropy weight $\\alpha$ is also introduced. It is based on the identification of three different regimes in the value of $\\chi^2$ as a function of $\\alpha$: Large values of $\\alpha$...

  7. Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletti, Luigi

    2014-08-15

    The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

  8. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. In conclusion, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  9. Global convergence of diluted iterations in maximum-likelihood quantum tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Gonçalves; M. A. Gomes-Ruggiero; C. Lavor

    2013-06-13

    In this paper we present an inexact stepsize selection for the Diluted R\\rho R algorithm, used to obtain the maximum likelihood estimate to the density matrix in quantum state tomography. We give a new interpretation for the diluted R\\rho R iterations that allows us to prove the global convergence under weaker assumptions. Thus, we propose a new algorithm which is globally convergent and suitable for practical implementation.

  10. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-21

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  11. PISA -Pooling Information from Several Agents: Multiplayer Argumentation from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coenen, Frans

    PISA - Pooling Information from Several Agents: Multiplayer Argumentation from Experience Maya Abstract In this paper a framework, PISA (Pooling Information from Several Agents), to facilitate argumentation is a form of dialogue game involving three or more players. The PISA framework is founded on a two

  12. Seeing Red: New Tools for Mapping and Understanding Fire Severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Seeing Red: New Tools for Mapping and Understanding Fire Severity The 2012 fire season was resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts

  13. Impacts of Severe Space Weather on the Electric Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Impacts of Severe Space Weather on the Electric Grid JASON The MITRE Corporation 7515 Colshire. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Impacts of Severe Space Weather on the Electric Grid 5b. GRANT on the impact of space weather on the electric grid, seeking to understand 1) the current status of solar

  14. AIAA-2001-4232 Severe Weather Avoidance Using Informed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    AIAA-2001-4232 Severe Weather Avoidance Using Informed Heuristic Search S. Bokadia and J. Valasek, Suite 500, Reston, VA, 20191-4344. #12;AIAA 2001-4232 SEVERE WEATHER AVOIDANCE USING INFORMED HEURISTIC airport's terminal space3 . But an important issue in free flight is the safety of an airplane. Weather

  15. AUTOMATIC SCORING OF THE SEVERITY OF PSORIASIS SCALING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTOMATIC SCORING OF THE SEVERITY OF PSORIASIS SCALING David Delgado Bjarne Ersbøll Jens Michael the severity of scaling in psoriasis lesions is proposed. The method separates the different regions during the treatment. An experiment over a collection of psoriasis images is conducted to test

  16. Lung Segmentation from CT with Severe Pathologies Using Anatomical Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Segmentation from CT with Severe Pathologies Using Anatomical Constraints Neil Birkbeck Healthcare, Oxford, UK Abstract. The diversity in appearance of diseased lung tissue makes automatic segmentation of lungs from CT with severe pathologies chal- lenging. To overcome this challenge, we rely

  17. Resuspension rates from aged inert-tracer sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-11-01

    Wind-caused particle resuspension rates were investigated with molybdenum tracers at two circular resuspension sites in the Hanford area. The tracer particles were calcium molybdate. The radii of each circular tracer-source area were 22.9 m and 29.9 m respectively for tracer deposited on 2 October 1973 and 29 May 1979. Resuspension rates were investigated by sampling resuspended tracer with air sampling equipment mounted as a function of height on a centrally located sampling tower at each site. Sampling equipment was operated as a function of wind speed increments in order to investigate resuspension rates, wind speed dependencies of resuspension rates, and for subsequent comparisons of resuspension rate changes as a function of time for constant wind speed ranges. Experimental results are reported for measurements over several years. Resuspension rates ranged from about 10/sup -13/ to 10/sup -6/ fraction of the tracer source resuspended per second. Resuspension rates tended to increase with increasing wind speed. At one investigation site, resuspension rates were nearly constant, except for seasonal variations, for a four-year time period. Resuspension rates appear higher in the autumn than in the spring and summer.

  18. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  19. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  20. Dependence of heat transport on the strength and shear rate of prescribed circulating flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; K. M. Pang

    2001-11-28

    We study numerically the dependence of heat transport on the maximum velocity and shear rate of physical circulating flows, which are prescribed to have the key characteristics of the large-scale mean flow observed in turbulent convection. When the side-boundary thermal layer is thinner than the viscous boundary layer, the Nusselt number (Nu), which measures the heat transport, scales with the normalized shear rate to an exponent 1/3. On the other hand, when the side-boundary thermal layer is thicker, the dependence of Nu on the Peclet number, which measures the maximum velocity, or the normalized shear rate when the viscous boundary layer thickness is fixed, is generally not a power law. Scaling behavior is obtained only in an asymptotic regime. The relevance of our results to the problem of heat transport in turbulent convection is also discussed.

  1. Role of Passive Safety Systems in Severe Accidents Prevention for Advanced WWER-1000 Reactor Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukin, N.V.; Fil, N.S.; Shumsky, A.M. [EDO 'Gidropress', 21 Ordzhonikidze str., Podolsk, Moscow Region, RU-142103 (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Role of new safety systems applied in advanced WWER-1000 (passive residual heat removal system, SPOT and passive core flooding system, HA-2) in severe accident prevention is considered in the paper. The following typical beyond-design accidents (BDBAs) that essentially determine the design basis of the above passive systems are considered in the paper: - station blackout; - LB LOCA (double-ended cold leg break 850 mm diameter) with station blackout. The domestic DINAMIKA-97 and TETCH-M-97 codes developed by EDO 'Gidropress' were used for the analyses. Besides, some supporting calculations have been performed by new Russian KORSAR code and western RELAP5/MOD3.2 and ATHLET 1.2A codes. The analysis of station blackout accident without operation of new passive systems have shown the exceeding of the maximum design limit of fuel rod damage already in 2-2,5 h after initiating event. Operation of SPOT system prevents any core damage during the BDBA under consideration. The analysis have also demonstrated that operation of new passive safety systems (SPOT and HA-2) ensures the effective core cooling within required period of time. This ensures essentially decreased probability of severe core degradation. (authors)

  2. Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Letter to South Texas Electric Coop., Inc requesting an extension of the existing rate formula FalconAmistad WAPA-143 FERC Approval FalconAmistad Published WAPA-143 Falcon...

  3. Tier 2 Vintage Rate Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    period FY2015 through 2028. Customers have a diversification right to limit the amount of power they purchase at the Load Growth rate in future years with notice provided by...

  4. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2003-08-01

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that ...

  5. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2004-11-30

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that stock market prices are correlated ...

  6. High repetition rate fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

  7. High compression rate text summarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on methods for condensing large documents into highly concise summaries, achieving compression rates on par with human writers. While the need for such summaries in the current age of information overload ...

  8. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Jae, M.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Xing, L.; Dhir, V.K.; Lim, H.; Okrent, D.; Swider, J.; Yu, D. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering

    1991-11-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainty includes operator, system and instrument behavior during severe accidents. During the period May 15--17, 1990 a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings.

  9. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pražnikar, Jure [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Primorska, (Slovenia); Turk, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, (Slovenia)

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  10. Several new lower bounds for football pool systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litsyn, Simon

    Several new lower bounds for football pool systems Uri Blass and Simon Litsyn Tel­Aviv University a big deal of attention due to its equivalence to constructing systems for football pools. A survey

  11. Conservation of Severely Damaged Paper Using Passivation Polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eilert, Eloise

    2012-10-19

    This work examined the use of passivation polymers in the conservation of severely damaged paper. It specifically investigated the use of this functional polymer treatment to address the issues of damage to paper caused ...

  12. Can short sellers predict accounting restatements and foresee their severity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efendi, Jap

    2005-11-01

    This dissertation investigates whether short sellers establish short positions prior to accounting restatement announcements and whether the levels of short interest are related to the severity of restatements. Using 565 firms with restatement...

  13. Constitutive Model for Material Comminuting at High Shear Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdenek P. Bazant; Ferhun C. Caner

    2013-06-04

    The modeling of high velocity impact into brittle or quasibrittle solids is hampered by the unavailability of a constitutive model capturing the effects of material comminution into very fine particles. The present objective is to develop such a model, usable in finite element programs. The comminution at very high strain rates can dissipate a large portion of the kinetic energy of an impacting missile. The spatial derivative of the energy dissipated by comminution gives a force resisting the penetration, which is superposed on the nodal forces obtained from the static constitutive model in a finite element program. The present theory is inspired partly by Grady's model for comminution due to explosion inside a hollow sphere, and partly by analogy with turbulence. In high velocity turbulent flow, the energy dissipation rate is enhanced by the formation of micro-vortices (eddies) which dissipate energy by viscous shear stress. Similarly, here it is assumed that the energy dissipation at fast deformation of a confined solid gets enhanced by the release of kinetic energy of the motion associated with a high-rate shear strain of forming particles. For simplicity, the shape of these particles in the plane of maximum shear rate is considered to be regular hexagons. The rate of release of free energy density consisting of the sum of this energy and the fracture energy of the interface between the forming particle is minimized. The particle sizes are assumed to be distributed according to Schuhmann's power law. It is concluded that the minimum particle size is inversely proportional to the (2/3)-power of the shear strain rate, that the kinetic energy release is to proportional to the (2/3)-power, and that the dynamic comminution creates an apparent material viscosity inversely proportional to the (1/3)-power of the shear strain rate.

  14. Use of probabilistic safety analyses in severe accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neogy, P.; Lehner, J.

    1991-01-01

    An important consideration in the development and assessment of severe accident management strategies is that while the strategies are often built on the knowledge base of Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA), they must be interpretable and meaningful in terms of the control room indicators. In the following, the relationships between PSA and severe accident management are explored using ex-vessel accident management at a PWR ice-condenser plant as an example. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Study on drywell cooler applicability to severe accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro [Information and manufacturing systems division, Toshiba Plant Systems and Services Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Akinaga, Makoto [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Center, Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan); Hamazaki, Ryoichi [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Matsuo, Toshihiro [Nuclear Power Engineering Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kouji [Nuclear Plant Engineering Department, HITACHI, Ltd., 1-1, Saiwai-cho, 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 317-8511 (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns applicability of drywell cooler (DWC) heat removal under severe accident condition in BWR plants. Newly developed heat removal models based on DWC heat removal experiments were built into the MAAP3 code. And then, two types of Japanese BWR were selected to evaluate DWC heat removal performance under typical severe accident scenarios. According to the results of the evaluation, DWC delays or prevents containment failure or venting. (authors)

  16. Maximum Likelihood method for ultrahigh energy cosmic ray cross correlations with astrophysical sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Jansson; Glennys R. Farrar

    2007-08-20

    We extend the Maximum Likelihood method used by HiRes to study cross correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. Our approach permits individual sources to be ranked according to their likelihood of having emitted the correlated UHECRs. We test both old and new method by simulations for various scenarios. We conclude that there are 9 true correlation between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6*10^-5 probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  17. Discrimination of two mixed quantum states with maximum confidence and minimum probability of inconclusive results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrike Herzog

    2009-02-28

    We study an optimized measurement that discriminates two mixed quantum states with maximum confidence for each conclusive result, thereby keeping the overall probability of inconclusive results as small as possible. When the rank of the detection operators associated with the two different conclusive outcomes does not exceed unity we obtain a general solution. As an application, we consider the discrimination of two mixed qubit states. Moreover, for the case of higher-rank detection operators we give a solution for particular states. The relation of the optimized measurement to other discrimination schemes is also discussed.

  18. On the geometrical place formed by the maximum heights of projectile motion with air resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Saldaña, H

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the geometrical place formed by the set of maxima of the orbits of a projectile launched in a media with linear drag. Such a place is written in term of the Lambert W function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. In order to characterize it, a study of the curvature is presented in two parameterizations, in terms of the launching angle and in the polar one. The angles of maximum curvature are compared with other important angles in the projectile problem.

  19. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  20. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November18.5 385.5DryMay-15Decade Year-0Elements) Maximum

  1. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

  2. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2002-05-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents.

  3. Considerations for severe-accident management strategies in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.; Carter, J.C. (IT Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of a sensitivity study for potential recovery actions during a station blackout severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The accident progression for each of the recovery actions was calculated by a modified version of the severe-accident integrated analysis code MAAP 3.0B. According to MAAP calculations for a station blackout in a PWR, vessel failure can be avoided if the power is recovered between 9500 s (2.6h) and 9800 s (2.7 h) after accident initiation (depending on reflood flow rate) and the core is immediately reflooded. If the power is recovered after 10 000 s (2.8 h), vessel failure cannot be avoided. Finally, there is a time window of 26 h between vessel failure and containment failure for actions that could prevent containment failure.

  4. Bounds and phase diagram of efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling molecular motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Tu

    2013-02-08

    The efficiency at maximum power (EMP) for tight-coupling molecular motors is investigated within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. It is found that the EMP depends merely on the constitutive relation between the thermodynamic current and force. The motors are classified into four generic types (linear, superlinear, sublinear, and mixed types) according to the characteristics of the constitutive relation, and then the corresponding ranges of the EMP for these four types of molecular motors are obtained. The exact bounds of the EMP are derived and expressed as the explicit functions of the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step. A phase diagram is constructed which clearly shows how the region where the parameters (the load distribution factor and the free energy released by the fuel in each motor step) are located can determine whether the value of the EMP is larger or smaller than 1/2. This phase diagram reveals that motors using ATP as fuel under physiological conditions can work at maximum power with higher efficiency ($>1/2$) for a small load distribution factor ($<0.1$).

  5. Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

  6. A Fast Parallel Maximum Clique Algorithm for Large Sparse Graphs and Temporal Strong Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Ryan A; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H; Patwary, Md Mostofa Ali

    2013-01-01

    We propose a fast, parallel, maximum clique algorithm for large, sparse graphs that is designed to exploit characteristics of social and information networks. We observe roughly linear runtime scaling over graphs between 1000 vertices and 100M vertices. In a test with a 1.8 billion-edge social network, the algorithm finds the largest clique in about 20 minutes. For social networks, in particular, we found that using the core number of a vertex in combination with a good heuristic clique finder efficiently removes the vast majority of the search space. In addition, we parallelize the exploration of the search tree. In the algorithm, processes immediately communicate changes to upper and lower bounds on the size of maximum clique, which occasionally results in a super-linear speedup because vertices with especially large search spaces can be pruned by other processes. We use this clique finder to investigate the size of the largest temporal strong components in dynamic networks, which requires finding the large...

  7. Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert Paul; Ross, Michael P.

    2013-08-01

    Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inches-typically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

  8. Iron/potassium perchlorate pellet burn rate measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, J.W.; Walters, R.R.

    1995-01-25

    A burn rate test having several advantages for low gas-producing pyrotechnic compacts has been developed. The technique involves use of a high speed video motion analysis system that allows immediate turnaround and produces all required data for rate computation on magnetic tape and becomes immediately available on the display screen. The test technique provides a quick method for material qualification along with data for improved reliability and function. Burn rate data has been obtained for both UPI and Eagle Pitcher Iron/Potassium Perchlorate blends. The data obtained for the UPI blends cover a range of composition, pellet density, and ambient (before ignition) pellet temperature. Burn rate data for the E-P blends were extended to include surface conditions or particle size as a variable parameter.

  9. Directional recoil rates for WIMP direct detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alenazi, Moqbil S.; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E Rm 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    New techniques for the laboratory direct detection of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are sensitive to the recoil direction of the struck nuclei. We compute and compare the directional recoil rates dR/dcos{theta} (where {theta} is the angle measured from a reference direction in the sky) for several WIMP velocity distributions including the standard dark halo and anisotropic models such as Sikivie's late-infall halo model and logarithmic-ellipsoidal models. Since some detectors may be unable to distinguish the beginning of the recoil track from its end (lack of head-tail discrimination), we introduce a folded directional recoil rate dR/d|cos{theta}|, where |cos{theta}| does not distinguish the head from the tail of the track. We compute the CS{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} exposures required to distinguish a signal from an isotropic background noise, and find that dR/d|cos{theta}| is effective for the standard dark halo and some but not all anisotropic models.

  10. Analysis of Severe Accident Management Strategy for a BWR-4 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.-C.; Wang, S.-J.; Teng, J.-T

    2005-12-15

    The Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP) is a Mark-I boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP located in northern Taiwan. The Chinshan NPP severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) were developed based on the BWR Owners Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines/Severe Accident Guidelines and were developed at the end of 2003. The MAAP4 code has been used as a tool to validate the SAMG strategies. The development process and characteristics of the Chinshan SAMGs are described. The T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence, the highest core damage frequency in the probabilistic risk assessment insight of the Chinshan NPP, is cited as a reference case for SAMG validation. Not all safety injection systems are operated in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence. The severe accident progression is simulated, and the entry condition of the SAMGs is described. Then, the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence is simulated with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) depressurization. Mitigation actions based on the Chinshan NPP SAMGs are then applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SAMGs. Sensitivity studies on RPV depressurization with the reactor water level and minimum RPV injection flow rate are also investigated in this study. Based on MAAP4 calculation and the default values of the parameters calculating the severe accident phenomena, the result shows that RPV depressurization before the reactor water level reaches one-fourth of the core water level can prevent the core from damage in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence. The flow rate of two control rod drive pumps is enough to maintain the reactor water level above the top of active fuel and cool down the core in the T{sub 5}U{sub t}X{sub C} sequence without operator action.

  11. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  12. OSSA - An optimized approach to severe accident management: EPR application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauvage, E. C.; Prior, R.; Coffey, K. [AREVA, FRAMATOME-ANP SAS, Paris, 92084 La Defense (France); Mazurkiewicz, S. M. [AREVA, FRAMATOME-ANP Inc, Lynchburg, VA 24506-0935 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    There is a recognized need to provide nuclear power plant technical staff with structured guidance for response to a potential severe accident condition involving core damage and potential release of fission products to the environment. Over the past ten years, many plants worldwide have implemented such guidance for their emergency technical support center teams either by following one of the generic approaches, or by developing fully independent approaches. There are many lessons to be learned from the experience of the past decade, in developing, implementing, and validating severe accident management guidance. Also, though numerous basic approaches exist which share common principles, there are differences in the methodology and application of the guidelines. AREVA/Framatome-ANP is developing an optimized approach to severe accident management guidance in a project called OSSA ('Operating Strategies for Severe Accidents'). There are still numerous operating power plants which have yet to implement severe accident management programs. For these, the option to use an updated approach which makes full use of lessons learned and experience, is seen as a major advantage. Very few of the current approaches covers all operating plant states, including shutdown states with the primary system closed and open. Although it is not necessary to develop an entirely new approach in order to add this capability, the opportunity has been taken to develop revised full scope guidance covering all plant states in addition to the fuel in the fuel building. The EPR includes at the design phase systems and measures to minimize the risk of severe accident and to mitigate such potential scenarios. This presents a difference in comparison with existing plant, for which severe accidents where not considered in the design. Thought developed for all type of plants, OSSA will also be applied on the EPR, with adaptations designed to take into account its favourable situation in that field. This revised approach will incorporate a number of new features which will simplify and streamline the guidance material while ensuring comprehensive guidance for response to any severe accident. Examples of such features include : - Identification of severe accident challenges based on plant specific studies. - Revision of the split of responsibilities between operations and technical support center staff. - Fixed setpoint entry conditions, ensuring that the transition from emergency procedures takes place at a consistent core/fuel condition (regardless of scenario), and which fixes the time window available to attempt ultimate preventive measures. - A safety function concept for monitoring plant conditions (in the control room). - An integrated graphic-based diagnostic tool including entry condition, challenge prioritization, and exit condition monitoring to be used by the technical support team. This paper describes the basic features of OSSA, and project status. (authors)

  13. A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.

    2012-06-14

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. It should be noted that the SGQ masses presented in this report represent limits that would comply with the external radiation limits under 10CFR Part 71. They do not necessarily bound lower limits that may be required to comply with other factors such as heat load of the package.

  14. Developing a knowledge base for the management of severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was given to the development of procedures for the management of severe accidents, that is, accidents in which the reactor core is damaged. Since TMI, however, significant effort has been devoted to developing strategies for severe accident management. At the same time, the potential application of artificial intelligence techniques, particularly expert systems, to complex decision-making tasks such as accident diagnosis and response has received considerable attention. The need to develop strategies for accident management suggests that a computerized knowledge base such as used by an expert system could be developed to collect and organize knowledge for severe accident management. This paper suggests a general method which could be used to develop such a knowledge base, and how it could be used to enhance accident management capabilities.

  15. Summary of a workshop on severe accident management for BWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Jae, M.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Xing, L.; Dhir, V.K.; Lim, H.; Okrent, D.; Swider, J.; Yu, D. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering

    1991-11-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of strategies there may be several options available to the operator; and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrument behavior during an accident. During the period September 26--28, 1990, a workshop was held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to address these uncertainties for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This report contains a summary of the workshop proceedings.

  16. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  17. MEDICAL RATES for Active Employees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    -time, your base salary is calculated on the full-time equivalent. For example, if you are at an appointment percentage of 50% and earn $12,000 per year, your base salary is $24,000 and UNM would contribute 40%. UNM Health-Bi-Weekly Rates Annualized Salary $34,999 and below Annualized Salary $35,000 - $49,999 Annualized

  18. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Zbigniew (Shoreham, NY); Falkowski, Paul (Stony Brook, NY)

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  19. Spatially resolved heat release rate measurements in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.; Frank, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Heat release rate is a fundamental property of great importance for the theoretical and experimental elucidation of unsteady flame behaviors such as combustion noise, combustion instabilities, and pulsed combustion. Investigations of such thermoacoustic interactions require a reliable indicator of heat release rate capable of resolving spatial structures in turbulent flames. Traditionally, heat release rate has been estimated via OH or CH radical chemiluminescence; however, chemiluminescence suffers from being a line-of-sight technique with limited capability for resolving small-scale structures. In this paper, we report spatially resolved two-dimensional measurements of a quantity closely related to heat release rate. The diagnostic technique uses simultaneous OH and CH{sub 2}O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the pixel-by-pixel product of the OH and CH{sub 2}O PLIF signals has previously been shown to correlate well with local heat release rates. Results from this diagnostic technique, which we refer to as heat release rate imaging (HR imaging), are compared with traditional OH chemiluminescence measurements in several flames. Studies were performed in lean premixed ethylene flames stabilized between opposed jets and with a bluff body. Correlations between bulk strain rates and local heat release rates were obtained and the effects of curvature on heat release rate were investigated. The results show that the heat release rate tends to increase with increasing negative curvature for the flames investigated for which Lewis numbers are greater than unity. This correlation becomes more pronounced as the flame gets closer to global extinction.

  20. Bayesian and maximum entropy methods for fusion diagnostic measurements with compact neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Zimbal, Andreas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    In applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, it is advantageous to use methods of data analysis which can extract information from the spectrum that is directly related to the parameters of interest that describe the plasma. We present here methods of data analysis which were developed with this goal in mind, and which were applied to spectrometric measurements made with an organic liquid scintillation detector (type NE213). In our approach, we combine Bayesian parameter estimation methods and unfolding methods based on the maximum entropy principle. This two-step method allows us to optimize the analysis of the data depending on the type of information that we want to extract from the measurements. To illustrate these methods, we analyze neutron measurements made at the PTB accelerator under controlled conditions, using accelerator-produced neutron beams. Although the methods have been chosen with a specific application in mind, they are general enough to be useful for many other types of measurements.

  1. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore »using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  2. Combustion Process in a Spark Ignition Engine: Analysis of Cyclic Maximum Pressure and Peak Pressure Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Litak; T. Kaminski; J. Czarnigowski; A. K. Sen; M. Wendeker

    2006-11-29

    In this paper we analyze the cycle-to-cycle variations of maximum pressure $p_{max}$ and peak pressure angle $\\alpha_{pmax}$ in a four-cylinder spark ignition engine. We examine the experimental time series of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ for three different spark advance angles. Using standard statistical techniques such as return maps and histograms we show that depending on the spark advance angle, there are significant differences in the fluctuations of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$. We also calculate the multiscale entropy of the various time series to estimate the effect of randomness in these fluctuations. Finally, we explain how the information on both $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ can be used to develop optimal strategies for controlling the combustion process and improving engine performance.

  3. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  4. Lyapunov exponent and natural invariant density determination of chaotic maps: An iterative maximum entropy ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Biswas; H. Shimoyama; L. R. Mead

    2009-10-23

    We apply the maximum entropy principle to construct the natural invariant density and Lyapunov exponent of one-dimensional chaotic maps. Using a novel function reconstruction technique that is based on the solution of Hausdorff moment problem via maximizing Shannon entropy, we estimate the invariant density and the Lyapunov exponent of nonlinear maps in one-dimension from a knowledge of finite number of moments. The accuracy and the stability of the algorithm are illustrated by comparing our results to a number of nonlinear maps for which the exact analytical results are available. Furthermore, we also consider a very complex example for which no exact analytical result for invariant density is available. A comparison of our results to those available in the literature is also discussed.

  5. Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

    2010-08-30

    Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

  6. Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

    2009-01-01

    Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

  7. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  8. Predicting Whole Forest Structure, Primary Productivity, and Biomass Density From Maximum Tree Size and Resource Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempes, Christopher P; Dooris, William; West, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    In the face of uncertain biological response to climate change and the many critiques concerning model complexity it is increasingly important to develop predictive mechanistic frameworks that capture the dominant features of ecological communities and their dependencies on environmental factors. This is particularly important for critical global processes such as biomass changes, carbon export, and biogenic climate feedback. Past efforts have successfully understood a broad spectrum of plant and community traits across a range of biological diversity and body size, including tree size distributions and maximum tree height, from mechanical, hydrodynamic, and resource constraints. Recently it was shown that global scaling relationships for net primary productivity are correlated with local meteorology and the overall biomass density within a forest. Along with previous efforts, this highlights the connection between widely observed allometric relationships and predictive ecology. An emerging goal of ecological...

  9. Weakest solar wind of the space age and the current 'MINI' solar maximum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D. J.; Angold, N.; Elliott, H. A.; Livadiotis, G.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.; Skoug, R. M.

    2013-12-10

    The last solar minimum, which extended into 2009, was especially deep and prolonged. Since then, sunspot activity has gone through a very small peak while the heliospheric current sheet achieved large tilt angles similar to prior solar maxima. The solar wind fluid properties and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have declined through the prolonged solar minimum and continued to be low through the current mini solar maximum. Compared to values typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, the following proton parameters are lower on average from 2009 through day 79 of 2013: solar wind speed and beta (?11%), temperature (?40%), thermal pressure (?55%), mass flux (?34%), momentum flux or dynamic pressure (?41%), energy flux (?48%), IMF magnitude (?31%), and radial component of the IMF (?38%). These results have important implications for the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere's interaction with the local interstellar medium, with the proton dynamic pressure remaining near the lowest values observed in the space age: ?1.4 nPa, compared to ?2.4 nPa typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. The combination of lower magnetic flux emergence from the Sun (carried out in the solar wind as the IMF) and associated low power in the solar wind points to the causal relationship between them. Our results indicate that the low solar wind output is driven by an internal trend in the Sun that is longer than the ?11 yr solar cycle, and they suggest that this current weak solar maximum is driven by the same trend.

  10. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  11. Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

    1981-09-01

    The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity.

  12. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    burn severity for individual daily areas burned that occurred during 42 large forest fires in central progression, forest fires, infrared perimeter mapping, northern Rockies 1. Introduction Extreme wildfires Yellowstone Fires (Turner et al 1994), the 1997 Indonesian Forest Fires, and the Australian Black Saturday

  13. Soft Vector Processors with Streaming Pipelines A. Severance , J. Edwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Guy

    Soft Vector Processors with Streaming Pipelines A. Severance , J. Edwards aaronsev-multiplexed fashion, this does not exploit a key strength of FPGA performance: pipeline par- allelism. This paper shows how streaming pipelines can be integrated into the datapath of a SVP to achieve dramatic speedups

  14. Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source waters to feed desalination plants: the location of the plant in relation to water sources available, the deliv- ery destination of the treated water, the quality of the source water, the pretreatment options available, and the ecological

  15. RESEARCH Open Access Are clinical trials dealing with severe infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    efforts have been pro- vided to improve treatment and global management of patients suffering from severe this conference, a number of major studies have been pub- lished that substantially modified the management Department of Emergency Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Princesse Grace, MC-98012, Principalty of Monaco Full

  16. Characterisation of severely deformed austenitic stainless steel wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Experimental procedure Stainless steel (316L) wires with 190 mm diameter in the annealed state are usedCharacterisation of severely deformed austenitic stainless steel wire H. S. Wang1 , J. R. Yang1 of 316L austenitic stainless steel has been examined using TEM and X-ray diffraction. The deformation

  17. EXECUTION COSTS IN FINANCIAL MARKETS WITH SEVERAL INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuying

    strategies to execute a trade. For a given price-impact function, the execution cost problem dealsEXECUTION COSTS IN FINANCIAL MARKETS WITH SEVERAL INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS Somayeh Moazeni, Yuying trade large volumes face a price impact that depends on their trading volumes simul- taneously

  18. Introduction The study attempts to quantify several con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry Methods: Paper questionnaire + personal Data Source: Managers and hourly workers from three Oregon turnover rates that affect the industry. FORESTBUSINESSSOLUTIONSRESEARCHBRIEF 2006 Volume 4, Issue 1 forest industry companies Key Findings: To be creative a committed upper man- agement is crucial

  19. Physically constrained maximum likelihood (PCML) mode filtering and its application as a pre-processing method for underwater acoustic communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papp, Joseph C

    2009-01-01

    Mode filtering is most commonly implemented using the sampled mode shape or pseudoinverse algorithms. Buck et al [1] placed these techniques in the context of a broader maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework. However, the ...

  20. ESTIMATE OF SOLAR MAXIMUM USING THE 1-8 Å GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES X-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 Å band from 1986 to the present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and the date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in solar cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in spring 2013.

  1. Integrated CMOS Energy Harvesting Converter with Digital Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Portable Thermophotovoltaic Power Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert

    This paper presents an integrated maximum power point tracking system for use with a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) portable power generator. The design, implemented in 0.35 ?m CMOS technology, consists of a low-power control ...

  2. Estimate of Solar Maximum using the 1-8 \\AA$\\,$Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, L M

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 \\AA$\\,$band from 1986 - present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in Solar Cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in Spring 2013.

  3. Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl customer and attempts... electricity to municipalities and rural electric cooperatives in both Texas and Louisiana. In Baton Rouge. GSU supplies steam and electricity to a large industrial customer through a cogeneration facility that the company has had in operation since...

  4. THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    a schematic of energy transport processes in a planetary system composed of the Earth, the Sun, and outer to absorption of solar radiation in the climate system is found to be irrelevant to the maximized prop- erties conclusion about heat engines is that there is a certain limit for the conversion rate of the heat energy

  5. ON OPTIMAL PEER-TO-PEER TOPOLOGY CONSTRUCTION WITH MAXIMUM PEER BANDWIDTH CONTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    to high "churn" (depar- ture) rates of peers. Maintenance algorithms for these topolo- gies that the optimization is achieved in a high-churn peer-to-peer network with realistic peer uplink capacities and link the objective of scalability. Furthermore, the op- timized topology is resilient to churn with arbitrary

  6. ENHANCED SEVERE TRANSIENT ANALYSIS FOR PREVENTION TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gougar, Hans

    2014-09-01

    This document outlines the development of a high fidelity, best estimate nuclear power plant severe transient simulation capability that will complement or enhance the integral system codes historically used for licensing and analysis of severe accidents. As with other tools in the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Toolkit, the ultimate user of Enhanced Severe Transient Analysis and Prevention (ESTAP) capability is the plant decision-maker; the deliverable to that customer is a modern, simulation-based safety analysis capability, applicable to a much broader class of safety issues than is traditional Light Water Reactor (LWR) licensing analysis. Currently, the RISMC pathway’s major emphasis is placed on developing RELAP-7, a next-generation safety analysis code, and on showing how to use RELAP-7 to analyze margin from a modern point of view: that is, by characterizing margin in terms of the probabilistic spectra of the “loads” applied to systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and the “capacity” of those SSCs to resist those loads without failing. The first objective of the ESTAP task, and the focus of one task of this effort, is to augment RELAP-7 analyses with user-selected multi-dimensional, multi-phase models of specific plant components to simulate complex phenomena that may lead to, or exacerbate, severe transients and core damage. Such phenomena include: coolant crossflow between PWR assemblies during a severe reactivity transient, stratified single or two-phase coolant flow in primary coolant piping, inhomogeneous mixing of emergency coolant water or boric acid with hot primary coolant, and water hammer. These are well-documented phenomena associated with plant transients but that are generally not captured in system codes. They are, however, generally limited to specific components, structures, and operating conditions. The second ESTAP task is to similarly augment a severe (post-core damage) accident integral analyses code with high fidelity simulations that would allow investigation of multi-dimensional, multi-phase containment phenomena that are only treated approximately in established codes.

  7. Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -digestion of several wastes (manure, sewage sludge and wastes from food processing industry) is another environmentally ­ the dilution rate and the flow rates of methane and carbon dioxide in the biogas. The estimation schemes thus. Keywords: Waste treatment, Biotechnology, Observer, Estimation theory, Algebraic systems theory 1

  8. Transarterial Embolization With Cyanoacrylate for Severe Arterioportal Shunt Complicated by Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Haibin Yang Zhengqiang; Liu Sheng; Zhou Weizhong; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2013-04-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of cyanoacrylate glue embolization in the treatment of severe arterioportal shunt (APS) presenting with hepatofugal portal venous flow in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Between July 2000 and January 2010, 27 HCC patients with severe APS presenting with hepatofugal portal venous flow underwent transarterial angiography and treatment. Among them, four patients were excluded from the study. Twelve patients underwent transarterial chemoperfusion and embolization of APS with cyanoacrylate glue between January 2006 and January 2010 (Emb group), and the other 11 patients undergoing only transarterial chemoperfusion without embolization of APS between July 2000 and December 2005 served as a control group (non-Emb group). The change of APS, survival rates, and procedure related complications were analyzed. In the Emb group, APS was improved in all of the 12 patients after initial glue embolization; long-term APS improvement with hepatopetal portal flow was achieved in 80 % (8 of 10) patients who underwent follow-up angiography. Survival rates in the Emb group were 67 % at 6 months, 33 % at 1 year, and 8 % at 2 years, whereas those in the non-Emb group were 0 % at 6 months (P < 0.05). Median survival time in the Emb group was 275 days, which was longer than that of 107 days in the non-Emb group (P = 0.001). There were no major complications in both groups. The preliminary experience suggests that glue embolization may be an effective and safe therapy in the management of severe APS accompanied by HCC and also improve patient survival.

  9. Cooling rate, heating rate and aging effects in glassy water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Giovambattista; H. Eugene Stanley; Francesco Sciortino

    2004-03-03

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the properties of the potential energy landscape sampled by a system of water molecules during the process of generating a glass by cooling, and during the process of regenerating the equilibrium liquid by heating the glass. We study the dependence of these processes on the cooling/heating rates as well as on the role of aging (the time elapsed in the glass state). We compare the properties of the potential energy landscape sampled during these processes with the corresponding properties sampled in the liquid equilibrium state to elucidate under which conditions glass configurations can be associated with equilibrium liquid configurations.

  10. WP-07 Power Rate Case (rates/ratecases)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos Videos Re-EntryApproval OMB No.:Rates

  11. October 1996 - September 2001 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power are

  12. October 2001 - March 2002 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power

  13. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power1 -

  14. October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power1

  15. October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power13 -

  16. October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power13

  17. October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA charges for power135

  18. WP-07 Rate Case Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *415,Rates > Meetings &

  19. Severe fuel-damage scoping test performance. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, G.E.; Buescher, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. The first test of Phase I of this series has been successfully completed in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Following the first test, calculations were performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code with actual experimental boundary conditions. This paper discusses the test conduct and performance and presents the calculated and measured test bundle results. The test resulted in a slow heatup to 2000 K over about 4 h, with an accelerated reaction of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1600 K in the lower part or the bundle and 2000 K in the upper portion of the bundle.

  20. Natural migration rates of trees: Global terrestrial carbon cycle implications. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The paper discusses the forest-ecological processes which constrain the rate of response by forests to rapid future environmental change. It establishes a minimum response time by natural tree populations which invade alien landscapes and reach the status of a mature, closed canopy forest when maximum carbon storage is realized. It considers rare long-distance and frequent short-distance seed transport, seedling and tree establishment, sequential tree and stand maturation, and spread between newly established colonies.

  1. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: I. Monte Carlo Method and Statistical Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Longland; Christian Iliadis; Art Champagne; Joe Newton; Claudio Ugalde; Alain Coc; Ryan Fitzgerald

    2010-04-23

    A method based on Monte Carlo techniques is presented for evaluating thermonuclear reaction rates. We begin by reviewing commonly applied procedures and point out that reaction rates that have been reported up to now in the literature have no rigorous statistical meaning. Subsequently, we associate each nuclear physics quantity entering in the calculation of reaction rates with a specific probability density function, including Gaussian, lognormal and chi-squared distributions. Based on these probability density functions the total reaction rate is randomly sampled many times until the required statistical precision is achieved. This procedure results in a median (Monte Carlo) rate which agrees under certain conditions with the commonly reported recommended "classical" rate. In addition, we present at each temperature a low rate and a high rate, corresponding to the 0.16 and 0.84 quantiles of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. These quantities are in general different from the statistically meaningless "minimum" (or "lower limit") and "maximum" (or "upper limit") reaction rates which are commonly reported. Furthermore, we approximate the output reaction rate probability density function by a lognormal distribution and present, at each temperature, the lognormal parameters miu and sigma. The values of these quantities will be crucial for future Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. Our new reaction rates, appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory, are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II). The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the third paper of this series (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this series (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  2. Estimation of Several Political Action Effects of Energy Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitford, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    One important effect of price shocks in the United States has been increased political attention paid to the structure and performance of oil and natural gas markets, along with some governmental support for energy conservation. This paper describes how price changes helped lead the emergence of a political agenda accompanied by several interventions, as revealed through Granger causality tests on change in the legislative agenda.

  3. Extension of emergency operating procedures for severe accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, S.C. (Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1992-01-01

    To enhance the capability of reactor operators to cope with the hypothetical severe accident its the key issue for utilities. Taiwan Power Company has started the enhancement programs on extension of emergency operating procedures (EOPs). It includes the review of existing LOPs based on the conclusions and recommendations of probabilistic risk assessment studies to confirm the operator actions. Then the plant specific analysis for accident management strategy will be performed and the existing EOPs will be updated accordingly.

  4. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response to several FOIA

  5. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response to several

  6. Upscaling Calcite Growth Rates From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative prediction of mineral reaction rates in the subsurface remains a daunting task partly because a key parameter for macroscopic models, the reactive site density, is poorly constrained. Here we report atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements on the calcite surface of monomolecular step densities, treated as equivalent to the reactive site density, as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index. Data for the obtuse step orientation are combined with existing step velocity measurements to generate a model that predicts overall macroscopic calcite growth rates. The model is quantitatively consistent with several published macroscopic rates under a range of alkaline solution conditions, particularly for two of the most comprehensive data sets without the need for additional fit parameters. The model reproduces peak growth rates and its functional form is simple enough to be incorporated into reactive transport or other macroscopic models designed for predictions in porous media. However, it currently cannot model equilibrium, pH effects, and may overestimate rates at high aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratios. The discrepancies in rates at high calcium-to-carbonate ratios may be due to differences in pre-treatment, such as exposing the seed material to SI 1.0 to generate/develop growth hillocks, or other factors.

  7. Rate Schedule CV-SPR4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that is available immediately to serve load and is synchronized with the power system. Formula Rate: The formula rate for spinning reserve includes three components: Component 1:...

  8. Rate Schedule CV-SUR4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within the first 10 minutes to take load and is synchronized with the power system. Formula Rate: The formula rate for supplemental reserve service includes three components:...

  9. Rate Schedule COTP-T3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and system control and dispatch service needed to support the transmission service. Formula Rate: The formula rate for COTP firm and non-firm PTP transmission service includes...

  10. Rate Schedule CV-NWT5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and system control and dispatch service needed to support the transmission service. Formula Rate: The formula rate for CVP NITS includes three components: Component 1: The NITS...

  11. Rate Schedule PACI-T3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and system control and dispatch service needed to support the transmission service. Formula Rate: The formula rate for PACI firm and non-firm transmission includes three...

  12. Rate Schedule CV-RFS4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    load and for maintaining scheduled interconnection frequency at 60-cycles per second. Formula Rate: The formula rate for regulation includes three components: Component 1: Annual...

  13. Rate Schedule CV-EID4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that is established in the service agreement or Interconnected Operations Agreements. Formula Rate: The formula rate for EI service includes three components: Component 1: EI...

  14. Numerical Estimation of Frictional Torques with Rate and State Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun K. Singh; T. N. Singh

    2015-01-20

    In this paper, numerical estimation of frictional torques is carried out of a rotary elastic disc on a hard and rough surface under different rotating conditions. A one dimensional spring- mass rotary system is numerically solved under the quasistatic condition with the rate and state dependent friction model. It is established that torque of frictional strength as well as torque of steady dynamic stress increases with radius and found to be maximum at the periphery of the disc. Torque corresponding to frictional strength estimated using the analytical solution matches closely with the simulation only in the case of high stiffness of the connecting spring. In steady relaxation simulation, a steadily rotating disc is suddenly stopped and relaxational angular velocity and corresponding frictional torque decreases with both steady angular velocity and stiffness of the connecting spring in the velocity strengthening regime. In velocity weakening regime, in contrast, torque of relaxation stress deceases but relaxation velocity increases. The reason for the contradiction is explained.

  15. High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1983-07-14

    It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

  16. Biological Electric Fields and Rate Equations for Biophotons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alvermann; Y. N. Srivastava; J. Swain; A. Widom

    2014-04-13

    Ultraweak bioluminescence - the emission of biophotons - remains an experimentally well-established, but theoretically poorly understood phenomenon. This paper presents several related investigations into the physical process of both spontaneous biophoton emission and delayed luminescence. Since light intensities depend upon the modulus squared of their corresponding electric fields we first make some general estimates about the inherent electric fields within various biological systems. Since photon emission from living matter following an initial excitation ("delayed luminescence") typically does not follow a simple exponential decay law after excitation we discuss such non-exponential decays from a general theoretical perspective and argue that they are often to be expected and why. We then discuss the dynamics behind some nonlinear rate equations, connecting them both to biological growth rates and biophoton emission rates, noting a possible connection with cancer. We then return to non-exponential decay laws seen for delayed luminescence in an experimental context and again note a possible connection with cancer.

  17. NCRAWL: Network Coding for Rate Adaptive Wireless Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broustis, Ioannis; Syrivelis, Dimitris; Georgiadis, Leonidas; Tassiulas, Leandros

    2011-01-01

    Intersession network coding (NC) can provide significant performance benefits via mixing packets at wireless routers; these benefits are especially pronounced when NC is applied in conjunction with intelligent link scheduling. NC however imposes certain processing operations, such as encoding, decoding, copying and storage. When not utilized carefully, all these operations can induce tremendous processing overheads in practical, wireless, multi-rate settings. Our measurements with prior NC implementations suggest that such processing operations severely degrade the router throughput, especially at high bit rates. Motivated by this, we design {\\bf NCRAWL}, a Network Coding framework for Rate Adaptive Wireless Links. The design of NCRAWL facilitates low overhead NC functionalities, thereby effectively approaching the theoretically expected capacity benefits of joint NC and scheduling. We implement and evaluate NCRAWL on a wireless testbed. Our experiments demonstrate that NCRAWL meets the theoretical predicted ...

  18. Power Rates Study Final Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w w w.pv - te ch.orgPower PlantRates >5

  19. Rate Schedules | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your PowerWeatherize »Rain orRate

  20. MILLISECOND PULSAR AGES: IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY EVOLUTION AND A MAXIMUM SPIN LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Buelent; Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bulent@astro.ucsc.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    In the absence of constraints from the binary companion or supernova remnant, the standard method for estimating pulsar ages is to infer an age from the rate of spin-down. While the generic spin-down age may give realistic estimates for normal pulsars, it can fail for pulsars with very short periods. Details of the spin-up process during the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase pose additional constraints on the period (P) and spin-down rates ( P-dot ) that may consequently affect the age estimate. Here, we propose a new recipe to estimate millisecond pulsar (MSP) ages that parametrically incorporates constraints arising from binary evolution and limiting physics. We show that the standard method can be improved by this approach to achieve age estimates closer to the true age while the standard spin-down age may overestimate or underestimate the age of the pulsar by more than a factor of {approx}10 in the millisecond regime. We use this approach to analyze the population on a broader scale. For instance, in order to understand the dominant energy loss mechanism after the onset of radio emission, we test for a range of plausible braking indices. We find that a braking index of n = 3 is consistent with the observed MSP population. We demonstrate the existence and quantify the potential contributions of two main sources of age corruption: the previously known 'age bias' due to secular acceleration and 'age contamination' driven by sub-Eddington progenitor accretion rates. We explicitly show that descendants of LMXBs that have accreted at very low rates ( m-dot << M-dot{sub Edd}) will exhibit ages that appear older than the age of the Galaxy. We further elaborate on this technique, the implications and potential solutions it offers regarding MSP evolution, the underlying age distribution, and the post-accretion energy loss mechanism.

  1. Water/Icy Super-Earths: Giant Impacts and Maximum Water Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Robert A; Stewart, Sarah T; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Water-rich super-Earth exoplanets are expected to be common. We explore the effect of late giant impacts on the final bulk abundance of water in such planets. We present the results from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of impacts between differentiated water(ice)-rock planets with masses between 0.5 and 5 M_Earth and projectile to target mass ratios from 1:1 to 1:4. We find that giant impacts between bodies of similar composition never decrease the bulk density of the target planet. If the commonly assumed maximum water fraction of 75wt% for bodies forming beyond the snow line is correct, giant impacts between similar composition bodies cannot serve as a mechanism for increasing the water fraction. Target planets either accrete materials in the same proportion, leaving the water fraction unchanged, or lose material from the water mantle, decreasing the water fraction. The criteria for catastrophic disruption of water-rock planets are similar to those found in previous work on super-Earths of terre...

  2. Nonlinear oscillations of compact stars in the vicinity of the maximum mass configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Brillante; Igor Mishustin

    2015-07-17

    We solve the dynamical GR equations for the spherically symmetric evolution of compact stars in the vicinity of the maximum mass, for which instability sets in according to linear perturbation theory. The calculations are done with the analytical Zeldovich-like EOS P=a(rho-rho_0) and with the TM1 parametrisation of the RMF model. The initial configurations for the dynamical calculations are represented by spherical stars with equilibrium density profile, which are perturbed by either (i) an artificially added inward velocity field proportional to the radial coordinate, or (ii) a rarefaction corresponding to a static and expanded star. These configurations are evolved using a one-dimensional GR hydro code for ideal and barotropic fluids. Depending on the initial conditions we obtain either stable oscillations or the collapse to a black hole. The minimal amplitude of the perturbation, needed to trigger gravitational collapse is evaluated. The approximate independence of this energy on the type of perturbation is pointed out. At the threshold we find type I critical behaviour for all stellar models considered and discuss the dependence of the time scaling exponent on the baryon mass and EOS.

  3. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-08-16

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z {approx} 0.01-0.1 of r{sub V} = 4.26{sub -1.93 -0.10}{sup +1.39 +0.10} h{sup 3} x 10{sup -4} SNe Ia/yr/Mpc{sup 3} from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  4. What Is the Right Rate? Loan Rates and Demand | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What Is the Right Rate? Loan Rates and Demand What Is the Right Rate? Loan Rates and Demand Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: "What is the Right...

  5. Optimal discrimination of quantum states with a fixed rate of inconclusive outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bagan; R. Munoz-Tapia; G. A. Olivares-Renteria; J. A. Bergou

    2012-06-19

    In this paper we present the solution to the problem of optimally discriminating among quantum states, i.e., identifying the states with maximum probability of success when a certain fixed rate of inconclusive answers is allowed. By varying the inconclusive rate, the scheme optimally interpolates between Unambiguous and Minimum Error discrimination, the two standard approaches to quantum state discrimination. We introduce a very general method that enables us to obtain the solution in a wide range of cases and give a complete characterization of the minimum discrimination error as a function of the rate of inconclusive answers. A critical value of this rate is identified that coincides with the minimum failure probability in the cases where unambiguous discrimination is possible and provides a natural generalization of it when states cannot be unambiguously discriminated. The method is illustrated on two explicit examples: discrimination of two pure states with arbitrary prior probabilities and discrimination of trine states.

  6. Human factors review for Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krois, P.A.; Haas, P.M.; Manning, J.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper will discuss work being conducted during this human factors review including: (1) support of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program based on an assessment of operator actions, and (2) development of a descriptive model of operator severe accident management. Research by SASA analysts on the Browns Ferry Unit One (BF1) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) was supported through a concurrent assessment of operator performance to demonstrate contributions to SASA analyses from human factors data and methods. A descriptive model was developed called the Function Oriented Accident Management (FOAM) model, which serves as a structure for bridging human factors, operations, and engineering expertise and which is useful for identifying needs/deficiencies in the area of accident management. The assessment of human factors issues related to ATWS required extensive coordination with SASA analysts. The analysis was consolidated primarily to six operator actions identified in the Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) as being the most critical to the accident sequence. These actions were assessed through simulator exercises, qualitative reviews, and quantitative human reliability analyses. The FOAM descriptive model assumes as a starting point that multiple operator/system failures exceed the scope of procedures and necessitates a knowledge-based emergency response by the operators. The FOAM model provides a functionally-oriented structure for assembling human factors, operations, and engineering data and expertise into operator guidance for unconventional emergency responses to mitigate severe accident progression and avoid/minimize core degradation. Operators must also respond to potential radiological release beyond plant protective barriers. Research needs in accident management and potential uses of the FOAM model are described. 11 references, 1 figure.

  7. Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

    2006-11-14

    We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

  8. Proceedings of the 1992 EPRI heat rate improvement conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.E. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Diverse but compelling forces such as increasing fuel prices, greater power demands, growing competition, and ever more aggressive regulatory incentives are causing utilities to place additional focus on power plant heat rate. The 1992 heat rate improvement conference was a gathering of utility industry experts to share knowledge and concerns on such key issues as on-line measurement of stack gas mass flow rate-increasingly important because of the regulations of the Clean Air Act of 1990. These proceedings present the latest developments by EPRI and the utility industry to improve heat rate. Representatives of utilities, architect/engineering firms, research firms, and manufacturers presented 71 papers, and a panel discussion by the ASME performance test code committee on PTC 46 provided a forum on the overall plant performance test code. These proceedings report on a number of heat rate improvement programs, both in development and in place, including EPRI's Plant Monitoring Workstation (PMW), the State-of-the-Art Power Plant (SOAPP) conceptual design tool, and several developments in boiler performance monitoring, including an on-line system at PEPCO's Morgantown unit 2. Other conference papers describe advances in heat rate improvement through (1) computer software tools modeling boiler cleanliness, heat balance, duct system dynamics, heat rate root cause diagnosis, and conceptual plant design; (2) new instruments and testing systems in the areas of performance testing, heat rate monitoring, circulating water flow measurement, and low-pressure turbine efficiency measurement; and (3) auxiliary equipment improvements such as condensing heat exchangers, macrobiofouling control, condenser in-leakage and air binding control, air heater monitoring, and feedwater heater level control. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  9. Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences Using Inherent Safety Principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Wigeland; J. E. Cahalan

    2009-12-01

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors are designed to have a high level of safety. Events of high probability of occurrence are typically handled without consequence through reliable engineering systems and good design practices. For accidents of lower probability, the initiating events are characterized by larger and more numerous challenges to the reactor system, such as failure of one or more major engineered systems and can also include a failure to scram the reactor in response. As the initiating conditions become more severe, they have the potential for creating serious consequences of potential safety significance, including fuel melting, fuel pin disruption and recriticality. If the progression of such accidents is not mitigated by design features of the reactor, energetic events and dispersal of radioactive materials may result. For severe accidents, there are several approaches that can be used to mitigate the consequences of such severe accident initiators, which typically include fuel pin failures and core disruption. One approach is to increase the reliability of the reactor protection system so that the probability of an ATWS event is reduced to less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year, where larger accident consequences are allowed, meeting the U.S. NRC goal of relegating such accident consequences as core disruption to these extremely low probabilities. The main difficulty with this approach is to convincingly test and guarantee such increased reliability. Another approach is to increase the redundancy of the reactor scram system, which can also reduce the probability of an ATWS event to a frequency of less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year or lower. The issues with this approach are more related to reactor core design, with the need for a greater number of control rod positions in the reactor core and the associated increase in complexity of the reactor protection system. A third approach is to use the inherent reactivity feedback that occurs in a fast reactor to automatically respond to the change in reactor conditions and to result in a benign response to these events. This approach has the advantage of being relatively simple to implement, and does not face the issue of reliability since only fundamental physical phenomena are used in a passive manner, not active engineered systems. However, the challenge is to present a convincing case that such passive means can be implemented and used. The purpose of this paper is to describe this third approach in detail, the technical basis and experimental validation for the approach, and the resulting reactor performance that can be achieved for ATWS events.

  10. Advance plant severe accident/thermal hydraulic issues for ACRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    The ACRS has been reviewing various advance plant designs for certification. The most active reviews have been for the ABWR, AP600, and System 80+. We have completed the reviews for ABWR and System 80+ and are presently concentrating on AP600. The ACRS gave essentially unqualified certification approval for the two completed reviews, yet,,during the process of review a number of issues arose and the plant designs changed somewhat to accommodate some of the ACRS concerns. In this talk, I will describe some of the severe accident and thermal hydraulic related issues we discussed in our reviews.

  11. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric PowerNetworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donde, Vaibhav; Lopez, Vanessa; Lesieutre, Bernard; Pinar, Ali; Yang,Chao; Meza, Juan

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we propose a two-stage screening and analysis process for identifying multiple contingencies that may result in very severe disturbances and blackouts. In a screening stage we form an optimization problem to find the minimum change in the network to move the power flow feasibility boundary to the present operating point and that will cause the system to separate with a user-specified power imbalance. The lines identified by the optimization program are used in a subsequent analysis stage to find combinations that may lead to a blackout. This approach is applied to a 30-bus system with encouraging results.

  12. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response to severalEnergy

  13. Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

  14. The Establishment of Several Range Grasses Seeded in Burned and Unburned Slash of Ashe Junipe: (Juniperus Ashei Buchholz) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnett, Norman Neal

    1960-01-01

    requirements fox' thi dejxee ef = ' MASTER OP SCXENCE Vmy, 1960 FJa)ox SubJect: RANGE MANAGRMINY THE ESTABLISHMENT OP SEVERAL RANGE GRASSES SEEDED XN BURNED AND UNBURNED SLASH OP ASHE JUNXPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI BUCHHOLZ) NORMAN NEAL BONNETT Ajpproved aa... that fire prevented a rapid re- growth of Ashe )uniper. Naldrip (1984) also pointed out that burning the cedar slash greatly reduced the rate of cedar reinfestation (Figure 3). Four years following treatment in his experiments there were 447 cedar seed...

  15. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feng, Zhe

    2013-02-22

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  16. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feng, Zhe

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  17. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:InformationEnergyInformation Rate Jump

  18. Analysis of PWR RCS Injection Strategy During Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, K.-S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, S.-C. [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

    2004-05-15

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) injection is an important strategy for severe accident management of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Maanshan is a typical Westinghouse PWR nuclear power plant (NPP) with large, dry containment. The severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG.The purpose of this work is to analyze the RCS injection strategy of PWR system in an overheated core condition. Power is assumed recovered as the vessel water level drops to the bottom of active fuel. The Modular Accident Analysis Program version 4.0.4 (MAAP4) code is chosen as a tool for analysis. A postulated station blackout sequence for Maanshan NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. The hot leg creep rupture occurs during the mitigation action with immediate injection after power recovery according to WOG SAMG, which is not desired. This phenomenon is not considered while developing the WOG SAMG. Two other RCS injection methods are analyzed by using MAAP4. The RCS injection strategy is modified in the Maanshan SAMG. These results can be applied for typical PWR NPPs.

  19. Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

  20. A Stochastic Maximum Principle for a Stochastic Differential Game of a Mean-Field Type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, John Joseph Absalom, E-mail: j.j.a.hosking@cma.uio.no [University of Oslo, Centre of Mathematics for Applications (CMA) (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    We construct a stochastic maximum principle (SMP) which provides necessary conditions for the existence of Nash equilibria in a certain form of N-agent stochastic differential game (SDG) of a mean-field type. The information structure considered for the SDG is of a possible asymmetric and partial type. To prove our SMP we take an approach based on spike-variations and adjoint representation techniques, analogous to that of S. Peng (SIAM J. Control Optim. 28(4):966-979, 1990) in the optimal stochastic control context. In our proof we apply adjoint representation procedures at three points. The first-order adjoint processes are defined as solutions to certain mean-field backward stochastic differential equations, and second-order adjoint processes of a first type are defined as solutions to certain backward stochastic differential equations. Second-order adjoint processes of a second type are defined as solutions of certain backward stochastic equations of a type that we introduce in this paper, and which we term conditional mean-field backward stochastic differential equations. From the resulting representations, we show that the terms relating to these second-order adjoint processes of the second type are of an order such that they do not appear in our final SMP equations. A comparable situation exists in an article by R. Buckdahn, B. Djehiche, and J. Li (Appl. Math. Optim. 64(2):197-216, 2011) that constructs a SMP for a mean-field type optimal stochastic control problem; however, the approach we take of using these second-order adjoint processes of a second type to deal with the type of terms that we refer to as the second form of quadratic-type terms represents an alternative to a development, to our setting, of the approach used in their article for their analogous type of term.

  1. Using the Comoving Maximum of the Galaxy Power Spectrum to Measure Cosmological Curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst; Andrew H. Jaffe

    1999-04-26

    The large-scale maximum at k~0.05 identified in the power-spectrum of galaxy fluctuations provides a co-moving scale for measuring cosmological curvature. In shallow 3D surveys the peak is broad, but appears to be well resolved in 1D, at ~130 Mpc (k=0.048), comprising evenly spaced peaks and troughs. Surprisingly similar behaviour is evident at z=3 in the distribution of Lyman-break galaxies, for which we find a 5 sigma excess of pairs separated by Delta z=0.22pm0.02, equivalent to 85Mpc for Omega=1, increasing to 170 Mpc for Omega=0, with a number density contrast of 30% averaged over 5 independent fields. The combination, 3.2\\Omega_m -\\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0.7, matches the local scale of 130 Mpc, i.e. Omega=0.2\\pm0.1 or Omega_{m}=0.4\\pm0.1 for the matter-dominated and flat models respectively, with an uncertainty given by the width of the excess correlation. The consistency here of the flat model with SNIa based claims is encouraging, but overshadowed by the high degree of coherence observed in 1D compared with conventional Gaussian models of structure formation. The appearance of this scale at high redshift and its local prominence in the distribution of Abell clusters lends support to claims that the high-z `spikes' represent young clusters. Finally we show that a spike in the primordial power spectrum of delta\\rho/\\rho=0.3 at k=0.05 has little effect on the CMB, except to exaggerate the first Doppler peak in flat matter-dominated models, consistent with recent observations. \\\\effect on the CMB, except to exaggerate the first Doppler peak in flat matter-dominated models, consistent with recent observations.

  2. The Digital discrimination of neutron and {\\gamma} ray using organic scintillation detector based on wavelet transform modulus maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    yun, Yang; jun, Yang; xiaoliang, Luo

    2013-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the discrimination of neutron and {\\gamma}-ray with wavelet transform modulus maximum (WTMM) in an organic scintillation has been investigated. Voltage pulses arising from a BC501A organic liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field have been recorded with a fast digital sampling oscilloscope. The performances of most pulse shape discrimination methods in scintillation detection systems using time-domain features of the pulses are affected intensively by noise. However, the WTMM method using frequency-domain features exhibits a strong insensitivity to noise and can be used to discriminate neutron and {\\gamma}-ray events based on their different asymptotic decay trend between the positive modulus maximum curve and the negative modulus maximum curve in the scale-space plane. This technique has been verified by the corresponding mixed-field data assessed by the time-of-flight (TOF) method and the frequency gradient analysis (FGA) method. It is shown that the characterization of...

  3. Evaluation of a photovoltaic energy mechatronics system with a built-in quadratic maximum power point tracking algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, R.M.; Ko, S.H.; Lin, I.H. [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronics Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Pai, F.S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Tainan (China); Chang, C.C. [Department of Environment and Energy, National University of Tainan (China)

    2009-12-15

    The historically high cost of crude oil price is stimulating research into solar (green) energy as an alternative energy source. In general, applications with large solar energy output require a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm to optimize the power generated by the photovoltaic effect. This work aims to provide a stand-alone solution for solar energy applications by integrating a DC/DC buck converter to a newly developed quadratic MPPT algorithm along with its appropriate software and hardware. The quadratic MPPT method utilizes three previously used duty cycles with their corresponding power outputs. It approaches the maximum value by using a second order polynomial formula, which converges faster than the existing MPPT algorithm. The hardware implementation takes advantage of the real-time controller system from National Instruments, USA. Experimental results have shown that the proposed solar mechatronics system can correctly and effectively track the maximum power point without any difficulties. (author)

  4. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the finite gap width of the bunching module on compression are analyzed analytically.

  5. Steam Oxidation of FeCrAl and SiC in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-08-01

    Numerous research projects are directed towards developing accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concepts that will enhance safety margins in light water reactors (LWR) during severe accident scenarios. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of ATF solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012 [1-3] and this facility continues to support those efforts in the ATF community. Compared to the current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system, alternative cladding materials can offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation that can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident [4-5]. Thus, steam oxidation behavior is a key aspect of the evaluation of ATF concepts. This report summarizes recent work to measure steam oxidation kinetics of FeCrAl and SiC specimens in the SATS.

  6. Electrochemical hydrogen permeation studies of several mono- and diamines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Janabi, Y.T.; Lewis, A.L. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Lab. Research and Development Center; Oweimreen, G.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-01

    The combined presence of moisture and hydrogen sulfide, known in the oil industry as a sour environment, enhances corrosion reactions at a metal surface as well as promotes the entry of hydrogen atoms, resulting from these reactions, into the metal. Increased entry of hydrogen atoms increases the probability of occurrence of hydrogen-induced cracking. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of several organic amines to inhibit the overall process of hydrogen entry and to relate their inhibition abilities to their molecular structures. The diffusion coefficients for the permeation of hydrogen atoms through steel estimated in this study using the time-lag and Laplace methods are of the same order of magnitude as those in the published literature. In several hydrogen permeation curves, a characteristic hump was observed. The authors propose that this hump is due to the trapping of hydrogen at sites other than voids and microvoids. The electrochemical system was also sued to study the effectiveness of diethanolamine (DEA), morpholine (MOR), triethanolamine (TEA), ethylenediamine (EDA), and hexamethylene diamine (HMDA) in inhibiting the entry of hydrogen atoms into steel. The diamines were found to be more effective than the monoamines. A nonlinear relationship was observed between the inhibition effectiveness and the concentration of the amines studied. The inhibiting abilities of the monoamines were similar at the high concentration limit (0.01 M) but followed the trend TEA > MOR > DEA at the low concentration limit (5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M). For the diamines the inhibiting abilities were also similar at the high concentration limit (5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M) and followed the trend HMDA > EDA at the low concentration limit (5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M).

  7. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  8. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; University of Texas Health Science Center Martin-O'Meara, Elizabeth; Galvin, James; Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is common in long-term survivors. Age is the most significant factor, but hypopharyngeal dose also was associated.

  9. Maximum power, ecological function and efficiency of an irreversible Carnot cycle. A cost and effectiveness optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G Aragon-Gonzalez; A. Canales-Palma; A. Leon-Galicia; J. R. Morales-Gomez

    2007-01-29

    In this work we include, for the Carnot cycle, irreversibilities of linear finite rate of heat transferences between the heat engine and its reservoirs, heat leak between the reservoirs and internal dissipations of the working fluid. A first optimization of the power output, the efficiency and ecological function of an irreversible Carnot cycle, with respect to: internal temperature ratio, time ratio for the heat exchange and the allocation ratio of the heat exchangers; is performed. For the second and third optimizations, the optimum values for the time ratio and internal temperature ratio are substituted into the equation of power and, then, the optimizations with respect to the cost and effectiveness ratio of the heat exchangers are performed. Finally, a criterion of partial optimization for the class of irreversible Carnot engines is herein presented.

  10. Maximum power, ecological function and efficiency of an irreversible Carnot cycle. A cost and effectiveness optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aragon-Gonzalez, G; Leon-Galicia, A; Morales-Gomez, J R

    2007-01-01

    In this work we include, for the Carnot cycle, irreversibilities of linear finite rate of heat transferences between the heat engine and its reservoirs, heat leak between the reservoirs and internal dissipations of the working fluid. A first optimization of the power output, the efficiency and ecological function of an irreversible Carnot cycle, with respect to: internal temperature ratio, time ratio for the heat exchange and the allocation ratio of the heat exchangers; is performed. For the second and third optimizations, the optimum values for the time ratio and internal temperature ratio are substituted into the equation of power and, then, the optimizations with respect to the cost and effectiveness ratio of the heat exchangers are performed. Finally, a criterion of partial optimization for the class of irreversible Carnot engines is herein presented.

  11. IEICE TRANS. FUNDAMENTALS, VOL.E85 {A, NO.12 DECEMBER 2002 Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungjin

    IEICE TRANS. FUNDAMENTALS, VOL.E85 {A, NO.12 DECEMBER 2002 1 PAPER Approximate Maximum Likelihood (t)] T is generated by x(t) = As(t) + v(t); (1) where A 2 IR m#2;n (m #21; n) is called the mixing ma of Education of Korea for its #12;nancial support toward the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division

  12. Abstract--This paper presents an approach and associated circuitry for harvesting near maximum output from low power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Experimental results are presented for harvesting energy from miniature RF and wind power sources operating (PPT) and are commonly used in high power photovoltaic and wind power systems [4-5]. Existing that either inherently or by design achieve maximum output power over a wide power range when loaded

  13. Development of a branch and price approach involving vertex cloning to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachdeva, Sandeep

    2006-04-12

    We propose a novel branch-and-price (B&P) approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem (MWISP). Our approach uses clones of vertices to create edge-disjoint partitions from vertex-disjoint partitions. We solve the MWISP on sub...

  14. Factors Determining the Location of the Chlorophyll Maximum and the Fate of Algal Production within the Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukaveckas, Paul A.

    that cause the formation of a chlorophyll maximum within the tidal freshwater James River. Phyto- plankton in their dominant mode of hydrodynamics, tidal freshwaters share a number of features in common with rivers of the saline estuary. Their hydrodynamics are dominated by bi- directional flow but are subject to considerable

  15. CORRELATED STUDIES AT ACTIVITY MAXIMUM: THE SUN AND THE SOLAR WIND H. S. Hudson 1 and A. B. Galvin 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA ABSTRACT The breadth and power of the set of solar1 CORRELATED STUDIES AT ACTIVITY MAXIMUM: THE SUN AND THE SOLAR WIND H. S. Hudson 1 and A. B at solar minimum or in the declining phase of the past maxi­ mum, but we anticipate that most

  16. Maximum extent of the Eurasian ice sheets in the Barents and Kara Sea region during the Weichselian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möller, Per

    . ISSN 0300-9483. Based on field investigations in northern Russia and interpretation of offshore seismic that the Barents and Kara ice sheets attained their maximum Weichselian positions in northern Russia prior to 50), to more localized ice caps over the Urals a

  17. Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern African Sahel in a GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern in the Sahel could lead to reduced land surface emissivity and thus might have an asymmetric impact on daytime balance to changes in soil emissivity over the Sahel using the recently developed Community Land Model

  18. The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the potential for 100-meter hubs operating in windy regions with at least 30% capacity is 12,125 GW of wind, the installed U.S. wind power capacity is now about 35 GW. While most of the wind potential comes from the windyThe maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three

  19. 2 Ocean circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum: 3 A combined modeling and magnetic proxy-based study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    40 greater influence and penetration of deep water formed in 41 the Southern Ocean [e.g., Oppo2 Ocean circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum: 3 A combined modeling and magnetic proxy (NADW) is an important component of the ocean thermohaline 7 circulation, but debate exists over

  20. Analytical determination of package response to severe impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    One important part of radioactive material transport risk assessments is amount of release from packages in accidents more severe than design basis accident (US NRC 10CFR71 1995). In order to remove some of the conservatism from current risk assessments, an effort is ongoing to qualify the finite element method for predicting cask performance by comparing analytical results to test measurements of the Structural Evaluation Test Unit (SETU) cask. Comparisons of deformed shapes, strains, and accelerations were made for impact velocities of 13.4, 20.1, and 26.8 m/s (30, 45, and 60 mph). The 13.4 m/s impact corresponds to the regulatory 9 m (30 ft) free fall, and the others correspond to impacts with 2.25 and 4 times the kinetic energy of the regulatory impact. One other analysis at an impact velocity of 38.0 m/s (85 mph) or 8 times regulatory impact kinetic energy was also done.

  1. Cofrentes NPP activities on PSA and severe accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suarez, J.; Borondo, L. [IBERDROLA, Madrid (Spain); Garcia, P.J. [UITESA, Madrid (Spain). Nuclear Dept.

    1996-07-01

    Cofrentes NPP (CNPP) has developed a Level 1 PSA with the following scope: analysis of internal events, with the reactor initially operating at power, internal and external flooding risk analysis; internal fire risk analysis; reliability analysis of the containment heat removal and containment isolation systems. Level 1 CNPP-PSA results reveal that total core damage frequency in CNPP is less than other similar BWR/6 plants. The CNPP-PSA related activities and applications being carried out currently are: adjusting of MAAP 3.0B, revision 10, on VAX and PC; acquisition of MAAP 4; development of Level1/Level2-PSA interface; seismic site categorization for the IPEEE; prioritization of motor operated valves related to GL-89/10, complementary analysis for exemption to some 10CFR50 App. J requirements; Q-List grading; reliability-centered maintenance; maintenance rule support; on-line maintenance support, off-line risk-monitor development, PSA applicability to the 10CFR50 App. R requirements, analysis of the frequency of mis-oriented fuel bundle event, etc. About severe accident management, CNPP, as part of the Spanish-BWROG, is currently analyzing the generic products of the US-BWROG AMG in order to generate their specific ones. Also, in this group BWR, the development of tools to simulate accident scenarios beyond core damage will be studied and a training process oriented to warrant the optimum use of new EOP/AMG in accident scenarios will be implemented.

  2. Variable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang-Olson, Jeffrey; Wachs, Martin; Taylor, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    J Bradshaw, "SLate ’F~es’ Gasoline Tax So ~t Wdl Rise," TheVarlable-Rate State Gasoline Taxers Jeffrey Ang-Olson MartinVariable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes Jeffrey Ang-Olson

  3. Rate Schedule CV-TPT7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or receipt, adjusted for losses, and delivered to points as agreed to by the parties. Formula Rate: The formula rate for transmission of Western's power by others includes three...

  4. Fluorescence Assay for Polymerase Arrival Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Austin

    2003-08-31

    To engineer complex synthetic biological systems will require modular design, assembly, and characterization strategies. The RNA polymerase arrival rate (PAR) is defined to be the rate that RNA polymerases arrive at a ...

  5. Fluorescence assay for polymerase arrival rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Austin, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    To engineer complex synthetic biological systems will require modular design, assembly, and characterization strategies. The RNA polymerase arrival rate (PAR) is defined to be the rate that RNA polymerases arrive at a ...

  6. Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For new and existing home purchases that are rated 6 Star or 5 Star Plus, applicants are eligible for an interest rate reduction for the first $200,000 of the loan amount, with a blended interest...

  7. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28

    Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a challenge for small water systems. They must generate enough revenue to remain solvent, but offer affordable service. This publication describes the various types of rates and explains...

  8. Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

  9. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  10. Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage Carlos H. Crisosto o David Garner D Katia)at 32*F for 16 weeks. Un- der both storage conditions,large fruit had a slower rate of softening than fruit size and the rate of softening under air and CA conditions will help cold storage managerssafely

  11. An analysis of international grain freight rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnala, Sneha Latha

    1999-01-01

    decreasing rate as shipment quantity increases. Highest rates were associated with the berth term followed by the free discharge and free-in-and-out terms. The ships with U.S. flags were found to charge higher rates when compared to ships with foreign flags...

  12. The evolution of the cosmic SN rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Cappellaro; Maria Teresa Botticella; Laura Greggio

    2007-06-09

    We briefly review the contribution of SN rate measurements to the debate on SN progenitor scenarios. We find that core collapse rates confirms the rapid evolution of the star formation rate with redshift. After accounting for the dispersion of SN Ia measurements and uncertainty of the star formation history, the standard scenarios for SN Ia progenitors appear consistent with all observational constraints.

  13. Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

    2012-06-25

    The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

  14. Microscopic description of neutron emission rates in compound nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Zhu; Junchen Pei

    2014-11-02

    The neutron emission rates in thermal excited nuclei are conventionally described by statistical models with a phenomenological level density parameter that depends on excitation energies, deformations and mass regions. In the microscopic view of hot nuclei, the neutron emission rates can be determined by the external neutron gas densities without any free parameters. Therefore the microscopic description of thermal neutron emissions is desirable that can impact several understandings such as survival probabilities of superheavy compound nuclei and neutron emissivity in reactors. To describe the neutron emission rates microscopically, the external thermal neutron gases are self-consistently obtained based on the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (FT-HFB) approach. The results are compared with the statistical model to explore the connections between the FT-HFB approach and the statistical model. The Skyrme FT-HFB equation is solved by HFB-AX in deformed coordinate spaces. Based on the FT-HFB approach, the thermal properties and external neutron gas are properly described with the self-consistent gas substraction procedure. Then neutron emission rates can be obtained based on the densities of external neutron gases. The thermal statistical properties of $^{238}$U and $^{258}$U are studied in detail in terms of excitation energies. The thermal neutron emission rates in $^{238, 258}$U and superheavy compound nuclei $_{112}^{278}$Cn and $_{114}^{292}$Fl are calculated, which agree well with the statistical model by adopting an excitation-energy-dependent level density parameter. The coordinate-space FT-HFB approach can provide reliable microscopic descriptions of neutron emission rates in hot nuclei, as well as microscopic constraints on the excitation energy dependence of level density parameters for statistical models.

  15. Growth Rates of Global Energy Systems and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeoek, Mikael; Li, Junchen; Johansson, Kersti; Snowden, Simon

    2012-03-15

    The world is interconnected and powered by a number of global energy systems using fossil, nuclear, or renewable energy. This study reviews historical time series of energy production and growth for various energy sources. It compiles a theoretical and empirical foundation for understanding the behaviour underlying global energy systems' growth. The most extreme growth rates are found in fossil fuels. The presence of scaling behaviour, i.e. proportionality between growth rate and size, is established. The findings are used to investigate the consistency of several long-range scenarios expecting rapid growth for future energy systems. The validity of such projections is questioned, based on past experience. Finally, it is found that even if new energy systems undergo a rapid 'oil boom'-development-i.e. they mimic the most extreme historical events-their contribution to global energy supply by 2050 will be marginal.

  16. Effect of nuclear ownership on utility bond ratings and yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that investors have required an additional interest rate premium before purchasing bonds of utilities with large investments in nuclear facilities. The study required several tasks. First, the literature relating to firm bankruptcy and default was reviewed. Second, the failing financial health of the electric utility industry was assessed in terms of construction problems, the impact of federal and state regulations, and the impact of Three Mile Island. Finally, data were collected on 63 electric utilities. This allowed statistical estimation of the magnitude of the risk premium associated with utility involvement in nuclear power. The effect of this involvement on a utility's bond ratings was also examined. Multiple regression was the statistical tool used for the statistical testing and estimation.

  17. Component Failure Rate Data Sources for Probabilistic Safety and Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Eide

    2010-09-01

    Probabilistic safety methods are being used in several industries, including chemical, manufacturing, and energy. When performing reliability studies or using probabilistic safety approaches, a basic need arises for input data on failure rates of the mechanical, electrical, instrumentation and control, and other components that comprise the engineering systems in the facility. Some companies have many types of data stored and can retrieve these in-house data for such uses. Other companies hire consultants to perform safety assessments; the consulting firms often use their own data bases. For those analysts who do not have either of those options available, this paper presents some data sources that are retrievable from the literature. These data sources have been evaluated with a basic rating of usefulness for analysis work, and each has a description of what data can be found in the citation that can be used to support assessments in industry. The accessibility of data documents via the internet is also described.

  18. Variable firing rate power burner for high efficiency gas furnaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, H.H.; Demler, R.L.; Poulin, E.

    1980-02-01

    One method for increasing the efficiency of residential furnaces and boilers is to retrofit a burner capable of firing rate (FR) modulation. While maximum FR is still attainable, the average FR is significantly lower, resulting in more effective heat exchanger performance. Equally important is the capability for continuous firing at a very low rate (simmering) which eliminates off-cycle loss, a heavy contributor to inefficiency. Additional performance can be gained by reducing the excess air required by a burner. Based on its previous experience, Foster-Miller Associates, Inc. has designed and tested a low excess air (about 15%) variable firing rate (VFR) burner. The theory of operation and the construction of the test burner are described. Test results are given along with a conclusion/recommendation. A Phase II plan is outlined which suggests methods and steps for fabrication and field testing of a number of prototype units.

  19. CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAY TH

    2008-04-16

    The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

  20. Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, F. D. Mace, R. L.

    2014-04-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ?{sub j}{sup ?}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ?{sub j}{sup ?} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

  1. Future global environmental changes: Comparison with past and present rates of change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, K.L. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Quantification of past and present rates of vegetation change provides a yardstick for the evaluation of future rates of change. Holocene and post-settlement rates of vegetation change were measured at Channel Islands and Capitol Reef National Parks, and at Indiana Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores, using various paleoecological proxy data. Vegetation changes were quantified using several multivariate ordination techniques. Comparison of past vegetation changes due to climatic shifts, plant succession, and plant migration, with ongoing changes due to grazing, logging, exotic species invasions, and modified fire regimes, demonstrates that plant communities are presently suffering rates of change which are unprecedented in their severity for the Last 5000 years. The climatic warming projected for the next 50 years will exacerbate these ongoing changes, but win only be one of many variables operating in the unplanned experimental redesign our natural ecosystems.

  2. WHAT TO DO DURING SEVERE WEATHER WHILE ON CAMPUS If you observe a tornado/severe weather, you hear tornado sirens sound or receive a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    WHAT TO DO DURING SEVERE WEATHER WHILE ON CAMPUS If you observe a tornado/severe weather, you hear Clear Emergency Notification Text: OU Alert: The weather danger has passed. You may resume normal activity. New this season is our 2014 Severe Weather Procedure for Particularly Dangerous Storm (PDS

  3. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  4. Two experiments for the price of one? -- The role of the second oscillation maximum in long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Huber; Joachim Kopp

    2011-05-09

    We investigate the quantitative impact that data from the second oscillation maximum has on the performance of wide band beam neutrino oscillation experiments. We present results for the physics sensitivities to standard three flavor oscillation, as well as results for the sensitivity to non-standard interactions. The quantitative study is performed using an experimental setup similar to the Fermilab to DUSEL Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). We find that, with the single exception of sensitivity to the mass hierarchy, the second maximum plays only a marginal role due to the experimental difficulties to obtain a statistically significant and sufficiently background-free event sample at low energies. This conclusion is valid for both water Cherenkov and liquid argon detectors. Moreover, we confirm that non-standard neutrino interactions are very hard to distinguish experimentally from standard three-flavor effects and can lead to a considerable loss of sensitivity to \\theta_{13}, the mass hierarchy and CP violation.

  5. ESTIMATING POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER SOCIETAL IMPACTS USING PROBABILISTIC FORECASTS ISSUED BY THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effort to estimate potential severe weather societal impacts based on a combination of probabilistic forecasts and high resolution population data. For equal severe weather threat, events that occur over1 ESTIMATING POTENTIAL SEVERE WEATHER SOCIETAL IMPACTS USING PROBABILISTIC FORECASTS ISSUED

  6. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology.

  7. The Digital discrimination of neutron and ? ray using organic scintillation detector based on wavelet transform modulus maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang yun; Liu guofu; Yang jun; Luo xiaoliang

    2013-04-17

    A novel algorithm for the discrimination of neutron and {\\gamma}-ray with wavelet transform modulus maximum (WTMM) in an organic scintillation has been investigated. Voltage pulses arising from a BC501A organic liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field have been recorded with a fast digital sampling oscilloscope. The performances of most pulse shape discrimination methods in scintillation detection systems using time-domain features of the pulses are affected intensively by noise. However, the WTMM method using frequency-domain features exhibits a strong insensitivity to noise and can be used to discriminate neutron and {\\gamma}-ray events based on their different asymptotic decay trend between the positive modulus maximum curve and the negative modulus maximum curve in the scale-space plane. This technique has been verified by the corresponding mixed-field data assessed by the time-of-flight (TOF) method and the frequency gradient analysis (FGA) method. It is shown that the characterization of neutron and gamma achieved by the discrimination method based on WTMM is consistent with that afforded by TOF and better than FGA. Moreover, because the WTMM method is it self presented to eliminate the noise, there is no need to make any pretreatment for the pulses.

  8. Study of Cosmic-Ray Modulation during the Recent Unusual Minimum and Mini Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslam, O P M

    2015-01-01

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the current Solar Cycle 24 is one of the lowest cycles. These two periods of deep minimum and mini maximum are separated by a period of increasing solar activity. We study the cosmic-ray intensity variation in relation with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters, including the heliospheric current sheet, during these three periods (phases) of different activity level and nature: (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing activity period and (c) a mini maximum. We use neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence on modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minimum and maximum. We also study the time lag between the cosmic-ray intensity and various solar and interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. We also analyze the role of various parameters, including the current sheet tilt, in modulating the cosmic-ray intensity during the three different phases. Th...

  9. Equations of State and Maximum Mass of Neutron Stars in Light of PSR J1614-2230

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Daniel Xu

    2012-10-31

    We shall examine various types of equations of state for neutron stars, which determine the structure of neutron stars. In particular, the relation between mass and radius of neutron stars is of primary consideration. By combining an equation of state (EOS) with the Tolmann-Oppenheimer-Volkoff structure equations, we can determine the theoretical maximum mass of a neutron star for a given equation of state. One question we seek to answer is whether quark matter can exist in the core of a neutron star. In light of the discovery of pulsar PSR J1614-2230, the mass of which is observed to be 1.97 solar masses, a valid equation of state must achieve a maximum mass that is greater than 2 solar masses. To try to solve this problem, we experiment with different sets of parameters for the quark matter to try to meet the lower limit 2-solar-mass criterion. It is found that certain parameters contribute significantly to the maximum mass of a neutron star.

  10. Severe Weather Update: JLab Remains in HPC-2 for Nor'easter ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Severe Weather Update: JLab Remains in HPC-2 for Nor'easter & Hurricane Jefferson Lab's Emergency Management Severe Weather Team continues monitoring the forecasts and conditions...

  11. The dynamic shape factor of sodium chloride nanoparticles as regulated by drying rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Lewis, E.; King, S. M.; Freney, E.; Rosenoern, T.; Smith, M.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Poschl, U.; Wang, W.; Buseck, P. R.; Martin, S. T.

    2010-09-01

    The influence of drying rate on the dynamic shape factor {chi} of NaCl particles was investigated. The drying rate at the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of 45% was controlled in a laminar flow tube and varied from 5.5 {+-} 0.9 to 101 {+-} 3 RH s{sup -1} at ERH, where RH represents one percent unit of relative humidity. Dry particles having mobility diameters of 23-84 nm were studied, corresponding to aqueous particles of 37-129 nm at the RH (57%) prior to drying. At each mobility diameter and drying rate, the critical supersaturation of cloud-condensation activation was also measured. The mobility diameter and the critical supersaturation were combined in an analysis to determine the value of {chi}. The measured values varied from 1.02 to 1.26. For fixed particle diameter the {chi} value decreased with increasing drying rate. For fixed drying rate, a maximum occurred in {chi} between 35- and 40-nm dry mobility diameter, with a lower {chi} for both smaller and larger particles. The results of this study, in conjunction with the introduced apparatus for obtaining quantified drying rates, can allow the continued development of a more detailed understanding of the morphology of submicron salt particles, with the potential for the follow-on development of quantitative modeling of evaporation and crystal growth at these dimensions.

  12. Data Filtering Impact on PV Degradation Rates and Uncertainty (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    To sustain the commercial success of photovoltaics (PV) it becomes vital to know how power output decreases with time. In order to predict power delivery, degradation rates must be determined accurately. Data filtering, any data treatment assessment of long-term field behavior, is discussed as part of a more comprehensive uncertainty analysis and can be one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in long-term performance studies. Several distinct filtering methods such as outlier removal and inclusion of only sunny days on several different metrics such as PVUSA, performance ratio, DC power to plane-of-array irradiance ratio, uncorrected, and temperature-corrected were examined. PVUSA showed the highest sensitivity while temperature-corrected power over irradiance ratio was found to be the least sensitive to data filtering conditions. Using this ratio it is demonstrated that quantification of degradation rates with a statistical accuracy of +/- 0.2%/year within 4 years of field data is possible on two crystalline silicon and two thin-film systems.

  13. CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Availability:This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency (hereinafter...

  14. Rating the energy performance of buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olofsson, Thomas; Meier, Alan; Lamberts, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    T. , (1998), Building Energy Measurement and PerformanceRating a building’s energy performance is becoming anrating of energy performance of buildings. Modern existing

  15. BPA proposes rate increase to bolster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the proposed wholesale power rate increase is reduced revenue expectations from surplus power sales. Market prices have been, and are forecast to continue to be, suppressed...

  16. Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Orfield, Gary; Balfanz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    of minority students in Texas attend these schools, comparedfourths of the high schools in Texas where graduation is notthe Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas By Daniel Losen, Gary

  17. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  18. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

    1983-05-09

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

  19. Influence of finite radial geometry on the growth rate of ion-channel free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahmani, Mohammad; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-11-15

    The influence of finite radial geometry on the instability of a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in an ion-channel in a waveguide is investigated. The instability analysis is based on the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the perturbation about a self-consistent beam equilibrium. With the help of characteristic method the dispersion relation for the TE-mode is derived and analyzed through the numerical solutions. It is found that the positioning of the beam radius R{sub b} relative to the waveguide radius R{sub c}, and the ion-channel frequency can have a large influence on the maximum growth rate and corresponding wave number.

  20. Contribution to modeling of the reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core using PRELUDE experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France); Quintard, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France)

    2012-07-01

    In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ significantly from original rod-bundle geometry. Any attempt to inject water after significant core degradation can lead to further fragmentation of core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods may result in the formation of a 'debris bed'. The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), i.e., a high permeability porous medium. The French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' is developing experimental programs (PEARL and PRELUDE) and simulation tools (ICARE-CATHARE and ASTEC) to study and optimize the severe accident management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of in-vessel core degradation. It is shown that the quench front exhibits either a ID behaviour or a 2D one, depending on injection rate or bed characteristics. The PRELUDE experiment covers a rather large range of variation of parameters, for which the developed model appears to be quite predictive. (authors)

  1. Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution Chuan Wu and Baochun Li Department. This paper addresses the optimal rate allocation problem in overlay content distribution for efficient, these scenarios reflect the contrast between elastic and streaming content distribution, with either per

  2. China's High Savings Rates Rick Harbaugh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Emília

    the highest in the world. That savings would grow in a country emerging from poverty is not necessarilyChina's High Savings Rates Rick Harbaugh Prepared for conference on "The Rise of China Revisited Abstract Since the early 1980s China has witnessed a rapid increase in its national savings rate to one

  3. Heat release rate markers for premixed combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaou, Zacharias M.; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

    2014-06-16

    The validity of the commonly used flame marker for heat release rate (HRR) visualization, namely the rate of the reaction OH + CH2O ? HCO + H2O is re-examined. This is done both for methane–air and multi-component fuel–air mixtures for lean...

  4. Variable word rate N-grams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve

    The rate of occurrence of words is not uniform but varies from document to document. Despite this observation, parameters for conventional N-gram language models are usually derived using the assumption of a constant word rate. In this paper we...

  5. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  6. Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Hussein; M. Ueda; A. J. Sargeant; M. P. Pato

    2003-07-21

    We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Rates: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Rates: A Structure-Based Study K R I S T I N E H . W structure in determining the biodegradation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Laboratory. Introduction Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic pollutants that are commonly found

  8. Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Cadmium Biosorption Rate in Protonated Sargassum Biomass J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V Sargassum fluitans biomass was accompanied by the release of hydrogen protons from the biomass. The uptake the overall biosorption rate of cadmium ions in flat seaweed biomass particles. The overall biosorption

  9. The Gamma Ray Burst Rate at High Photon Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Mannheim; Dieter Hartmann; Burkhardt Funk

    1996-05-17

    Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra exhibit high energy tails with the highest photon energy detected at 18 GeV. The spectral slope of the high-energy tails is sufficiently flat in nu F_nu to consider the possibility of their detection at still higher energies. We calculate how many bursts can reasonably be expected above a given energy threshold for a cosmological distribution of bursts satisfying the observed apparent brightness distribution. The crucial point is that the gamma-ray absorption by pair production in the intergalactic diffuse radiation field eliminates bursts from beyond the gamma-ray horizon tau ~ 1, thus drastically reducing the number of bursts at high energies. Our results are consistent with the non-detection of bursts by current experiments in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. For the earth-bound detector array MILAGRO, we predict a maximal GRB rate of ~ 10 events per year. The Whipple Observatory can detect, under favorable conditions, ~1 event per year. The event rate for the HEGRA array is ~ 0.01 per year. Detection of significantly higher rates of bursts would severely challenge cosmological burst scenarios.

  10. Towards More Transmission Asset Utilization through Real-time Path Rating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Jin, Chunlian; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR; Jin, Shuangshuang; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2013-10-21

    Ratings of transmission paths, typically determined in an offline environment, are static and tend to be conservative, leading to underutilization of transmission assets, higher costs of system operation and renewable energy integration, and lower efficiency and savings. With the ever-increasing transmission congestion costs and new challenges from renewable integration, increasing transfer capacity of existing transmission lines is essential. Real-time path rating provides a promising approach to enabling additional power transfer capability and fully utilizing transfer capability. In this paper, the feasibility of real-time path rating is investigated. Several promising technologies to achieve real-time path rating are discussed. Various benefits that can be expected from real-time path rating, such as increased transfer capability and reduced total generation cost, are demonstrated through simulations conducted on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system model.

  11. G:\\FPDC\\Contracts Unit\\GCCM\\Appendix D GCCM_Gen_Conditions_Cost_Worksheet.doc GUARANTEED MAXIMUM COST FOR REIMBURSABLE EXPENSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    G:\\FPDC\\Contracts Unit\\GCCM\\Appendix D GCCM_Gen_Conditions_Cost_Worksheet.doc GUARANTEED MAXIMUM constitute the Guaranteed Maximum Cost for Reimbursables (GMCR). 100 Personnel/Organization Quantity Unit Unit Price GMC 1 Project Executive 2 Project Manager 3 Assistant Project Manager 4 Estimator 5 Project

  12. Maximum mass of stable magnetized highly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs: stable solutions with varying magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata, E-mail: upasana@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We address the issue of stability of recently proposed significantly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs. We present stable solutions of magnetostatic equilibrium models for super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs pertaining to various magnetic field profiles. This has been obtained by self-consistently including the effects of the magnetic pressure gradient and total magnetic density in a general relativistic framework. We estimate that the maximum stable mass of magnetized white dwarfs could be more than 3 solar mass. This is very useful to explain peculiar, overluminous type Ia supernovae which do not conform to the traditional Chandrasekhar mass-limit.

  13. Global self-weighted and local quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators for ARMA--GARCH/IGARCH models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ke; 10.1214/11-AOS895

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the asymptotic theory of the quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators (QMELE) for ARMA--GARCH models. Under only a fractional moment condition, the strong consistency and the asymptotic normality of the global self-weighted QMELE are obtained. Based on this self-weighted QMELE, the local QMELE is showed to be asymptotically normal for the ARMA model with GARCH (finite variance) and IGARCH errors. A formal comparison of two estimators is given for some cases. A simulation study is carried out to assess the performance of these estimators, and a real example on the world crude oil price is given.

  14. Stress Classification by Separation of Respiratory Modulations in Heart Rate Variability using Orthogonal Subspace Projection*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    classification (accuracy = 97.88%). I. INTRODUCTION The variability of the heart rate (HRV) is widely studied the tachogram, several measures, such as spectral indices, that quantify HRV are defined [1]. The power volume, independently of changes in vagal control [3], [4]. This makes that the interpretation of HRV

  15. IEEE INFOCOMM'99 1 Performance Evaluation of the RateBased Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ naling to them their allowable transmission rate. The behavior of the source and destination is specified][14]. The behavior of the switches, however, is left to the designer of the switch. Several controllers have been by a single bot­ tleneck queue [5][16][19][22]. Bounds for the buffer occupancy are then computed for EFCI

  16. Phase-lag heat conduction: decay rates for limit problems and well-posedness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Racke, Reinhard

    Phase-lag heat conduction: decay rates for limit problems and well-posedness Karin Borgmeyer, Ram approximations to dual-phase-lag and three-phase-lag heat conduction equations. However, for several limit cases analysis is rigorously proved exemplarily. 1 Introduction It is well known that Fourier's heat conduction

  17. A HIGH REPETITION RATE VUV-SOFT X-RAY FEL CONCEPT* J. Corlett#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    A HIGH REPETITION RATE VUV-SOFT X-RAY FEL CONCEPT* J. Corlett# , J. Byrd, W. M. Fawley, M. Gullans, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. Abstract We report on design studies for a seeded FEL light source that is responsive to the scientific needs of the future. The FEL process increases radiation flux by several orders

  18. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Entrainment to Periodic Initiation and Transition Rates in a Computational Model for Gene Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margaliot, Michael

    1 Entrainment to Periodic Initiation and Transition Rates in a Computational Model for Gene, the biological system must entrain or phase-lock to the periodic excitation. Entrainment is also important in synthetic biology. For example, connecting several artificial biological systems that entrain to a common

  20. Entrainment to Periodic Initiation and Transition Rates in a Computational Model for Gene Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Entrainment to Periodic Initiation and Transition Rates in a Computational Model for Gene to the solar day. In the terminology of systems theory, the biological system must entrain or phase-lock to the periodic excitation. Entrainment is also important in synthetic biology. For example, connecting several